OSU Extension Blogs

Orchard Management Series

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 40 min ago
Thursday, January 25, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

The third of a three-part series about tree fruit production on small farms.

 To register go to: http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/southern-willamette-valley-program/orchard-management-series 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

2018 Lambing School

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 40 min ago
Saturday, January 20, 2018 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
2018 LAMBING SCHOOL
Co-sponsored by Oregon Sheep Growers Association & OSU Extension Service
DATE: SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, 2018 TIME: 8 am to 5 pm LOCATION: Mont Alto Ranch, 2800 French Creek Rd,
Glide, Oregon
PRESENTED BY: Gene Pirelli, Oregon State University Extension Dr. Paul Bailey, Bailey Veterinary Clinic John Fine
This is an excellent opportunity to learn how to increase your odds of getting live lambs on the ground and off to a good start! This school will be held in a commercial sheep lambing barn, so there will be ample hands-on opportunities.
“EMPHASIS TO BE HANDS-ON EXPERIENCE” Ewes: Lambing problems, obstetrics, grafting, foot trimming and health. Lambs: Castration, docking, vaccinations, and emergency situations as they arise. The school will also include discussions on sheep nutrition and facilities. Participants are also asked to wear warm, appropriate barn clothing and bring clean rubber boots! All footwear will be disinfected before entering the barn. Cost: $40 per person. The school will be limited to 12 participants. Selection for the school will be based on the first 12 registered. Preference will be given to those attending for the first time. Lunch will be provided with registration.
DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION Monday, January 15, 2018 (Or until the class is filled)
Remember, first come, first served, because, unfortunately, we can only accommodate twelve people in the class. Fees will be returned if the class is filled. If you must cancel your plans to attend, please notify us four (4) working days prior to the lambing school, so that we can still refund your money. To register for the class, please fill out the enclosed form. Registration forms and fees must be received by January 15th to reserve your place in the class. All class participants will receive a packet of information. For more details on the Lambing School please call John Fine at 541-673- 0369 or email at johnandpeggyfine@charter.net.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Orchard Management Series

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 40 min ago
Thursday, January 11, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

The second of a three-part series about tree fruit production on small farms.

 To register go to: http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/southern-willamette-valley-program/orchard-management-series 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Raspberry & Blackberry Annual Growers Meeting

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 40 min ago
Wednesday, December 13, 2017 8:30 AM - 1:00 PM

The ORBC will be providing lunch to everyone who contacts us in advance to make a reservation.
541-758-4043 or connie@oregon-berries.com
RSVP Deadline for Lunch: Friday, December 1st

 

MEETING SCHEDULE

8:30 - 8:40 - Ken Van Dyke, Chair
· Welcome & Introductions
8:40 - 9:10 - Chad Finn, USDA-ARS & Bernadine Strik, OSU/NWREC
· Cooperative Breeding Program - Caneberries
· Developing the Genomic Infrastructure for Breeding Improved Black Raspberries
9:10 - 9:25 - Brian Yorgey, OSU
· Evaluation of Processing Quality of Advanced Caneberry Breeding Selections
9:25 - 9:50 - Joe DeFrancesco, OSU
· Caneberry Pesticide Registration, Tracking, and New Chemistries
· Insecticide Degradation for Oregon Blackberries
9:50 - 10:05 - Man-Yeon Choi, USDA ARS
· Development of Biologically-based RNAi insecticide to control SWD
10:05 - 10:20 - Pat Moore & Wendy Hoashi-Erhardt, WSU
· Development of New Raspberry Cultivars for the Pacific Northwest
10:20 - 10:35 - BREAK
10:35 - 10:55 - Tom Peerbolt, Peerbolt Crop Management & NW Berry Foundation
· Coordinated Regional On-Farm Trials of Advanced Caneberry Selections
· Weekly Email IPM Newsletter for Small Fruit Growers and Related Industry
10:55 - 11:10 - Sue Davis, ODA Produce Safety Development Specialist
· FSMA Produce Safety Rule Update
11:10 - 11:30 - Ann Colonna, OSU Sensory Program Manager
· Blackberry Puree Sensory Test Results
11:30 - 12:00 - Willamette Valley Fruit, Columbia Fruit & More
· Berry Packer Panel - Outlook for Caneberries
12:00 - 12:10 - Darcy Kochis, Food First Marketing
· National Blackberry Research & Promotion Program
12:10 - 12:50 - Darcy Kochis, Food First Marketing
· ORBC Promotion Report
12:50 Lunch Sponsored by the Oregon Raspberry & Blackberry Commission

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Orchard Management Series

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 40 min ago
Thursday, December 14, 2017 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

The first of a three-part series about tree fruit production on small farms.

To register go to: http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/southern-willamette-valley-program/orchard-management-series

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

DCWFN - Annual meeting and planning for 2018

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 40 min ago
Thursday, December 14, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
held at the OSU Extension office

for more information click here

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New publications look at Oregon coast recreational outfitter and tour guide businesses

Breaking Waves - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 1:26pm

Two new publications from Oregon Sea Grant examine several facets of Oregon coast recreational outfitters and tour guides, including their services, pricing, and online marketing effectiveness.

A fishing guide demonstrates his technique. (Photo by Erik Urdahl)

Assessment of Registered Oregon Coast Outfitters and Guides examines data related to guides registered with the Oregon State Marine Board and provides a summary of some basic information about registered guides in the state, including numbers, locations and types of services provided. A printable PDF of the eight-page publication is available for free download here.

A companion publication, Survey of Online Marketing Success and Pricing for Oregon Coast Fishing Guides and Tour Operators, presents an inventory of guided salmon fishing, whale watching and kayaking businesses. Guide and tour companies can use this study to gauge the effectiveness of their online marketing and to better understand how their services are priced in the marketplace. You can download a free, printable PDF of the 18-page publication here.

A novice kayaker gets the hang of paddling. (Photo by Erik Urdahl)

The publications represent an effort to better understand such businesses’ economic impacts, job opportunities, resource management, professional development opportunities and marketing support. Individuals and organizations that might benefit from these reports include registered Oregon guide businesses, tour operators, coastal tourism promoters, community and economic development firms, natural-resource management agencies and researchers.

The research for both publications was conducted with the support and cooperation of Oregon Sea Grant (OSG), Oregon State University Extension, Wild Rivers Coast Alliance, the Oregon Coast Visitors Association and the Oregon State Marine Board. Authors are Miles Phillips, an OSG Extension coastal tourism specialist; and Catie Michel, a 2017 OSG Summer Scholar. Phillips is also the author of the OSG publications Agritourism in Oregon’s Coastal Counties: Land Use Policy and Permitting Requirements and Transient Lodging Taxes on the Oregon Coast.

 

The post New publications look at Oregon coast recreational outfitter and tour guide businesses appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New publications look at Oregon coast recreational outfitter and tour guide businesses

Sea Grant - Mon, 12/11/2017 - 1:26pm

Two new publications from Oregon Sea Grant examine several facets of Oregon coast recreational outfitters and tour guides, including their services, pricing, and online marketing effectiveness.

A fishing guide demonstrates his technique. (Photo by Erik Urdahl)

Assessment of Registered Oregon Coast Outfitters and Guides examines data related to guides registered with the Oregon State Marine Board and provides a summary of some basic information about registered guides in the state, including numbers, locations and types of services provided. A printable PDF of the eight-page publication is available for free download here.

A companion publication, Survey of Online Marketing Success and Pricing for Oregon Coast Fishing Guides and Tour Operators, presents an inventory of guided salmon fishing, whale watching and kayaking businesses. Guide and tour companies can use this study to gauge the effectiveness of their online marketing and to better understand how their services are priced in the marketplace. You can download a free, printable PDF of the 18-page publication here.

A novice kayaker gets the hang of paddling. (Photo by Erik Urdahl)

The publications represent an effort to better understand such businesses’ economic impacts, job opportunities, resource management, professional development opportunities and marketing support. Individuals and organizations that might benefit from these reports include registered Oregon guide businesses, tour operators, coastal tourism promoters, community and economic development firms, natural-resource management agencies and researchers.

The research for both publications was conducted with the support and cooperation of Oregon Sea Grant (OSG), Oregon State University Extension, Wild Rivers Coast Alliance, the Oregon Coast Visitors Association and the Oregon State Marine Board. Authors are Miles Phillips, an OSG Extension coastal tourism specialist; and Catie Michel, a 2017 OSG Summer Scholar. Phillips is also the author of the OSG publications Agritourism in Oregon’s Coastal Counties: Land Use Policy and Permitting Requirements and Transient Lodging Taxes on the Oregon Coast.

 

The post New publications look at Oregon coast recreational outfitter and tour guide businesses appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Measuring plots in the woods

Tree Topics - Tue, 12/05/2017 - 12:05pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension agent for Benton, Linn and Polk Counties

In this series about young stand thinning , I’ve worked on the assumption that people know the density of trees in their woods. I realize that in many cases, people don’t really know that, so cannot easily apply that information to deciding if they have enough room for healthy growth or if trees need to be thinned.

If you know what distance the trees were said to have been planted, you may have a fair idea of the density (a 10’ x 10’ spacing is about 440 trees per acre, a 12’ x 12’ is about 300 tpa). This is a good start, but not necessarily very accurate.   Actual planting spacing can vary quite a bit according to the conditions in the field and experience of the planters.  And of course some seedlings die during establishment, or some other trees may seed in from outside.  So it is probably a good idea to go out and get a better idea of what you’ve got.  The basic way to do this is to measure some plots.

We commonly use circular plots for this since they are easy to install and measure accurately. We choose a radius for the size of the plot we want, (typically 1/100, 1/50, 1/20 or 1/10 of an acre). We use larger plots for larger trees, smaller plots (and typically more of them) for smaller trees. See the table at right.  It is never too early to get an idea of this.  Checking the work of a planting crew often involves checking planting density with a lot of small plots.

So how is this done? Let’s walk through the process together.

First, if you have not measured a plot before, make it easy for yourself. Choose some easy ground with trees that have been pruned up and are not overrun with blackberries.   Something like this, to the left.

I realize this may not describe the young stand you are actually interested in measuring, but since this is a training practice, that is fine. If you don’t have anything that fits this description, maybe ask a neighbor, or someone in your OSWA chapter to practice in theirs.

For this exercise you’ll want a few stakes, some flagging, paper and pencil, and a tape measure (a loggers tape is best). Oh, and maybe bring a friend along to help.

Go into the woods and toss several stakes out around the stand (each with a piece of flagging). Those will be the centers of your practice plots.  Working together, figure out which trees fall within the radius of your plot (for example, 16’ 7” feet for a 1/50 acre plot).  Some will be easy to tell, others will have to be measured from the plot center.  If on the line, count it as “in” only if the center of the tree is within the radius at breast height (which is why it is good to have a helper).  Let’s say you count 6 trees within your 1/50 acre plot.  What’s that mean? That represents a plot density of 300 tpa.  To find that, you multiply your plot count by the denominator of your plot size to get density (or 6 trees x 50 =300tpa).  Repeat on the other practice plots, or until you get the hang of it.

 

For bonus points, go back and measure the diameter of each of the “in” trees in the plot and record their diameter at breast height (dbh). If you figure the average and compare that to the illustration and description from the earlier post  you can learn how much competition those trees are contending with now, and how much room they have to grow in the future.

So that is the idea. Not that difficult, really.  Getting an accurate measure of a whole stand requires some rigor we will not go into here, but you’ll have to read more about that elsewhere.  But even a few plots can give you some important insight, so I’d encourage you to put in some plots, and start getting an eye for what you have.  It is easy to do when trees are small, before crown closure.  Yes, it can be hard work if your stand is brushy and full of blackberries.  You may want to do a little pruning and clearing in your plots to make it easier. But winter is a great time to do that sort of work.  Good luck.

 

The post Measuring plots in the woods appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

“Growing Your Operation’s Productivity and Profitability — From the Ground Up

Small Farms Events - Sat, 12/02/2017 - 2:36pm
Thursday, November 30, 2017 - Saturday, December 2, 2017 (all day event)
Make hotel reservations before Nov. 20 to receive the group rate: $89 + tax. Call the Holiday Inn direct at 541-284-0707 or use the reservation link on the OSGA web page: www.sheeporegon.com    Thursday – Nov. 30 OFGC & OSGA sponsored Forage & Sheep Tours. Details of tour sites and directions will be available soon. Check the OFGC web site: oregonforage.org 4:00 - 6:00 PM – Workshop Martin Dally of Super Sire Ltd. • Improving Reproductive Efficiency and Artificial Insemination 6:00 PM – Cayle Krebs Memorial Reception Welcome Reception & BBQ for All   Friday – Dec. 1 OFGC No-Host Breakfast & conversation Dr. Joe Snyder DVM (2 sessions) • Beyond Dewormers: Parasite Control in Grazing Animals • Vaccinology: Use and Misuse of Vaccines in Grazing Animals Amber Moore, OSU, Crop & Soil Science Extension • Soils to Maintain Forages John Williams, OSU Extension, Wallowa County • Wolves in Oregon, Facts, Issues and Research Rusty Burgett, Director, NSIP • NSIP in the Sheep Industry Walt Davis (by video conference) • Author and Rancher • How Not to go Broke Ranching Make hotel reservations before Nov. 20 to receive the group rate: $89 + tax. Call the Holiday Inn direct at 541-284-0707 or use the reservation link on the OSGA web page: www.sheeporegon.com Dave Pratt, Ranching for Profit • The 3 Secrets for Increasing Profit (3 hr workshop) Woody Lane, Lane Livestock Services • Technology Tips: A Sharing Session • Technology in Ranching. Bring your smartphone and your favorite apps. Cody Hiemke (by video conference) • Buying & Selling Lamb in Higher-End Markets: The Niman Ranch Lamb Program • Turning Mutton into Money: Innovative uses for Mutton Kathy Voth (pre-recorded video) • Livestock for Landscapes – Teaching Cows to Eat Weeds Special Bonus: 9am to 5:30pm Skills 101: Small group discussions for producers at all levels, led by industry experts. Drop in at any point & bring your questions! Topics: • Lambing Time Management • Pasture Layout & Design • Soil Health and Management • Grazing Management Note: Meet the Speakers – Following each talk, there will be an opportunity to meet the speaker for more questions. Friday Evening FUN – No Host Reception & Dinner, followed by Annual FUNdraising Auction   Saturday, Dec. 2 OSGA Industry Reports & Annual Meeting • Dave Williams, Wildlife Services • Dan Dawson, Douglas County Livestock Pilot Project on Trapping Surveillance • ASI Report – Reed Anderson • And More! OSGA Annual Business Meeting & Luncheon
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living with Wood Sickness

Tree Topics - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 3:55pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent for Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

The wood sickness is an all-too-common condition that afflicts many in the family forest landowner community.  As described earlier, it is characterized by large accumulations of wood in a person’s yard, shed, garage or barn, excessive buildup of chain saws and other logging tools, portable mills, and all sorts of secondary wood working tools. You know it when you see it.

People with this affliction treat wood with the same passion as collectors of fine wine treat their vintages. Each likes to hide things away and store them cool dark places, often for years at a time.  Yet each is able to recite the source and a story of how they came to own each piece or bottle.  They are determined and very patient waiting for each to find its destiny.

Orson Wells made a series of wine commercials late in his career that captured that spirit when he would declare “We sell no wine before its time.” The parallel sentiment among wood hoarders might be “we use no board before it’s stored.”

An afflicted friend of mine (who will remain unnamed) is remodeling a house and recently put in a hardwood floor. He patiently converted stacks of stickered wood into milled floorboards.  Then, he gradually and laboriously laid them out one by one to create a gorgeous floor of Oregon white oak, bordered with black walnut.  As discussed before, there is no cure for the wood sickness, but it can be helped by therapy.  The therapy is difficult and sometimes painful.  His therapy reduced the amount of wood in his stockpile while producing pain in his knees and back, but was otherwise effective and productive.

There are many people like Jay who are coping and trying to come to grips with their obsession. You see them around town from time to time.  No more so than this time of year, when they commonly emerge from garages and workshops coated in therapeutic sawdust, to display and maybe sell the products of their therapy at art shops, Christmas Bazars and the Local Goods from the Woods fair.  They may be friends, family or even complete strangers, but please show them some holiday spirit.  Meet them half way.

I bet that turned fruit bowl would look terrific in your sister’s dining room.

The post Living with Wood Sickness appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Applications now being accepted for 2019-20 Knauss Marine Policy Fellowships

Breaking Waves - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 11:39am

Oregon Sea Grant is now accepting applications for the 2019-2020 Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship. Applications are due February 23, 2018. In order to register for our new online application system, eSeaGrant, please email a brief declaration of interest to eseagrant@oregonstate.edu by February 9, 2018.

Melissa Errend stands on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Errend was a 2016-17 Knauss Fellow in the office of U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell. (Photo by Dylan McDowell)

The Knauss Fellowship Program provides a unique education experience to graduate students by matching fellows with hosts in the legislative branch, the executive branch, or appropriate associations and institutions located in the Washington, D.C., area for one year.

Oregon Sea Grant will host a brief, informational webinar about our NOAA and Sea Grant Winter Graduate Fellowship Opportunities on Friday, January 5, 2018, from 10:00 to 10:30 a.m. Pacific. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Register here.

Learn more about Oregon Sea Grant’s fellowship opportunities.

The post Applications now being accepted for 2019-20 Knauss Marine Policy Fellowships appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Applications now being accepted for 2019-20 Knauss Marine Policy Fellowships

Sea Grant - Thu, 11/30/2017 - 11:39am

Oregon Sea Grant is now accepting applications for the 2019-2020 Dean John A. Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship. Applications are due February 23, 2018. In order to register for our new online application system, eSeaGrant, please email a brief declaration of interest to eseagrant@oregonstate.edu by February 9, 2018.

Melissa Errend stands on the steps of the Capitol in Washington, D.C. Errend was a 2016-17 Knauss Fellow in the office of U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell. (Photo by Dylan McDowell)

The Knauss Fellowship Program provides a unique education experience to graduate students by matching fellows with hosts in the legislative branch, the executive branch, or appropriate associations and institutions located in the Washington, D.C., area for one year.

Oregon Sea Grant will host a brief, informational webinar about our NOAA and Sea Grant Winter Graduate Fellowship Opportunities on Friday, January 5, 2018, from 10:00 to 10:30 a.m. Pacific. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Register here.

Learn more about Oregon Sea Grant’s fellowship opportunities.

The post Applications now being accepted for 2019-20 Knauss Marine Policy Fellowships appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Visitor Center at Hatfield Center to close Dec. 5 for maintenance

Breaking Waves - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 12:08pm

11/21/2017

by Mark Floyd

The Visitor Center at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center, which annually draws some 150,000 visitors, will close on Dec. 5 for maintenance and renovation.

Oregon Sea Grant’s Visitor Center at HMSC will close for maintenance on Dec. 5. (Photo by Tiffany Woods)

The Visitor Center’s front exhibits and auditorium are tentatively scheduled to reopen on Feb. 1, though there will be no public access to the back exhibits. The rest of the Visitor Center, which is operated by Oregon Sea Grant, is scheduled to reopen on March 25.

“A couple of the larger tanks in the back exhibits need to be re-secured to the foundation, and we’ll take the opportunity to do some additional plumbing and renovation,” said Bob Cowen, director of the Newport-based HMSC. “We’re sorry for the inconvenience, but the maintenance is overdue.”

Some of the Visitor Center’s exhibits include a large octopus tank, tanks with near- and offshore sea life, touch pools, coral tanks, displays featuring marine studies and current research, three wave tanks, an augmented sand table, and a variety of other hands-on educational exhibits.

The post Visitor Center at Hatfield Center to close Dec. 5 for maintenance appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Visitor Center at Hatfield Center to close Dec. 5 for maintenance

Sea Grant - Wed, 11/22/2017 - 12:08pm

11/21/2017

by Mark Floyd

The Visitor Center at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center, which annually draws some 150,000 visitors, will close on Dec. 5 for maintenance and renovation.

Oregon Sea Grant’s Visitor Center at HMSC will close for maintenance on Dec. 5. (Photo by Tiffany Woods)

The Visitor Center’s front exhibits and auditorium are tentatively scheduled to reopen on Feb. 1, though there will be no public access to the back exhibits. The rest of the Visitor Center, which is operated by Oregon Sea Grant, is scheduled to reopen on March 25.

“A couple of the larger tanks in the back exhibits need to be re-secured to the foundation, and we’ll take the opportunity to do some additional plumbing and renovation,” said Bob Cowen, director of the Newport-based HMSC. “We’re sorry for the inconvenience, but the maintenance is overdue.”

Some of the Visitor Center’s exhibits include a large octopus tank, tanks with near- and offshore sea life, touch pools, coral tanks, displays featuring marine studies and current research, three wave tanks, an augmented sand table, and a variety of other hands-on educational exhibits.

The post Visitor Center at Hatfield Center to close Dec. 5 for maintenance appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Gratitude.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 12:58pm
Gratitude.

The day after tomorrow is a national holiday. One of gratitude.

It is the lead up to the end of the year holidays and the long dark.

Yep. Thanksgiving.

(I couldn’t decide which was more representative…certainly the Norman Rockwell painting isn’t; so I didn’t include it.)

Real meaning?

I recently read an article from my Alma mater on the “Real Meaning of Thanksgiving”. What I didn’t know is that “since 1970, Native Americans… commemorate a National Day of Mourning on the US Thanksgiving holiday.”  It is a “reminder of the genocide of millions of indigenous people, the theft of their lands, and the relentless assault on their culture.” This day of remembrance and spiritual connection protests the racism and oppression which the Native Americans continue to experience.  A similar gathering will take place in San Francisco, California, on Alcatraz Island.

This is because of the concept “described by scholars as settler colonialism”.

Ronald Trosper, professor of American Indian studies at the University of Arizona, presents a short quiz about Thanksgiving Day (three questions only). Although he cites the web site  GlobalSocietyTheory.com, that link doesn’t work. He says “Settler colonialism persists in the ongoing elimination of indigenous populations, and the assertion of state sovereignty and juridical control over their lands.” Although Thanksgiving is an US holiday, “…Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa also are examples of countries formed by settler colonialism.”

Criteria.

Everyone has a criteria for determining what Thanksgiving means to them. What is the value, merit, worth of that program.

Is is just a two day break from work? Is it just another holiday? Or is is about the food? For me, I look at the food and I am thankful. I have not gone hungry. Sometimes it is any food; sometimes it is only green food.

This year, I will be celebrating the holiday with my brother, his wife, his son, and his son’s girlfriend. We will feast of foods for which we are thankful. That does not include turkey.

I made a new pie for gathering. Dulce De Leche any one?

 

my.

 

The post Gratitude. appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Women In Ag Conference

Small Farms Events - Sat, 11/18/2017 - 2:39pm
Saturday, November 18, 2017 (all day event)

Registration is now open for the 6th annual Women in Agriculture Conference!

 

Whether you are on Facebook or face to face,

it matters how you connect with others.

  

"We Can Do It"

is the theme for the sixth annual Women in Agriculture Conference. This year's conference will be an engaging, interactive day full of inspiration, learning and networking with other women farmers.  The conference is a one-day event held simultaneously in 40 locations throughout Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington. 

 

Featured Speakers

Both of our 2017 speakers, Alexis Taylor, Oregon Department of Ag Director, and Anne Schwartz, Blue Heron Farm owner, will inspire participants to strengthen their leadership skills, become leaders in their communities, become more involved with long-time farmers and guide and mentor new farmers.

 

Panel

Each event location will have a panel of local women farmers who will talk about their leadership roles, the challenges they have faced and how they have used a mentor to develop their skills.

 

Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions and interact. It will be a full day of learning and networking!

 

This conference is designed for all women farmers and anyone who works with women farmers.  If you have been farming for years, are a new and aspiring farmer, a banker, lender or anyone in the agricultural industry, this conference is for you!

 

Registrations fees are: $25 if you register between October 5 and November 5; $30 if you register between November 6 and November 17.  Your registration fee includes a light breakfast, lunch and all the conference materials, along with a great bag to take everything home!

 

Limited scholarships are available for college and high school agriculture students, 4-H members and FFA members.  Visit our website for the application.

 

If you are an aspiring farmer and need financial assistance to attend this conference, please contact us directly at viebrock@wsu.edu.

 

For more information, find event locations or to register, visit WomenInAg.wsu.edu or contact me at WSU Extension. We hope to see you at one of our locations listed below!

 

2017 Locations

 

Washington: Bremerton, Chehalis, Colville, Coupeville, Des Moines, Elma, Everett, Goldendale, Mount Vernon, Nespelem, Olympia, Pasco, Port Angeles, Pullman, Raymond, Republic, Ritzville, Spokane, Vancouver, Walla Walla, Wenatchee and Yakima

 

Idaho: Bonners Ferry, Caldwell, Coeur d'Alene, McCall, Salmon, Sandpoint and Twin Falls


Oregon: La Grande, Redmond, Roseburg, Salem and The Dalles

 

Montana: Broadus, Great Falls and Missoula

 

Alaska: Delta Junction, Fairbanks and Palmer

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

CANCELLED - DCWFN - WSU Women Involved in Agriculture Conference

Small Farms Events - Sat, 11/18/2017 - 2:39pm
Saturday, November 18, 2017 8:00 AM - 3:30 PM

Due to low enrollment, this conference has been cancelled.

The conference will be at Phoenix School of Roseburg, 3131 NE Diamond Lake Blvd, Roseburg, OR 97470.  For more informatoin click here

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Agriculture & Commercial Pesticide and Empty Container Collection Event

Small Farms Events - Sat, 11/18/2017 - 2:39pm
Saturday, November 18, 2017 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
There will be a Agriculture & Commercial Pesticide and Empty Container Collection Event at Valley Agronomics, 13007 Downs Road, in Mt. Angel from 8:00 AM to 2:00 PM (by appointment) on November 18, 2017.

Agricultural, commercial, forestry, and institutional wastepesticides from pesticide users in Marion, Clackamas andadjacent counties will be accepted. Chemicals not included inpesticide products (e.g., fertilizers) will NOT be accepted

While the COST = FREE, you must complete an application form. More information and links to the application are available at the link.

http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nurspest/Pesticide_Collection_Event_brochure_Mt._Angel_November_2017.pdf
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good ideas.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 11/17/2017 - 4:24pm
Good ideas. Maybe.

Did I get good ideas? Maybe.

I recently returned (Saturday,November 11, 2017, late) from the 2017 annual American Evaluation Association conference. This year the meeting was held in Washington, D. C.  (Thank you Lance Wyman, for this photo.) I realize that this is not the iconic view of D.C. that one imagines (like this: .) It was fall and it was mostly clear. I did get to the zoo as part of the conference.

As you know, I determine if a conference is good by seeing three long time friends, meeting three new people I want to see again, and getting three new ideas . This year was bitter sweet. Yes, I did see three long time friends (however, there were only 10). Used to be that I could not go across the lobby without seeing someone I knew well and wanted to see again. This year, many friends (both professional and personal) were not there–they had retired; they were frail and not traveling; they had died and I thought of my own mortality and realized that I had less time to take breaths, even those that take my breath away. I did not meet (although I did interact with young people) three new people I wanted to see again. I think I got only two good ideas–maybe three; hard to say.

Expanding horizons?

I had the good fortune to attend a professional development workshop on Social Network Analysis. For those of you who do not know (myself included) social network analysis (SNA) is “a method of analyzing and visualizing social structures, represented in a form of graphs”. It can result in a graph that looks like this:

(with the blue dots being the measures of centrality) or this (with the red person being key). Perhaps I can use this technique in my work.

Economic Evaluation.

I also had the good fortune to hear Henry (Hank) Levin talk on economic evaluation in education.

This is the cover of his new edition published this year.

This may be the last time I see him live and in color as he is older than I am (although he is not frail as many 80+ are). I grew up with him and his first edition called Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

and had the good fortune of hearing him talk about economic evaluation in education (although he didn’t call it that at the time). He (with Patrick McEwan) had a second edition published in 2001.

Levin spoke about the neglect of cost effectiveness. (Most resources will talk about cost-benefit analysis [or benefit-cost analysis]). While CE compares costs for similar effectiveness, BC puts a monetary cost to a monetary benefit, with outcomes measured in monetary values. I think there is more to evaluation than monetary value.

Principles-focused evaluation.

I also heard Michael Quinn Patton talk about principles-focused evaluation.

Michael served as the chair and discussant on a panel sponsored by the Systems TIG.  What a thought provoking session, not unlike the book. That it included one of the most “creative contemporary thinker about how best to advance evaluation practice” provided a bonus.  Just listening to the interplay was valuable.

Now having said all this, the question remains: Can I use these ideas in my work?

I’ll think about it. A lot.

My .

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