OSU Extension Blogs

OSU gets two NOAA aquaculture grants to help oyster industry and marine fish hatcheries

Sea Grant - Tue, 11/07/2017 - 1:21pm

11/7/17

by Tiffany Woods

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has awarded scientists at Oregon State University two aquaculture grants that aim to make oysters safer to eat and help hatcheries feed certain marine fish more efficiently.

Oysters filter water in a depuration tank, thus expelling potential contaminants from their tissues. (Photo by Lynn Ketchum)

The first project, funded at $150,000, aims to reduce bacteria known as Vibrio parahaemolyticus in oysters without altering their texture and consistency. Researchers plan to add naturally occurring marine probiotics, which are live or freeze-dried microbial supplements, to the seawater in depuration tanks. Depuration tanks are where oysters are sometimes held to flush out contaminants that may be in their tissues. Researchers have already isolated various marine probiotics that inhibit the growth of pathogens.

The researchers also aim to develop a dipstick containing antibodies to quickly screen adult oysters for V. parahaemolyticus. The idea is that people would not need special training or equipment to use this diagnostic tool.

Researchers aim to use marine probiotics to decrease bacteria in oysters. (Photo by Lynn Ketchum)

The leader of this two-year project is Shelby Walker, the director of Oregon Sea Grant, although the actual research will be conducted by the lab of Claudia Hase, a professor with OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine. Partners include mAbDx, an immunodiagnostics company in Eugene, Ore.; and Reed Mariculture near San Francisco.

The other grant, worth $629,000, aims to improve the nutritional value of live prey fed to California halibut, California yellowtail and southern flounder. When they’re still in their larval stage, farmed saltwater fish are typically fed tiny rotifers and brine shrimp. However, these organisms are less nutritious than copepods, which are the natural prey of many marine fish in the wild. Given this, the researchers plan to feed rotifers and brine shrimp vitamin C and taurine, an amino acid. To make sure these nutrients don’t dissolve in the seawater, the researchers will encapsulate them in bubble-like liposomes, which can have impermeable membranes.

Oregon State University’s Chris Langdon received a grant to make prey that are fed to certain farmed fish more nutritious. (Photo by Stephen Ward)

The researchers plan to:

  • determine the optimal concentrations that should be used for taurine and vitamin C,
  • evaluate how these nutrients affect the growth, survival and stress resistance of the fish,
  • develop methods to produce the liposomes on a larger scale instead of just at the laboratory level,
  • study how long-term storage affects how the liposomes retain the nutrients, and
  • determine how much it would cost to produce and store liposomes and how many liposomes would be needed to feed a certain amount of prey.

Walker will lead the three-year project, but the research will be conducted by the lab of Chris Langdon, a professor with OSU’s Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, and well as by staff at the subcontracted Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute in San Diego. Partners include the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and Reed Mariculture. Bill Hanshumaker, a marine educator with Oregon Sea Grant Extension, will be involved with outreach activities.

Oregon Sea Grant will administer the funding for both projects. They are part of 32 grants totaling $9.3 million awarded by NOAA last week to further develop the nation’s marine aquaculture industry.

“This country, with its abundant coastline, should not have to import billions of pounds of seafood each year,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “These grants will promote aquaculture projects that will help us reduce our trade deficit in this key industry.”

All projects include public-private partnerships and will be led by university-based Sea Grant programs.

“Industry is working alongside researchers on each of these projects, which will help expand businesses, create new jobs and provide economic benefits to coastal communities,” said Jonathan Pennock, the director of NOAA Sea Grant.

NOAA received 126 proposals requesting about $58 million in federal funds.

The post OSU gets two NOAA aquaculture grants to help oyster industry and marine fish hatcheries appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

‘State of the Coast’ conference draws 250 people to Florence

Breaking Waves - Fri, 11/03/2017 - 9:13am

11-3-17

About 250 people attended Oregon Sea Grant’s annual State of the Coast conference, which was held this year in Florence on Oct. 28.

Sarah Seabrook (left) explains her research to Leigh Torres during the State of the Coast conference. (Photo: Tiffany Woods)

That figure includes 40 speakers, 35 students who explained their research in a poster session, and eight exhibiting artists, said Jamie Doyle, an Oregon Sea Grant faculty member who helped organize the event. The students came from Oregon State University, Portland State University and the University of Oregon.

Rick Spinrad, a former chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and a former vice president for research at OSU, gave the keynote address.

To see photos, visit Oregon Sea Grant’s Flickr page.

The post ‘State of the Coast’ conference draws 250 people to Florence appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

‘State of the Coast’ conference draws 250 people to Florence

Sea Grant - Fri, 11/03/2017 - 9:13am

11-3-17

About 250 people attended Oregon Sea Grant’s annual State of the Coast conference, which was held this year in Florence on Oct. 28.

Sarah Seabrook (left) explains her research to Leigh Torres during the State of the Coast conference. (Photo: Tiffany Woods)

That figure includes 40 speakers, 35 students who explained their research in a poster session, and eight exhibiting artists, said Jamie Doyle, an Oregon Sea Grant faculty member who helped organize the event. The students came from Oregon State University, Portland State University and the University of Oregon.

Rick Spinrad, a former chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and a former vice president for research at OSU, gave the keynote address.

To see photos, visit Oregon Sea Grant’s Flickr page.

The post ‘State of the Coast’ conference draws 250 people to Florence appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

High Tunnel Production & Marketing for the Diversified Vegetable Farm

Small Farms Events - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:41pm
Thursday, November 2, 2017 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM

BIG LICK FARM –942 Winston Section Rd, Winston

Big Lick Farm has been in operation for 10 years and they recently moved to a new, larger farm   location. Suzie will give a tour of her farm and discuss their diversified marketing channels and how they use high tunnels to extend their season.  Participants will have an opportunity to network over lunch.

www.biglickfarm.com

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/douglas/douglas-county-womens-farmer-network

Questions and to RSVP:

Contact Sara Runkel, Small Farms & Food Systems Coordinator

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:41pm
Thursday, November 2, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Weed Management

Learn about management strategies for common weeds on your land.  Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

At the Edge of the Forest

Terra - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:25pm
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Forest-dwelling animals don’t have to live right by a road, pasture or human settlement to be affected by what scientists call forest edges. Indeed, animals up to a kilometer (0.6 miles) from an edge show a measurable impact from their proximity to areas where trees have been removed to make way for other land uses.

In the largest-ever analysis of arboreal vertebrate species — 1,673 species on five continents — an international team of researchers has found that 85 percent are either attracted to or avoid the edges of forests. For 46 percent, the response is positive; edges provide these species with the resources they need to survive.

Tapirs are among the species that are threatened by the break up of forests into smaller patches. (Photo: Adam Hadley, Oregon State University)

However, scientists are more concerned with the 39 percent that show negative effects. That’s because as intact forested landscapes diminish and become broken into smaller areas, species that prefer the deep woods face shrinking habitats and an increased threat of extinction. The findings emphasize the need for conservation programs to preserve large areas of forestland and prevent them from being divided into smaller fragments.

Adam Hadley and Urs Kormann, research associate and post-doctoral scientist respectively in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, are co-authors of a paper announcing the team’s findings in the journal Nature. Marion Pfeifer at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom is the lead author of a team of 32 researchers from the U.K, North and South America, Europe, Australia, Africa and Australia.

The study is the latest showing how the rapid fragmentation of the world’s forests is affecting animal extinctions and biodiversity. About half of the world’s forested acres are now thought to be within 500 meters — the length of five and a half football fields — of the edge of a road, pasture or other non-forest land use.

Examples of species that depend on unbroken swaths of forested landscapes include the Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica), the Bahia tapaculo (Eleoscytalopus psychopompus), the long-billed black cockatoo (Zanda baudinii) and Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii).

For this study, researchers assembled data for animal abundance across a range of mostly tropical landscapes, from open non-forested habitats to forest edges and deep within remote jungles. For each of the species included in the paper, the researchers calculated two measurements, which they call “edge influence” and “edge sensitivity,” in order to capture the complexity of relationships between species and habitats.

“I was shocked that we could find this effect for so many species going so deep into the forest,” said Hadley, who studies pollinators in forested areas of Costa Rica and Oregon. Studies of deep forest habitats are especially rare, he said, since such areas are difficult to reach. Nevertheless, the data show that edges really matter, he added. “There are few remaining areas where you don’t have intrusions into the forests, such as roads and other activities. Maybe we should consider not putting roads into them. It may be valuable just to keep them as remote as possible. There aren’t that many left.”

The study is the first to document universal patterns across many groups of animals, said Kormann. “This adds stark evidence to the idea that, if we are to conserve species diversity on this planet, there is no alternative to doing more to safeguard the last expansive tracts of rainforest.”

The study was funded by the European Research Council.

The post At the Edge of the Forest appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Hitting the Genetic Jackpot

Terra - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 4:11pm

By Dani Douglas

Your environment — including food choices, exercise habits and sun exposure — contributes the most when it comes to living to an average age. But it is your genes that determine how likely you are to live to an exceptional age.

Harold Bae, assistant professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences

“We define exceptional age as the top 1 percent survival rate in a particular birth year cohort,” says Assistant Professor Harold Bae, who investigated the role of genes on longevity in a recent study published in the Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences.

“For example, in the New England Centenarian Study, the birth year cohort is 1900. That means that males age 96 and older and females age 100 and older have reached exceptional age.”

One example of our genes’ influence on exceptional aging shows up among siblings. Male siblings of centenarians are 17 times more likely than other men born around the same time to reach 100, and female siblings are 8.5 times more likely to reach 100.

A gene debunked

Bae and his team looked closely at genetic data in the blood samples of 2,072 subjects from four centenarian studies. One of the most interesting findings was that a gene called FOX03, which the scientific community has been studying for a decade, has less of an impact on exceptional aging than previously thought.

“The definition of longevity wasn’t consistent in prior studies,” says Bae. “The data shows that as subjects got older, the effect of FOX03 went down, and there was no survival benefit over the age of 95.”

“We don’t think that it’s a single gene,” he adds. “It looks like it’s a combination of genes and that, when they work together, they’re able to push your health span closer to life span, which is related to a hypothesis introduced over 35 years ago called compression of morbidity.”

The term ”compression of morbidity” was coined by James Fries of Stanford University in 1980. He theorized that most illness is chronic and occurs later in life — and that the lifetime burden of illness could be reduced if the onset of chronic illness could be postponed.

People living to exceptional age typically have an elongated health span close to life span, meaning they live in a healthful state until just a few years before they die. Those who live an average lifespan typically have a shorter health span and suffer longer in their later years.

Control the average

The average lifespan for Americans is currently 78.8 years. The good news for the majority of the population who won’t reach exceptional longevity is that 70 percent to 80 percent of normal aging is within our control in the choices we make daily for our health and well-being.

Bae cites the Seventh Day Adventists as an example. “This is a population that doesn’t engage in a lot of risky behaviors,” he says. “They don’t smoke or drink, and they eat well, and their lifespan is eight to 10 years longer than average.”

Because the healthy aging and longevity gene combination remains unknown, Bae and his team are focusing their efforts on using more advanced statistical techniques to tease meaningful results from small samples. The more they can study these prodigious individuals, the more we can learn about living the longest — and healthiest — life possible.

Calling all supercentenarians 

Living to 100 has its benefits, such as a longer health span and special words to designate the milestone.

  • A centenarian has reached 100 years old. About one in 5,000 people are centenarians.
  • Semi-supercentenarians are between the ages of 105 and 109. About one in 250,000 people reach this stage.
  • A supercentenarian is 110 years or older. About one in 5 million live this long.

According to a 2010 report published by the United States Census Bureau, the number of centenarians nationally is on the rise. In 1980, there were 32,194 centenarians, or 1.42 for every 100,000 people. In 2010, the number grew to 53,364 or 1.73 in every 100,000.

In 2010, centenarians were overwhelmingly female – 82.8 percent versus 17.2 percent male.

The post Hitting the Genetic Jackpot appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Inspiring Student Innovation

Terra - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 3:31pm

By Keith Hautala

Few things are more rewarding for graduate engineering students at Oregon State than a research partnership with a national laboratory. The highly motivated students who come to these facilities combine ambition and hard work with unique mentoring opportunities and access to the world’s most advanced scientific equipment, including supercomputers and particle accelerators.

The U.S. Department of Energy has 17 national labs scattered across the United States. These facilities are dedicated to finding innovative solutions to the world’s most urgent scientific challenges.

“Working at one of the national laboratories is a great opportunity for graduate students,” said Zdenek Dohnalek, deputy director of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. “The unique collaborative environment, state-of-the-art instrumentation and broad range of scientific expertise make for a winning combination. Students gain experience that is hard to get anywhere else.”

Ryan Frederick, a Ph.D. student in chemical engineering, used this scanning tunneling microscope system at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to study titanium dioxide clusters on graphene.

Ryan Frederick, a Ph.D. candidate in chemical engineering, spent last summer working at the national lab under Dohnalek’s supervision. His research aims at developing next-generation materials for the electronics industry — specifically, better photoresists based on inorganic metal oxide clusters.

Frederick’s project involved studying the growth of titanium dioxide clusters on graphene, which required him to become proficient in a technique called scanning tunneling microscopy. The timing couldn’t have been better; Oregon State is about to acquire a new scanning tunneling microscopy system, and Frederick has been tapped to help bring the instrument online.

“I now have a lot of experience with the technique, so I can help bring the new system to the university and train people to use it,” said Frederick.

A Better Battery

Lynza Sprowl, a Ph.D. student in chemical engineering, uses a supercomputer at the Argonne National Lab to perform computational molecular studies on battery anode chemistries.

Lynza Sprowl, who is also pursuing a Ph.D. in chemical engineering, is spending an entire year working in the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago. Sprowl focuses on the future of energy, particularly battery and fuel cell technologies. Her doctoral research delves into surface interactions that drive the chemical processes of catalysis and corrosion.

Sprowl’s work at Argonne, supported by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science Graduate Student Research program, involves modeling these interactions on a giant supercomputer. The national lab’s supercomputing resources enable Sprowl to accumulate data in a fraction of the time it would take back home. She’ll also have access to some of the best minds in her field.

“They have a great battery community at Argonne, so I’ll be drawing on their expertise,” said Sprowl. “Knowing that I’m doing something I really care about — that can also make a difference — is very exciting to me.”

Argonne is also home to the Advanced Photon Source, a facility that generates a massive beam of high-energy synchrotron X-rays used in various types of research. The beamline is divided among dozens of workstations. Each is occupied continuously, as investigators from around the country apply for “beam time” months in advance.

See the Flow

Environmental engineering master’s students Doug Meisenheimer and Rebecca Paustian have each made trips out to the synchrotron, where they use a technique called X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) to construct high-resolution 3-D images of multi-phase fluid flow through porous media. The technique enables them to, for example, track the movement of water, oil, and air through a sandstone aquifer. This type of research is instrumental in improving technologies for oil recovery and decontamination of drinking water reservoirs.

Doug Meiseheimer in environmental engineering used X-ray microtomography at the Argonne National Lab to construct high-resolution 3-D images of fluid flow through porous media. The technique applies to fluids such as water and oil in sand, gravel and rock.

The micro-CT workstations at Argonne are set up only three times a year, and the demand for beam time is so great that it is doled out in 48-hour increments. The tight scheduling leaves little margin for error, and there is intense pressure to make every moment count.

“We try to take shifts, but if experiments aren’t going well — or if it’s really exciting, if things are happening — we stay up most of the time,” said Meisenheimer. “I usually get maybe five hours of sleep during those 48 hours.”

In one 48-hour stint, the team can generate upwards of 2.5 terabytes of data, the equivalent of 100 Blu-Ray discs, full of high-resolution 3-D images.

The intensive, immersive environment at the synchrotron instills students with increased focus and clarity. “Condensing the project into such a short time period helped me learn quickly,” said Paustian.

Meisenheimer said that the national lab experience was truly inspirational. “It’s a huge facility. The synchrotron is 1.1 kilometers (more than a half mile) in circumference. Posters are displayed everywhere outlining current research. It’s amazing to see all the different types of work generating new ideas about what I want to do.”

_______________________________________________

See this and other stories about research partnerships in the fall 2017 issue of Momentum from the College of Engineering.

The post Inspiring Student Innovation appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - Thu, 10/26/2017 - 1:36pm
Thursday, October 26, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Pasture & Grazing Management

Make the most of your pasture by learning how grass plants grow, rotational grazing, nutrient and winter-time management. Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Now available: New issue of Oregon Sea Grant’s newsletter

Breaking Waves - Tue, 10/24/2017 - 2:26pm

October 24, 2017

The fall/winter 2017 issue of Confluence, a newsletter about Oregon Sea Grant’s research, outreach and educational programs, is now available for download. Inside this eight-page issue, you’ll find the following stories:

Gooseneck barnacles grow on top of thatched barnacles. (Photo by Julia Bingham)

Want to receive the next issue of Confluence in your email? Click here.

The post Now available: New issue of Oregon Sea Grant’s newsletter appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Leading Indicators – 2017

Terra - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 4:46pm

The post Leading Indicators – 2017 appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles

Breaking Waves - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 9:21am

10/13/17

By Tiffany Woods

A study led by a University of Oregon marine biologist has moved the seafood industry one step closer to farming gooseneck barnacles, which are a pricey delicacy in Spain and a common sight on the West Coast.

Gooseneck barnacles grow on top of adult thatched barnacles. (Photo by Julia Bingham)

Funded by Oregon Sea Grant, researchers found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab grew at rates comparable to those of their counterparts in the wild.

Led by Alan Shanks, a professor with the UO’s Charleston-based Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB), the researchers glued juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside 12 plastic tubes that were about twice the height and diameter of a can of tennis balls. Unfiltered seawater was pumped in, vigorously aerated and allowed to overflow. After a week, the barnacles began secreting their own cement.

Twice a day for eight weeks, the researchers fed the barnacles either micro-algal paste or brine shrimp eggs; a third group of barnacles was not fed anything but was left to filter food out of the seawater. Once a week the researchers measured the barnacles’ growth. Those that were fed the brine shrimp eggs outgrew the other barnacles.

Seawater is pumped into plastic tubes containing juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab at the University of Oregon as part of a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers glued the juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside the tubes. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

“The experiment has demonstrated that feeding is not dependent on high water velocities, and barnacles can be stimulated to feed using aeration and will survive and grow readily in mariculture,” Shanks said.

He added that unlike high-flow systems, his low-flow “barnacle nursery” doesn’t use as much energy or have expensive pumps to maintain, so it has the potential to decrease operating costs.

Despite the findings, the researchers are cautiously optimistic.

“While our experiment showed promise, there is still a great deal of research which needs to be done to solve some of the barriers to successful and profitable mariculture,” said research assistant Mike Thomas. “For example, inducing settlement of gooseneck barnacle larvae onto artificial surfaces has historically proven difficult and this makes the implantation of barnacles a laborious task. There are other methods of mariculture which need to be explored further for their efficacy before deciding on the best method.”

Another part of Shanks’ project involved conducting field research to see if there are enough gooseneck barnacles in southern Oregon to sustain commercial harvesting. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife allows commercial harvesting of gooseneck barnacles on jetties but not on natural rock formations. Shanks hopes the agency will be able use the results of his work when regulating their harvesting.

A juvenile gooseneck barnacle grows on an acrylic plate in a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers at the University of Oregon found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in their lab grew at rates comparable to or greater than those for species in the wild. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

Researchers used photographs and transects to estimate the barnacle populations on eight jetties in Winchester Bay, Coos Bay, Bandon, Port Orford, Gold Beach and Brookings. They estimated that there are roughly 1 billion adult and juvenile gooseneck barnacles attached to these eight jetties but only about 2 percent are of commercially harvestable size.

“Our surveys suggest that wild populations are unlikely to sustain long-term commercial harvest should the market significantly expand beyond its current size,” researcher Julia Bingham wrote in a report about the project.

She added that with the exception of jetties in Coos Bay and Winchester Bay, the other six jetties had such limited numbers of barnacles that even a “very small-scale harvest” – about 500 pounds per year per jetty – could wipe out harvestable-sized goosenecks on them in five years.

With a second round of funding from Oregon Sea Grant that was awarded in 2017, Shanks and Aaron Galloway, an aquatic ecologist at the OIMB, are continuing the research. Their new work includes:

  • studying how long it takes for a population to return to pre-harvest densities
  • testing different glues and surfaces to see if harvested barnacles that are too small for market can be reattached to plates and returned to the ocean
  • testing out bigger tubes for rearing barnacles in the lab to make them feasible for larger-scale aquaculture
  • testing other diets, including finely minced fish waste from a seafood processing plant

Additional reporting by Rick Cooper.

The post UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence

Breaking Waves - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 7:45am

10-13-17

By Tiffany Woods

Registration has opened for Oregon Sea Grant’s annual State of the Coast conference, which will be held Oct. 28 in Florence.

Shelby Walker addresses the audience at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference at Gleneden Beach in 2016. She is the director of Oregon Sea Grant. (Photo by Charles Robinson)

Billed as Oregon’s coastal conference for everyone, the event aims to bring together the public, scientists, fishermen, resource managers, teachers, students and conservationists. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn, network and talk about the current status and future of Oregon’s marine environment.

The keynote speaker will be Rick Spinrad, the chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from 2014 to January 2017. He was also the vice president of research at Oregon State University from 2010 to 2014.

Under this year’s theme of “innovation,” presentations and hands-on activities will include the following topics:

  • invasive European green crabs
  • pyrosomes, the jelly-like, tube-shaped organisms that were seen off the Oregon coast in unusually large numbers this year
  • coastal governance and coastal-related legislation
  • the science behind fresh and frozen seafood
  • innovations in observing marine mammals
  • marine gear and technology
  • engaging communities in art
  • tracking local and global seafood across the supply chain
  • forecasting ocean conditions for recreation, profit and safety
  • managing estuaries for everyone

Marie Kowalski, a former master’s student at Oregon State University, talks about her research on mitigating microplastics at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference in Coos Bay in 2015. (Photo by Anne Farrell-Matthews)

Additionally, students from various universities in Oregon will talk about their coastal research. Also, a coastal chef will demonstrate how to prepare various types of seafood.

Registration in advance is recommended as space is limited. Cost is $35 for the public and $25 for students. It includes refreshments, lunch and a raffle ticket. The conference begins at 8:30 a.m. and concludes with a reception that starts at 4 p.m. For more information and to register, visit www.stateofthecoast.com. The event will take place at the Florence Events Center at 715 Quince St.

The post ‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 12:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 12:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 8:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs