OSU Extension Blogs

Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 20 min ago
Thursday, January 29, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

 For more information, contact the OSU Lane County Extension office at (541)344-5859, or stop by the office at 996 Jefferson Street in Eugene, to pick up an application.

Office hours are Monday-Thursday, 10am-1pm and 2-5pm.

Cost of session is $25.00.  Pre-registration is required.

For payment with a credit card see the website: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 20 min ago
Thursday, January 29, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

 For more information, contact the OSU Lane County Extension office at (541)344-5859, or stop by the office at 996 Jefferson Street in Eugene, to pick up an application.

Office hours are Monday-Thursday, 10am-1pm and 2-5pm.

Cost of session is $25.00.  Pre-registration is required.

For payment with a credit card see the website: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Farms - Southern Oregon

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 20 min ago
Monday, January 26, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Growing Farms: Successful Whole Farm Management

A hybrid course for beginning farmers that teaches those new to farming how to plan and manage a farm, while giving them tools to produce and market farmed and raised goods. The course also encourages interaction and community building among participants, helping build a professional network among small farmers and ranchers.

While developing a whole-farm plan, participants will learn about sustainable practices and land stewardship. The course encourages farmers to see how small farms and ranches fit into our community’s economic and environmental success.

Class meets:
6 - 8:30pm, Monday, January 26th
6 - 8:30pm, Monday, February 9th
Full Day, Saturday, February 21st
6 - 8:30pm, Monday, March 9th

REGISTER HERE:  https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/growing-farms-hybrid-course-beginning-farmers#introduction-section  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Farms - South Willamette Valley

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 20 min ago
Thursday, January 22, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Growing Farms: Successful Whole Farm Management

A hybrid course for beginning farmers that teaches those new to farming how to plan and manage a farm, while giving them tools to produce and market farmed and raised goods. The course also encourages interaction and community building among participants, helping build a professional network among small farmers and ranchers.

While developing a whole-farm plan, participants will learn about sustainable practices and land stewardship. The course encourages farmers to see how small farms and ranches fit into our community’s economic and environmental success.

Class meets:
6 - 8:30pm, Thursday, January 22
6 - 8:30pm, Thursday, February 5th
Full Day, Saturday, February 21st
6 - 8:30pm, Thursday, March 5th

REGISTER HERE:  https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/growing-farms-hybrid-course-beginning-farmers#introduction-section  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

2015 EcoFarm Conference

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 20 min ago
Wednesday, January 21, 2015 - Saturday, January 24, 2015 (all day event)

The Ecological Farming Association presents the 35th annual EcoFarm Conference at the Asilomar Conference Grounds in Pacific Grove, California, January 21-24, 2015

As the largest and oldest ecological agricultural gathering in the West, the EcoFarm Conference offers more than 70 workshops featuring an array of educational and technical workshops for farmers, ranchers, distributors, retailers, activists, consumers, students, and educators, along with notable keynote speakers, an exhibitor marketplace, live entertainment, discussion groups, mixers, delicious organic meals and libations.

Visit www.eco-farm.org for more info and to register.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Farms - North Willamette Valley

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 20 min ago
Wednesday, January 21, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Growing Farms: Successful Whole Farm Management

A hybrid course for beginning farmers that teaches those new to farming how to plan and manage a farm, while giving them tools to produce and market farmed and raised goods. The course also encourages interaction and community building among participants, helping build a professional network among small farmers and ranchers.

While developing a whole-farm plan, participants will learn about sustainable practices and land stewardship. The course encourages farmers to see how small farms and ranches fit into our community’s economic and environmental success.

Class meets:
6 - 8pm, Wednesday, January 21st
6 - 8:30pm, Wednesday, February 4th
Full Day, Saturday, February 21st
6 - 8:30pm, Wednesday, March 4th

REGISTER HERE:  https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/growing-farms-hybrid-course-beginning-farmers#introduction-section  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Farms - North Coast

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 20 min ago
Thursday, January 8, 2015 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Growing Farms: Successful Whole Farm Management

A hybrid course for beginning farmers that teaches those new to farming how to plan and manage a farm, while giving them tools to produce and market farmed and raised goods. The course also encourages interaction and community building among participants, helping build a professional network among small farmers and ranchers.

