OSU Extension Blogs

Northwest Horse Fair & Expo 2016

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 31 min ago
Sunday, March 20, 2016 (all day event)

Northwest Horse Fair & Expo 2016: March 18-20, Linn County Fair & Expo Center, Albany, Oregon. Exciting equine entertainment and education for horse owners and horse lovers! Featuring: Clinics with Top-notch Trainers and Riders; the Ultimate Super Horse Challenge; Huge Trade Show; BreyerWest; Breed & Stallion Demos plus much more!

More Information: http://equinepromotions.net/northwest-horse-fair/t or 765-655-2107.

Daring stunts on horseback, parades of horse breeds, strutting stallions, a star-studded list of clinicians and a huge trade show, all await horse lovers at the Northwest Horse Fair 2016! Now in its seventeenth year, the Northwest Horse Fair will run March 18, 19 and 20, at the Linn County Fair and Expo Center in Albany, Oregon.

The Northwest Horse Fair features top-notch equine experts giving workshops, demos and clinics. World-renowned rider and trainer Pat Parelli, will present clinics on Friday and Saturday at the expo, spotlighting Parelli Natural Horsemanship. And Charles Wilhelm will highlight clinics on The Making of a Super Horse; Mark Bolender will feature Extreme Trail; Heidi McLaughlin will offer Fearless Rider sessions; Robert Eversole will conduct Trailmeister seminars; the Riata Ranch Cowboy Girls will present Trick Riding clinics; and Wayne Williams will provide a look at his award-winning movie, Horse Spirit Society. A Dressage clinic will also be offered; details to be announced soon.

Dancing horses in costume, mounted archers, thrilling drill teams on horseback, plus trick riding, fancy roping and much more! The BlackPearl Friesian Dance Troupe will guide their elegant horses through magical maneuvers to music. The Breed Showcase of horses and the Stallion Review will provide spectators with both entertainment and education, focusing on the diversity of horses in size, breed, function and color.

New this year, Breyer Horse will host BreyerWest at the Northwest Horse Fair and Expo! The weekend will include two live model horse shows, hands-on model horse hobby demonstrations, workshops with hobby experts, FREE Stablemates painting and lots of fun with model horses! Learn more about the model horse hobby, paint your very own Breyer Model or show your models.

Registration and full event details will be announced soon on BreyerHorses.com and at http://equinepromotions.net/northwest-horse-fair/

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Stayton Town Hall Gathering

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 31 min ago
Thursday, February 18, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Free Well Water Testing!

All farmers, livestock producers, rural landowners, agricultural operators, and streamside landowners in the Mill Creek Watershed are invited to join us for an evening
Town Hall Gathering: February 18, 2016 from 6-8 pm
City of Stayton Community Center: 400 W. Virginia Street Stayton, Oregon
The two hour event will showcase…
- The area’s Agricultural Water Quality Management Plan and Mill Creek Focus Area Project
With Brenda Sanchez Marion SWCD Agricultural Water Quality Program Coordinator
- Cost-share and incentive programs for agricultural water quality management
- Local information on invasive plants in your watershed
With Jenny Meisel Marion SWCD Invasive Plant Program Coordinator
- Free well-water testing provided by Oregon State University Extension
All homes with private wells should be aware of their nitrate level
For a free nitrate screening, bring ½ cup of untreated well water in a clean, water-tight container
- Snacks and Refreshments!
- Door Prizes!!!

With special guest the North Santiam Watershed Council - Rebecca McCoun - Watershed Coordinator
The NSWC is now providing services to the Mill & Pringle Creek Watersheds
For More Information or to RSVP Please Call Brenda Sanchez at 503-391-9927
Not sure if you can make it? No Problem. Walk-ins will be welcomed!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Northwest Horse Fair & Expo 2016

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 31 min ago
Saturday, March 19, 2016 (all day event)

Northwest Horse Fair & Expo 2016: March 18-20, Linn County Fair & Expo Center, Albany, Oregon. Exciting equine entertainment and education for horse owners and horse lovers! Featuring: Clinics with Top-notch Trainers and Riders; the Ultimate Super Horse Challenge; Huge Trade Show; BreyerWest; Breed & Stallion Demos plus much more!

More Information: http://equinepromotions.net/northwest-horse-fair/t or 765-655-2107.

Daring stunts on horseback, parades of horse breeds, strutting stallions, a star-studded list of clinicians and a huge trade show, all await horse lovers at the Northwest Horse Fair 2016! Now in its seventeenth year, the Northwest Horse Fair will run March 18, 19 and 20, at the Linn County Fair and Expo Center in Albany, Oregon.

The Northwest Horse Fair features top-notch equine experts giving workshops, demos and clinics. World-renowned rider and trainer Pat Parelli, will present clinics on Friday and Saturday at the expo, spotlighting Parelli Natural Horsemanship. And Charles Wilhelm will highlight clinics on The Making of a Super Horse; Mark Bolender will feature Extreme Trail; Heidi McLaughlin will offer Fearless Rider sessions; Robert Eversole will conduct Trailmeister seminars; the Riata Ranch Cowboy Girls will present Trick Riding clinics; and Wayne Williams will provide a look at his award-winning movie, Horse Spirit Society. A Dressage clinic will also be offered; details to be announced soon.

Dancing horses in costume, mounted archers, thrilling drill teams on horseback, plus trick riding, fancy roping and much more! The BlackPearl Friesian Dance Troupe will guide their elegant horses through magical maneuvers to music. The Breed Showcase of horses and the Stallion Review will provide spectators with both entertainment and education, focusing on the diversity of horses in size, breed, function and color.

New this year, Breyer Horse will host BreyerWest at the Northwest Horse Fair and Expo! The weekend will include two live model horse shows, hands-on model horse hobby demonstrations, workshops with hobby experts, FREE Stablemates painting and lots of fun with model horses! Learn more about the model horse hobby, paint your very own Breyer Model or show your models.

Registration and full event details will be announced soon on BreyerHorses.com and at http://equinepromotions.net/northwest-horse-fair/

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Northwest Horse Fair & Expo 2016

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 31 min ago
Friday, March 18, 2016 (all day event)

Northwest Horse Fair & Expo 2016: March 18-20, Linn County Fair & Expo Center, Albany, Oregon. Exciting equine entertainment and education for horse owners and horse lovers! Featuring: Clinics with Top-notch Trainers and Riders; the Ultimate Super Horse Challenge; Huge Trade Show; BreyerWest; Breed & Stallion Demos plus much more!

More Information: http://equinepromotions.net/northwest-horse-fair/t or 765-655-2107.

Daring stunts on horseback, parades of horse breeds, strutting stallions, a star-studded list of clinicians and a huge trade show, all await horse lovers at the Northwest Horse Fair 2016! Now in its seventeenth year, the Northwest Horse Fair will run March 18, 19 and 20, at the Linn County Fair and Expo Center in Albany, Oregon.

The Northwest Horse Fair features top-notch equine experts giving workshops, demos and clinics. World-renowned rider and trainer Pat Parelli, will present clinics on Friday and Saturday at the expo, spotlighting Parelli Natural Horsemanship. And Charles Wilhelm will highlight clinics on The Making of a Super Horse; Mark Bolender will feature Extreme Trail; Heidi McLaughlin will offer Fearless Rider sessions; Robert Eversole will conduct Trailmeister seminars; the Riata Ranch Cowboy Girls will present Trick Riding clinics; and Wayne Williams will provide a look at his award-winning movie, Horse Spirit Society. A Dressage clinic will also be offered; details to be announced soon.

Dancing horses in costume, mounted archers, thrilling drill teams on horseback, plus trick riding, fancy roping and much more! The BlackPearl Friesian Dance Troupe will guide their elegant horses through magical maneuvers to music. The Breed Showcase of horses and the Stallion Review will provide spectators with both entertainment and education, focusing on the diversity of horses in size, breed, function and color.

New this year, Breyer Horse will host BreyerWest at the Northwest Horse Fair and Expo! The weekend will include two live model horse shows, hands-on model horse hobby demonstrations, workshops with hobby experts, FREE Stablemates painting and lots of fun with model horses! Learn more about the model horse hobby, paint your very own Breyer Model or show your models.

Registration and full event details will be announced soon on BreyerHorses.com and at http://equinepromotions.net/northwest-horse-fair/

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Fruit Tree Pruning Workshop

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 31 min ago
Tuesday, February 9, 2016 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Ross has more than 50 years of orchard management experience - come learn from the best! Classes will be held rain or shine. There will be an opportunity for hands-on activities after the workshops, so bring your gloves and pruners. Register here: https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/972
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Agritourism Network Meeting

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 31 min ago
Friday, February 19, 2016 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Oregon Agritourism Network is a growing working group of farmers, ranchers, tour operators, agencies and associations with expertise and interest in developing Oregon as a premier travel destination for authentic agritourism experiences.

These events are open to anyone interested in cultivating Oregon’s agritourism potential and developing this segment of the tourism industry.

Network meetings rotate across Oregon to engage stakeholders from every corner of the state – you are invited to attend one, or all of them. Light refreshments and beverages will be provided. We invite you to join us this February in Corvallis for the 2016 Winter meeting.

At this meeting, we’ll have discussion around relevant opportunities and industry organization updates, the reveal of the agritourism marketing toolkit, action team updates, discussion around major challenges directly from producers and resource sharing for agritourism opportunities and business development.

WHERE: Alumni Center Ballroom | Oregon State University | 725 SW 26th Street, Corvallis, Ore. 97331

WHEN: Friday, Feb. 19, 2016 | 1:00-5:00 p.m.

RSVP: In advance online

Want more information about Oregon Agritourism Network Meeting?

If you have additional questions or comments about Oregon Agritourism Network Meeting, please contact Alexa Carey, Destination Development Specialist with Travel Oregon at Alexa@TravelOregon.com or (971)717-6178
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

16th Annual Oregon Small Farms Conference

Small Farms Events - 6 hours 31 min ago
Saturday, February 20, 2016 7:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The Oregon Small Farms Conference is a daylong event geared toward farmers, agricultural professionals, food policy advocates, students and managers of farmers markets.  Thirty educational sessions are offered on a variety of topics relevant to the Oregon small farmers and include a track in Spanish. Speakers include farmers, OSU Extension faculty, agribusiness, and more.

Who Should Attend?
  • Farmers
  • Farmers’ Market Managers
  • Food Retailers
  • Restaurant Owners
  • Community Members & Leaders
  • Agriculture Professionals
  • Community Food Policy Advocates
  • Students
Registration Fees:
  • Now until February 1st: $45/person
  • February 2nd - February 12th: $65/person
  • If available - at the door $100/person
Check out the Oregon Small Farms Conference website for more information & to get registered!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Mid-Valley Food Summit

Small Farms Events - Sat, 02/06/2016 - 2:42pm
Saturday, February 6, 2016 8:30 AM - 3:45 PM

Learn about local food efforts in Marion &Polk counties and engage in the exciting collaborative plans to improve the Mid-Willamette Valley food sytem. There will be a keynote speaker, breakout sessions, informational booths, and a local lunch.

Agenda: 8:30-9:00am – Registration
9:00-9:15am – Welcome, Background
9:15-9:45am – Community Food Assessment Presentation
9:45-11:00am – 5-Minute Community Talks 
11:00-11:15am – Break
11:15-12:15pm – Keynote presentation/activity with Lauren Gwin, OSU Small Farms
12:15-1:00pm – Lunch 
1:00-2:00pm – Breakout Session 1
2:00-2:15pm – Break
2:15-3:15pm – Breakout Session 2
3:15-3:45pm – Closing 
Breakout session 1: -Linking producers & buyers: making local food connections
-Creating access to local food for all
-Growing food & community: building a garden network in the Mid-Valley
-Why buy local? Where to buy local? – Understanding the economic impacts of local purchasing
Breakout session 2:

-Building the local food economy in the Mid-Valley
-Understanding rural challenges to food access
-Teaching the next generation: youth & the local food system
-Who’s picking our food? –Learning about the farmworker movement

When Saturday, February 6, 2016 from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM (PST) - Add to Calendar

Where Willamette University - Putnam University Center - 900 State Street Salem, OR 97301 - View Map

Website: http://www.marionpolkfoodshare.org/Programs/MidValleyFoodSummit/MidValleyFoodSummitAgenda.aspx

Tickets: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mid-valley-food-summit-tickets-19690036429

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Leigh Torres: Racing whales

Breaking Waves - Thu, 02/04/2016 - 11:35am

“… Our task was to find them, pace them, and let them continue their remarkable behavior without disturbance, while also documenting the behavior and collecting our photos and biopsy samples. Tricky. With a truly team effort, and help from the whales when they slowed down occasionally, we succeeded.

We paced the whales nearby, watching them explode through the water side by side. So close they could have been touching each other.”

— Dr. Leigh Torres, featured in National Geographic’s Explorers Journal blog

Leigh Torres holds a joint position with OSU’s Marine Mammal Institute and Oregon Sea Grant Extension. Her research focuses on 50 blue whales in the South Taranaki Bight, some of New Zealand’s busiest and most industrialized waters, seeking to learn how many whales are there, how important it is as a feeding area for them, and to what population of whales  they belong.

Follow Dr. Torres’ work in the MMI’s blog, complete with video of the racing whales.

The post Leigh Torres: Racing whales appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Leigh Torres: Racing whales

Sea Grant - Thu, 02/04/2016 - 11:35am

“… Our task was to find them, pace them, and let them continue their remarkable behavior without disturbance, while also documenting the behavior and collecting our photos and biopsy samples. Tricky. With a truly team effort, and help from the whales when they slowed down occasionally, we succeeded.

We paced the whales nearby, watching them explode through the water side by side. So close they could have been touching each other.”

— Dr. Leigh Torres, featured in National Geographic’s Explorers Journal blog

Leigh Torres holds a joint position with OSU’s Marine Mammal Institute and Oregon Sea Grant Extension. Her research focuses on 50 blue whales in the South Taranaki Bight, some of New Zealand’s busiest and most industrialized waters, seeking to learn how many whales are there, how important it is as a feeding area for them, and to what population of whales  they belong.

Follow Dr. Torres’ work in the MMI’s blog, complete with video of the racing whales.

The post Leigh Torres: Racing whales appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Local Food Connection

Small Farms Events - Mon, 02/01/2016 - 2:36pm
Monday, February 1, 2016 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
 

 

 www.localfoodconnection.org

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Spacing young conifer stands

Tree Topics - Fri, 01/29/2016 - 10:26am

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

In a previous article , I wrote that many folks in NW Oregon are growing too many trees in young stands given some common family forest landowners’ objectives, including doing a commercial thinning when the trees are in their mid 20s.  Since most people are hoping to do a commercial thinning on their way towards a variety of longer-term objectives and stand conditions, we need to focus on reaching that first commercial thinning in a timely manner and leaving the stand in a good condition to meet future objectives. Let’s begin by looking at what it takes to have a commercial thinning.

My contacts in the business around the mid-Valley tell me that while the first thinning should provide a mix of saw logs and chip logs, most of the surplus trees removed in the thinning need to produce a sawlog or two if you hope to break even or make a little money (a mix of around 2/3 saw logs and the remaining 1/3 chip logs is a rule of thumb used by some). Too many small logs and you are losing money. That sawlog will vary according to the mill it is headed to, but is generally 20 feet to 32 feet long with a 6 or 7 inch top. Smaller wood goes to chip and saw or pulp.

Roughly speaking, you need a stand with an average size of about 10 inches dbh (or bigger) to get this desired mix of products to have a profitable operation in recent market conditions ($475 to $500 per MBF).

So why are people having trouble achieving that? It has to do with how trees grow in stands.  Let’s review nature’s rules:

  • Bigger trees need to use more site resources (mainly light, water and nutrients) than little trees.
  • The resources available on any given site are limited.
  • As a group of trees grows, it reaches a point where there are not enough resources to go around and trees begin to compete, leading to winners and losers.
  • Eventually some trees have to die (the losers) for others (the winners) to have room to grow.

What’s neat is that there is a regular and reliable pattern to this process which applies generally to all species (when growing in groups of similar age). There is a predictable maximum number of trees of a given size that can grow together in a group.

So it follows that there is a predictable maximum average size for any given number of trees growing together in a group, according to its species.  As a group of trees grows towards its maximum size for that number (its spacing or density), it will pass through certain stages along the way.  These stages (e.g. crown closure) or zones (e.g. self-thinning) all correspond to different and increasing levels of competition among the trees, each occurring a  predictable point. See illustration below.

 

 

 

As covered before, the idea in spacing a young stand is to have the “right” number of well-distributed trees to allow them to grow until they are big enough to support a commercial thinning, and to be able to do it “on time”, before future opportunities are affected by overly-intense competition. This generally means aiming to thin the stand when it is in the Goldilocks zone (yellow or gold), and avoiding slipping into the self- thinning zone (red).  Bad things happen in the red zone. Trees start dying, starved to death for want of resources by excessive competition among their neighbors.  This is euphemistically called “self-thinning”.  Self-thinning is an entirely natural process that gradually allows room for surviving trees to grow larger.  But in the process live crowns get smaller, individual tree growth slows down and all the trees suffer.  If allowed to proceed too far (approaching the brown zone), the stand becomes  too weak and unstable to be thinned effectively.  That leaves few options besides letting the stand grow (and self-thin) for another decade or so until it can be clear cut, then start over.  This is not necessarily a bad decision, but not the outcome many family landowners are aiming for.

This relationship of predictable stages (commonly expressed as a ratio of the maximum) also gives us predictable average tree sizes at which different stages are reached. This lets us know if trees growing at any particular spacing will reach a given target, like the 10 inch average size needed for a commercial thinning, before becoming too crowded and stressed.

 

Let’s consider some young Douglas-fir stands.

Growing at the commonly planted spacing of 10×10 (about 440 tpa, the column on the right), trees will just be 6” (on average) when they enter the Goldilocks zone, and barely 8” when they are pushing up against the red zone. We saw why it is hard to have a profitable operation at that size.  But delaying the thinning operation is unlikely to fix the situation, since we won’t have reached even a  10” average before approaching the brown zone.  Generally many the trees we’d like to remove in an early thinning will be smaller than average.  A delay for any reason at this spacing is likely a big step towards a short rotation.

 

 

Trees planted and growing at an 11×11 spacing (360 tpa) may do a little better, growing into the Goldilocks zone at an average size of about 6½”, and reaching the red zone at about 8½”. Still shy of the thinning target while avoiding intense stress, but it might work for some people.

 

So what about a still wider spacing? Trees growing at a 12×12 (300 tpa) spacing have a lot more room to grow before crowding and competition begins to undermine other management objectives. At a 12×12 spacing trees will be about 7½”, when they fully occupy the site and 10″ on average when they approach the self-thinning red zone. It is much easier to see a profitable thinning operation in this type of stand, and less temptation to delay and push beyond the upper end of the desired thinning window. But should life or market conditions mandate a delay, this spacing gives a bit more breathing room. Other advantages of this stocking level include an earlier (if small) cash flow to offset some establishment costs, fewer, larger trees to handle in the thinning harvest, and a residual stand of deep-crowned, wind firm, rapidly growing trees which provides the landowner a wider range of silvicultural options.

 

Oh oh, so what if you planted at 10×10? Watch for an article soon on the nearly-forgotten practice of pre-commercial thinning (PCT).

The post Spacing young conifer stands appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Nutrient Management Workshop: Keeping Nitrogen in the Crop and Dollars in the Pocket

Small Farms Events - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, January 26, 2016 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Join us for an interactive, one-day nitrogen workshop for Oregon Growers on nutrient management solutions. Local experts from Oregon State University Extension and local fertilizer companies will share information and tools to increase nitrogen use efficiency. Grower participation is the backbone of this workshop as grower knowledge and needs are the drivers for applicable solutions to nitrogen management. This workshop is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided. Certified Crop Advisor CEUs will be available.

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/5080d4cadad22a57-oregon

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Story

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 3:25pm

Alan Rickman  died this month. He was an actor of my generation; one that provided me with much entertainment. I am sad. Then I saw this quote on the power of stories. How stories explain. How stories can educate. How stories can help reduce bias.  And I am reminded how stories are evaluative.

Dick Krueger did a professional development session (then called a “pre-session”) many years ago. It seems relevant now. Of course, I couldn’t find my notes (which were significant) so I did an online search, using “Dick Krueger and stories” as my search terms. I was successful! (See link.) When I went to the link, he had a whole section on story and story telling. What I remember most about that session is what he has listed under “How to Analyze the Story”. Specifically the four points he lists under problems with credibility:

  • Authenticity – Truth
  • Accuracy – Memory Problems
  • Representativeness and Sampling
  • Generalizability / Transferability

The next time you tell a story think of it in evaluative terms. And check out what Dick Krueger has to say.

I’ve started aggregating my blog posts (no easy task, to be sure) in preparation for developing the “modules” for a WECT-like approach to evaluation. The first section is Program Planning and Logic Modeling. The following posts are relevant (and presented in no particular order):

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/11/09/relevant-resources/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2010/01/05/101/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/04/19/timely-topic-planning-your-evaluation/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2012/05/30/perpetual-beta/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/10/12/stories-as-evaluation/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/04/01/how-do-you-find-the-answer/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/03/25/language-what-does-it-really-mean-and-how-do-you-know/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/03/02/all-of-the-people-all-of-the-time/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/01/27/standard-evaluation-tools/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2015/02/04/logic-models-good-tool/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2012/03/09/causal-relationships-evaluation-and-logic-models/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2012/01/23/logic-models-again/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2010/12/21/logic-model-revisited/

There may be more that are remotely related to Program Planning and Logic Modeling. This was my first pass. The URLs work and will take you to a longer post. You may have to cut and paste.

my .

molly.

 

 

 

The post Story appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28

Breaking Waves - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 7:00am

NEWPORT – The OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center and the Union of Concerned Scientists will host a reception and panel discussion on the environmental and economic impacts of ocean acidification on our coastal communities. The event is from 5-7 pm this Thursday, January 28  in the HMSC Visitor Center’s Hennings Auditorium.

Expert panelists will discuss the science of ocean acidification, local impacts and potential solutions with community members and elected officials.

Panelists are:

  • Dr. George Waldbusser, Assistant Professor, OSU College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Alan Barton, Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery
  • Dr. Francis Chan, Associate Professor and Senior Researcher, OSU College of Science
  • Emily Heffling, Western States Outreach Coordinator, Union of Concerned Scientists

Join us for a light reception and meet our panelists before the presentation.

The event, hosted by HMSC Director Bob Cowen and State Representative David Gomberg, is family-friendly, free and open to the public. RSVP requested – eheffling@ucsusa.org or 510-809-1584.

Learn more: Current and recent Oregon Sea Grant-funded research on ocean acidification

The post Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28

Sea Grant - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 7:00am

NEWPORT – The OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center and the Union of Concerned Scientists will host a reception and panel discussion on the environmental and economic impacts of ocean acidification on our coastal communities. The event is from 5-7 pm this Thursday, January 28  in the HMSC Visitor Center’s Hennings Auditorium.

Expert panelists will discuss the science of ocean acidification, local impacts and potential solutions with community members and elected officials.

Panelists are:

  • Dr. George Waldbusser, Assistant Professor, OSU College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Alan Barton, Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery
  • Dr. Francis Chan, Associate Professor and Senior Researcher, OSU College of Science
  • Emily Heffling, Western States Outreach Coordinator, Union of Concerned Scientists

Join us for a light reception and meet our panelists before the presentation.

The event, hosted by HMSC Director Bob Cowen and State Representative David Gomberg, is family-friendly, free and open to the public. RSVP requested – eheffling@ucsusa.org or 510-809-1584.

Learn more: Current and recent Oregon Sea Grant-funded research on ocean acidification

The post Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Many young stands too crowded

Tree Topics - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 3:40pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

In my travels around the mid-Willamette Valley, I am seeing a lot of young conifer stands (generally Douglas-fir up to 20 something years old) with just too many trees. Why do I say there are too many trees?
I know many people in this part of western Oregon who are patiently waiting for their trees to grow, hoping to do a commercial thinning (meaning sell the harvested trees to make at least a small profit) when their stand is about 25 years old.

 

All too often it is not working out that way. Instead, as the stand approaches the target age they find that trees have already become too crowded, with too many small, slow growing trees in the stand. The trees are still too small to support a profitable thinning operation yet. To thin at that point is to do so at a cost, although it may be best for the woodland in the long-run. To delay the thinning and wait for the trees to grow enough to make the thinning operation profitable is appealing. It may avoid the short term expense but is likely to weaken the stand at a long-term cost of growth, stand stability and future options. It is a classic “pay now or pay later” situation.


In young stands, the idea is to have the “right” number of well-spaced trees to allow the trees in the stand to grow more or less unchecked until they are big enough to support a commercial thinning, and to do it “on time”, that is before future opportunities are affected by intense competition. This should leave the landowner with a healthy, stable and vigorously growing stand easily shaped to meet any of a wide range of long term objectives that family landowners commonly aim for. These common objectives (see related article about objectives) including habitat diversity, recreational opportunities as well as periodic income, are generally best met by growing trees in longer rotations (>45 yrs) and with multiple thinnings over time. So it is important to get off on the right foot.


Of course there are many nuances in choosing the right spacing for any stand, but I’m saying there is a lot less nuance in the decision leading up to the first commercial thinning of a young stand than there is in later thinning decisions. It is fairly simple. In a young stand, we want to have the right number of trees to support a timely commercial thinning while avoiding excessive competition. This will keep the most options open for the landowner in the future.
We’ll look at what that number might be in another article.

The post Many young stands too crowded appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Winter Farming Series

Small Farms Events - Wed, 01/20/2016 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, January 20, 2016 12:00 PM

Are you interested in exploring whether winter production would be a good addition to your farm business? There are several crops that can be harvested during the winter months in Oregon. This class series will cover the basics of winter production including season extension tips and tools, planting dates and varietal selection that you will need to get started in winter production. We’ll also walk you through the process of keeping records to track production costs and analyzing whether winter production can be a profitable enterprise for your farm.

You’ll have a chance to visit with farmers that are experienced with winter production to get perspectives from the field. Our goal is to support you with testing out winter production on your farm to determine whether it is a feasible enterprise for your operation. Classes are spread out over a whole year and timed so that you can apply what you learn for your winter plantings in 2016.

For more information:
http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/southern-willamette-valley-program/winter-farming
Registration opens in November!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

North Willamette Horticulture Society Meetings

Small Farms Events - Thu, 01/14/2016 - 2:44pm
Tuesday, January 12, 2016 - Thursday, January 14, 2016 (all day event)

The North Willamette Horticulture Society is hosting their 61st annual meeting.

  • Organic Crops Section - Tuesday,Jan. 12
  • Vegetable Crops Section - Wednesday, Jan. 13
  • Berry Crops Section - January 14.
The conference includes a trade show with exhibitors from the local horticulture industry. The meeting features some of the latest information on organic and conventional fresh vegetable and berry production relevant to the Willamette Valley.

 

Registration information and program agendas are available at http://nwhortsoc.com. General registration includes breakfast (starting at 7am) and lunch. If you cannot register online or are interested in being an exhibitor for the first time, contact Jan Egli at 971-373-5912.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Exploring the Small Farm Dream - Roseburg

Small Farms Events - Thu, 01/14/2016 - 2:44pm
Thursday, January 14, 2016 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Are you considering launching a small farm enterprise, but are not sure where to start?
Whether you are dreaming of raising sheep, growing berries, or selling heirloom vegetables, this class series will give you the tools to start making that dream come true.
In this three-session course you will learn about current trends in small-scale agriculture, explore goals for your farm business, assess personal and financial resources, conduct preliminary market research, and develop an action plan to guide your next steps.

What to expect:
• Creative exercises, research, and class discussions that will help you assess your skills and resources.
• Interview with local farm-business owner that will assist you in deciding how to carry your dream forward.
• An opportunity to make connections with others interested in starting new farm enterprises.

Who should attend?

If you are exploring the idea of starting a farm business, this course is designed for you. This includes people thinking about full-time farming, farming part-time while continuing other employment, changing careers to start a farm, and/or developing an existing but informal farming pastime into a more serious business activity.

Dates, times and locations:
This class series will be offered in two locations.
Thursdays, January 14, 21, and 28, 2016
6:00-8:30 pm Linn County Extension Service office in Tangent.
5:30–8:00 pm Douglas County Extension Service office in Roseburg.

Fee: $60 for one individual; $75 for two farm business partners.
Fee includes worksheets and handouts, 7.5 hours of detailed instruction and class exercises led by Extension Faculty and successful local farmers, and refreshments at each session.

To register:
To register for the Linn County visit here or contact Chrissy Lucas at 541-766-3556
To register for the Douglas County series visit here or call the Douglas County Extension Service at: 541-672-4461

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs