OSU Extension Blogs

DCWFN - WSU Women Involved in Agriculture Conference

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 12 min ago
Saturday, November 18, 2017 8:00 AM - 3:30 PM

The conference will be at Phoenix School of Roseburg, 3131 NE Diamond Lake Blvd, Roseburg, OR 97470.  For more informatoin click here

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Agriculture & Commercial Pesticide and Empty Container Collection Event

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 12 min ago
Saturday, November 18, 2017 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM
There will be a Agriculture & Commercial Pesticide and Empty Container Collection Event at Valley Agronomics, 13007 Downs Road, in Mt. Angel from 8:00 AM to 2:00 PM (by appointment) on November 18, 2017.

Agricultural, commercial, forestry, and institutional wastepesticides from pesticide users in Marion, Clackamas andadjacent counties will be accepted. Chemicals not included inpesticide products (e.g., fertilizers) will NOT be accepted

While the COST = FREE, you must complete an application form. More information and links to the application are available at the link.

http://oregonstate.edu/dept/nurspest/Pesticide_Collection_Event_brochure_Mt._Angel_November_2017.pdf
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Temporary Electric Fence Building Workshop

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 12 min ago
Saturday, October 21, 2017 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Attend the fence building workshop and learn how to build temporary electric fences for livestock control and management of pastures. Field location TBA.

Register on line: http://bit.ly/JacksonSmallFarms  or call 541-776-7371

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

High Tunnel Production & Marketing for the Diversified Vegetable Farm

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 12 min ago
Thursday, November 2, 2017 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM

BIG LICK FARM –942 Winston Section Rd, Winston

Big Lick Farm has been in operation for 10 years and they recently moved to a new, larger farm   location. Suzie will give a tour of her farm and discuss their diversified marketing channels and how they use high tunnels to extend their season.  Participants will have an opportunity to network over lunch.

www.biglickfarm.com

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/douglas/douglas-county-womens-farmer-network

Questions and to RSVP:

Contact Sara Runkel, Small Farms & Food Systems Coordinator

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training Course - MEDFORD

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 12 min ago
Tuesday, November 7, 2017 (all day event)

Registration cost: $25, includes PSA Grower Training manual; Certificate of Completion, morning coffee and refreshments, and lunch

Registration is required. Register by Oct. 31, 2017on-line at:  PSA Grower Training

Location:
RCC/SOU Higher Education Center
Presentation Hall
101 South Bartlett Street
Medford, OR 97501

Questions? Contact Sara Runkel: 541-672-4461 , sara.runkel@oregonstate.edu or Sue Davis: 503-807-5864, sdavis@oda.state.or.us

Who Should Attend

Fruit and vegetable growers and others interested in learning about produce safety, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule, Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs), and co-management of natural resources and food safety. The PSA Grower Training Course is one way to satisfy the FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirement outlined in § 112.22(c) that requires ‘At least one supervisor or responsible party for your farm must have successfully completed food safety training at least equivalent to that received under standardized curriculum recognized as adequate by the Food and Drug Administration.’


What to Expect at the PSA Grower Training Course

The trainers will spend approximately seven hours of instruction time covering content contained in these seven modules:

  • Introduction to Produce Safety

  • Worker Health, Hygiene, and Training

  • Soil Amendments

  • Wildlife, Domesticated Animals, and Land Use

  • Agricultural Water (Part I: Production Water; Part II: Postharvest Water)

  • Postharvest Handling and Sanitation

  • How to Develop a Farm Food Safety Plan

In addition to learning about produce safety best practices, key parts of the FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirements are outlined within each module. There will be time for questions and discussion, so participants should come prepared to share their experiences and produce safety questions.


Benefits of Attending the Course

The course will provide a foundation of Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and co-management information, FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirements, and details on how to develop a farm food safety plan. Individuals who participate in this course are expected to gain a basic understanding of:

  • Microorganisms relevant to produce safety and where they may be found on the farm

  • How to identify microbial risks, practices that reduce risks, and how to begin implementing produce safety practices on the farm

  • Parts of a farm food safety plan and how to begin writing one

  • Requirements in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule and how to meet them.

After attending the entire course, participants will be eligible to receive a certificate from the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO) that verifies they have completed the training course. To receive an AFDO certificate, a participant must be present for the entire training and submit the appropriate paperwork to their trainer at the end of the course.

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 12 min ago
Thursday, November 2, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Weed Management

Learn about management strategies for common weeds on your land.  Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 12 min ago
Thursday, October 26, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Pasture & Grazing Management

Make the most of your pasture by learning how grass plants grow, rotational grazing, nutrient and winter-time management. Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - Thu, 10/19/2017 - 2:36pm
Thursday, October 19, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Woodlands and Wildlife

Look at the woodlands and natural areas on your property and consider options to enhance and manage for healthy trees and wildlife habitat.  Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Leading Indicators – 2017

Terra - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 5:46pm

The post Leading Indicators – 2017 appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Advanced Poultry Feeding

Small Farms Events - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Advanced poultry feeding for small-scale commercial flocks.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Practical, Low-Cost Grazing Management

Small Farms Events - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 2:38pm
Monday, October 16, 2017 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Learn the basics of managing your pastures, not through costly inputs but by controlling your livestock to maximize plant health and growth. Learn about the factors that determine paddock size and fence location, temporary water systems and more.  If you have one, bring a large laminated map of your property and dry-erase markers to begin planning your fence locations.  Instructors: Gordon Jones, OSU Extension General Ag Faculty and Angela Boudro, Boudro Enterprises

Register on line: http://bit.ly/JacksonSmallFarms  or call 541-776-7371

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles

Breaking Waves - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 10:21am

10/13/17

By Tiffany Woods

A study led by a University of Oregon marine biologist has moved the seafood industry one step closer to farming gooseneck barnacles, which are a pricey delicacy in Spain and a common sight on the West Coast.

Gooseneck barnacles grow on top of adult thatched barnacles. (Photo by Julia Bingham)

Funded by Oregon Sea Grant, researchers found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab grew at rates comparable to those of their counterparts in the wild.

Led by Alan Shanks, a professor with the UO’s Charleston-based Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB), the researchers glued juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside 12 plastic tubes that were about twice the height and diameter of a can of tennis balls. Unfiltered seawater was pumped in, vigorously aerated and allowed to overflow. After a week, the barnacles began secreting their own cement.

Twice a day for eight weeks, the researchers fed the barnacles either micro-algal paste or brine shrimp eggs; a third group of barnacles was not fed anything but was left to filter food out of the seawater. Once a week the researchers measured the barnacles’ growth. Those that were fed the brine shrimp eggs outgrew the other barnacles.

Seawater is pumped into plastic tubes containing juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab at the University of Oregon as part of a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers glued the juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside the tubes. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

“The experiment has demonstrated that feeding is not dependent on high water velocities, and barnacles can be stimulated to feed using aeration and will survive and grow readily in mariculture,” Shanks said.

He added that unlike high-flow systems, his low-flow “barnacle nursery” doesn’t use as much energy or have expensive pumps to maintain, so it has the potential to decrease operating costs.

Despite the findings, the researchers are cautiously optimistic.

“While our experiment showed promise, there is still a great deal of research which needs to be done to solve some of the barriers to successful and profitable mariculture,” said research assistant Mike Thomas. “For example, inducing settlement of gooseneck barnacle larvae onto artificial surfaces has historically proven difficult and this makes the implantation of barnacles a laborious task. There are other methods of mariculture which need to be explored further for their efficacy before deciding on the best method.”

Another part of Shanks’ project involved conducting field research to see if there are enough gooseneck barnacles in southern Oregon to sustain commercial harvesting. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife allows commercial harvesting of gooseneck barnacles on jetties but not on natural rock formations. Shanks hopes the agency will be able use the results of his work when regulating their harvesting.

A juvenile gooseneck barnacle grows on an acrylic plate in a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers at the University of Oregon found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in their lab grew at rates comparable to or greater than those for species in the wild. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

Researchers used photographs and transects to estimate the barnacle populations on eight jetties in Winchester Bay, Coos Bay, Bandon, Port Orford, Gold Beach and Brookings. They estimated that there are roughly 1 billion adult and juvenile gooseneck barnacles attached to these eight jetties but only about 2 percent are of commercially harvestable size.

“Our surveys suggest that wild populations are unlikely to sustain long-term commercial harvest should the market significantly expand beyond its current size,” researcher Julia Bingham wrote in a report about the project.

She added that with the exception of jetties in Coos Bay and Winchester Bay, the other six jetties had such limited numbers of barnacles that even a “very small-scale harvest” – about 500 pounds per year per jetty – could wipe out harvestable-sized goosenecks on them in five years.

With a second round of funding from Oregon Sea Grant that was awarded in 2017, Shanks and Aaron Galloway, an aquatic ecologist at the OIMB, are continuing the research. Their new work includes:

  • studying how long it takes for a population to return to pre-harvest densities
  • testing different glues and surfaces to see if harvested barnacles that are too small for market can be reattached to plates and returned to the ocean
  • testing out bigger tubes for rearing barnacles in the lab to make them feasible for larger-scale aquaculture
  • testing other diets, including finely minced fish waste from a seafood processing plant

Additional reporting by Rick Cooper.

The post UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles

Sea Grant - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 10:21am

10/13/17

By Tiffany Woods

A study led by a University of Oregon marine biologist has moved the seafood industry one step closer to farming gooseneck barnacles, which are a pricey delicacy in Spain and a common sight on the West Coast.

Gooseneck barnacles grow on top of adult thatched barnacles. (Photo by Julia Bingham)

Funded by Oregon Sea Grant, researchers found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab grew at rates comparable to those of their counterparts in the wild.

Led by Alan Shanks, a professor with the UO’s Charleston-based Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB), the researchers glued juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside 12 plastic tubes that were about twice the height and diameter of a can of tennis balls. Unfiltered seawater was pumped in, vigorously aerated and allowed to overflow. After a week, the barnacles began secreting their own cement.

Twice a day for eight weeks, the researchers fed the barnacles either micro-algal paste or brine shrimp eggs; a third group of barnacles was not fed anything but was left to filter food out of the seawater. Once a week the researchers measured the barnacles’ growth. Those that were fed the brine shrimp eggs outgrew the other barnacles.

Seawater is pumped into plastic tubes containing juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab at the University of Oregon as part of a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers glued the juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside the tubes. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

“The experiment has demonstrated that feeding is not dependent on high water velocities, and barnacles can be stimulated to feed using aeration and will survive and grow readily in mariculture,” Shanks said.

He added that unlike high-flow systems, his low-flow “barnacle nursery” doesn’t use as much energy or have expensive pumps to maintain, so it has the potential to decrease operating costs.

Despite the findings, the researchers are cautiously optimistic.

“While our experiment showed promise, there is still a great deal of research which needs to be done to solve some of the barriers to successful and profitable mariculture,” said research assistant Mike Thomas. “For example, inducing settlement of gooseneck barnacle larvae onto artificial surfaces has historically proven difficult and this makes the implantation of barnacles a laborious task. There are other methods of mariculture which need to be explored further for their efficacy before deciding on the best method.”

Another part of Shanks’ project involved conducting field research to see if there are enough gooseneck barnacles in southern Oregon to sustain commercial harvesting. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife allows commercial harvesting of gooseneck barnacles on jetties but not on natural rock formations. Shanks hopes the agency will be able use the results of his work when regulating their harvesting.

A juvenile gooseneck barnacle grows on an acrylic plate in a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers at the University of Oregon found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in their lab grew at rates comparable to or greater than those for species in the wild. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

Researchers used photographs and transects to estimate the barnacle populations on eight jetties in Winchester Bay, Coos Bay, Bandon, Port Orford, Gold Beach and Brookings. They estimated that there are roughly 1 billion adult and juvenile gooseneck barnacles attached to these eight jetties but only about 2 percent are of commercially harvestable size.

“Our surveys suggest that wild populations are unlikely to sustain long-term commercial harvest should the market significantly expand beyond its current size,” researcher Julia Bingham wrote in a report about the project.

She added that with the exception of jetties in Coos Bay and Winchester Bay, the other six jetties had such limited numbers of barnacles that even a “very small-scale harvest” – about 500 pounds per year per jetty – could wipe out harvestable-sized goosenecks on them in five years.

With a second round of funding from Oregon Sea Grant that was awarded in 2017, Shanks and Aaron Galloway, an aquatic ecologist at the OIMB, are continuing the research. Their new work includes:

  • studying how long it takes for a population to return to pre-harvest densities
  • testing different glues and surfaces to see if harvested barnacles that are too small for market can be reattached to plates and returned to the ocean
  • testing out bigger tubes for rearing barnacles in the lab to make them feasible for larger-scale aquaculture
  • testing other diets, including finely minced fish waste from a seafood processing plant

Additional reporting by Rick Cooper.

The post UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence

Breaking Waves - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 8:45am

10-13-17

By Tiffany Woods

Registration has opened for Oregon Sea Grant’s annual State of the Coast conference, which will be held Oct. 28 in Florence.

Shelby Walker addresses the audience at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference at Gleneden Beach in 2016. She is the director of Oregon Sea Grant. (Photo by Charles Robinson)

Billed as Oregon’s coastal conference for everyone, the event aims to bring together the public, scientists, fishermen, resource managers, teachers, students and conservationists. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn, network and talk about the current status and future of Oregon’s marine environment.

The keynote speaker will be Rick Spinrad, the chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from 2014 to January 2017. He was also the vice president of research at Oregon State University from 2010 to 2014.

Under this year’s theme of “innovation,” presentations and hands-on activities will include the following topics:

  • invasive European green crabs
  • pyrosomes, the jelly-like, tube-shaped organisms that were seen off the Oregon coast in unusually large numbers this year
  • coastal governance and coastal-related legislation
  • the science behind fresh and frozen seafood
  • innovations in observing marine mammals
  • marine gear and technology
  • engaging communities in art
  • tracking local and global seafood across the supply chain
  • forecasting ocean conditions for recreation, profit and safety
  • managing estuaries for everyone

Marie Kowalski, a former master’s student at Oregon State University, talks about her research on mitigating microplastics at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference in Coos Bay in 2015. (Photo by Anne Farrell-Matthews)

Additionally, students from various universities in Oregon will talk about their coastal research. Also, a coastal chef will demonstrate how to prepare various types of seafood.

Registration in advance is recommended as space is limited. Cost is $35 for the public and $25 for students. It includes refreshments, lunch and a raffle ticket. The conference begins at 8:30 a.m. and concludes with a reception that starts at 4 p.m. For more information and to register, visit www.stateofthecoast.com. The event will take place at the Florence Events Center at 715 Quince St.

The post ‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence

Sea Grant - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 8:45am

10-13-17

By Tiffany Woods

Registration has opened for Oregon Sea Grant’s annual State of the Coast conference, which will be held Oct. 28 in Florence.

Shelby Walker addresses the audience at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference at Gleneden Beach in 2016. She is the director of Oregon Sea Grant. (Photo by Charles Robinson)

Billed as Oregon’s coastal conference for everyone, the event aims to bring together the public, scientists, fishermen, resource managers, teachers, students and conservationists. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn, network and talk about the current status and future of Oregon’s marine environment.

The keynote speaker will be Rick Spinrad, the chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from 2014 to January 2017. He was also the vice president of research at Oregon State University from 2010 to 2014.

Under this year’s theme of “innovation,” presentations and hands-on activities will include the following topics:

  • invasive European green crabs
  • pyrosomes, the jelly-like, tube-shaped organisms that were seen off the Oregon coast in unusually large numbers this year
  • coastal governance and coastal-related legislation
  • the science behind fresh and frozen seafood
  • innovations in observing marine mammals
  • marine gear and technology
  • engaging communities in art
  • tracking local and global seafood across the supply chain
  • forecasting ocean conditions for recreation, profit and safety
  • managing estuaries for everyone

Marie Kowalski, a former master’s student at Oregon State University, talks about her research on mitigating microplastics at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference in Coos Bay in 2015. (Photo by Anne Farrell-Matthews)

Additionally, students from various universities in Oregon will talk about their coastal research. Also, a coastal chef will demonstrate how to prepare various types of seafood.

Registration in advance is recommended as space is limited. Cost is $35 for the public and $25 for students. It includes refreshments, lunch and a raffle ticket. The conference begins at 8:30 a.m. and concludes with a reception that starts at 4 p.m. For more information and to register, visit www.stateofthecoast.com. The event will take place at the Florence Events Center at 715 Quince St.

The post ‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Managing Mud and Manure

Small Farms Events - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 2:34pm
Thursday, October 12, 2017 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

The rainy season will be here soon and livestock in small pastures, paddocks, or other confined spaces benefit from proper management of mud and manure. Now is the time to identify those areas that need treatment, such as high traffic areas and roof drip lines. Sign-up for this two part workshop to learn how to reduce mud around your cattle, sheep, horse, or other livestock pastures this year. Composting and fertilizer value of manure will also be discussed.

Oct. 12th:  6 —9 pm, Evening educational program, Lookingglass Grange Hall, Roseburg

Oct. 13th: 9 am—12 pm, Tour of ranches in the Lookingglass area (you must attend the workshop on Oct. 12th to participate in the farm tour)

Register on-line here.

or by calling the Extension Office at 541-672-4461

Instructors:

Sara Runkel, Small Farms & Food Systems, OSU Extension Service

Shelby Filley, Livestock & Forages, OSU Extension Service

Walt Barton, Hydrologist, Douglas Soil & Water Conservation District

Questions?  Contact Sara Runkel at 541-236-3049 or sara.runkel@oregonstate.edu

 

 

 

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 2:34pm
Thursday, October 12, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Wells & Septic Systems

Bring well water for nitrate screening .Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for   small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Science with a Human Face

Terra - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 3:24pm

By Nick Houtman, Terra editor

When I was a boy, I cared more about Willie Mays and the San Francisco Giants than just about anything else. My grandfather, a chemical engineer, had other ideas. He bought me a chemistry set. The metal case opened to show rows of small bottles filled with powders and solutions. There were test tubes for concocting mixtures and a kind of cookbook to guide me through the wonders of chemical reactions.

1940s Gilbert chemistry set

One year, Opa (as Dutch kids call their grandfather) gave me a 4-inch-thick edition of Van Nostrand’s Scientific Encyclopedia. He sprinkled iron filings on a piece of paper to show me how magnets work. However, despite his best efforts to inspire another scientist in the family, I followed a different path. I was attracted to ideas and events with a human face: history, politics, language — in short, the humanities.

So I pursued journalism and economics in college and worked as a reporter for a local newspaper in rural Wisconsin. I wrote stories about education and the struggling farm economy. But I was also drawn to questions about how things work: a farmer’s computerized milking system, pesticide contamination in local wells, an inventor’s claim of a perpetual motion machine.

I enjoy stories that connect people with science. I learned why the inventor’s machine would eventually stop and how a pesticide might wind up in someone’s drinking water. But while physical principles illuminate a process, it’s the human story that brings them to life.

Such stories are central to the liberal arts. In recognition of OSU150, the celebration of Oregon State’s land grant designation, this issue of Terra looks at the arts and humanities at OSU (see “From the Margins to the Center”). Gordon Gilkey was a leading figure in the drama. He led the transformation of the liberal arts from “lower division” standing to a full and equal partnership with other colleges. I expect he’d be thrilled to see OSU’s ongoing efforts to integrate the arts and humanities with science and engineering, especially plans to create the “great hall” for education and the performing arts that he envisioned.

Opa once told me that the chemists who worked for him knew their science but often lacked the writing skills to share their knowledge. Research needs to be communicated so that people can understand and appreciate the benefits. The liberal arts and the sciences need each other.

The post Science with a Human Face appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon State Earns Record $441 Million in Research Revenues

Terra - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 3:01pm
OSU researchers tested a cross-laminated timber structure in July.

In the wake of a federal grant to design and build a new regional research vessel, Oregon State University crossed the $400 million threshold in grants and contracts for the first time in the fiscal year that ended June 30.

Oregon State received $441 million from state and federal governments, businesses and foundations for research on a wide range of projects in natural resources, health, engineering and science across the state and around the world. That represents a 31 percent increase over last year’s record-breaking total of $336 million. Over the past 10 years, Oregon State’s research revenues have more than doubled.

OSU research totals took a dramatic leap in June with a $122 million grant from the National Science Foundation for a  new regional research vessel, which will be stationed at the university’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. It was the largest single grant ever received by the university.

Oregon State wave energy researchers are developing a new testing center in Newport.

Revenues from business and industry — including technology testing, sponsored contracts and licensing of innovations developed at the university — grew to $34 million last year, up 10 percent from the previous year.

OSU’s Go Baby Go program adds zip to kids with mobility limitations.

“Investment in research pays back dividends in economic growth for Oregonians. Researchers are starting new businesses and assisting established companies. Our latest success is the result of hard work and strategic decisions by our faculty and partners in business, local and state government and the federal delegation,” said Cynthia Sagers, vice president for research.

Based on past OSU research, startup companies such as Agility Robotics (animal-like robot motion), Outset Medical (at-home kidney dialysis) and Inpria (photolithography for high-performance computer chips) are attracting private investment and creating jobs. Advances in agricultural crops (winter wheat, hazelnuts, small fruits and vegetables) and forest products (cross-laminated timber panels for high-rise construction) are bolstering rural economies as well.

Since it began in 2013, the Oregon State University Advantage program has provided market analysis and support services to more than 70 local technology businesses and startup companies.

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The post Oregon State Earns Record $441 Million in Research Revenues appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Life of Beer

Terra - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 9:52am

By Nick Houtman

The next time you sip a beer with friends, consider the source: barley prompted to sprout, only to have its development arrested; yeast that turns barley sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide; hops bred to produce fragrant oils for flavor and aroma. These are the tools of the brewer’s art, which turns grain, microbes and flowers into a liquid feast.

Oregon State University assists the brewing industry by developing new varieties of barley and hops. And like chefs in a gourmet kitchen, students and faculty in OSU’s fermentation science program — key to the new $18 million Oregon Quality Food and Beverage Center being built on the Corvallis campus — collaborate with craft beer-makers on new recipes for this ancient drink.

Like all fermented foods, beer is the result of a finely tuned living process. It reflects the same biochemical principles that lead a seed to become a plant, make bread rise and enable us to savor and digest a meal.

While there are endless variations to the brewer’s art, here are the simplified steps, courtesy of Tom Shellhammer, the Nor’Wester Professor of Fermentation Science in the College of Agricultural Sciences and an internationally recognized expert in hop chemistry.

Origins: Making Malt


1. Barley soaked in water begins to germinate.

2. In the awakening seed, a hormone (gibberellin) triggers the development of enzymes within the barley that turn complex starches and proteins into nutrition — simple sugars and amino acids — for the growing embryo.

3. But before the new shoot can emerge, the maltster dries the wet grain to stop this enzymatic action and preserve it for the brewer.

4. For pale beers, the malt is lightly kilned. For darker brews, such as porters and stouts, the malt is kilned hotter and longer to develop more color and flavor.

In the Brewery — Mashing and Boiling


5. The brewer grinds the malt into a coarse grist and combines it with warm water to create a thin soup, aka mash. Sugars produced during mashing can be fermented by yeast while the remaining starches cannot. 7:3 is the average ratio of what’s fermentable to what’s non-fermentable in wort. Fermentable sugars will ultimately yield alcohol, while the non-fermentables will affect the beer’s flavor, mouthfeel and satiating quality.

6. The enzymes created during malting begin breaking down the malted barley’s starch to produce a rich broth containing sugars, amino acids and an array of compounds that provide flavor and aroma.

7. Separated from the spent grains, which are often sold off as animal feed, this liquid called wort is the foundation for the final product.

8. The brewer boils the wort to sterilize it and to extract essential oils and acids from hops, which are added as the liquid cooks. The female flower of the hop plant, Humulus lupulus, includes lupulin glands. Found deep inside the hop cone, these glands contain the oils that deliver herbal, floral, citrus and tropical aromas and acids that can pack a bitter punch in the finished beer. Boiling hops in wort produces iso-alpha acids which contribute bitterness and antimicrobial properties to beer. Brewers sometimes add hops after boiling or during fermentation in an effort to turn up the hoppy aroma while minimizing their bitter contribution in the final product.

Yeast in Time

9. Enter a single-celled microbe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the workhorse of alcoholic fermentation. With the wort cleared of all microorganisms by sterilization, yeast provides the last critical transformation, turning simple starches and sugars into ethanol at a ratio of two units of sugar to one of ethanol.

10. Yeast also produces a host of other compounds (organic acids, esters and alcohols) that lend winey, fruity and other flavors to beer. Brewers reuse their yeast from previous fermentations in a process that can take two to 10 days. Choosing one of the thousands of yeast strains is part of the art.

Editor’s note: For a thorough review of OSU’s beer-making research from barley to hops, see the fall 2017 issue of Oregon’s Agricultural Progress magazine

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