OSU Extension Blogs

NWREC Public Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 2 min ago
Friday, September 23, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Last tours of the year are on Friday September 23rd and October 28th.

North Willamette Research and Extension Center (NWREC)
will provide two-hour afternoon farm tours. Anyone interested in seeing the latest research and education activities taking place at the farm are encouraged to attend.

  •  Tours begin at 2:00pm and conclude by 4:00pm. Bring friends, family or neighbors.
  • Call 503-678-1264 or stop by the Main office from 8:00am until 4:30pm daily to reserve your spot.
  • Alltours are provided free of charge as a public service.

Larger groups (up to 24) can be accommodated, too. Call ahead to schedule a convenient time.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Vegetable Variety Field Day

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 2 min ago
Thursday, September 8, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:30 PM

Join us for an afternoon of field tours, tasting tables and discussions with Extension agents, farmers and seed companies.

Over 15 crops with multiple varieties of vegetables are growing at the NWREC Learning Farm. Come see what varieties work for your farm. 

More information: Website and to RSVP: http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/nwrec-2016-vegetable-variety-field-day-aurora

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

GET YER GOAT-GOAT EDUCATION DAY

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 2 min ago
Saturday, October 1, 2016 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

FLYER

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

This annual event is sponsored by the Rogue Valley Dairy Goat Association. Both Beginner and Advanced workshop tracts are offered. Topics include Goats 101, diseases, parasites, genetics, poisonous plants toxic to goats and other livestock, building a milk stand (complete construction; completed unit will be raffled at this event). A separate cheese-making class taught by Alex Appleman runs from 12:45 to 4 pm for an additional $50 (replacing two afternoon class choices). 

REGISTER ON LINE

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Small Farm School

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 2 min ago
Thursday, September 15, 2016 (all day event)

Small Farm School is a full day of hands-on and classroom workshops for beginning commercial farmers and rural land owners.
Topics for 2016 include hazlenut production, pollinator health and habitat, goat management, soil and pasture care, fencing for grazing,  business classes and many others.

Registration opens on July 12, 2016

Visit the Small Farm School Website for more information.
http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/small-farm-school

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Vegetable Insect IPM Series - Carrot rust fly, Cabbage maggot, &Cabbage Moths

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 2 min ago
Wednesday, September 28, 2016 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Are you interested in learning more about managing vegetable insect pests on your farm?

Workshop will be held at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center 

Pleae visit: http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/vegetable-insect-ipm-series-aurora for registration information and the workshop agenda

This workshop will cover prevention, avoidance, monitoring and suppression of carrot rust fly, cabbage maggot and cabbage moths. There will also be a tour and discussion on farmscaping for beneficials. 

Participants will receive a hand lens, handouts, and a SARE thumb drive loaded with IPM resources.

Instructors include Nick Andrews, Heather Stoven, Heidi Noordijk; OSU Extension,
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Outputs or outcomes? Logic models again.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 08/26/2016 - 2:54pm

Sheila Robinson has an interesting post which she titled “Outputs are for programs. Outcomes are for people.”  Sounds like a logic model to me.

Evaluating something (a strategic plan, an administrative model, a range management program) can be problematic. Especially if all you do is count. So “Do you want to count?” OR “Do you want to determine what difference you made?” I think it all relates to outputs and outcomes.

 

Logic model

 

The model below explains the difference between outputs and outcomes.

. (I tried to find a link on the University of Wisconsin website and UNFORTUNATELY it is no longer there…go figure. Thanks to Sheila, I found this link which talks about outputs and outcomes) I think this model makes clear the  difference between Outputs (activities and participation) and Outcomes-Impact (learning, behavior, and conditions).

You can count the outputs: the “what we do” column and the “who we reach” column. They can be compared (if that is what you want to do–this year against last year, for example), but they are still counts–How many. Now to be fair, many of the learning outcomes as well as the behavior outcomes can be counted as well. You can even count the number of conditions, although that is often harder. What I want to advocate here is that there are other ways to find out if you made a difference besides counting. The statistics used to determine if you have made a difference will be different if you just count. And you can talk to the participants! How hard is talking?