While developing a whole-farm plan, participants will learn about sustainable practices and land stewardship. The course encourages farmers to see how small farms and ranches fit into our community’s economic and environmental success.

Class meets:
5 - 8pm, Thursday, January 8
5 - 8pm, Thursday, January 22
9am - 4pm, Saturday, January 31
5 - 8pm, Thursday, February 12 

REGISTER HERE:  https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/growing-farms-hybrid-course-beginning-farmers#introduction-section  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Lane County Livestock Association Breakfast Educational Program

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 20 min ago
Wednesday, January 14, 2015 6:30 AM - 8:00 AM

 

For more information contact Shelby Filley (541) 672-4461  shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Linn-Benton Livestock & Forages Breakfast Educational Program

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 20 min ago
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 6:30 AM - 8:00 AM

 

For more information contact:

Shelby Filley (541)672-4461   shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Graduate fellowship deadlines approach

Sea Grant - Wed, 12/17/2014 - 9:59am

Oregon Sea Grant is seeking qualified applicants for four graduate and postgraduate fellowships in marine science and policy.

The NOAA Coastal Management Fellowship (deadline Friday, January 23, 2015) provides on-the-job education and training opportunities in coastal resource management and policy for postgraduate students while assisting state coastal zone management programs. The program matches postgraduate students with state coastal zone programs to work on projects proposed by the state and selected by the fellowship sponsor, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center. This two-year opportunity offers a competitive salary, medical benefits, and travel and relocation expense reimbursement. Any student who will complete a master’s, doctoral, or professional degree program in natural resource management or environmental-related studies at an accredited U.S. university between January 1, 2014, and July 31, 2015, is eligible.

The National Marine Fisheries Service/Sea Grant Graduate Fellowship Program in Marine Resource Economics (deadline Thursday, January 29, 2015) expects to award at least two new PhD Fellowships starting Aug. 1, 2015 to students who are interested in careers related to marine ecosystem and population dynamics. The Fellowships can provide support for up to three years for highly qualified graduate students working toward a PhD in quantitative ecology, ecosystem ecology, population dynamics or related fields of study. Fellows will work on thesis problems of public interest and relevance to NMFS under the guidance of National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) mentors at participating NMFS Science Centers or Offices. Applicants must be United States citizens, and at the time they apply must be admitted to a PhD program in a relevant field of study at a US institution.

The NMFS/Sea Grant Graduate Fellowship Program in Population and Ecosystem Dynamics (deadline  Thursday, January 29, 2015) generally awards two new PhD Fellowships each year to students who are interested in careers related to the development and implementation of quantitative methods for assessing the economics of the conservation and management of living marine resources. Fellows will work on thesis problems of public interest and relevance to NMFS under the guidance of NMFS mentors at participating NMFS Science Centers or Offices. The Fellowship can provide support for up to two years for highly qualified graduate students working towards a Ph.D. in in marine resource economics, natural resource economics, or environmental economics. Applicants admitted to a PhD degree program in resource or environmental economics at a US institution.

Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowships (deadline Friday, February 13, 2015)  provides a unique educational experience to students enrolled in graduate programs in fields related to marine or Great Lakes studies. The program matches highly qualified graduate students with hosts in the legislative branch, the executive branch, or appropriate associations and institutions located in the Washington, D.C. area. Recipients spend one year working on substantive national policy issues related to marine issues; a stipend is provided. The Fellowship is open to any student, regardless of citizenship, who is enrolled toward a degree in a graduate or professional program at an accredited US institution.

For all four opportunities, completed applications must be delivered to the Oregon Sea Grant program office in Suite 350 of the University Plaza Building, 15th and Western in Corvallis,  by 5 pm on the deadline date.

Learn more:

 

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Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Shellfish larvae more vulnerable to “saturation state” than acidification, study finds

Breaking Waves - Tue, 12/16/2014 - 1:20pm

The mortality of larval Pacific oysters in Northwest hatcheries has been linked to ocean acidification, yet the rate of increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the decrease of pH in near-shore waters have been questioned as being severe enough to cause the die-offs.

However, a new study of Pacific oyster and Mediterranean mussel larvae found that the earliest larval stages are directly sensitive to saturation state, not carbon dioxide (CO2) or pH. Saturation state is a measure of how corrosive seawater is to the calcium carbonate shells made by bivalve larvae, and how easy it is for larvae to produce their shells.

It is important to note that increasing CO2 lowers saturation state, the researchers say, and saturation state is very sensitive to CO2; the challenge interpreting previous studies is that saturation state and pH typically vary together with increasing CO2. The scientists utilized unique chemical manipulations of seawater to identify the direct sensitivity of larval bivalves to saturation state.

Results of the study, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, are being reported this week in the journal Nature Climate Change.

“Bivalves have been around for a long time and have survived different geologic periods of high carbon dioxide levels in marine environments,” said George Waldbusser , an Oregon State University marine ecologist and biogeochemist and lead author on the study, “The difference is that in the past, alkalinity levels buffered increases in CO2, which kept the saturation state higher relative to pH.”

“The difference in the present ocean is that the processes that contribute buffering to the ocean cannot keep pace with the rate of anthropogenic CO2 increase,” added Waldbusser, who is in Oregon State’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.  “As long as the saturation state is high, the oysters and mussels we tested could tolerate CO2 concentrations almost 10 times what they are today.”

The idea that early bivalve development and growth is not as physiologically linked to CO2 or pH levels as previously thought initially seems positive. However, the reverse is actually true, Waldbusser noted. Larval oysters and mussels are so sensitive to the saturation state (which is lowered by increasing CO2) that the threshold for danger will be crossed “decades to centuries” ahead of when CO2   increases (and pH decreases) alone would pose a threat to these bivalve larvae.

Learn more

The post Shellfish larvae more vulnerable to “saturation state” than acidification, study finds appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New study finds “saturation state” directly harmful to bivalve larvae

Sea Grant - Tue, 12/16/2014 - 1:20pm

The mortality of larval Pacific oysters in Northwest hatcheries has been linked to ocean acidification, yet the rate of increase in anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the decrease of pH in near-shore waters have been questioned as being severe enough to cause the die-offs.

However, a new study of Pacific oyster and Mediterranean mussel larvae found that the earliest larval stages are directly sensitive to saturation state, not carbon dioxide (CO2) or pH. Saturation state is a measure of how corrosive seawater is to the calcium carbonate shells made by bivalve larvae, and how easy it is for larvae to produce their shells.

It is important to note that increasing CO2 lowers saturation state, the researchers say, and saturation state is very sensitive to CO2; the challenge interpreting previous studies is that saturation state and pH typically vary together with increasing CO2. The scientists utilized unique chemical manipulations of seawater to identify the direct sensitivity of larval bivalves to saturation state.

Results of the study, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, are being reported this week in the journal Nature Climate Change.

“Bivalves have been around for a long time and have survived different geologic periods of high carbon dioxide levels in marine environments,” said George Waldbusser , an Oregon State University marine ecologist and biogeochemist and lead author on the study, “The difference is that in the past, alkalinity levels buffered increases in CO2, which kept the saturation state higher relative to pH.”

“The difference in the present ocean is that the processes that contribute buffering to the ocean cannot keep pace with the rate of anthropogenic CO2 increase,” added Waldbusser, who is in Oregon State’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.  “As long as the saturation state is high, the oysters and mussels we tested could tolerate CO2 concentrations almost 10 times what they are today.”

The idea that early bivalve development and growth is not as physiologically linked to CO2 or pH levels as previously thought initially seems positive. However, the reverse is actually true, Waldbusser noted. Larval oysters and mussels are so sensitive to the saturation state (which is lowered by increasing CO2) that the threshold for danger will be crossed “decades to centuries” ahead of when CO2   increases (and pH decreases) alone would pose a threat to these bivalve larvae.

Learn more

The post New study finds “saturation state” directly harmful to bivalve larvae appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Calving School

Small Farms Events - Fri, 12/12/2014 - 6:36am
Friday, December 12, 2014 12:30 PM - 4:00 PM

This program will consist of presentations, educational videos, and simulated calving assistance.  A handbook will be provided.

Please RSVP to let us know you are coming

For more information or to register please contact Shelby Filley (541)672-4461

shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

Registration fee $25.00 payable at the door in cash or check

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

A Reply to Jeff Gillman's 'Some Thoughts on Extension'

Master Gardener Blog - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 4:25pm
Recently, Jeff Gillman penned a blog post entitled 'Some Thoughts on Extension', where he worked his way through three points.  These were:

  1. Extension is important.
  2. Extension is dying.
  3. Extension cannot be saved unless administrators make fundamental changes in the way things are done.
I have immense respect for Dr. Gillman.  He's a respected scholar, teacher, author and blogger.  He is, in many ways, the type of professional I aspire to be.  That being said, I do disagree with some parts of his post ~ something that he welcomed and invited in the original post.
To provide a context for my perspective, I wanted to briefly go over my professional experience and background.  I came to Extension as an outsider.  I accepted the position as the Statewide Coordinator of the Oregon State University Extension Master Gardener Program in 2007, without truly understanding what Extension was or what the Master Gardener Program was about.  From 2002-2007, I was an Assistant Professor of Biology at Fordham University in New York City, where I studied the ecology of insects in urban and suburban gardens. 
To this day, it amazes me that I was able to land the position at OSU.  I was not a gardener.  I thought that the term 'Master Gardener' was a term used to describe a journeyman union worker ~ like 'Master Electrician' or 'Master Plumber'.  I didn't know what I was walking into.
Perhaps that is why, as a relative outsider with only 8 years of experience in Extension, I view Extension as vital, thriving and innovative.  A cynic by nature, I don't believe that my view is tainted by rose colored glasses.
That being said, I wanted to take on points #2 and #3 from Jeff's post, and provide an alternative view.
Jeff's Point #2:  Extension is dying.  
  • Extension has failed to keep up with current communication trends.  You won't easily find us with internet searches.  Top 'hits' are reserved for retail big box stores and magazines.
  • Extension faculty aren't given credit for gathering and distributing research-based information.  Credit is primarily given for research papers and grant dollars.
My reply:  My position is in urban and community horticulture.  I am under constant pressure to reach as many people as possible and to utilize innovative methods to deliver educational content.   I work hard to make sure that our work in urban and community horticulture, and that our work via the Master Gardener Program, is accessible and apparent online.  I manage 4 websites and 2 social media accounts for the Program.
I don't have a marketing budget.  I don't have experience in marketing.  Heck ~ I don't even have help.  At the Statewide level, I'm a one-woman show.  And, I'm losing the marketing and media game.  The Facebook page I maintain for OSU Extension's Master Gardener Program has 2,932 'likes'.  The Facebook page for Scott's Lawn Care has 319,567 'likes'.
But, what I lack in quantity of interactions, I try my best to make up for with high quality educational exchanges.
On an annual basis, I teach about 30 classes to about 1,000 people.  Small numbers, in the large scheme of things.  But the outcomes of those classes are anything but trivial.  Those who take Master Gardener classes report that they have taken steps to attract beneficial insects into their garden (64%), are more tolerant of spiders in the garden (58%), planted a pest-resistant cultivar (71%), decreased or eliminated pesticide use (68%), disposed of a pesticide at a community hazardous waste removal event (54%), and are more tolerant of insect pests (58%) as a direct result of what they have learned in our classes.  Take that, search engine optimization winners!
Extension changes attitudes and behavior, while stores and companies make sales.  In this way, I don't think that I am competing with commercial retail operations for customers.  So I'm not the most popular kid on the internet (thank goodness!).  The internet will not kill Extension (despite repeated warnings to the contrary), in the same way that the internet has not killed the public library.
That being said, I do want to note that we have worked to reinvent ourselves.  In Oregon, we offer an online Master Gardener training option, as well as many other gardening courses, online.  We work directly with local and regional news outlets to reach the masses with research-based gardening tips. OSU Extension faculty experts have monthly gardening spots on local morning shows.  We blog.  We tweet.  We try to cover as much ground as possible, with the limited resources that we have.  And, I'm pretty proud say that we directly reach over 200,000 people each year, and conservatively estimate that we reach another 550,000 through our online and media outreach efforts.  Small potatoes ~ I'm sure ~ compared to some commercial firms . . . . but our numbers are focused on making a difference, rather than a sale.
Jeff's Point #3:  Extension cannot be saved unless administrators make fundamental changes in the way things are done.
Here, Jeff makes an argument that I hear all too often ~ administrators need to give credit, make promotions, and grant raises based upon the comprehensive portfolio of work done by Extension professionals.  Incentives need to place less weight on research and more weight on outreach.
At Oregon State, I feel that the work I do in the field (public outreach and education) is recognized and valued.  But, there is also the expectation that I will do more than teach the same three general topics, year after year.  I'm expected to innovate, grow and learn ~ and to pass on the information that I acquire to the general public.


And I've really tried to do this.  This word cloud was generated from my public talk titles.  Even though I'm an entomologist who has expertise in IPM, I've aggressively sought out information on pesticides, GMOs, invasive pests and weed control ~ because folks kept asking for more information on these topics.  I've acquired expertise in these areas by reading the scientific literature, participating in research projects, and talking to experts in the field.  
If you're still with me at this point, I know you're dying to know more about my expertise in insect sex.  I give a public lecture on just this very topic, in Portland, in March of 2015.  Catch it if you can.
My experience has been that efforts in public outreach and education are recognized by administrators ~ if you don't rest on your laurels, and continually work to learn and improve.
And, where research is sometimes characterized as a distraction in Extension ~ my experience has been that staying engaged in the research community (by writing grant proposals and research papers, attending and presenting at professional society conferences, taking the time to read the latest research in the scientific journals) makes me better as an Extension professional.  I LOVE it when I learn something new ~ through research or through the literature ~ that I can pass onto Master Gardeners and the general public.  
I 'live tweeted' my way through the Entomological Society of America Meetings  (#EntSoc14), where I also took pages worth of notes.  These latest research findings make their way into my public outreach and education events.
I spent the last two months working on two separate NSF grant proposals (that have a slim chance of getting funded).  But, the time I spent putting the proposals together have been fantastic.  I've had engaging conversations with potential collaborators ~ some of the top experts in urban land use, biodiversity, waste management, life cycle analysis ~ and I've been immersed in the literature on urban ecology and agriculture.  Once again, what I've gained through this time ~ even if the proposals are not funded ~ will make its way into my public outreach and education events.
So yes, my administrators will probably be a lot happier if I land big grants and write heavily cited research papers.  But they also understand what it is that I do, and they do their best to support my efforts.  And for that, I feel very blessed.
Just my two cents.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Sea Grant’s Ruby Moon featured on new OSU coast video

Breaking Waves - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 7:00am

Oregon: The Coast is a new interactive, multimedia application that’s part of Oregon State University’s Beaver Nation campaign, aiming to document how OSU people and programs connect with the state, the nation – and the world beyond. And it features Sea Grant Extension agent Ruby Moon in a feature about buying fresh seafood off the docks from the people who catch it.

“I was nervous,” says Moon, who worked with David Baker of OSU’s Interactive Communications unit this summer to produce her segment. “But they made me look smart.”

Moon works out of the Lincoln County Extension office in Newport on issues related to fisheries, seafood and marine renewable energy.

Check out Oregon: The Coast and the rest of the growing collection of Beaver Nation Is Everywhere multimedia programs at OSU’s Interactive Communications site.

The post Sea Grant’s Ruby Moon featured on new OSU coast video appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Sea Grant’s Ruby Moon featured on new OSU coast video

Sea Grant - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 7:00am

Oregon: The Coast is a new interactive, multimedia application that’s part of Oregon State University’s Beaver Nation campaign, aiming to document how OSU people and programs connect with the state, the nation – and the world beyond. And it features Sea Grant Extension agent Ruby Moon in a feature about buying fresh seafood off the docks from the people who catch it.

“I was nervous,” says Moon, who worked with David Baker of OSU’s Interactive Communications unit this summer to produce her segment. “But they made me look smart.”

Moon works out of the Lincoln County Extension office in Newport on issues related to fisheries, seafood and marine renewable energy.

Check out Oregon: The Coast and the rest of the growing collection of Beaver Nation Is Everywhere multimedia programs at OSU’s Interactive Communications site.

The post Sea Grant’s Ruby Moon featured on new OSU coast video appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

50 years of Oregon Sea Grant film and video

Breaking Waves - Wed, 12/10/2014 - 10:57am

Marine science, resource conservation, community resilience – and a whole lot of gorgeous Oregon coastal scenery: Check out this new compilation by Communications Director Joe Cone of excerpts from some of the many films and videos produced by Oregon Sea Grant since our program’s start in 1971:

http://vimeo.com/112763821

The post 50 years of Oregon Sea Grant film and video appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

50 years of Oregon Sea Grant film and video

Sea Grant - Wed, 12/10/2014 - 10:57am

Marine science, resource conservation, community resilience – and a whole lot of gorgeous Oregon coastal scenery: Check out this new compilation by Communications Director Joe Cone of excerpts from some of the many films and videos produced by Oregon Sea Grant since our program’s start in 1971:

http://vimeo.com/112763821

The post 50 years of Oregon Sea Grant film and video appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Lane County Livestock Association Breakfast Educational Program

Small Farms Events - Wed, 12/10/2014 - 6:35am
Wednesday, December 10, 2014 6:30 AM - 8:00 AM

 

For more information contact Shelby Filley (541) 672-4461  shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Evaluation theory tree

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 4:32pm

Recently, I got a copy of Marvin Alkin’s book, Evaluation Roots (his first edition; eventually, I will get the second edition).

In Chapter Two, he and Tina Christie talk about an evaluation theory tree and presents this idea graphically (all be it in draft form).

Think of your typical tree with three strong branches (no leaves) and two roots. Using this metaphor, the authors explain the development of evaluation theory as it appears in western (read global north) societies.

As you can see, the roots are “accountability and control” (positivist paradigm?) and social inquiry (post-positivist paradigm?).

The branches are labeled “use”, “methods”, and “valuing”. Scattered along those branches are various theorists who were/are significant in evaluation and its development. Some of these theorists have models that I have talked about in previous blogs (Lincoln/Guba, Stake, House, Eisner). Some are known to me and need to be shared here (Cousins, Stufflebeam, Greene, Rossi). Some are unknown to me (MacDonald, Wolf/Owens, Suchman, who have not been invited to contribute). In the first edition, Alkin has invited chapters by most of the folks listed in the tree.

The second edition lists more folks than the first. The metaphor of the tree has also been revised  (see http://www.amazon.com/Evaluation-Roots-Perspective-Theorists-Influences/dp/1412995744#reader_1412995744). It now has leaves, some of which list the theorists,and a third root has been added: epistemology. Alkin says that the valuing branch stems from that root and is divided into objectivist and subjectivist views.

Although I don’t own the 2nd edition (yet), it takes a more global coverage but “…no chapter emerged on development theory in low and middle income countries (LMICs)”. This quote is taken from an article written by Alkin and Fred Carden in the January 2012 issue of Journal of MultiDisciplinary Evaluation (8, 17, 102-118). They suggest “…evaluation analysts…build a more comprehensive knowledge and documentation on development evaluation and more broadly on building the field of evaluation in LMICs.” It would be valuable for the global south to be represented.

The metaphor makes it easy to categorize the various views of evaluation; provides the reader with names to follow; and provides a history of sorts of evaluation. It would be interesting to see what is being done in the world they don’t address. Perhaps there is a novel approach that will be a newly leafed bud by someone who has yet to be named. Then it wouldn’t be a history…it would be contemporary.

 

my.

molly.

(Pee Ess: I’ve been blogging for five years…)

The post Evaluation theory tree appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs