OSU Extension Blogs

Compost Trouble Shooting

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 8 min ago
Saturday, August 6, 2016 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Instructor:  Chris Hjerrild, Master Gardener

Already have a compost system, but still have questions or need help?  Get your questions answered in this fun class

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

NWREC Public Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 8 min ago
Friday, July 29, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Every last Friday of the month, from May through October, North Willamette Research and Extension Center (NWREC)
will provide two-hour afternoon farm tours. Anyone interested in seeing the latest research and education activities taking place at the farm are encouraged to attend.
  •  Tours begin at 2:00pm and conclude by 4:00pm. Bring friends, family or neighbors.
  • Call 503-678-1264 or stop by the Main office from 8:00am until 4:30pm daily to reserve your spot.
  • Alltours are provided free of charge as a public service.

Larger groups (up to 24) can be accommodated, too. Call ahead to schedule a convenient time.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Aurora Crop Up (TM) Dinner & Market Showcase

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 8 min ago
Thursday, July 21, 2016 5:30 PM - 9:30 PM

Dine on delicious dishes built around Oregon’s Specialty Crops grown in the local regions surrounding each dinner site. Specialty Market Showcases will be happening before dinner at each site providing opportunity learn more about the Specialty Crops.

 

Crop-UpTM Dinner Tickets cost $20 per person and include access to the market showcase and dinner.

 

Click here to purchase tickets

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

PASTURE MANAGEMENT

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 8 min ago
Monday, July 18, 2016 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
In this brief course we will introduce the concepts of pasture management and show how you can use pasture management to increase animal health, improve profitability and also improve the health of your soil and forage resource base.
We’ll discuss how plants grow, how animals graze and what you can do to help your pasture plants thrive. Email your questions to the instructor in advance and they will be covered during the class. Start planning now for the 2016 grazing year! Have questions about pasture management? Send questions for the class to instructor, Angie Boudro
REGISTER ON LINE https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/1023
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Caneberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 8 min ago
Wednesday, June 29, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Annual Caneberry Field Day! Agenda with details!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Blueberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 8 min ago
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Annual Blueberry Field Day!  

Agenda with all the details!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Native Seed Collection

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 8 min ago
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Suzie Savoie.
Learn how to save seed from our Southern Oregon native plants.   Useful for restoration and native horticulture.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Vegetable Insect IPM Series - Cucumber, Flee Beetles, & Symphylans

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 8 min ago
Wednesday, July 20, 2016 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Are you interested in learning more about managing vegetable insect pests on your farm? Join us for one, two or all three workshops this growing season.

All classes will be held at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center 

 

Pleae visit: http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/vegetable-insect-ipm-series-aurora for registration information and the workshop agenda

Each workshop will cover Integrated Pest Management principles, pest and beneficial id, scouting and trapping, insect life cycles, disease transmission and organic strategies for managing pests.

Participants will receive a hand lens, handouts, and a SARE thumb drive loaded with IPM resources.

Instructors include Nick Andrews, Heather Stoven, Heidi Noordijk; OSU Extension, John Maurer; Evergreen Growers Supply, Michelle Armstrong; Wilbur-Ellis, Hillary Sardinas; Xerces Society.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

NWREC Public Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - Fri, 06/24/2016 - 2:49pm
Friday, June 24, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Every last Friday of the month, from May through October, North Willamette Research and Extension Center (NWREC)
will provide two-hour afternoon farm tours. Anyone interested in seeing the latest research and education activities taking place at the farm are encouraged to attend.
  •  Tours begin at 2:00pm and conclude by 4:00pm. Bring friends, family or neighbors.
  • Call 503-678-1264 or stop by the Main office from 8:00am until 4:30pm daily to reserve your spot.
  • Alltours are provided free of charge as a public service.

Larger groups (up to 24) can be accommodated, too. Call ahead to schedule a convenient time.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Shrubs for wildlife: Snowberry

Tree Topics - Fri, 06/24/2016 - 10:11am

By Brandy Saffell and Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension

Snowberry leaves and fruit in the fall. Photo: Pat Breen, OSU

If one of your land management goals is to provide wildlife habitat, you’ll want to consider keeping a mix of native shrub species on your property. Shrubs provide a host of services to wildlife, including shelter or cover, nesting space, and food from their twigs, leaves, flowers, and fruit. With thought given to species selection and location, retaining existing shrubs or planting them can benefit wildlife without compromising timber growth or forest operations. This is the second article in our Shrubs for Wildlife series (first is here). Each article will highlight one species that benefits wildlife in northwest Oregon forests.

Species Name: Common snowberry – Symphoricarpos albus

Description: Snowberry is a medium sized shrub, growing in thickets and up to six feet tall. The leaves are simple, opposite, deciduous, and variable in shape. They are generally oval but can be nearly round (3/4 – 2 1/2” long). The leaf edges vary from entire to shallowly lobed on the same plant and same stem. The flowers are small (1/4”), pink-white, bell-shaped, and found in clusters at the end of the branch. The round, white, waxy berries persist into the winter; they are non-edible to humans and toxic due to the saponin they contain. Twigs are opposite, slender, smooth, and yellow-brown.

Small pink blossoms are present this time of year. Photo: A. Grotta

Wildlife Value: Snowberry is useful to pollinators as a host and food plant. The flowers attract Anna’s and rufous hummingbirds, as well as various insects including bees. Several birds have been observed eating the berries, such as towhees, thrushes, robins, grosbeaks, and waxwings. Birds also use snowberry thickets for cover. In addition, the Vashti sphinx moth (Sphinx vashti) relies on it as a food plant in its larval stage.

Management Considerations: Following harvest, snowberry resprouts readily from belowground.  To ensure optimum survival and growth of planted trees, control snowberry where it is likely to overtop planted seedlings.  Consider retaining snowberry plants on the site where they are not in direct competition with seedlings.  For those who would like to actively enhance wildlife habitat by planting snowberry, it tolerates a variety of environments, and can be planted in coarse sand to fine-textured clay, full sun to dense understory, dry well-drained slops to moist stream banks, and low to high nutrient soils.  It also establishes readily and tolerates general neglect.

Plant habit and fruit in winter. Photos: Pat Breen, OSU

If you are interested in learning more about creating wildlife habitat on your property, check out the Woodland Fish and Wildlife website.

 

 

The post Shrubs for wildlife: Snowberry appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Making a difference

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Thu, 06/23/2016 - 4:40pm

We close every rehearsal and concert with the song, “Be the change”. Using the words from Gandhi, I try to remember to make a difference; to be the change I want to see in the world.

That is not easy. I ride my bike all the time. (Yep. Really.) I compost. I grow my own vegetables in the summer and support my farmers’ market and CSA (both of which, thankfully, run through Thanksgiving). But I ask my self, “Am I making a difference?”

The same mantra applies to this blog. In the almost seven years since I started blogging, my readership has grown and not just among evaluators (though certainly among them).  I regularly get posts that tell me that if I provide something that is interesting, enlightening, creative, informative, (you get the idea…) that I am making a difference because I blog. Yet, I look at the state of the world and wonder.

Gandhi’s  seven dangers to human virtue (called by Wikipedia the Seven Social Sins) come to mind. (The title listed below is not mine.)

The political systems in the world (at least in the US) seem to be broken (see number 7); large scale destruction happens both humon made (e.g., the shooting in Orlando, the destruction in the middle east) (see number 3 and 6) and nature driven (e.g., hurricane, tsunami, earthquake, fire) (see number 3, 4, 5); and then there is all the rest (e.g., climate change, fracking, species extinction, poverty, hunger) (see number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) .  I have to wonder. Can I make a difference with one little blog?

Yet, I keep on (and not because I was told to blog; I find I enjoy blogging). I blog. I tie my blog to evaluation. It is a form of speaking truth to power. It is a form of Satyagraha (from the Sanskrit “words satya [meaning “truth”] and Agraha [“insistence”, or “holding firmly to”].  Everyday, people evaluate, even if those evaluations cannot be considered rigorous by academics. The difference is that everyday people do not (cannot?) articulate the criteria that they use. Everyone has criteria. Not everyone articulates those criteria. That is the difference between evaluating everyday and evaluating as a professional. Professional evaluators have guiding principles, criteria. By teaching people to be critical (by example, by practice), I think I can make a difference. So I continue.

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Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Rural Living Basics: Living with Your Well and Septic System

Small Farms Events - Thu, 06/23/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, June 23, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:15 PM

This class is designed for rural residents to learn about the basics of groundwater, water wells, and septic systems. Learn steps to protect the health of your family, neighbors, livestock, your property investment, and the saftey of groundwater resources.

 Please RSVP as space can be limited

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Postcard from Scandinavia– Parting shots

Tree Topics - Thu, 06/16/2016 - 2:02pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension

 

Our final days of the tour included meetings with the local landowners’ cooperative in Telemark County and visits to two specialty sawmills.

The Tinnoset sawmill specializes in shaping large logs for traditional style log homes. Most are sold to builders, but they do some custom building on site too.

Nearly completed home on site. Harald explaining the building process.

 


Getting a closer look at construction details.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Svenneby family sawmill has been working with leading architects and looking for less traditional uses of wood, including many exotic (USA) species. We lucked into a presentation by nationally acclaimed architect Einar Jarmund who talked about the expanding role and popularity of wood in both commercial and residential buildings in Norway and showed a number of projects done by his firm  ( http://www.jva.no/ ) using materials developed and delivered by the Svenneby mill.

 

Turid Svenneby discusses weathering of oiled oak siding with tour member Claude Rowley. The Svenneby mill and farm is yet another example of a multi generation, multi-enterprise business. Next to Kirk (ID) are Thorvald, Turid and Ole Svenneby.

 

 

 

 

We could not help but noticing how common and prominently wood was being used in Norway, and particularly as architectural and visual elements around Oslo.  Why does wood seem less used, less celebrated here?

 

A building on the Oslo waterfront area sided with wood prepared by the Svenneby mill. Another, renovated building on the waterfront.

 

 

 

Large wood laminated structural elements visible in the airport.

 

Smaller wood furnishing and finish elements abound in the airport

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Postcard from Scandinavia– Parting shots appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Case study–a qualitative inquiry.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Wed, 06/15/2016 - 4:07pm

It has been almost a month since I last blogged. When I last blogged, I talked about evaluation history. That blog was a bunny path from what I had been talking about: methodology. I was talking about the implementation, monitoring, and delivery of interventions which are to be evaluated. Another methodology I want to talk about is case study. I did go through the archives to locate the blogs relating to case study. They are below.

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2015/01/15/blogging-case-study/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2010/04/13/other-ways-to-gather-information-the-case-study/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2013/06/12/causation/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2013/06/07/one-of-the-5cs-clarity/

I’ve also identified the references (on my shelf) that refer to case study. I’m sure there are others; there always are. They are the following.

Robert O. Brinkerhoff has developed a method, the Success Case Method , as an evaluation approach that “easier, faster, and cheaper than competing approaches, and produces compelling evidence decision-makers can actually use.”  As an evaluation approach, this method is quick and inexpensive and most of all, produces useful results.

Robert E. Stake has taken case study beyond one to many with his recent book, Multiple Case Study Analysis.  It looks at cross-case analysis and can be used when broadly occurring phenomena need to be explored, such as leadership or management. He also wrote the book, “The Art of Case Study” (among others).

Robert K. Yin wrote two seminal books on case studies, one in 1993 (now in a 3rd edition , 1993 was the 1st edition) and the other in 1989 (now in the 5th edition , 1989 was the 1st edition).

Another  book I have on my shelf is “Case Study Method” edited by Roger Gomm, Martyn Hammersley, and Peter Foster. Nigel Fielding at the University of Surrey says, “This book collects together key sources on a “hardy perennial” topic, guaranteeing its relevance for academics, researchers, and students on higher level methods programmes. Well-known authorities in the field are represented by carefully constructed contributions.” Both Stake and Yin are cited in this work. It is a relatively new book (2000) as opposed to updated versions of classics.

Start with Yin; move on to Stake; include Gomm, Hammersley, and Foster as well as Brinkerhoff in your review. Case study methodology yields qualitative data; it is a form of qualitative research. It will yield richness and depth. Although valuable, it is a lot of work.

my .

molly.

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Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Youth Tractor Safety & Certification Course

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/15/2016 - 2:37pm
Monday, June 13, 2016 8:30 AM - Wednesday, June 15, 2016 4:30 PM
Youth Tractor Safety & Certification Course

Cost:$75/participant (non-refundable), which includes Safe Operation of Agricultural Equipment Manual, lunch on Friday, and snacks Wednesday and Thursday.


 Pre-Registration is required by June 1, 2016.
 Students must be 14 by June 15, 2016. 4-H / FFA membership not required.
 Classes held at North Willamette Research Extension Center (NWREC), 15210 NE Miley
Road, Aurora, OR. NWREC is located 1 mile east of I-5 (exits 282 or 282B).
 Participants must attend all sessions to receive certification.

Complete course information and registration information

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

A Postcard from Norway

Tree Topics - Tue, 06/14/2016 - 1:35am

Brad Withrow-Robinson. OSU Forestry & Natural Resources agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

In the fjord regions of Norway, both forestry and farming are limited to the area between the rock and the water.   The bottom of the valley is farmed, and the narrow toes of the valley walls are forested. Many communities were not connected by roads until the 1920s.  It is beautiful country, but it strikes me as a beautiful place to starve. It is not hard to see why so many people left for America in the late 19th Century.  Those who stayed looked for alternative sources of income to supplement farm incomes/earnings.

Looking up valley and seeing patches of spruce and pine on lower slopes of valley wall.

 

Local County Forester Rune K. discussing management of Spruce in the Valley.

 

Many of the family farm and forest owners in the Andalsness area of Romdal Conty are now “farming tourists” to one degree or another. Farmers in the Innfjorden valley now run a cooperative of about 60 rental cabins in their traditional summer pasture areas near the head of the valley. They are popular destinations in summer and winter for fishing, hiking and skiing.  The vacationers are not limited to the cooperatives land holding, since Scandinavian tradition and law allows open access for such activities across all lands.

Jacob Hagen explains the conversion of the traditional common summer grazing areas to cooperative recreation rentals. Traditional rustic cabins like this are mixed in with newer rustic cabins.

 

 

 

It is not an easy or lucrative place to grow and especially harvest and sell logs.

 

Watching a gravity (down hill) logging operation near Byrkjelo Norway A turn of small spruce logs arriving at the landing

 

 

County Forester Torkel (wearing Sgakit logging tower T-shirt) talks harvesting equipment with Columbia county landowner/logger KC Van Natta.

 

Wish you were here.

 

Brad

 

 

 

The post A Postcard from Norway appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Postcard from Scandinavia– Parting shots from Sweden

Tree Topics - Fri, 06/10/2016 - 9:35am

Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry & Natural resources Extension.

 

One of our visits was to a cooperative forest jointly owned by about a dozen families from Bengtshedens village. The Mellanskog landowner cooperative also has a significant share of ownership.

We were greeted on arrival by two of the family owners with coffee and cinnamon rolls before touring the forest.

 

Mellanskog Forester Lars Eric explaining management practices such as regeneration, thinning and fertilization in a 100-year-old stand of Scotts pine.

 

 

 

We visited the Log Max factory in Grangarde, innovative producers of logging processing heads. Our group observing Log Max and Eco Log equipment in their native habitat of central Sweden.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Regeneration of pine with seed tree cuts is common in Sweden and Norway.

 

 

The post Postcard from Scandinavia– Parting shots from Sweden appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Strawberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/08/2016 - 2:41pm
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Annual Strawberry Field Day! Check back often for agenda, exact times and other important information! Details will be posted as soon as available!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Rural Living Basics: Living with Your Well & Septic System

Small Farms Events - Tue, 06/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
FREE Class & Screening
Bring 1/2 cup of untreated well water for nitrate screen. All results are confidential.

This class is designed for rural residents to learn the basics of groundwater, water wells, and septic systems. Learn steps to protect the health of your family, neighbors, animals, your property investment, and the safety of groundwater resources. 

When: June 7th, 2016 6:30pm to 8:30pm
Where: Aurora Presbyterian Church, 21553 Liberty Street, NE Aurora, Oregon 97002

RSVP’s Appreciated as this space only holds 35.
Chrissy.Lucas@oregonstate.edu
See all of our events at http://wellwater.oregonstate.edu

Questions? Chrissy at 541-766-3556

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

OSG specialist to serve up Pacific albacore in Washington, D.C.

Breaking Waves - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 10:14am

NEWPORT – Kaety Jacobson, Oregon Sea Grant fisheries specialist, is packing her bags – and then some – for a trip to the nation’s capital to take part in the 41st annual NOAA Fish Fry.

Thanks to a donation from the Oregon Albacore Commission, Jacobson will travel with 250 lbs of fresh-frozen albacore tuna loin portions – and a recipe for tuna poke, a Hawaiian-style marinated tuna salad, courtesy of Newport’s Local Ocean Seafoods restaurant.

The Fish Fry, a popular summer event sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association runs Wednesday, June 8th from 6pm – 9pm at the Herbert C. Hoover Main Commerce Building on 14th St. and Constitution Avenue.  The event promotes public understanding of aquaculture and sustainable marine fisheries.

Sea Grant programs from around the country were invited to take part during our 50th anniversary year to showcase the variety of sustainable seafood from in the nation’s ocean and Great Lakes states.

The post OSG specialist to serve up Pacific albacore in Washington, D.C. appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs