OSU Extension Blogs

Pacific Northwest Vegetable Association Conference & Trade Show

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 58 min ago
Wednesday, November 12, 2014 8:00 AM - Thursday, November 13, 2014 4:00 PM

Annual trade show and program for PNVA members and nonmembers.

For complete information and how to register please visit the PNVA website.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

WHOLESALE PROFITABILITY FARM TRIP

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 58 min ago
Monday, December 8, 2014 9:00 AM - Tuesday, December 9, 2014 6:00 PM

10/21 Update: ONLY 5 SPOTS LEFT
This trip is being organized by OSU Extension Small Farms and Thrive. The $25 fee is being used to offset the costs of the presentations, farm tours and van transportation arranged by OSU Extension and Thrive.  Participants are responsible for costs of their own food and lodging. Exception, lunch Tuesday at Persephone Farm is included in the $25 fee.  READ MORE...
Ever wonder if selling wholesale might be a profitable alternative or addition to your farmers market sales? Are you selling some wholesale currently but don't know you're really making money from it? Are you interested in being a solution to the food security issue in our valley? Are you interested in getting contract to grow your crops?

Monday, Dec. 8
9 am  Meet to carpool at the OSU Extension Office, 569 Hanley Rd Central Point. Travel by van to Corvallis
12 pm  lunch (bring a packed lunch)
2-4 pm  Tour Denison Farm, Corvallis
5-7 pm  Wholesale Profitability talk with Tanya Murray, OSU

Tuesday, Dec. 9
10-noon  Tour Persephone Farm
12:30-1:30 pm Lunch at Persephone Farm (provided) and discussion "Bringing It Back Home"

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 58 min ago
Tuesday, December 2, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

 For more information, contact the OSU Lane County Extension office at (541)344-5859, or stop by the office at 996 Jefferson Street in Eugene, to pick up an application.

Office hours are Monday-Thursday, 10am-1pm and 2-5pm.

Cost of session is $25.00.  Pre-registration is required.

For payment with a credit card see the website: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

 

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Nano-cellulose Based InnofreshTM Coatings for Preserving Pre- and Post-harvest Fruit Quality

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 58 min ago
Monday, December 1, 2014 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Fall 2014 Faculty Seminar Schedule, Dept. of Food Science & Technology

Presenter: Yanyun Zhao, Professor

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Disposable Electrochemical Microchip for On-Farm Detection of E.coli from Agricultural Water

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 58 min ago
Monday, November 3, 2014 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Fall 2014 Faculty Seminar Schedule, Dept. of Food Science & Technology

Presenter: Fei Hei, Postdoctoral Research Associate

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 58 min ago
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE            Contact: Brooke Edmunds

October 14, 2014                              Phone: 541-344-5859

 

[Eugene, Oregon] – The OSU Extension Service in Lane County is starting a Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series of classes. The first class “Pasture Management” will be held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014, 6-8:30 p.m. at 996 Jefferson Street, Eugene (enter on 10th at the ramp). Cost of each session is $25 per person. This class is for the small acreage landowner who is managing pasture and livestock. You will learn how to improve pasture productivity by managing soil health, fertilizing and liming, and grazing systems.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

RECIPE TO MARKET-Creating a Food Business

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 58 min ago
Saturday, November 1, 2014 10:00 AM - Saturday, November 15, 2014 5:00 PM

FLYER
The aim of this Southern Oregon four-part series is to help small farmers, local "foodies" and would-be entrepreneurs transform their passion for food into an artisan & value-added food business. The series will provide critical, useful and time saving information needed to launch a successful food business.
Oct. 15 Kick Off at the Tap Rock was a big success.  If you missed it you may still join us for the first class on Nov. 1 fro 10 am to 5 pm at the Josephine County Extension Center.  $40 for Nov. 1 only or register on line below for all 3 classes ($55)

READ THE DETAILS...

REGISTER

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

AG SQUARED-Farm Record Keeping Tool Training

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 58 min ago
Friday, November 21, 2014 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM

FLYER
This class is offered by OSU Extension Small Farms, Thrive and AgSquared to train farmers in best management practices. Learn how to use this online tool to both plan and manage an increase in production, plus keep the records needed in order to track farm growth over a period of time. Instructors: Drew Katz and David Wides, AgSquared Customer Success Team. And, Jeff Higley, a local Applegate Valley farmers will talk about his experience using AgSquared.
Location: RCC/SOU Higher Education Center
101 South Bartlett Street; Medford

REGISTER ON LINE

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Students debate wave energy at coastal conference

Breaking Waves - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 2:42pm

FLORENCE – Oregon State University Fisheries and Wildlife students exchanged arguments about whether wave energy should be supported in Oregon at last weekend’s State of the Coast conference – and  every statement had to to be backed by a scientific source.

“We are trying to emphasize critical thinking skills,” said professor Scott Heppell,  who taught the debate class. “This is not about memorizing facts, but to learn how to objectively evaluate the evidence available for any given natural resource issue and come to a rational conclusion.”

Fisheries and Wildlife students debate wave energy in Oregon at the State of the Coast Conference.

The eight students were randomly assigned to one side of the issue in class regardless of their personal opinion, and tasked with finding ways to support their arguments. The two teams of four sat at adjacent conference tables on the Florence Events Center theatre stage. Heppell started the session off with an overview of the issue to the audience of about 60 conference attendees.

Team Yes hit the ground running with data suggesting that wave energy would significantly reduce Oregon’s reliance on coal and natural gas. Jordan Ellison, one of the undergraduate students on the team, reinforced the science with an economic incentive.

“Wave energy is expected to produce thousands of engineering jobs, as well as business for the coastal communities,” she said.

Following a strong opening by their opponents, Team No retaliated with dollars and cents. Estimates vary, but the cost of one facility would be upwards of $300 million, they said.

Team Yes also made a case for establishing marine reserves  around the devices and asserted that the structure would be beneficial to marine organisms. Team No shot back with concerns about disrupted migration patterns, and an overall lack of knowledge as to how these impacts would actually play out.

“We think the ecological and economic costs of these structures outweighs the benefit,” said Michelle Huppert, a member of Team No, in her closing argument. “Really what we need is more research on the marine environment before we make these costly decisions.”

While there was no clear winner in the debate, Huppert’s view was recently corroborated by Ocean Power Technology’s decision to withdraw its support for wave energy in Oregon, citing the exorbitant cost.

OSU scientists deploy wave energy test device

Research on the environmental and economic impacts are still ongoing at OSU, however, and organizers hoped the debate would help both students and community members understand the issue as renewable resources continue to gain popularity.

“Most of these questions aren’t science question; they are societal questions,” Heppell said following the debate. “Science can answer the question: ‘if we want to have wave energy, what are the expected outcomes?’”

Both teams said the exercise taught them to look at problems objectively. The future of wave energy on the Oregon coast is uncertain, but critical thinking skills will benefit these students as they tackle other marine issues throughout their careers.

 

The post Students debate wave energy at coastal conference appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Students debate wave energy at coastal conference

Sea Grant - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 2:42pm

FLORENCE – Oregon State University Fisheries and Wildlife students exchanged arguments about whether wave energy should be supported in Oregon at last weekend’s State of the Coast conference – and  every statement had to to be backed by a scientific source.

“We are trying to emphasize critical thinking skills,” said professor Scott Heppell,  who taught the debate class. “This is not about memorizing facts, but to learn how to objectively evaluate the evidence available for any given natural resource issue and come to a rational conclusion.”

Fisheries and Wildlife students debate wave energy in Oregon at the State of the Coast Conference.

The eight students were randomly assigned to one side of the issue in class regardless of their personal opinion, and tasked with finding ways to support their arguments. The two teams of four sat at adjacent conference tables on the Florence Events Center theatre stage. Heppell started the session off with an overview of the issue to the audience of about 60 conference attendees.

Team Yes hit the ground running with data suggesting that wave energy would significantly reduce Oregon’s reliance on coal and natural gas. Jordan Ellison, one of the undergraduate students on the team, reinforced the science with an economic incentive.

“Wave energy is expected to produce thousands of engineering jobs, as well as business for the coastal communities,” she said.

Following a strong opening by their opponents, Team No retaliated with dollars and cents. Estimates vary, but the cost of one facility would be upwards of $300 million, they said.

Team Yes also made a case for establishing marine reserves  around the devices and asserted that the structure would be beneficial to marine organisms. Team No shot back with concerns about disrupted migration patterns, and an overall lack of knowledge as to how these impacts would actually play out.

“We think the ecological and economic costs of these structures outweighs the benefit,” said Michelle Huppert, a member of Team No, in her closing argument. “Really what we need is more research on the marine environment before we make these costly decisions.”

While there was no clear winner in the debate, Huppert’s view was recently corroborated by Ocean Power Technology’s decision to withdraw its support for wave energy in Oregon, citing the exorbitant cost.

OSU scientists deploy wave energy test device

Research on the environmental and economic impacts are still ongoing at OSU, however, and organizers hoped the debate would help both students and community members understand the issue as renewable resources continue to gain popularity.

“Most of these questions aren’t science question; they are societal questions,” Heppell said following the debate. “Science can answer the question: ‘if we want to have wave energy, what are the expected outcomes?’”

Both teams said the exercise taught them to look at problems objectively. The future of wave energy on the Oregon coast is uncertain, but critical thinking skills will benefit these students as they tackle other marine issues throughout their careers.

 

The post Students debate wave energy at coastal conference appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

State of the Coast Draws 200 Coastal Stakeholders

Breaking Waves - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 11:26am

FLORENCE – Roughly 200 people from around Oregon came together on Saturday at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast conference to discuss ocean change and adaption.

The conference, at the Florence Events Center, began with a welcome from Oregon Sea Grant’s director, Shelby Walker, and 9th District State Representative, Caddy McKeown. The keynote speaker was author Paul Greenberg, who informed the “fishy crowd” about the inspiration behind his best-selling books, “Four Fish” and “American Catch.”

Among the audience were students from Oregon State University and University of Oregon, along with professors, scientists, representatives from NOAA, Oregon Parks and Recreation. the Nature Conservancy, and legislators.

This year’s conference was the 10th annual of what used to be called the Heceta Head Coastal Conference. Unlike previous years, multiple break-out sessions characterized State of the Coast, a change that was met with positive feedback from participants. The morning was filled with “stage-setting talks” focused on changes the coast has experienced in the past several decades. A new component of the conference focused on food concerns, a theme reflected in a presentation by Newport’s Local Ocean restaurant owner Laura Anderson as well as in break-out sessions.

The event offered students an opportunity to share their marine-related research. Student researchers from the OSU Marine Resource Management and the U of O School of Law programs presented their poster projects to attendees who helped judge the content. The categories were effectiveness in communicating research, accessibility of the information presented, and overall design for reaching a general and diverse audience.

The afternoon allowed attendees to choose break-out sessions based on their interests. These included seafood cooking demos, a student debate on wave and wind energy by the OSU Fisheries and Wildlife department, a hands-on educational session on oysters, and a discussion of the sea star wasting syndrome that is sweeping the west coast, among others.

State of the Coast was filled with multi-faceted learning, networking, and cooperative exchange between Oregon’s coastal stakeholders. The one-day conference was concluded by 5th District State Senator Arnie Roblan, whose remarks highlighted the importance of addressing coastal change.

“We have a major need to better understand the environment we live in,” Roblan said. “This is a place where local people and the entire coast can come to learn about coastal issues.”

The post State of the Coast Draws 200 Coastal Stakeholders appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

State of the Coast Draws 200 Coastal Stakeholders

Sea Grant - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 11:26am

FLORENCE – Roughly 200 people from around Oregon came together on Saturday at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast conference to discuss ocean change and adaption.

The conference, at the Florence Events Center, began with a welcome from Oregon Sea Grant’s director, Shelby Walker, and 9th District State Representative, Caddy McKeown. The keynote speaker was author Paul Greenberg, who informed the “fishy crowd” about the inspiration behind his best-selling books, “Four Fish” and “American Catch.”

Among the audience were students from Oregon State University and University of Oregon, along with professors, scientists, representatives from NOAA, Oregon Parks and Recreation. the Nature Conservancy, and legislators.

This year’s conference was the 10th annual of what used to be called the Heceta Head Coastal Conference. Unlike previous years, multiple break-out sessions characterized State of the Coast, a change that was met with positive feedback from participants. The morning was filled with “stage-setting talks” focused on changes the coast has experienced in the past several decades. A new component of the conference focused on food concerns, a theme reflected in a presentation by Newport’s Local Ocean restaurant owner Laura Anderson as well as in break-out sessions.

The event offered students an opportunity to share their marine-related research. Student researchers from the OSU Marine Resource Management and the U of O School of Law programs presented their poster projects to attendees who helped judge the content. The categories were effectiveness in communicating research, accessibility of the information presented, and overall design for reaching a general and diverse audience.

The afternoon allowed attendees to choose break-out sessions based on their interests. These included seafood cooking demos, a student debate on wave and wind energy by the OSU Fisheries and Wildlife department, a hands-on educational session on oysters, and a discussion of the sea star wasting syndrome that is sweeping the west coast, among others.

State of the Coast was filled with multi-faceted learning, networking, and cooperative exchange between Oregon’s coastal stakeholders. The one-day conference was concluded by 5th District State Senator Arnie Roblan, whose remarks highlighted the importance of addressing coastal change.

“We have a major need to better understand the environment we live in,” Roblan said. “This is a place where local people and the entire coast can come to learn about coastal issues.”

The post State of the Coast Draws 200 Coastal Stakeholders appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

A good conference

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 2:49pm

Having just returned from the annual AEA conference (Evaluation 2014) in Denver, I am taking this moment to reflect, process, and apply.

For years my criteria for a “good” conference was the following

  • See three long time friends and spend some time catching up;
  • Meet three people I didn’t know before and would like to continue to know;
  • Get three new ideas that I can use.

I think this year’s conference was a success (despite the difficulty in identifying who was doing what when because the management corporation minimized the program in an attempt to be ecological, if excluding). If I were to ask my daughters to rate the conference on a scale of one (1) to 10 (ten), one being not “good”, 10 being “good”, I think they would have said an 8 – 8.5. (They have their own following of friends and their own interests.)

I saw and talked to three long time friends, although I missed those who have chosen not to attend AEA any more (I must be getting old) and those with whom I didn’t spend time.

I met more than three people I didn’t know before and I must say, if they are any indication (and I think they are) of the evolution of the association, the association is in good hands (even though I miss the intimacy I “grew up with”).

Most importantly, I did get at least three new ideas.

  • Competencies is a topic that evokes a lot of discussion both pro and con. One cannot talk about accreditation, certification, and credentialing without talking about competencies  (the skills and knowledge that make evaluators distinct).
  • Blogging is challenging. (I keep at it, even though.) Folks who blog about evaluation are a special lot. Blogging is probably no easy task; blogging on evaluation is challenging. It is one way to get ideas “out there”. Chris Lysy  (one of those folks I finally actually met–he is the cartoon guy) says it so eloquently in his blog post on Freshspectrum. He says it helps him stay connected with colleagues all year. He uses the metaphor of analog vs. digital (read his post). Being in the digital world is definitely challenging for a digital immigrant like me. Still I blog.
  • I thought I knew a lot about focus groups (and I do). Yet I learned new things from Michelle Revels  in her session on Focus Group  Research. Although she talked about using focus groups for collecting  research data, focus groups are a wonderful tool for gathering qualitative data for evaluation questions, too.
  • Certainly, my thinking and knowledge about needs assessments (needs as a noun, not verb) was increased. I think the fallacy is that too many people want to get it done quickly and don’t think of strengths of the target audience. Every time I do a professional development session on needs assessment with my long time friend and colleague, Jim Altschuld , I learn something about the process. This year was no different. (I really must finish his new book…)

There were other things which I have used in the last three days, for sure, and although they need to be mentioned, I’ve exceeded my self-imposed limit of 500 words.

If you went to AEA, let me know what you thought. Did you have a good conference? If so, what did you learn?

my .

molly.

The post A good conference appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

STARTING A FARM STAND

Small Farms Events - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 6:48am
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

FLYER

Considering opening a farm stand? This class will cover county regulations and fees, tips for making your stand a success and other considerations.  Producers with success ful farm stands from Easy Valley Farm and Whistling Duck will share their experiences. Also instructing: Maud Powell, OSU Extension Small Farms faculty and Kely Madding, Jackson County Planner.

REGISTER ON LINE

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

HORSES AND MUD

Small Farms Events - Sat, 10/18/2014 - 6:48am
Saturday, October 18, 2014 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM

FLYER
Protect the health of your horses and other livestock by learning how to manage winter mud and manure. Also covered will be all-weather surface construciton, horse health issues, pasture and grazing management, grant programs and much more. Instructors: Angie Boudro and Paul DiMaggio

REGISTER ON LINE

Youth 12-18 may attend for $12.50. YOUTH REGISTRATION

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

State of the Coast conference coming Oct. 25

Breaking Waves - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:16am

Students in the marine sciences and related fields have until Oct. 10 to submit posters for the 2014 State of the Coast conference, taking place Oct. 25 at the Florence Events Center in Florence, on the southern Oregon coast.

State of the Coast – formerly known as the Heceta Head Coastal Conference – invites everyone from scientists to students to industry to citizens to learn, network, and engage in the current and future state of Oregon’s marine environment. The one day conference, organized by Oregon Sea Grant, includes informative talks on current marine science and policy: El Niño, Sea Star Wasting Syndrome, Coastal Energy, Local Food on the Coast, Hazards, and more.

Join us for seafood cooking demos, hands-on learning, and fun.

The student poster session is a dedicated time when conference participants can view posters and interact with student scientists as they explain their marine-related research and results. This is a chance for students to showcase their research, gain professional experience, and network.

Oregon Sea Grant invites posters from advanced undergraduates (juniors or seniors), recent graduates and graduate students. Poster submissions are welcomed in any discipline related to issues and opportunities facing the marine environment: biology, anthropology, law, engineering, policy, chemistry, business, ecology, environmental science, management, and more!

Posters will be judged by conference participants on their effectiveness in communicating research, accessibility of the information presented, and overall design for reaching a general and diverse audience. Prizes will be awarded to the top posters.

For more information on poster submissions: http://www.stateofthecoast.com/student-posters/

Registration is $35, $25 for students and includes lunch. For more information and registration visit http://www.stateofthecoast.com/

The post State of the Coast conference coming Oct. 25 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

State of the Coast conference coming Oct. 25

Sea Grant - Wed, 10/01/2014 - 10:16am

Students in the marine sciences and related fields have until Oct. 10 to submit posters for the 2014 State of the Coast conference, taking place Oct. 25 at the Florence Events Center in Florence, on the southern Oregon coast.

State of the Coast – formerly known as the Heceta Head Coastal Conference – invites everyone from scientists to students to industry to citizens to learn, network, and engage in the current and future state of Oregon’s marine environment. The one day conference, organized by Oregon Sea Grant, includes informative talks on current marine science and policy: El Niño, Sea Star Wasting Syndrome, Coastal Energy, Local Food on the Coast, Hazards, and more.

Join us for seafood cooking demos, hands-on learning, and fun.

The student poster session is a dedicated time when conference participants can view posters and interact with student scientists as they explain their marine-related research and results. This is a chance for students to showcase their research, gain professional experience, and network.

Oregon Sea Grant invites posters from advanced undergraduates (juniors or seniors), recent graduates and graduate students. Poster submissions are welcomed in any discipline related to issues and opportunities facing the marine environment: biology, anthropology, law, engineering, policy, chemistry, business, ecology, environmental science, management, and more!

Posters will be judged by conference participants on their effectiveness in communicating research, accessibility of the information presented, and overall design for reaching a general and diverse audience. Prizes will be awarded to the top posters.

For more information on poster submissions: http://www.stateofthecoast.com/student-posters/

Registration is $35, $25 for students and includes lunch. For more information and registration visit http://www.stateofthecoast.com/

The post State of the Coast conference coming Oct. 25 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Capacity building and competencies

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Tue, 09/30/2014 - 1:12pm

Recently, I drafted a paper about a capacity building; I’ll be presenting it at the 2014 AEA conference. The example on which I was reporting was regional and voluntary; it took a dedication, a commitment from participants. During the drafting of that paper, I had think about the parts of the program; what would be necessary for individuals who were interested in evaluation and had did not have a degree. I went back to the competencies listed in the AJE article (March 2005) that I cited in a previous post. I found it interesting to see that the choices I made (after consulting with evaluation colleagues) were listed in the competencies identified by Stevahn et al., yet they list so much more. So the question occurs to me is: To be competent, to build institutional evaluation capacity are all those needed? Or can an nascent evaluator function competently having reviewed only two categories of competencies listed by Stavahn et al? The two categories on which this capacity building program was based included Systematic Inquiry (2.0) and Situational Analysis (3.0). And even then, I only addressed 2.2, 2.3, 2. 13, 2.14, 2.16, 3.1, 3.2, 3.8. Yet these do not list logic modeling as one of the competencies, unless it is housed under 3.2 (Determines program evaluability).

 

So my question is to you, reader, is what I offered in the capacity building program (Logic Modeling, Implementation, Qualitative Data Analysis and Management,  Quantitative Data Analysis and Management, Evaluation Use) essential? Is it enough? I’d really like to hear from you on this, because I really do not know. And although a summative evaluation was conducted after the program ended, I do not know what difference the program made in the lives of the participants. Whether the program had value, merit, worth? PLEASE LET ME KNOW.

Those of you who participated in the program, how has it helped you now that it has been almost two years since it ended (January 2013).

A new topic:

I will not be blogging until the week of October 20. I will be attending the Engagement Scholarship Consortium conference and AEA. I hope to see some of you at either or both.

my.

molly.

The post Capacity building and competencies appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Woodland management in the Blue Mountains

Amy Grotta's Tree Topics - Mon, 09/29/2014 - 8:47am

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension – Columbia, Washington & Yamhill Counties

Our tour hosts (left) with local Extension forestry agent Paul Oester

Last week I traveled to sunny Eastern Oregon for the OSU Extension Forestry team’s annual planning meeting. To kick things off, our group spent an afternoon with Tom and Cindy Beechinor, who are active forest landowners, Master Woodland Managers, and dedicated Extension supporters in the Blue Mountains above the town of Milton-Freewater. We toured the family’s 640-acre property and learned much about how they care for their land and some of the challenges they face. Some observations:

  • The Beechinors envy those of us here in northwest Oregon for the high productivity of our forest soils. On their site, 18-24 inch annual leader growth is “good”.
  • They also envy our access to markets. They mentioned Douglas-fir prices in the $300/MBF range. That’s about half of what it is on the west side! Log hauling costs are also a challenge, as the nearest mill is about 100 miles away.

    High elevation mixed conifer forest

  • On their land, situated about 4500 feet in elevation, grand fir is the most common species, followed by Engelmann spruce, although this is partly a result of early logging practices which removed the higher-value Douglas-fir and western larch. Today, through selective logging and replanting the Beechinors are attempting to convert the forest to a more diverse tree mix.
  • Anyone in our neck of the woods who has attempted to plant western redcedar in an area where deer and elk live can relate to the Beechinors’ situation with trying to grow western larch. They have planted thousands of seedlings, but most have not made it due to elk rubbing.
  • Speaking of elk, our hike through the woods was punctuated by the sounds of elk bugling all around us. For those of you who have not experienced this before, it is really something!
  • Maintaining the land’s value for elk and other wildlife is an important management objective, although this comes with a big challenge: wolves. So far, they have not experienced any livestock predation, but the Walla Walla wolf pack is known to come on to their land and they have seen evidence of elk kills. They have a good relationship with fish & wildlife officials, who can alert them as soon as a radio-collared wolf is tracked on their property. That way, they can move their cattle if needed. One challenge they’ve come across is that they no longer can use dogs to manage their livestock, because their cows are now so skittish from wolves that they don’t respond to domesticated dogs either.

All in all, it was an enlightening tour and a great introduction to this part of the state. There are opportunities for woodland owners to visit tree farms in other regions too, such as through OSWA’s annual meeting. I encourage you to take advantage of these opportunities to travel and learn about the diversity of issues, and commonalities, faced by small woodland owners across Oregon.

It’s 30 minutes to pavement through this country to the Beechinors’ property.

The post Woodland management in the Blue Mountains appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs