OSU Extension Blogs

Strawberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Annual Strawberry Field Day! Check back often for agenda, exact times and other important information! Details will be posted as soon as available!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Youth Tractor Safety & Certification Course

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Monday, June 13, 2016 8:30 AM - Wednesday, June 15, 2016 4:30 PM
Youth Tractor Safety & Certification Course

Cost:$75/participant (non-refundable), which includes Safe Operation of Agricultural Equipment Manual, lunch on Friday, and snacks Wednesday and Thursday.


 Pre-Registration is required by June 1, 2016.
 Students must be 14 by June 15, 2016. 4-H / FFA membership not required.
 Classes held at North Willamette Research Extension Center (NWREC), 15210 NE Miley
Road, Aurora, OR. NWREC is located 1 mile east of I-5 (exits 282 or 282B).
 Participants must attend all sessions to receive certification.

Complete course information and registration information

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

NWREC Public Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Friday, June 24, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Every last Friday of the month, from May through October, North Willamette Research and Extension Center (NWREC)
will provide two-hour afternoon farm tours. Anyone interested in seeing the latest research and education activities taking place at the farm are encouraged to attend.
  •  Tours begin at 2:00pm and conclude by 4:00pm. Bring friends, family or neighbors.
  • Call 503-678-1264 or stop by the Main office from 8:00am until 4:30pm daily to reserve your spot.
  • Alltours are provided free of charge as a public service.

Larger groups (up to 24) can be accommodated, too. Call ahead to schedule a convenient time.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Caneberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Wednesday, June 29, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Annual Caneberry Field Day! Check back often for agenda, exact times and other important information! Details will be posted as soon as available!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Blueberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Annual Blueberry Field Day! Check back often for agenda, exact times and other important information! Details will be posted as soon as available!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Native Seed Collection

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Suzie Savoie.
Learn how to save seed from our southern Oregon native plants.   Useful for restoration and native horticulture.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Rural Living Basics: Living with Your Well and Septic System

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Thursday, June 23, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:15 PM

This class is designed for rural residents to learn about the basics of groundwater, water wells, and septic systems. Learn steps to protect the health of your family, neighbors, livestock, your property investment, and the saftey of groundwater resources.

 Please RSVP as space can be limited

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Water, Soil and Carbon for Every Farm with Keyline Design: Learning from the world's driest inhabited continent and it’s drought solutions

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Thursday, June 2, 2016 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
FREE  - RSVP please include the number of people coming.
  • Water, Soil and Carbon for Every Farm with Keyline Design: Learning from the world's driest inhabited continent and it’s drought solutions – Australian Permaculture Consultant, Darren Doherty (Regrarians Ltd.)
    • Holistic management, planned grazing and financial planning as a primary drought strategy
    • Keyline farm planning for the structural reconfiguration of the farmscape considering cost-effective drought mitigation
    • Keyline and other regenerative agriculture strategies for soil and production improvements
    • ‘How much water do we actually need?' and 'what are all of the sources of water available to me?'
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Vegetable Insect IPM Series - Cucumber, Flee Beetles, & Symphylans

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Wednesday, June 29, 2016 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Are you interested in learning more about managing vegetable insect pests on your farm? Join us for one, two or all three workshops this growing season.

All classes will be held at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center 

 

Pleae visit: http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/vegetable-insect-ipm-series-aurora for registration information and the workshop agenda

Each workshop will cover Integrated Pest Management principles, pest and beneficial id, scouting and trapping, insect life cycles, disease transmission and organic strategies for managing pests.

Participants will receive a hand lens, handouts, and a SARE thumb drive loaded with IPM resources.

Instructors include Nick Andrews, Heather Stoven, Heidi Noordijk; OSU Extension, John Maurer; Evergreen Growers Supply, Michelle Armstrong; Wilbur-Ellis, Hillary Sardinas; Xerces Society.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Grass Anatomy/ Field ID

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Friday, June 3, 2016 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

ISTRUCTOR: Rachel Werling; OSU Extension

Part 1: (9:00-11:00am) will cover anatomy and Part 2: (12:00-3:00pm) will cover native grasses for landowners in the field  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

POISONOUS PLANTS-Risks to Grazing Livestock

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Saturday, June 4, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
  This class is designed to help livestock owners identify poisonous plants and manage the risk of animals consuming toxins.
A) Economic impacts of plant poisoning;
B) Keys to identifying local toxic plants;

C) Assessing potential harm to your animals;
D) How, why and when plant poisoning occurs;
E) Common sense pasture/farm management
Instructor: Author, Shirley Weathers. Field Guide to Plants Poisonous to Livestock, Western U.S., will be available at the class

REGISTER ON LINE:  https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/1022

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Rural Living Basics: Living with Your Well & Septic System

Small Farms Events - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 2:44pm
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
FREE Class & Screening
Bring 1/2 cup of untreated well water for nitrate screen. All results are confidential.

This class is designed for rural residents to learn the basics of groundwater, water wells, and septic systems. Learn steps to protect the health of your family, neighbors, animals, your property investment, and the safety of groundwater resources. 

When: June 7th, 2016 6:30pm to 8:30pm
Where: Aurora Presbyterian Church, 21553 Liberty Street, NE Aurora, Oregon 97002

RSVP’s Appreciated as this space only holds 35.
Chrissy.Lucas@oregonstate.edu
See all of our events at http://wellwater.oregonstate.edu

Questions? Chrissy at 541-766-3556

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Soil Amendment Workshop

Small Farms Events - Sat, 05/28/2016 - 2:55pm
Saturday, May 28, 2016 12:30 PM - 3:00 PM

instructor: Kyle Krenzer; Elevation Organics

Don’t just add products to your soil, come learn what to add and when to maximize soil tilth and your harvest

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

NWREC Public Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 2:39pm
Friday, May 27, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Every last Friday of the month, from May through October, North Willamette Research and Extension Center (NWREC)
will provide two-hour afternoon farm tours. Anyone interested in seeing the latest research and education activities taking place at the farm are encouraged to attend.
  •  Tours begin at 2:00pm and conclude by 4:00pm. Bring friends, family or neighbors.
  • Call 503-678-1264 or stop by the Main office from 8:00am until 4:30pm daily to reserve your spot.
  • Alltours are provided free of charge as a public service.

Larger groups (up to 24) can be accommodated, too. Call ahead to schedule a convenient time.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Hay Assessment - Buying Quality Hay

Small Farms Events - Thu, 05/26/2016 - 2:34pm
Thursday, May 26, 2016 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Know your hay and save some green! Learn to perform a sensory analysis, read a forage (nutritional) analysis and match it to your animal's needs. Don't buy your hay based on color alone - come learn how to buy based on nutritional quality. Instructor: Angie Boudro.

Register on line-Jo County:  https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/1016

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Evaluation Pioneers

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Thu, 05/26/2016 - 12:17pm

Having written about evaluation history previously, I identified  those who contributed, not those who could be called evaluation pioneers; rather those who had influenced my thinking.  I think it is noteworthy to mention those evaluation pioneers who set the field on the path we see today, those whom I didn’t mention and need to be. As a memorial (it is Memorial Day weekend , after all), Michael Patton (whom I’ve mentioned previously) is coordinating an AEA365 to identify and honor those evaluation pioneers who are no longer with us. (Thank you, Michael). The AEA365 link above will give you more details.  I’ve also linked the mentioned evaluation pioneers that have been remembered. Some of these pioneers I’ve mentioned before; all are giants in the field; some are dearly loved as well. All those listed below have died. Patton talks about the recent-dead, the sasha, and the long-dead, the zamani. He cites the Historian James W. Loewen when he makes this distinction. Some of the listed are definitely the sasha (for me); some are zamani (for me). Perhaps photos will help (for whom photos could be found) and dates. There are other pioneers that are not mentioned here. Who was instrumental in your development? (They can still be alive. Or not.)

Patton starts by remembering Brenda Zimmerman (1956-2014), .

 Marcia Guttentag (1933-1977) by Sara Miller McCune;

Donald Campbell (1916-1996) by Mel Mark; 

Asa Hilliard III (1933-2007)  by Rodney Hopson; 

Egon Guba (1924-2008) by Jennifer Greene;

Peter H. Rossi (1921-2006) by Mark Lipsey;

Barry MacDonald (1933-2013) by Ernie House;

Kathy Bolland (1950-2015) by Sharon Rallis;

Robert Ingle (1926-1998) by Jean King;

Carol Weiss (1927-2013) by Sharon Rallis; 

Will Shadish (1949-2016) by Laura Leviton; 

Lee Sechrest  (1929-2015) by Eleanor Chelimsky; and

Paul Lazarsfeld (1901-1976) , and

Alva (1902-1986) and Gunnar (1898-1987)  Myrdal by Charmagne Campbell-Patton.

My sasha; my zamani.

I  knew Bob Ingle, Will Shadish, Kathy Bolland, Lee Sechrest, and Egon Guba. Bob (and his wife, Maria), Will, and Kathy were friends of mine as well as colleagues. I miss them. A lot. Egon and Lee were colleagues; I miss them as well.  They are sasha to me; they added much to the field. As did those who are zamani to me, even though they may have died within the last few years (Brenda Zimmerman, Don Campbell, Marcia Guttentag, Asa Hillard, Peter Rossi, Carol Weiss, Barry MacDonald, Paul Lazarsfeld, Alva Myrdal, and Gunnar Myrdal). I only knew Don Campbell, Carol Weiss, and Peter Rossi through their writings; there are books by them on my shelf. Although all these folks made their mark in other fields as well as evaluation, evaluation wouldn’t be where it is today without their conscientious application of what they knew (from their original fields) to what could be and made their contribution. They are remembered.

my .

molly.

The post Evaluation Pioneers appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Effects of drought continue in Valley

Tree Topics - Thu, 05/26/2016 - 11:30am

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

Conifer trees around the Valley continue to show signs of severe drought and heat stress this year. This should not be news to many readers:  young dead trees are now a common sight throughout the Valley.  Also, I wrote about this problem in past Tree Topics blogs (See stories from  May and September 2015 for background) but have new updates for this season.

I think you can expect to continue seeing similar damage to Douglas-fir this year and that symptoms will continue to unfold as the season progresses. Some of the trees damaged late last year did not show that damage immediately. The damage did not become evident until the trees came out of dormancy and began to grow this spring.  Also, the various insect and disease organisms that take advantage of       weak and damaged trees are likely to continue with their business this year, causing new signs of drought damage to show up during the season.  Happily, those players like Douglas-fir cankers and twig weevils do not typically blow up and kill healthy trees.  This suggests things will look much like what we saw and described last year and is likely to continue to unfold this season and maybe longer, whatever weather we get.  “It is important to understand that the effects of drought damage do not go away suddenly when the rain starts again” cautions Christine Buhl, ODF Forest Entomologist “drought can impact the tree’s whole plumbing structure, and affect the growth and vigor of the tree for years.”

What we are beginning to see and anticipate may be different this year is more damage to stands rather than just individual trees, and damage to older and larger Douglas-fir trees than was typical last year. The drought is likely adding to and exacerbating other problems lurking out of view, so crowded stands, existing root disease and marginal sites (wet or shallow soils, southern aspects) can all be expected to contribute to the problem.

Unfortunately, this implies potential economic or forest health issues. Any merchantable tree lost to drought represents an economic loss if not salvaged.  But larger (>8” dbh) drought-damaged Doug-fir trees can also support growing populations of bark beetles, such as the Douglas-fir beetle.  Under the right conditions Doug-fir beetles’ numbers can increase to the point where they can overcome the defenses of healthier trees in the stand.  Drought stressed trees are not generally considered as good a nursery material as winter storm damaged trees  but can support a damaging increase of beetles if conditions are right.  I may need to write more on that later in the season.

We will also likely see drought stress issues in other conifer species. In our local Valley ponderosa pine, it is already causing some limited outbreaks of the California five-spine Ips, a tiny but destructive beetle.  With several generations a year, Ips can rapidly increase in numbers when trees are stressed and conditions favor the insect.  Also, the Ips is able to use much smaller wood (just three inches or more in diameter) than the Douglas-fir bark beetle mentioned above, so even a young planation can provide brood material for the beetle.  Sanitation of dead and dying trees as well as slash materials >3” is a very important control measure for Ips.  For more information on the Ips life cycle and management, see this 2014 article about Ips  or follow links to other resources provided below.

The Oregon Department of Forestry has a series of fact sheets on insects, disease, drought and slash management.  Several are currently being revised, so be sure to check back in July to see the updated versions.

 

 

 

The post Effects of drought continue in Valley appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Shrubs for wildlife: Cascara

Tree Topics - Tue, 05/24/2016 - 4:06pm

By Brandy Saffell and Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension

If one of your land management goals is to provide wildlife habitat, you’ll want to consider keeping a mix of native shrub species on your property. Shrubs provide a host of services to wildlife, including shelter or cover, nesting space, and food from their twigs, leaves, flowers, and fruit. With thought given to species selection and location, retaining existing shrubs or planting them can benefit wildlife without compromising timber growth or forest operations. This is the first article in a series intended to help you recognize some of the “brush” species that may exist on your property, and understand how they may fit with your management goals. Each article will highlight one species that benefits wildlife in northwest Oregon forests.

Species Name: Cascara (or cascara buckthorn, chittam) – Rhamnus purshiana

Description: Growing up to about 30 feet, cascara could be considered a small tree or a large shrub. Its leaves are deciduous, simple, and alternating on the stem. They are oblong (2 – 6” long) and prominently penniveined (having a single central leaf vein with singular veins branching to either side). The leaf edges are very finely serrated or wavy. The small, green-white flower clusters are inconspicuous. The cherry-like fruits are round, 1/3” diameter, and purple to black with a yellow pulp. In winter, look for smooth, gray-brown bark with a patchy appearance. Winter buds are naked, meaning they appear to be small clusters of tiny overlapping leaves.

You may have mistaken cascara for red alder, which has similar looking oblong, serrated, prominently-veined leaves, smooth bark and also grows on moist sites.  You wouldn’t be the first to confuse these two hardwoods.  You can tell cascara and alder apart primarily by the fruits; cascara has a dark purple to black cherry-like fruit while alder has a one-inch woody cone-like fruit (called a strobile). Cascara’s leaves are smoother and glossier than alder’s.

Ideal habitat: West of Cascades in low to mid elevation coniferous forests; Grows on moist, well-drained sites, especially along streams; tolerant of shade.

Wildlife Value: This plant is particularly attractive to birds. For example, the band-tailed pigeon feeds on cascara fruits from July through autumn, often congregating in cascara patches well into the migration season. Band-tailed pigeons are found along the west coast and prefer nesting habitat less than 1000 feet in elevation, putting them in private forestland throughout much of western Oregon. Cascara is also a preferred forage for elk and valuable for pollinators.

Management Considerations: Cascara is not a very fast or aggressively growing species, so it does little to compete with the growth of timber species such as Douglas-fir. Consider retaining existing cascara trees when selectively harvesting in mixed forests. You could also try underplanting cascara in small openings after a thinning. For pollinator or mammal forage, plant in clumps along stand edges to promote flowering and a more thicket-like habit.

If you are interested in learning more about creating wildlife habitat on your property, check out the Woodland Fish and Wildlife website.

Photo credits: Pat Breen, Oregon State University

The post Shrubs for wildlife: Cascara appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Summer hours start at HMSC Visitor Center

Breaking Waves - Tue, 05/24/2016 - 10:58am

NEWPORT – Summer hours start Tuesday, May 31 at our Visitor Center at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center.

From then until Labor Day, the Visitor Center will be open from 10 am to 5 pm seven days a week, with new exhibits, trained interpreters, animal feedings and programs designed to engage people of all ages in exploring and learning about Oregon’s dynamic coast and ocean.

To find out about upcoming activities, events and special programs, bookmark the Visitor Center’s home page.

The Center is operated by Oregon Sea Grant, and also houses our Marine Education program, which sponsors many summer day camps, classes and special activities for K-12 learners and families.

The post Summer hours start at HMSC Visitor Center appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Summer hours start at HMSC Visitor Center

Sea Grant - Tue, 05/24/2016 - 10:58am

NEWPORT – Summer hours start Tuesday, May 31 at our Visitor Center at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center.

From then until Labor Day, the Visitor Center will be open from 10 am to 5 pm seven days a week, with new exhibits, trained interpreters, animal feedings and programs designed to engage people of all ages in exploring and learning about Oregon’s dynamic coast and ocean.

To find out about upcoming activities, events and special programs, bookmark the Visitor Center’s home page.

The Center is operated by Oregon Sea Grant, and also houses our Marine Education program, which sponsors many summer day camps, classes and special activities for K-12 learners and families.

The post Summer hours start at HMSC Visitor Center appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs