OSU Extension Blogs

March for Science Scheduled for Earth Day

Terra - Fri, 02/03/2017 - 12:18pm

By Fritz Freudenberger

On January 21, people across the world participated in the Women’s March to demonstrate support for women’s rights. Now, scientists and science enthusiasts, including those at Oregon State University, are following in their footsteps organizing a march to support science as a non-partisan issue.

Two days after the Women’s March, a Facebook group, March for Science (then named Scientists March on Washington) grew out of an idea spawned on the website Reddit. The Facebook group includes over 815,000 members, supporters of evidence-based, empirical science.

The March for Science announced through Twitter that the main event in Washington, D.C., will be held on Earth Day, April 22. Satellite marches are being planned for cities across the country, including Portland.

The group grew out of concern for what supporters see as an anti-science attitude in the federal government, especially in regard to climate change. Stressing a non-partisan commitment to aid evidence-based policy, the group and its supporters are planning the event to defend access to science.

In Oregon, the March for Science – Portland has over 7,000 members including graduate students, staff, and faculty at Oregon State University. March for Science also has a Eugene Facebook page with over 1,700 supporters.

Alejandra Sanchez is at OSU studying oceanography as a Ph.D. student in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences and plans to attend the march in Portland in hopes that it will help connect science to the public.

“I believe one of the biggest problems we have in this country — and I could argue, everywhere — is the separation of scientists and the community,” she said. “My life has been focused on science and I love it. It pains me to see we haven’t done a good job transferring our facts and excitement for it to the entire community.”

Sanchez was born in the United States but was raised in Mexico before coming back to the U.S. for graduate school. Her international background plays an important role in how she sees science studies in the U.S. To her, international students have to work, be efficient and productive but with the feeling that their place in the country is not secure.

“I’m privileged in the fact that I don’t have that fear, but I had to fight hard to get a place in this school too,” she said. “I owe it to my peers to fight for their rights, their security and their science that, in the end, is beneficial to the USA.”

The March for Science group celebrates diversity as a cornerstone to scientific success and notes that the changes in policy toward science will disproportionately affect minority scientists and advocates.

Sanchez, who also participated in the Women’s March in Portland, believes that diversity in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) fields and the nation makes for a stronger country as well.

“It’s incredible to see  stories — when you start digging more into people’s backgrounds and work — how minorities are an essential component for the advancement of science in the USA,” she said. “I feel this march is also a way to create awareness on how diversity does make us stronger and has done so for a long time now!”

This celebration of diversity is echoed in the OSU community in a letter from president Edward Ray on January 30. The letter reaffirmed the university’s commitment to its international student body and noted that OSU will remain dedicated to the diversity of its students and researchers.

“This university will remain unwavering in its commitment to inclusive excellence, social justice, diversity of all kinds and the safety of all people,” the letter reads. “These commitments are the foundation upon which we build excellence in everything we do. As your university’s president, I assure you that Oregon State University is fully committed to support students’ pursuit of their education and faculty’s work in teaching and research.”

Details for the march, such as specific locations, are yet unclear. However, organizers are planning the main event, coordinating satellite marches and maintaining Facebook and Twitter feeds for information.

Editor’s note: Fritz Freudenberger is a graduate student in the OSU College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.

The post March for Science Scheduled for Earth Day appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New videos show how to maintain sewage disposal facilities for boaters

Breaking Waves - Wed, 02/01/2017 - 1:10pm

Oregon Sea Grant’s communications team has produced eight videos that teach maintenance staff at marinas and parks how to take care of sewage disposal facilities for recreational boaters.

A need for training was identified after OSG Extension’s boating outreach coordinator, Jenny East, met with staff at various facilities, checked the equipment for wear and tear, and reported her findings to the Oregon State Marine Board (OSMB).

Each of the eight videos focuses on a specific topic and can be viewed alone or as part of two longer compilations. The combined video about pumpout stations, for example, provides tips on how to perform weekly, quarterly and annual maintenance tasks; winterize them; and troubleshoot common problems. Another video addresses similar topics but for dump stations for portable toilets.

OSG’s videographer, Vanessa Cholewczynski, shot and edited the videos; OSG managing editor, Rick Cooper, produced the music; and the OSMB provided input on scripts and the overall concept. Funding was provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Clean Vessel Act grant program.

(Photo of Jenny East by Vanessa Cholewczynski, Oregon Sea Grant)

The post New videos show how to maintain sewage disposal facilities for boaters appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New videos show how to maintain sewage disposal facilities for boaters

Sea Grant - Wed, 02/01/2017 - 1:10pm

Oregon Sea Grant’s communications team has produced eight videos that teach maintenance staff at marinas and parks how to take care of sewage disposal facilities for recreational boaters.

A need for training was identified after OSG Extension’s boating outreach coordinator, Jenny East, met with staff at various facilities, checked the equipment for wear and tear, and reported her findings to the Oregon State Marine Board (OSMB).

Each of the eight videos focuses on a specific topic and can be viewed alone or as part of two longer compilations. The combined video about pumpout stations, for example, provides tips on how to perform weekly, quarterly and annual maintenance tasks; winterize them; and troubleshoot common problems. Another video addresses similar topics but for dump stations for portable toilets.

OSG’s videographer, Vanessa Cholewczynski, shot and edited the videos; OSG managing editor, Rick Cooper, produced the music; and the OSMB provided input on scripts and the overall concept. Funding was provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Clean Vessel Act grant program.

(Photo of Jenny East by Vanessa Cholewczynski, Oregon Sea Grant)

The post New videos show how to maintain sewage disposal facilities for boaters appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

CLAY SUPPORT GROUP

Small Farms Events - Tue, 01/31/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, January 31, 2017 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

PLEASE PRE PAY AND REGISTER ONLINE AT:http://bit.ly/JacksonMG2017

$15.00 IF PAID AT THE DOOR.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

EcoFarm Conference

Small Farms Events - Sat, 01/28/2017 - 2:35pm
Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - Saturday, January 28, 2017 (all day event)
The Ecological Farming Association (EcoFarm) presents the 37th annual EcoFarm Conference January 25 - 28, 2017 in Pacific Grove, CA. As the oldest and largest organic farming event in the West, EcoFarm is a prime networking and educational hub for farmers, ranchers, distributors, retailers, activists, researchers, and educators - featuring over 70 workshops, keynote speakers, discussion groups, an exhibitor marketplace, seed swap, live entertainment, mixers, and delicious organic meals. To learn more and to register, visit www.eco-farm.org/conference.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Fruit Tree Pruning Workshop

Small Farms Events - Wed, 01/25/2017 - 2:40pm
Wednesday, January 25, 2017 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM

Professor emeritus, Ross Penhallegon has more than 50 years of orchard management experience—come learn from the best! Classes will be held rain or shine, so dress weather appropriate. There will be an opportunity for a hands-on activity after the workshops, so bring your gloves and pruners. Please register for one of the following classes.To register by phone call 541-967-3871. You may register online at http://tinyurl.com/jj57qsv, or drop by the Benton or Linn County OSU Extension Service office 

4077 SW Research Way, Corvallis (Benton)
33630 McFarland Rd, Tangent (Linn)
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 12:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 12:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 8:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs