OSU Extension Blogs

Summer Grape Care

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 21 min ago
Saturday, May 7, 2016 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

INSTRUCTOR:  Chris Hubert; Results Partners

Grapes are low maintenance, but need some summer care for health and production – learn what to do and when

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Hay Assessment - Buying Quality Hay

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 21 min ago
Thursday, May 26, 2016 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Know your hay and save some green! Learn to perform a sensory analysis, read a forage (nutritional) analysis and match it to your animal's needs. Don't buy your hay based on color alone - come learn how to buy based on nutritional quality. Instructor: Angie Boudro.

Register on line-Jo County:  https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/1016

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Soil Amendment Workshop

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 21 min ago
Saturday, May 28, 2016 12:30 PM - 3:00 PM

instructor: Kyle Krenzer; Elevation Organics

Don’t just add products to your soil, come learn what to add and when to maximize soil tilth and your harvest

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Grass Anatomy/ Field ID

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 21 min ago
Friday, June 3, 2016 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

ISTRUCTOR: Rachel Werling; OSU Extension

Part 1: (9:00-11:00am) will cover anatomy and Part 2: (12:00-3:00pm) will cover native grasses for landowners in the field  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

POISONOUS PLANTS-Risks to Grazing Livestock

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 21 min ago
Saturday, June 4, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
  This class is designed to help livestock owners identify poisonous plants and manage the risk of animals consuming toxins.
A) Economic impacts of plant poisoning;
B) Keys to identifying local toxic plants;

C) Assessing potential harm to your animals;
D) How, why and when plant poisoning occurs;
E) Common sense pasture/farm management
Instructor: Author, Shirley Weathers. Field Guide to Plants Poisonous to Livestock, Western U.S., will be available at the class

REGISTER ON LINE:  https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/1022

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Rural Living Basics: Living with Your Well & Septic System

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 21 min ago
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
FREE Class & Screening
Bring 1/2 cup of untreated well water for nitrate screen. All results are confidential.

This class is designed for rural residents to learn the basics of groundwater, water wells, and septic systems. Learn steps to protect the health of your family, neighbors, animals, your property investment, and the safety of groundwater resources. 

When: June 7th, 2016 6:30pm to 8:30pm
Where: Aurora Presbyterian Church, 2155s Liberty Street, NE Aurora, Oregon 97002

RSVP’s Appreciated
Chrissy.Lucas@oregonstate.edu
See all of our events at http://wellwater.oregonstate.edu

Questions? Chrissy at 541-766-3556

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Pasture & Grazing Management Class

Small Farms Events - 4 hours 21 min ago
Tuesday, May 17, 2016 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

This class is for the small acreage landowner who is managing pasture for grazing animals.  Pastures under controlled grazing have less wasted forage, especially in the spring, and plants have an opportunity to rest and recover between pasture rotations, leading to increased forage production.  In this class we will cover topics such as how grass plants grow, rotational grazing systems and pasture fertility. 

Register at:  https://secure.oregonstate.edu/smallfarms-events/register/131

Please contact Chrissy Lucas at 541-766-3556 or Chrissy.Lucas@oregonstate.edu with questions.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Science Pub takes on coral reef decline

Sea Grant - 10 hours 58 min ago

CORVALLIS – Research on the worldwide decline in coral reefs will take center stage at the Corvallis Science Pub on Monday, May 9.

Rebecca Vega-Thurber investigates the microbial ecology of reefs in the Red Sea, the Caribbean and the Pacific and will describe what she has learned about how microbes influence reef health.

“Coral species differ in their susceptibility to bleaching and disease, but these differences are only partially explained by the evolutionary history of corals,” said Vega-Thurber, an assistant professor of microbiology at Oregon State University.

Science Pub is free and open to the public. It begins at 6 p.m. at the Old World Deli, 341 S.W. Second St. in Corvallis.

Learn more:

The post Science Pub takes on coral reef decline appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Methodology 2: Focus groups

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Tue, 05/03/2016 - 11:30am

Previously, I talked about Survey’s (even though I posted it April 27, 2016). Today, I’ll collect all the posts about focus groups and add a bit more.

2010/01/05 Talks about the type of questions to use in a Focus Group

2010/01/27 One of three topics mentioned

2010/09/09 Talks about focus groups in terms of analyzing a conversation

2011/05/31 Talks about focus groups in the context of sampling

2011/06/23 Mentions Krueger, my go to

2013/11/15 Mentions focus groups

2014/10/23  Mentions focus groups and an individual with information

2015/02/11 Mentions focus groups…

2015/05/08 Virtual focus groups

Discovery

Although focus groups are a mentioned throughout many of my posts, there are few that are exclusively devoted to focus groups. That surprises me. I need to talk more about focus groups. I especially need to talk about what I found when I did the virtual focus groups, more than with the specific post. From the interest at AEA last year, there needs to be much discussion.

So OK. More about focus groups.

Although Dick  Krueger  is my go to reference for focus groups (I studied with him, after all), there are other books on focus groups. (I just discovered that Krueger and Casey have also revised and published a 5th edition.)

The others for example (in no particular order),

  1. Stewart, D. W. & Shamadasani, P. N. (1990). Focus groups: Theory and practice. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications. There is a 3rd edition of this book available
  2. Morgan, D. L. (ed.) (1993). Successful focus groups: Advancing the state of the art. Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications.
  3. Greenbaum, T. L. (2000). Moderating focus groups. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  4. Greenbaum, T. L. (2nd edition). (1998). The handbook for focus group research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  5. Carey, M. A. & Asbury, J-E. (2012). Focus group research. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press, Inc.

Plus many others that are published by Sage, available from Amazon, and others. I think you can find one that works for you.

Mary Marczak and Meg Sewell have an introduction to focus groups here (it is shorter that reading the book by Krueger and Casey).

I think it is important to remember that focus groups:

  1. Yield qualitative data;
  2. Are used in evaluation (just not in a pre-post sense);
  3. Are a GROUP activity of people who are typically unfamiliar with each other.

Next time: More on focus groups.

my .

molly.

The post Methodology 2: Focus groups appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

2016 Pacific Northwest Let's Grow Lamb and Wool Symposium

Small Farms Events - Sat, 04/30/2016 - 2:37pm
Saturday, April 30, 2016 8:00 AM - 4:30 PM

Speakers:
Jan Busboom, Extension Meat Specialist, Washington State University
Alan Culham, ASI Let's Grow Program Coordinator
Gene Pirelli, Regional Livestock & Forage Specialist, Oregon State University
Lesa Eidman, Superior Farms
Paul Kuber, Washington State University
Martin Maquivar, Washington State University

Registration Deadline Wednesday, April 27
Register online at:
bit.ly/Sheepsymposium

For more information, view the 2016 Pacific Northwest Let's Grow Lamb and Wool
Symposium event flyer

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Rural Living Basics: Living with Your Well & Septic System

Small Farms Events - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, April 28, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
FREE Class & Screening
Bring 1/2 cup of untreated well water for nitrate screen. All results are confidential.

This class is designed for rural residents to learn the basics of groundwater, water wells, and septic systems. Learn steps to protect the health of your family, neighbors, animals, your property investment, and the safety of groundwater resources. 

When: April 28th, 2016 6:30pm to 8:30pm
Where: Stayton Community Center, 400 W. Virginia St., Stayton, Oregon

RSVP’s Appreciated
Chrissy.Lucas@oregonstate.edu
See all of our events at http://wellwater.oregonstate.edu

Questions? Chrissy at 541-766-3556

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Sea Grant publication wins Silver Award of Distinction

Breaking Waves - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 9:00am

Oregon Sea Grant has won a Silver Award of Distinction in the 2016 Communicator Awards competition, for its field guide Key Aquatic Invasive Species Watch: Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris in the Eastern Pacific.

According to the Communicator Awards’ website, the competition is sanctioned and judged by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts, “an invitation-only group consisting of top-tier professionals from acclaimed media, communications, advertising, creative and marketing firms.” The competition, which receives “over 6,000 entries from companies and agencies of all sizes,” honors work that “transcends innovation and craft – work that made a lasting impact.”

The Award of Distinction is presented for “projects that exceed industry standards in quality and achievement.”

You can download a free PDF or order printed copies of Key Aquatic Invasive Species Watch here.

The post Oregon Sea Grant publication wins Silver Award of Distinction appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Sea Grant publication wins Silver Award of Distinction

Sea Grant - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 9:00am

Oregon Sea Grant has won a Silver Award of Distinction in the 2016 Communicator Awards competition, for its field guide Key Aquatic Invasive Species Watch: Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris in the Eastern Pacific.

According to the Communicator Awards’ website, the competition is sanctioned and judged by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts, “an invitation-only group consisting of top-tier professionals from acclaimed media, communications, advertising, creative and marketing firms.” The competition, which receives “over 6,000 entries from companies and agencies of all sizes,” honors work that “transcends innovation and craft – work that made a lasting impact.”

The Award of Distinction is presented for “projects that exceed industry standards in quality and achievement.”

You can download a free PDF or order printed copies of Key Aquatic Invasive Species Watch here.

The post Oregon Sea Grant publication wins Silver Award of Distinction appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

MATE ROV competition in North Bend this weekend

Breaking Waves - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 8:00am

NORTH BEND – Forty-three teams of elementary, middle school, high school and college students from across Oregon descend on the North Bend Community Pool and North Bend High Schoolthis Saturday, April 30, to try out their hand-built underwater robots in the Oregon regional section of the annual Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Remotely Operated Vehicle competition.

The event, which is open to the public, runs from 8:30 am to 4:30 p.m.

The Oregon competition is one of 24 regional contests held around the world under the coordination of the MATE Center. Top teams from upper level divisions will earn an opportunity to compete in MATE’s 15th annual international ROV competition June 23-25 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

This year’s contest highlights the role of ROVs in scientific research and exploration in the deep ocean and outer space. Students will pilot their RVs through missions designed to meet NASA-identified needs. Among other things, teams are challenged to build a robot that can survive transport to Jupiter’s moon, Europa, and operate in the ocean beneath the moon’s ice sheet to collect data and deploy instrumentation. Teams must also create a poster and be interviewed by engineering judges.

The competition promotes entrepreneurship and leadership skills by requiring students to organize their teams into a company, with each student taking on a specific roll as they design, manufacture and market their student-built robots. They must manage a project and budget, brainstorm innovative solutions and work as a team – all important workforce skills.

The Oregon Regional MATE ROV Competition is supported by numerous partners and more than 50 volunteers who serve as divers, judges and support staff. This year’s competition is sponsored by the Oregon Coast Stem Hub.

Learn more:

 

 

The post MATE ROV competition in North Bend this weekend appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

MATE ROV competition in North Bend this weekend

Sea Grant - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 8:00am

NORTH BEND – Forty-three teams of elementary, middle school, high school and college students from across Oregon descend on the North Bend Community Pool and North Bend High Schoolthis Saturday, April 30, to try out their hand-built underwater robots in the Oregon regional section of the annual Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Remotely Operated Vehicle competition.

The event, which is open to the public, runs from 8:30 am to 4:30 p.m.

The Oregon competition is one of 24 regional contests held around the world under the coordination of the MATE Center. Top teams from upper level divisions will earn an opportunity to compete in MATE’s 15th annual international ROV competition June 23-25 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

This year’s contest highlights the role of ROVs in scientific research and exploration in the deep ocean and outer space. Students will pilot their RVs through missions designed to meet NASA-identified needs. Among other things, teams are challenged to build a robot that can survive transport to Jupiter’s moon, Europa, and operate in the ocean beneath the moon’s ice sheet to collect data and deploy instrumentation. Teams must also create a poster and be interviewed by engineering judges.

The competition promotes entrepreneurship and leadership skills by requiring students to organize their teams into a company, with each student taking on a specific roll as they design, manufacture and market their student-built robots. They must manage a project and budget, brainstorm innovative solutions and work as a team – all important workforce skills.

The Oregon Regional MATE ROV Competition is supported by numerous partners and more than 50 volunteers who serve as divers, judges and support staff. This year’s competition is sponsored by the Oregon Coast Stem Hub.

Learn more:

 

 

The post MATE ROV competition in North Bend this weekend appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Get rid of unused drugs the safe way this Saturday

Breaking Waves - Wed, 04/27/2016 - 12:00pm

Saturday is National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day across the US, when law enforcement teams up with community groups to help consumers safely dispose of their unwanted prescription drugs.

While the campaign was originally launched more than six years ago to address public health and safety due to prescription drug abuse, theft and accidental poisonings, it’s  turning out to be important for the environment.

Recent studies funded by Oregon Sea Grant and others have discovered that improperly disposing of unused medicines – by flushing them down toilets or sending them to landfills – can release these drugs into the environment via waterways, where they can accumulate in the tissues of fish and other wildlife with as-yet unknown consequences.

And it’s not just narcotics that are the problem; scientists have found traces of birth control hormones, antibacterial soaps and even caffeine accumulating in fish tissues.

Even discarded pet care products and medications can contribute to the problem – and for this Drug Take-Back Day, selected drop-off spots – including the Benton County, OR. Sheriff’s Department – are accepting those products, too. Contact your closest collection spot (see below) to find out what they accept.

NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Lab and the US Environmental Protection Agency recently worked with students at the Pacific Northwest College of Art to create a set of posters using a salmon-inspired theme to encourage safer disposal of unused pharmaceuticals in Oregon, Washington and California.

During the most recent Take-Back Day, last Septembers, Americans turned in more than 350 tons of prescription drugs at more than 8,000 drop-off sites set up by the DEA and local law enforcement partners. In addition, local law enforcement agencies in many Oregon cities and counties offer year-round collection sites.

Find collection sites near you: Learn more:

 

The post Get rid of unused drugs the safe way this Saturday appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Get rid of unused drugs the safe way this Saturday

Sea Grant - Wed, 04/27/2016 - 12:00pm

Saturday is National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day across the US, when law enforcement teams up with community groups to help consumers safely dispose of their unwanted prescription drugs.

While the campaign was originally launched more than six years ago to address public health and safety due to prescription drug abuse, theft and accidental poisonings, it’s  turning out to be important for the environment.

Recent studies funded by Oregon Sea Grant and others have discovered that improperly disposing of unused medicines – by flushing them down toilets or sending them to landfills – can release these drugs into the environment via waterways, where they can accumulate in the tissues of fish and other wildlife with as-yet unknown consequences.

And it’s not just narcotics that are the problem; scientists have found traces of birth control hormones, antibacterial soaps and even caffeine accumulating in fish tissues.

Even discarded pet care products and medications can contribute to the problem – and for this Drug Take-Back Day, selected drop-off spots – including the Benton County, OR. Sheriff’s Department – are accepting those products, too. Contact your closest collection spot (see below) to find out what they accept.

NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Lab and the US Environmental Protection Agency recently worked with students at the Pacific Northwest College of Art to create a set of posters using a salmon-inspired theme to encourage safer disposal of unused pharmaceuticals in Oregon, Washington and California.

During the most recent Take-Back Day, last Septembers, Americans turned in more than 350 tons of prescription drugs at more than 8,000 drop-off sites set up by the DEA and local law enforcement partners. In addition, local law enforcement agencies in many Oregon cities and counties offer year-round collection sites.

Find collection sites near you: Learn more:

 

The post Get rid of unused drugs the safe way this Saturday appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Methodology

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Wed, 04/27/2016 - 11:17am

NOTE: This was written last week. I didn’t have time to post. Enjoy.

 

Methodology, aka implementation, monitoring, and deliveryis important. What good is it if you just gather the first findings that come to mind. Being rigorous here is just as important as when you are planning and modeling the program. So I’ve searched the last six years of blogs posts and gathered some of them for you. They are all about Survey, a form of methodology. Survey is a methodology that is often used by Extension, as it is easy to use. However, organizing the survey, getting the survey’s back, and dealing with non-response are problematic (another post, another time).

The previous posts are organized by date from the oldest to the most recent:

 

2010/02/10

2010/02/23

2010/04/09

2010/08/25

2012/08/09

2012/10/12

2013/03/13

2014/03/25

2014/04/15

2014/05/19

2015/06/29

2015/07/24

2015/12/07

2016/04/15

2016/04/21 (today’s post isn’t hyperlinked)

Just a few words on surveys today: A colleague asked about an evaluation survey for a recent conference. It will be an online survey probably using the University system, Qualtrics. My colleague jotted down a few ideas. The thought occurred to me that this book (by Ellen Taylor-Powell and Marcus Renner) would be useful. On page ten of this book, it asks for the type of information that is needed and wanted. It lists five types of possible information:

  1. Participant reaction (some measure of satisfaction);
  2. Teaching and facilitation (strengths and weaknesses of the presenter, who may (or may not) change the next time);
  3. Outcomes (what difference/benefits/intentions did the participant experience);
  4. Future programming (other educational needs/desires); and
  5. Participant background (who is attending and who isn’t can be answered here).

Thinking through these five categories made all the difference for my colleague. (Evaluation was a new area.) I had forgotten about how useful this booklet is for people being exposed to evaluation for the first time and to surveys, as well. I recommend it.

The post Methodology appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Terra + Spring 2016

Terra - Tue, 04/26/2016 - 3:31pm

Mother Whales Meet Seafloor Drilling
Pygmy blues face industrial hazards in a New Zealand gulf

In New Zealand there shines a gulf the color of indigo where whales live. Geographically, it glistens at the nexus of two islands and two seas. Politically, it sits at a different nexus, the classic clash of nature and commerce. Read More

Exclusive video
Aerial drone may show blue whale calf nursing.

Gorgeous new footage may shed light on one of the mysteries of the largest animal that ever lived: How do blue whales nurse? Read More

The Internet of Things
OSU is part of a coalition of more than 200 companies and technical supporters that develop standard interfaces for “Internet of Things” projects. Read More

A West Coast Wake-Up Call
The West Coast is a hotspot for acidification because of coastal upwelling, which brings nutrient-rich, low-oxygen and high carbon dioxide water from deep in the water column to the surface near the coast. Read More

Writing Instructor Wins Oregon Book Award
David Biespiel, an OSU instructor of English and creative writing, won an Oregon Book Award for a collection of essays from his long-running poetry column in The Oregonian. Read More

  Pulled from the Headlines

Every day, breaking news from OSU researchers makes headlines around the world. Here’s a handful of recent examples:

Picking grapes for perfect pinot means hitting the sweet spot for aroma. Biochemists Michael Qian and Fang Yuan of OSU found four aromatic compounds that hold the key to great pinot noir. Read about it in The Economist.

Hatchery and wild steelhead have stark genetic differences, a new study by Michael Blouin of OSU confirms. Get the details in Newsweek.

Fear of large predators keeps smaller animals in check. OSU forest ecologist Bill Ripple is cited in a story in The Washington Post.

 

Visit the Terra Website

Watch for the next issue of Terra magazine, which will give you a sweeping look inside the university’s extensive marine research program. You’ll visit a Corvallis lab where massive ocean-sensing equipment is designed and built. You’ll journey with us to the Pibilof Islands in the Bering Sea where vast colonies of seabirds and fur seals raise their young. You’ll learn about research underway in Oregon’s five marine reserves and hear from the fishermen who are impacted. Another story takes you to the iciest places on the planet, where scientists are collecting clues about climate change. You’ll read about the “blue economy” in Oregon and beyond and get an introduction to OSU’s fledgling Marine Studies Initiative. All of this is packaged with stunning photos and creative design to enhance your reading experience.

If you’re not yet receiving the print version of Terra magazine, email us at terra.magazine@oregonstate.edu to request a free subscription. These stories also will be available online at www.blogs.oregonstate.edu/terra in late-May.

New Research Enterprises

Oregon State University is Oregon’s leading public research university, receiving $308.9 million in research funding for fiscal year 2015. Here we highlight a few of our most recent grant-funded projects:

Dunes and Coastal Ecosystems
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: PETER RUGGIERO, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS, COLLEGE OF EARTH, OCEAN, AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES
The National Science Foundation has awarded $385,000 to Oregon State University for a study on the influence of intertidal sandbar welding on dune growth. Coastal dunes play an important role in coastal communities and ecosystems by helping to conserve native species, defend against flooding and boost local economies by attracting tourists.

Ambitious Math and Science
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: THOMAS DICK, PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS AND DEPARTMENT CHAIR, COLLEGE OF SCIENCE
The National Science Foundation has awarded nearly $1.4 million for a project called Ambitious Math and Science Teaching Fellows. The goal of the project is to support every student across racial, ethnic, gender and linguistic boundary to learn key ideas within a discipline that will in turn enable authentic problem solving.

Metals Manufacturing
PRINCIPAL INVETIGATOR: JULIE TUCKER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, MATERIALS SCIENCE PROGRAM, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
The Oregon Metals Initiative has awarded $27,500 to Oregon State University for a study on corrosion and strength optimization of multi-tool alloys.

 

Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331
541-737-1000
terranewsletter@oregonstate.edu
To unsubscribe click here

The post Terra + Spring 2016 appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

STEM Week Oregon celebrates, encourages STEM learning

Breaking Waves - Tue, 04/26/2016 - 2:00pm

May 1-8 is  STEM Week Oregon, a state-wide movement to raise awareness, celebrate and engage in activities involving science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Oregon Sea Grant’s marine education team and the Oregon Coast STEM Hub say that STEM learning is crucial to students, academic and professional success. Engaging students, families, and community members in STEM related activities will help promote the importance — and fun — of STEM!

How can you participate?

The STEM Oregon website offers these suggestions:

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Categories: OSU Extension Blogs