Think about making a difference. Counting the number of workshops you conducted will not answer that question. Determining the difference in what people (participants) know before they came into the workshop and after completing the workshop may (depending on how long the workshop is). The length of the workshop gets into methodology and that is not what we are talking about today.

Today, we are really talking about making a difference and measuring that.

Sheila says it best: Outputs ≠ Outcomes

my  .

molly.

 

 

The post Outputs or outcomes? Logic models again. appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

NWREC Public Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - Fri, 08/26/2016 - 6:08am
Friday, September 30, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Every last Friday of the month, from May through October, North Willamette Research and Extension Center (NWREC)
will provide two-hour afternoon farm tours. Anyone interested in seeing the latest research and education activities taking place at the farm are encouraged to attend.
  •  Tours begin at 2:00pm and conclude by 4:00pm. Bring friends, family or neighbors.
  • Call 503-678-1264 or stop by the Main office from 8:00am until 4:30pm daily to reserve your spot.
  • Alltours are provided free of charge as a public service.

Larger groups (up to 24) can be accommodated, too. Call ahead to schedule a convenient time.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

NWREC Public Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - Fri, 08/26/2016 - 6:08am
Friday, August 26, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Every last Friday of the month, from May through October, North Willamette Research and Extension Center (NWREC)
will provide two-hour afternoon farm tours. Anyone interested in seeing the latest research and education activities taking place at the farm are encouraged to attend.
  •  Tours begin at 2:00pm and conclude by 4:00pm. Bring friends, family or neighbors.
  • Call 503-678-1264 or stop by the Main office from 8:00am until 4:30pm daily to reserve your spot.
  • Alltours are provided free of charge as a public service.

Larger groups (up to 24) can be accommodated, too. Call ahead to schedule a convenient time.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

A Market for Barnacles

Terra - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 1:40pm

In Spain, a plate of gooseneck barnacles will set you back more than the cost of a lobster dinner. Known as percebes, goosenecks “set the palate in ecstasy,” a Barcelona chef recently told a reporter. Nevertheless, Julia Bingham winced a little last spring when asked if she had ever tried the tube-shaped delicacies while she was studying them as an undergraduate at Oregon State University.

“I get that question a lot, and it kills me to say ‘no,’” said Bingham, who had gingerly navigated the wave-tossed shore of Cape Perpetua to collect barnacle samples for her University Honors College thesis. “It’s supposed to be sweeter than crab or lobster and taste like the ocean.”

Gooseneck barnacles dot rocks at Smelt Sands beach in Yachats. (Photo: Julia Bingham)

In Spain and other parts of the world, that reputation has been the barnacles’ downfall. Harvesters go to extremes to scrape the crustaceans (relatives of shrimp and krill as well as crab and lobster) from the rocks. The fishers wade into pounding surf or hang precariously on ropes just above the waves. Populations of Pollicipes pollicipes collapsed as prices reached as high as $50 per pound.

During a summer 2015 field course at Oregon State’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, Bingham learned about the gooseneck problem. She also discovered that a similar species, Pollicipes polymerus, grows abundantly on the West Coast. She wondered if this animal, which lives among mussels and extends what amounts to a leg into the passing surf, could pose an opportunity for fishermen. And if so, how could Oregon avoid overharvesting local populations?

Goosenecks are opportunists. They sometimes grow on top of acorn barnacles. (Photo courtesy of Julia Bingham)

Bingham found that there was little published information about goosenecks on the Oregon coast. She sought research advice from OSU marine biologists Bruce Menge, Sally Hacker and Sarah Henkel. With help from two friends and fellow students, Max Afshar and Levi Vasquez, she did preliminary population surveys at Cape Perpetua and Cape Foulweather.

Last winter and spring, as a student in assistant professor Mark Novak’s marine ecology lab, Bingham launched the first systematic evaluation of gooseneck barnacle biology in Oregon. She “chased the low tide,” she says, meaning that she sometimes got up in the middle of the night to arrive at her Cape Perpetua field site before dawn when the tides were out far enough for her to safely do her research.

In 2015, her work earned a “best undergraduate paper” award at a meeting of the Western Society for Naturalists in California.

This summer, she is building on her results with support from Oregon Sea Grant. In a collaboration with University of Oregon professor Alan Shanks at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology in Charleston and with Tom Calvanese, director of Oregon State’s Port Orford Field Station, she is surveying populations on jetties — rock walls built to enhance navigation — where commercial harvesting would likely start. She is also testing methods to encourage goosenecks to reproduce and grow.

As part of the project, Calvanese and Port Orford Sustainable Seafood, an organization that supports local fishers, will explore the possibility of developing a West Coast market for goosenecks. By encouraging collaboration between scientists, fishers and the public, Bingham and her team aim to foster a sustainable approach to management.

Julia Bingham

“The barnacles need specific conditions to colonize and settle,” Bingham says. “And they don’t grow everywhere. As they develop into adults, there’s a lot of mortality along the way. It takes a long time for them to reach harvestable size. The recruits take at least a couple of years to become adults, and growth tends to slow.

“Part of what makes the barnacles’ life history traits so sensitive to overharvest is that they settle onto each other,” she adds. “Harvesting clumps kills not just adults but the juveniles, which would already take a long time to grow enough to replace the harvested adults in the population.”

Shelby Walker, Oregon Sea Grant director, says she was deeply impressed by Bingham’s persistence and enthusiasm. “This is exactly the type of work that Sea Grant strives to support, a project that truly integrates research and community engagement,” she said.

In Spain and Portugal, scientists and fishers have worked to restore gooseneck populations without closing the fishery. Oregon has a chance to learn from that experience and get ahead of a new opportunity before problems arise, adds Bingham.

It may be well worth the wait. “I finally tried the barnacles,” she says. “Members of our research team boiled up some goosenecks from the rocks at one of our field sites. I can confirm that they are sweeter than crab with a distinctly salty ocean taste.”

In 2016, Bingham received her undergraduate honors degrees in biology and international studies from Oregon State.

Goosenecks share tidepools at Yachats Smelt Sands beach. (Photo courtesy of Julia Bingham)

The post A Market for Barnacles appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Solar Eclipse 2017

Terra - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 1:22pm

YOUR COMMUNITY — YOUR ECLIPSE

Did you know that the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse will pass directly over Corvallis?

Please join a town hall meeting to learn about the science of eclipses and have a discussion with civic leaders about this inspiring event.

Where: International Living Learning Center, Room 155, 1701 SW Western Blvd., Oregon State University

When: Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Sponsored by: Multiverse at UC Berkeley and Google Making & Science

Questions? Please email multiverse@ssl.berkeley.edu

The post Solar Eclipse 2017 appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Leave a Legacy: Land Conservancy Agreements

Small Farms Events - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 6:11am
Wednesday, August 24, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Craig Harper of SOLC.
Want your land stewardship/management values to continue when you move on to greener pastures? Craig Harper of the Southern Oregon Land Conservancy will walk you through the possibilities and processes of this options and share some examples from SOLC.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Organic Hispanic Farmer Evening

Small Farms Events - Mon, 08/22/2016 - 2:40pm
Monday, August 22, 2016 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

 22 Agosto de 6 a 7 PM
¡Bienvenidos a la primera reunión para granjeros Hispanos de pequeña escala! Usted participara en
demonstraciones técnicas de métodos para producción orgánica y podrá probar las distintas bayas y
frutas en producción en la parcela certificada para enseñanza orgánica.  El evento es en Español con los siguientes talleres:

Muestreo de suelo y de tejido para manejo de la fertilidad del suelo y nutrición para plantas. Javier Fernandez-Salvador. Oregon State University.

Insumos para producción orgánica y uso de la lista de OMRI. Ana Negrete, Organic Materials Review Institute.


Realidades del manejo de pequeñas fincas: mano de obra, planificación, coordinación, y que hacer con excedentes de la cosecha. Claudia Garcia, Administradora del Proyecto de Bayas Orgánicas.

¿Dónde?
Parcela de Bayas Organicas. Club Organico de OSU.
34306 NE Electric Rd. Corvallis, OR 97333
Para mayor información, contacte a: Javier Fernández-Salvador: javier.f-s@oregonstate.edu 503-373-3766

Welcome to the first Hispanic small farmer evening gathering! You will be able to see demonstrations on
production techniques and taste berry products and fruit from the certified organic teaching parcel. The event will be in Spanish with the following short workshops:

  • Tissue and soil sampling for fertility and plant nutrition management. Javier Fernandez-Salvador.
  • OMRI listed inputs for organic farming. Ana Negrete, Organic Materials Review Institute.
  • Realities of small farm management: labor, planning, coordination and what to do with surplus harvest. Claudia Garcia, Organic Growers Club Berry Project Manager.

Where:
OSU Organic Growers Club Berry Project Parcel
34306 NE Electric Rd. Corvallis, OR 97333
For more information, contact Javier Fernández-Salvador: javier.f-s@oregonstate.edu 503-373-3766

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Possible? You bet!

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 3:50pm
Probable? Maybe. Making a difference is always possible.

Oxford English Dictionary defines possible as capable of being (may/can exist, be done, or happen). It  defines probable as worthy of acceptance, believable.

Ray Bradbury : “I define science fiction as the art of the possible. Fantasy is the art of the impossible.”

Somebody asked me what was the difference between science fiction and fantasy. Certainly the simple approach is that science fiction deals with the possible (if you can think it, it can happen). Fantasy deals with monsters, fairies, goblins, and other mythical creatures, i.e., majic and majical creatures.

(Disclaimer: I personally believe in majic; much of fantasy deals with magic.) I love the Arthurian legend (it could be fantasy; it has endured for so long it is believable). It is full of majic. I especially like  the Marion Zimmer Bradley book, The Mists of Avalon . (I find the feminist perspective refreshing.)

Is fantasy always impossible as Bradbury suggests, or is it just improbable?  (Do the rules of physics apply?) This takes me back to Bradbury’s quote and evaluation after the minor digression. Bradbury also says that “Science fiction, again, is the history of ideas, and they’re always ideas that work themselves out and become real and happen in the world.” Not unlike evaluation. Evaluation works itself out and becomes real and happens. Usually.

Evaluation and the possible.

Often, I am invited to be the evaluator of record after the program has started. I sigh. Then I have a lot of work to do. I must teach folks that evaluation is not an “add on” activity. I  must also teach the folks how to identify the difference the program made. Then there is the issue of outputs (activities, participants) vs. outcomes (learning, behavior, conditions). Many principal investigators want to count differences pre-post.

Does the “how many” provide a picture of what difference the program made? If you start with no or few participants  and you end with many participants, have you made a difference? Yes, it is possible to count. Counts often meet reporting requirements. They are possible. So is documenting the change in knowledge, behavior, and conditions. It takes more work and more money. It is possible. Will you get to world peace? Probably not. Even if you can think it. World peace may be probable; it may not be possible (at least in my lifetime).

my .

molly.

 

The post Possible? You bet! appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Vulnerability

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 08/12/2016 - 3:23pm

AEA365 ran a blog on vulnerability recently (August 5, 2016). It cited the TED talk by Brené Brown  on the same topic. Although I really enjoyed the talk (I haven’t met a TED talk I didn’t like), it was more than her discussion of vulnerability that I enjoyed (although I certainly enjoyed learning that vulnerability is the birth place of joy and connection is why we are here .

She talked about story and its relationship to qualitative data. She says that she is a qualitative researcher and she collects stories. She says that “stories are just data with a soul”. That made a lot of sense to me.

See, I’ve been struggling to figure out how to turn the story into a meaningful outcome without reducing it to a number. (I do not have an answer, yet. If any of you have any ideas, let me know.) She says (quoting a former research professor) that if you cannot measure it, it does not exist. If it doesn’t exist then is what ever you are studying a figment of your imagination? So is there a way to capture a story and aggregate that story with other similar stories to get an outcome WITHOUT REDUCING IT TO A NUMBER? So given that stories are often messy, and given that stories are often complicated, and given that stories are rich in what they tell the researcher, it occurred to me that stories are more than themes and and content analysis. Stories are “data with a soul”.

Qualitative Data

Yet any book on qualitative data analysis (for example or or ) you will see that there is confusion in the analysis process. Is it the analysis of qualitative data OR is it the qualitative analysis of data. Where do you put the modifier “qualitative”? To understand the distinction, a 2×2 visual might be helpful. (Adapted from Bernard, H. R. & Ryan, G. W. (1996). Qualitative data, quantitative analysis. Cultural Anthropology Methods Journal, 8(1), 9 – 11. Copyright © 1996 Sage Publications.)

We are doing data analysis in all four quadrants. We are analyzing and capturing the deeper meaning of the data in cell A. Yes, we are analyzing data in other cells (B, C, and D) just not the capturing the deeper meaning of those data. Cell D is the quantitative analysis of quantitative data; Cell B is the qualitative analysis of quantitative data; and Cell C is the quantitative analysis of qualitative data. So the question becomes “Do you want deeper meaning from your data?” or “Do you want a number from your data?” (I’m still working on relating this to story!)

It all depends on what you want when you analyze your data. If you want to reduce it to a number, focus on cells B, C, and D. If you want deeper meaning, focus on cell A. Depending on what you want (and how you interpret the data) will be the place where the personal and situational bias occur. No, you cannot be the “objective and dispassionate” scientist. Doesn’t happen in today’s world (probably ever–only I can only speak of today’s world). Everyone has biases and they rear their heads (perhaps ugly heads) when least expected.

You have to try. Regardless.

my .

molly.

 

 

The post Vulnerability appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Compost Trouble Shooting

Small Farms Events - Sat, 08/06/2016 - 2:36pm
Saturday, August 6, 2016 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Instructor:  Chris Hjerrild, Master Gardener

Already have a compost system, but still have questions or need help?  Get your questions answered in this fun class

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Young Stand Thinning Strategies

Tree Topics - Fri, 08/05/2016 - 1:01pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

Continuing on the general theme of young stand management and especially the need for thinning, I’d like to look at strategies for thinning a young stand. Let’s start with some things to keep in mind about Young Stand Thinning or YST (also called precommercial thinning or PCT):

  • The idea of young stand thinning (YST) is to avoid harmful overcrowding later by removing excess trees early on.
  • The impact of thinning out a tree is very local. The overall stocking level (trees per acre) can be misleading. It is the spacing among immediate neighbors that counts.
  • The greatest benefit of YST is increased growing space rather than selection among trees. Creating more growing space to benefit as many leave trees as possible is the primary goal. Culling is secondary.
  • YST is key to achieving longer rotations and many non-timber objectives many family forest landowners desire.

As discussed previously , the common practice of planting Douglas-fir on a 10×10 grid gives about 440 trees per acre (tpa),  which is too many trees to carry to an initial thinning harvest.    We plant extra trees to allow for seedling losses in the establishment phase, but depending on survival, we will likely be well above our target for the initial thinning harvest (250-300tpa). So we need to remove  1/4 to 1/3 of the trees in a YST if trees are to reach a usable size  before they become overcrowded.  There are several approaches to that.

If we have a plantation with a regular and uniform planting pattern, a very simple and efficient approach to this is row removal. Removing every fourth row would reduce to 75% of original trees/planting spaces (reducing from 440 tpa  to 330 tpa) and removing every third row would reduce to 67% (from 440 tpa to  295 tpa).   Each is illustrated below.

 

This illustrates removing each fourth row. Each tree in the two rows adjacent to the row removed is given space on one side (a common thinning rule of thumb), but not on the third row, so not every tree benefits similarly. Still, this may be an adequate thinning if we saw moderate initial survival (75-85%) and do some additional thinning in the inner leave row.

 

In this illustration removing each third row, notice that every remaining tree is given space on one side, ensuring that every tree benefits similarly. This thinning ratio is well suited to stands with high planting survival, but might be overly aggressive in stands with more modest survival.

Besides the mechanical and intellectual ease of row thinning, it can have added benefits if you are a little late in doing the job, and having trouble getting the larger trees to fall to the ground. Felling a row gives room to fell trees into an open space.

Another systematic and only slightly less straight forward approach is to remove every third or fourth tree in a row.   That sound too easy?  By saying you will choose any one of every 3 or 4 trees in each row, you can do some limited selection and remove small or defective trees preferentially.  But don’t get carried away, stay focused on the main goal of removing one of each group of three or four trees, not culling.  That comes later.  When you come upon a gap with a missing tree (previously thinned by deer, voles or drought) you may count it as a removal and move on, or not, depending on you actual stocking, your target stocking, and how many trees you need to remove.  You can also take a couple rows at a time and consider the 3 or 4 spaces in each row as a group of 6 or 8 from which to choose your two trees to thin out.

In this illustration removing every third tree in a row, notice that it also creates a pretty uniform benefit to all trees. Each leave tree generally gets opened up on two sides (when removal is staggered row to row), benefiting every tree similarly.

 

 

This illustrates the two systematic thinning strategies (1/4 left, 1/3 right), the local effect of a thinning gap and how it allows a tree to retain more crown. The greatest benefit comes from releasing each tree on at least one side.

So there you have a few simple approaches that will allow you to expand the growing space and effectively redistribute resources among your leave trees through YST. Each can be done with a minimal amount of thought and debate.  There are other schemes that also work.  But the point is to choose an approach that makes sense to you, one that you can do consistently, effectively and efficiently.  The earlier you do it (maybe around age 10 in western Oregon) the more efficient and beneficial it will be.

Remember, the idea of YST is to make room for trees to grow without harmful competition until more can be removed in the first thinning harvest, which should then pay for itself. It is at that initial thinning harvest that you can make more complicated decisions about spacing and arrangement to reflect your long term goals for a stand, such as habitat diversity or timber quality.

Young stand thinning is not all that complicated, but it does seem hard for people to get done. If you have too many trees it is a very important step towards keeping you on track.  Without it, it is often harder to achieve many landowners’ goals, especially those relating to aesthetics or habitat diversity.

 

 

The post Young Stand Thinning Strategies appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Handle? Head or Heart?

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 08/05/2016 - 12:21pm

To handle yourself, use your head; to handle others, use your heart. ~~Eleanor Roosevelt

This quote is often attributed to Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962); there are some sites that attribute this quote to Donald Anderson Laird (1897-1969), a psychologist and author (no photo found). Probably, more accurate. I’m not sure that the origin of the saying is really important. It may be enough to keep in mind the saying itself. (I know–how does this relate to evaluation? Trust me, it does.)

Before I was an evaluator, I was a child therapist (I also treated young women). I learned many skills as a therapist that have served me well as an evaluator. Skills like listening, standing up for your self, looking at alternatives. Which leads me to this saying. I had to “handle” others all the time at the same time I had to “handle” my self. I could not “blow up” when reprimanded. I could not become discouraged when someone (the client, the funder) criticized me. I had to learn to laugh when the joke was on me. I had to keep my spirits up when things went wrong. I had to keep cool in emergencies. I had to learn to tune out gossip and negative comments from others. This was a hard time for me. I tend to be passionate when I have an opinion; I have/had opinions (often).

As an evaluator, I am still passionate. Once my evaluation “on” button is pushed, it is hard to turn it off. Yet I still have to handle people. This morning, for example, I met with a fellow faculty member. I had to listen. I had to look for (and at) alternatives. I “handled” with my head; remember, I am passionate about evaluation. I provided her with alternatives and followed through with those alternatives. I handled with my heart.

When others are involved (and in evaluation there are always others), they must be handled with care, with the heart. It goes back to the standards (propriety)  and the guiding principles   (integrity/honesty, direct respect for people, and responsibilities for general and public welfare).  In the current times, it is especially important to have direct respect for people. All people. (Regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity, sex, national origin, veteran status, and disability.) To be honest and have integrity. One way to make sure you have integrity is to handle with your heart.

 

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Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon residents: Take the Oregon Coastal Values survey

Breaking Waves - Fri, 08/05/2016 - 11:10am

A research team at Portland State University is conducting a survey of Oregonians to find out how Oregon residents use and value the coast and ocean. The survey asks for your opinions on marine management activities and your preferences for future management. It also includes an online mapping activity, allowing you to indicate places on the coast that are important to you and to recommend changes in the management of areas.

The goal of the survey is to reach a broad set of adult residents who have lived in Oregon for a year or more. The research team also wants to make sure they hear from people across the state, including eastern and southern Oregon. Please feel free to share this link with others via e-mail, social media, or any other way you feel comfortable.

This project is funded by Oregon Sea Grant, and findings will be shared in a final report to managers, researchers, and the public. All responses will be anonymous, and only summaries of findings will be shared.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Paul Manson, a Ph.D. student researcher at Portland State University: mansonp@pdx.edu. You may also contact the project’s principal investigator, Elise Granek, at graneke@pdx.edu. The research team is also on Twitter.

The post Oregon residents: Take the Oregon Coastal Values survey appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon residents: Take the Oregon Coastal Values survey

Sea Grant - Fri, 08/05/2016 - 11:10am

A research team at Portland State University is conducting a survey of Oregonians to find out how Oregon residents use and value the coast and ocean. The survey asks for your opinions on marine management activities and your preferences for future management. It also includes an online mapping activity, allowing you to indicate places on the coast that are important to you and to recommend changes in the management of areas.

The goal of the survey is to reach a broad set of adult residents who have lived in Oregon for a year or more. The research team also wants to make sure they hear from people across the state, including eastern and southern Oregon. Please feel free to share this link with others via e-mail, social media, or any other way you feel comfortable.

This project is funded by Oregon Sea Grant, and findings will be shared in a final report to managers, researchers, and the public. All responses will be anonymous, and only summaries of findings will be shared.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Paul Manson, a Ph.D. student researcher at Portland State University: mansonp@pdx.edu. You may also contact the project’s principal investigator, Elise Granek, at graneke@pdx.edu. The research team is also on Twitter.

The post Oregon residents: Take the Oregon Coastal Values survey appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Barnacles for dinner? Could be!

Breaking Waves - Thu, 08/04/2016 - 9:25am

In Spain, a plate of gooseneck barnacles will set you back more than the cost of a lobster dinner. Known as percebes, goosenecks “set the palate in ecstasy,” a Barcelona chef recently told a reporter. Nevertheless, Julia Bingham winced a little last spring when asked if she had ever tried the tube-shaped delicacies while she was studying them as an undergraduate at Oregon State University.

“I get that question a lot, and it kills me to say ‘no,’” said Bingham, who had gingerly navigated the wave-tossed shore of Cape Perpetua to collect barnacle samples for her University Honors College thesis. “It’s supposed to be sweeter than crab or lobster and taste like the ocean.”

Read the whole story about Bingham’s Oregon Sea Grant-funded research in Terra.

The post Barnacles for dinner? Could be! appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs