OSU Extension Blogs

CREATING THE FARM LIFE YOU WANT

Small Farms Events - 5 min 48 sec ago
Tuesday, July 7, 2015 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Is your farm or ranch as profitable as you would like? Do you feel
constantly torn between work and family priorities? Does the treadmill seems to go faster and faster, but not bring you closer to your goals?

Holistic Management may hold the answer.  It is a decision-making framework that helps us handle the complexity of the natural systems we manage while balancing social, environmental and economic needs. We’ll discuss the model and demonstrate how it is applied in real life. This is a participatory workshop where you can immediately see how to apply the basics to your life. Couples, $30  REGISTER ON LINE

Instructor: Angela Boudro and local experts

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Blueberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - 5 min 48 sec ago
Wednesday, July 8, 2015 1:00 PM - Thursday, July 16, 2015 5:30 PM
For complete information, please view Blueberry Field Day agenda.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Last Fridays Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - 5 min 48 sec ago
Friday, July 31, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
North Willamtte Research and Extension Center Farm Tours

 

Bring a friend and come see what's going on at the farm! Learn about current research projects and other activities at NWREC.

Tours begin at 2:00 pm every final Friday of the month, beginning in May. They are usually about 1.5 hours in length and are free.

Please pre-register with Jan by calling 503-678-1264. Tours are free and limited to the first 24 attendees.

If you have a large group, such as a garden club or other organization, that would like to tour NWREC, please schedule a separate date with Jan.

Tour dates are on the following Fridays

  • July 31st
  • Aug 28th
  • Sept 25th

 Driving directions to NWREC

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Upcoming “Dock Shop” walks take the mystery out of buying fresh seafood

Breaking Waves - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 8:00am

NEWPORT – Want to learn more about the seafood caught off the Oregon coast – and have a chance to buy some while you’re at it? Join Oregon Sea Grant for a series of “Dock Shop” guided tours on July 10, 16, 22 and 28 at Newport’s commercial fishing port.

Led by Ruby Moon,  Oregon Sea Grant Extension fisheries specialist, the walks start at the entrance of Port Dock 5, across SE Bay Boulevard from Local Ocean restaurant at noon each date. They last from 1-2 hours, depending on what vessels are in port and who’s selling what.

Moon will lead the walks while talking about what seafood is in season, what local boats fish for and how, vessel types, fishing practices and sustainability.

Those interested in buying seafood should bring cash and a cooler with ice. Comfortable shoes with good traction are a must! There is no charge for taking part in the walk.

Learn more:

The post Upcoming “Dock Shop” walks take the mystery out of buying fresh seafood appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Upcoming “Dock Shop” walks take the mystery out of buying fresh seafood

Sea Grant - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 8:00am

NEWPORT – Want to learn more about the seafood caught off the Oregon coast – and have a chance to buy some while you’re at it? Join Oregon Sea Grant for a series of “Dock Shop” guided tours on July 10, 16, 22 and 28 at Newport’s commercial fishing port.

Led by Ruby Moon,  Oregon Sea Grant Extension fisheries specialist, the walks start at the entrance of Port Dock 5, across SE Bay Boulevard from Local Ocean restaurant at noon each date. They last from 1-2 hours, depending on what vessels are in port and who’s selling what.

Moon will lead the walks while talking about what seafood is in season, what local boats fish for and how, vessel types, fishing practices and sustainability.

Those interested in buying seafood should bring cash and a cooler with ice. Comfortable shoes with good traction are a must! There is no charge for taking part in the walk.

Learn more:

The post Upcoming “Dock Shop” walks take the mystery out of buying fresh seafood appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans

Breaking Waves - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 1:15pm

(This post was co-written by Kelsey Adkisson, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Fellow and Ivan Kuletz, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Intern. )
Oregon doesn’t stop at the beach. In fact, the shoreline is just the beginning of an incredibly complex and thriving marine environment full of colorful rockfish, towering kelp forests, expansive sandy flats, jagged rocky reefs, and a diversity of unique invertebrates.

To ensure this environment remains healthy and vibrant, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and Oregon Sea Grant (OSG) teamed up and developed a successful partnership that focuses on enhancing the intersection of science and management. This partnership has fostered fellowships and scholarships that support science-based resource management issues. As part of this collaboration, two OSG Fellows, Kelsey Adkisson and Ivan Kuletz, worked with ODFW on a great example of Oregon’s support for science-based ocean resource management- the Oregon Nearshore Strategy.

The Oregon Nearshore Strategy is a set of prioritized recommendations for conservation, management, and research of species and habitats that occur within state waters. Oregon’s nearshore environment is home to a vast array of species and habitats. All of which are integral components of a complex nearshore ecosystem. This ecosystem is interconnected through food webs, ocean currents, and a multitude of other biological, physical, chemical, geological and human use factors.

Originally developed in 2005, and currently undergoing a ten year revision, the Nearshore Strategy was created via a collaborative process led by ODFW. Members of the public, ocean-related businesses, recreational interests, conservation groups, government agencies, tribes, universities, and many other sectors helped contribute to the Strategy.

“At its core, the Nearshore Strategy is intended to contribute to the larger domain of marine resources management and focus actions towards priority issues and areas that have not already received the attention they deserve,” explained Caren Braby, the ODFW Marine Resources Program Manager. “Ultimately, the Strategy’s effectiveness hinges on public input, which helps shape the document, and also ensures that diverse perspectives, values, visions and concerns for the nearshore environment are represented.”

As part of the 2015 revision process, Kelsey and Ivan worked with ODFW Project Leader, Greg Krutzikowsky, to review and update the enormous body of scientific knowledge that underpins the document. This information was used to develop recommendations that support Oregon’s diversity of marine life. As Sea Grant Scholars, it was a unique experience to be part of something that is used by such a broad variety of interest groups, including federal agencies, policy makers, citizen groups, fishermen, conservation organizations, and researchers.
The Nearshore Strategy is currently undergoing public review and the update is due to be completed by October 1, 2015. Public input is essential to shaping and prioritizing resource needs for the next ten years and ODFW is seeking input on the Strategy. To review the Oregon Nearshore Strategy, provide input, or find out more about the revision process please visit the ODFW Oregon Nearshore Strategy website: (http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/nearshore/index.asp).

Learn more:

(Photo credits: Janna Nichols)

The post Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans

Sea Grant - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 1:15pm

(This post was co-written by Kelsey Adkisson, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Fellow and Ivan Kuletz, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Intern. )
Oregon doesn’t stop at the beach. In fact, the shoreline is just the beginning of an incredibly complex and thriving marine environment full of colorful rockfish, towering kelp forests, expansive sandy flats, jagged rocky reefs, and a diversity of unique invertebrates.

To ensure this environment remains healthy and vibrant, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and Oregon Sea Grant (OSG) teamed up and developed a successful partnership that focuses on enhancing the intersection of science and management. This partnership has fostered fellowships and scholarships that support science-based resource management issues. As part of this collaboration, two OSG Fellows, Kelsey Adkisson and Ivan Kuletz, worked with ODFW on a great example of Oregon’s support for science-based ocean resource management- the Oregon Nearshore Strategy.

The Oregon Nearshore Strategy is a set of prioritized recommendations for conservation, management, and research of species and habitats that occur within state waters. Oregon’s nearshore environment is home to a vast array of species and habitats. All of which are integral components of a complex nearshore ecosystem. This ecosystem is interconnected through food webs, ocean currents, and a multitude of other biological, physical, chemical, geological and human use factors.

Originally developed in 2005, and currently undergoing a ten year revision, the Nearshore Strategy was created via a collaborative process led by ODFW. Members of the public, ocean-related businesses, recreational interests, conservation groups, government agencies, tribes, universities, and many other sectors helped contribute to the Strategy.

“At its core, the Nearshore Strategy is intended to contribute to the larger domain of marine resources management and focus actions towards priority issues and areas that have not already received the attention they deserve,” explained Caren Braby, the ODFW Marine Resources Program Manager. “Ultimately, the Strategy’s effectiveness hinges on public input, which helps shape the document, and also ensures that diverse perspectives, values, visions and concerns for the nearshore environment are represented.”

As part of the 2015 revision process, Kelsey and Ivan worked with ODFW Project Leader, Greg Krutzikowsky, to review and update the enormous body of scientific knowledge that underpins the document. This information was used to develop recommendations that support Oregon’s diversity of marine life. As Sea Grant Scholars, it was a unique experience to be part of something that is used by such a broad variety of interest groups, including federal agencies, policy makers, citizen groups, fishermen, conservation organizations, and researchers.
The Nearshore Strategy is currently undergoing public review and the update is due to be completed by October 1, 2015. Public input is essential to shaping and prioritizing resource needs for the next ten years and ODFW is seeking input on the Strategy. To review the Oregon Nearshore Strategy, provide input, or find out more about the revision process please visit the ODFW Oregon Nearshore Strategy website: (http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/nearshore/index.asp).

Learn more:

(Photo credits: Janna Nichols)

The post Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Milkweed for Monarchs: does it make sense in Oregon?

Master Gardener Blog - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 4:57pm
(Originally published in the March 2015 issue of The Gardener's Pen newsletter)

Larvae (left) and adult (right) of the Monarch butterfly, Danaus plexipuss.  Photo Credit:  Dr. Jeffrey Miller, Oregon State University Professor of Entomology.

Ecology of the Monarch Butterfly, Danaus plexippus,  in the Pacific Northwest:  Monarchs are common on the east side of the Cascade Mountains, but very uncommon on the west side.  Monarch caterpillars feed on milkweed during the early summer.  Adults fly from spring to fall when they migrate south.  Found in open habitats, particularly along roadsides and fencerows. (Adapted from: Miller and Hammond, 2003. Lepidoptera of the Pacific Northwest. USDA FHTET-03-11)

Monarch butterflies are specialist insects, with specialized digestive systems and feeding behaviors that are adapted for feeding on plants in the genus Asclepias (milkweed plants).

Asclepias plants have toxic chemicals (cardiac glycosides) and a latex sap that deters most insect feeding.  Monarchs store the cardiac glycosides in their exoskeleton, which circumvents the need to metabolize these nasty chemicals and also makes them poisonous to vertebrate predators.

The latex sap of milkweeds gums up the mouthparts of many insects ~ causing them to starve.  Monarchs deal with the latex sap by clipping the veins on milkweed leaves, allowing the latex to ‘bleed out’ of the plant before they feed.

Monarch adults are migratory.  East of the Rocky Mountains, monarch butterflies fly south to overwintering sites in Mexico each the fall, and return north in the spring.  Scientists have have noted that overwintering populations of Monarchs in Mexico have significantly declined over the last two decades (Brower et al. 2012).  Three factors have been implicated in the decline of eastern monarchs:  (1) loss of forest habitat in Mexico, where the butterfly overwinters; (2) loss of breeding habitat/milkweed plants in the United States due to land development and increased use of herbicides in Roundup-Ready crop fields; (3) occasional extreme weather conditions that decrease the length of the breeding season.

Known migration routes, breeding territories and overwintering areas for Monarch butterflies.  Map reproduced courtesy of MonarchWatch.org.
Although most North American monarchs overwinter in Mexico, those that live west of the Rocky Mountains generally overwinter at one more than 300 sites along the California coast.  These monarch ‘groves’ tend to be within a few km of the ocean, which is thought to moderate temperature, and are usually protected from the elements in some fashion.  Unlike eastern monarchs, who may fly thousands of miles from Canada to Mexico, western monarchs usually migrate no more than 100 miles.  Their breeding sites are thought to range as far north as western Canada, and as far south as southern Arizona, in the mountains and foothills of California, the Pacific Northwest and the Great Basin States.  General dogma has been that monarchs may wander into southern Oregon, during their spring migration to breeding sites or their fall migration to overwintering sites in California.  But the truth is, we really don’t know that much about where western monarchs breed.

Still, many groups have advocated that Oregon gardeners plant native milkweed plants to support western monarchs ~ particularly because there has been about an 80% decline in western monarch numbers recorded from California overwintering sites since 1997.  The factors implicated in western monarch decline include:  (1) milkweed loss following prolonged drought, (2) land development that reduces overwintering habitat and/or breeding habitat, and (3) pesticide use.

Does it make sense for Oregon gardeners ~ particularly those in Western Oregon ~ to plant milkweed to support western monarchs, given that conventional dogma suggests that monarchs don’t migrate through or utilize breeding sites in Western Oregon?

I suggest that it can’t hurt for Oregon gardeners to plant milkweed in an effort to support the Western Monarch.  Although monarchs may not be common outside of southern Oregon, what little data there is suggests that monarchs may at least be migrating through ~ and in some cases may be breeding in ~ broad areas of Oregon.  What data do I have to support this assertion?


  1. A map of the known and potential monarch breeding areas in the western U.S. includes (as best as I can read) monarch breeding records in Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Harney, Lane, Benton, Washington, Multnomah, Wasco and Deschutes counties.  I do not have access to the data that was used to construct the map, but it appears as if the researchers are relying on museum records.  So, the identified breeding sites probably represent a record of a monarch specimen from a museum, which was collecting during the summer at a particular locale.  If this is true, there are records of summer monarchs in both eastern and western Oregon locales.  These may be ‘vagrants’ that wander off of their migration path, but they may also be breeding adults.
  2. The Butterflies and Moths of North America site has user-verified records (with photos) of monarchs reported for nearly every Oregon county.  I was able to access details for the three most recent sitings.  I’ve paraphrased the details of the sitings, below, so that you can see that there is evidence of monarch breeding in southern Oregon (caterpillars in Josephine County) and adult migration through the Willamette Valley (strong adult flights ~ rather than tattered-winged vagrants).
    • June 10, 2014, Benton County, OR, one adult monarch sipping nectar from showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa).
    • June 21, 2014, Black Bear Bar along a wild and scenic section of the Rogue River, OR.  Monarch caterpillars munching on showy milkweed.
    • June 20, 2014, Lane County, OR, one adult monarch flying around and sipping nectar from Buddleia.  Flight was strong and direct.  Perhaps a migrant. Over the past few years, several organizations have been promoting the planting of milkweed plants, in order to provide host plants for monarch butterflies.
  3. The adults I've seen in Oregon (Douglas County, Lane County, Linn County) have had intact wings and scales - not what I expect from strays far from their host plants/flight path.

What type of milkweed should you plant?  Opt for native milkweeds, and avoid tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica).  The Xerces Society has a wonderful publication that details the milkweed plants native to Oregon.  These include:

  • Asclepias cordifolia (purple milkweed):  scattered in south and southwest Oregon
  • Asclepias cryptoceras ssp. Davisii (Davis’ milkweed): scattered in central and eastern Oregon
  • Asclepias fascicularis (narrow-leaved milkweed):  scattered across Oregon
  • Asclepias speciosa (showy milkweed):  widespread across Oregon

You will most easily be able to find seed of Asclepias speciosa from local nurseries, who may also have Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly weed, native to the Eastern US) and Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed, native to Europe).  Asclepias tuberosa and Asclepias syriaca, like many milkweeds, can have weedy tendencies.  They are called milkWEEDS, after all.  But, with this weediness comes the potential to invade areas outside of your garden.

Thus, when selecting milkweed, try to stick to native species that are appropriate for your area ~ such as Asclepias speciosa ~ in order to limit the introduction of non-native plants in natural areas.  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Knowledge is personal

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 2:56pm

Knowledge is personal!

A while ago I read a blog by Harold Jarche. He was talking about knowledge management (the field in which he works). That field  makes the claim that knowledge can be transferred; he makes the claim that knowledge cannot be transferred.  He goes on to say that we can share (transfer) information; we can share data; we cannot share knowledge. I say once we share the information, the other person has the choice to make that shared information part of her/his knowledge or not. Stories help individuals see (albeit, briefly) others’ knowledge.

Now,  puzzling the phrase, “Knowledge is personal”.  I would say, “The only thing ‘they” can’t take away from you is knowledge.” (The corollary to that is “They may take your car, your house, your life; they cannot take your knowledge!”).

So I am reminded, when I remember that knowledge is personal and cannot be taken away from you, that there are evaluation movements and models which are established to empower people with knowledge, specifically evaluation knowledge. I must wonder, then, if by sharing the information, we are sharing knowledge? If people are really empowered? To be sure, we share information (in this case about how to plan, implement, analyze, and report an evaluation). Is that sharing knowledge?

Fetterman (and Wandersman in their 2005 Guilford Press volume*) says that “empowerment evaluation is committed to contributing to knowledge creation”. (Yes, they are citing Lentz, et al., 2005*; and Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995*., just to be transparent.) So I wonder, if knowledge is personal and known only to the individual, how can “they” say that empowerment evaluation is contributing to knowledge creation. Is it because knowledge is personal and every individual creates her/his own knowledge through that experience? Or does empowerment evaluation contribute NOT to knowledge creation but information creation? (NOTE: This is not a criticism of empowerment evaluation, only an example using empowerment evaluation of the dissonance I’m experiencing; in fact, Fetterman defines empowerment evaluation as “the use of evaluation concepts, techniques, and findings to foster improvement and self-determination”. It is only later in the volume cited that the statement of knowledge creation)

Given that knowledge is personal, it would make sense that knowledge is implicit and implicit knowledge requires interpretation to make sense of it. Hence, stories because stories can help share implicit knowledge. As each individual seeks information to become knowledge, that same individual makes that information into knowledge and that knowledge implicit.  Jarche says, “As each person seeks information, makes sense of it through reflection and articulation, and then shares it through conversation…” I would add, “and shared as information”.

Keep that in mind the next time you want to measure knowledge as part of KASA on a survey.

my .

molly.

  1. * Fetterman, D. M. & Wandersman, A. (eds.) (2005). Empowerment evaluation principles in practice. New Y0rk: Guilford Press.
  2. Lentz, B. E., Imm, P. S., Yost, J. B., Johnson, N. P., Barron, C., Lindberg, M. S. & Treistman, J. In D. M. Fetterman & A. Wandersman (Eds.), Empowerment evaluation principles in practice. New York: Guilford Press.
  3. Nonaka, I., & Takeuchi, K. (1995). The knowledge creating company. New York: Oxford University Press.

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Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

BENEFICIAL INSECTS ON THE FARM $20

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/24/2015 - 2:41pm
Wednesday, June 24, 2015 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

This class covers the basics of increasing agricultural biodiversity and how to increase it.  Topics include beneficial insects, their relationships to crop pests in both vegetable and orchard systems, information on habitat and practices northwest farmers use to keep them (and native pollinators) on the farm. Farm tour if weather permits; dress for the weather. Bring a hand lens and/or insect net if you like. 
Instructor: Gwendolyn Ellen, OSU Extension, FARM SCAPING FOR BENEFICIALS.  Integrated Plant Protection Center "IPPC", Oregon State University, Corvallis.

On line registration is closed. Please pay at the door.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Malouf Scholarship: Applicants sought

Breaking Waves - Fri, 06/19/2015 - 10:25am

Oregon Sea Grant is soliciting applications for the 2015-2016 Robert E. Malouf Marine Studies Scholarship, awarded to support  graduate students who combine societally relevant research with education or public engagement.

The deadline to apply is 5 p.m. Friday, July 20. 2015.

Applicants must be graduate students at any college or university in Oregon, working toward a degree in a field compatible with Oregon Sea Grant’s mandate and areas of interest. Disciplines may include, but are not limited to biological, geological, physical and chemical sciences; marine resource management and policy; marine resource economics; social sciences; engineering; geology; education or public health.

The scholarship’s purpose is to provide a significant contribution to students seeking advanced degrees and to contribute to building the nation’s future capacity in the marine sciences. Oregon Sea Grant plans to award two Malouf Scholarships in 2015: one to a Master’s student and one to a Ph.D. student. If funding permits, more than two scholarships may be granted.

The scholarship is named for Dr. Robert E. Malouf, Oregon Sea Grant director from 1991-2008.

For full details and to apply, visit the Oregon Sea Grant Website.

The post Malouf Scholarship: Applicants sought appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Malouf Scholarship: Applicants sought

Sea Grant - Fri, 06/19/2015 - 10:25am

Oregon Sea Grant is soliciting applications for the 2015-2016 Robert E. Malouf Marine Studies Scholarship, awarded to support  graduate students who combine societally relevant research with education or public engagement.

The deadline to apply is 5 p.m. Friday, July 20. 2015.

Applicants must be graduate students at any college or university in Oregon, working toward a degree in a field compatible with Oregon Sea Grant’s mandate and areas of interest. Disciplines may include, but are not limited to biological, geological, physical and chemical sciences; marine resource management and policy; marine resource economics; social sciences; engineering; geology; education or public health.

The scholarship’s purpose is to provide a significant contribution to students seeking advanced degrees and to contribute to building the nation’s future capacity in the marine sciences. Oregon Sea Grant plans to award two Malouf Scholarships in 2015: one to a Master’s student and one to a Ph.D. student. If funding permits, more than two scholarships may be granted.

The scholarship is named for Dr. Robert E. Malouf, Oregon Sea Grant director from 1991-2008.

For full details and to apply, visit the Oregon Sea Grant Website.

The post Malouf Scholarship: Applicants sought appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Farmscaping for Predators, Parasitic Wasps, and Native Bees on Christmas Tree Farms

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/17/2015 - 2:33pm
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM

We will be meeting at Green Valley Farm to learn about beneficial insects and native pollinators and the plants, landscapes and farming practices that support them in Oregon Christmas Tree Farms.  Your farm likely already has currently existing plants and locations that can be further exploited to provide resources beneficial insects need to remain on the farm.  Come learn about these beneficials that can aid in pest management.  The Farmscaping for Beneficials Project of the Integrated Plant Protection Center (IPPC) at Oregon State University (OSU), and the farmers at Green Valley Farm encourage all interested growers, extension personnel, consultants and conservationists to take a break with us for a period of discovery with native bees, predators and parasitic wasps Wednesday, June 17th from 10:00 to 1:00

You will learn:

what plants and practices support beneficial insects and native pollinators

how these practices might be integrated into Christmas Tree production systems

field identification, and biology of beneficial insects and native bees

state-of-the-art integrated production practices used at Green Valley Farm

 Green Valley Farm is a second-generation family farm located in the western foothills of the Oregon Cascade Mountains.

They currently have approximately 300 acres, that include Christmas trees, hay, and timber.  Noble fir, Nordman fir, Grand fir, and Scotch pine in 3 different grades are wholesaled to retail lot operators.  Having operated a retail lot in Texas 20 years ago, they have a keen understanding of the value of customer service, the intrinsic value of fresh trees and sustainable practices.  The farm is surrounded by diverse habitat and they have established grass cover in the trees.

Using Green Valley Far as our classroom we will discuss designing and enhancing on-farm habitat in and around the Christmas tree fields.  Don’t miss this unique opportunity to work with an innovative, veteran grower and bugscapers as we begin to understand and observe how the complex web of on-farm biodiversity and crop production interact right before our eyes!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

PURCHASING RURAL & SMALL FARM PROPERTY-3 class series; $45

Small Farms Events - Mon, 06/15/2015 - 2:34pm
Monday, June 15, 2015 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Many people in Jackson County dream of a small farm in the country. Buying and owning rural property comes with a host of special connsiderations. Get the facts about wells, septic systems, zoning requirements and limitations, special assessments, water and soil needs, farm product marketing restrictions, and water rights.  And learn about how to find the perfect piece of property, loan options and how the closing process works.  Each class may be attended individually, $20 each class. Instructors: Angela Boudro, Maud Powell, OSU Extension Small Farms and local experts. 
Spouse or farm partner attends for $.50 more when registering on line. Paid pre- registration is required.
All 3 classes, $45/ couples $46: REGISTER ON LINE

Class 1: REGISTER $20-Monday, June 15, 5:30 pm, Land & Legal Considerations.
Class 2: REGISTER $20-Monday, June 22, 5:30 pm, Water, Soils, Septic Systems.
Class 3: REGISTER $20-Monday, June 29, 5:30 p; Find & Finance Rural and Farm Property

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Tractor Safety and Operation for Adults

Small Farms Events - Tue, 06/09/2015 - 2:38pm
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 (all day event)

The beginner class is intended for new farmers or those looking to buy a new tractor. Instructors Marc Anderson and Derek Wells are  Master Trainers in farm equipment and safety education and are experts on equipment operation. Light snacks and water will be provided, please bring a sack lunch.

Registration fee: $50 or $90 if registering for beginner and advanced class together

http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/adult-tractor-safety-and-operation

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Mapping your forest with Google Earth and a GPS phone app

Amy Grotta's Tree Topics - Tue, 06/09/2015 - 11:56am

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension – Columbia, Washington, & Yamhill Counties

This must be the end of the road…

One of the first orders of business on the Matteson Demonstration Forest is getting to know the lay of the land.  180 acres is a lot to get to know!  As is the case with any new woodland owner, we need a map to help orient ourselves while on the property, and to keep track of where different roads and trails lead.

Eventually, the OSU College Forests staff will create a GIS map of the Matteson Forest with various spatial layers – property boundaries, roads, forest types, culverts, and so forth.  In the meantime, I’ve been using Google Earth to create my own map, adding information as I continue to explore the tract.  While in the woods, I’ve been using a GPS app on my smartphone to keep track of where I am and to record points and paths. In this article I’ll describe how I’ve been using these two applications, which I think would be useful to most woodland owners who don’t have GIS at their fingertips.

Some woodland owners are already familiar with Google Earth. For those that are not, Tristan Huff (OSU Extension Forester on the south coast) has developed a useful tutorial for landowners.  I recommend the Pro version of Google Earth, which is now available for free (a recent change).  In addition to all the standard features of Google Earth, the Pro version shows tax lot boundaries and allows you to calculate the area of a polygon that you draw.  This enabled me to draw the Matteson property boundaries on my map with reasonable accuracy, by tracing the taxlot lines.

Yellow polygon approximates the property boundary. Google Earth Pro

On a recent visit to the Matteson Forest my goal was to map the roads and trails in the southern half of the property.  Major roads stand out on the aerial photo, but walking the tract we’ve come across numerous secondary roads, trails and a small pond that are obscured by the canopy when looking at  the aerial image.

Mature timber in the southwest section obscures roads and trails in this aerial view. My iPhone GPS proved to be at least as precise as this handheld GPS receiver.

A GPS receiver can be used to map them. GPS receivers vary widely in their accuracy, especially under tree canopy; the most accurate systems are quite costly.  Even a consumer-grade GPS receiver, which might be accurate to around 50 ft under tree canopy, can cost several hundred dollars.  But, if you are one of the two-thirds of American adults that has a smartphone, you already have a GPS receiver built in.  Why not use it?

Doing some research I came across Motion X-GPS, an iPhone app available for the bargain price of 99 cents.  Motion X-GPS uses your phone’s GPS receiver to track your location.  This works in places where you don’t get a phone signal.  You can record tracks and points as you move about. You can even take photos and associate them with a place or track.

Motion X-GPS has good tutorials on their website, so I won’t go into much detail here on how to the app in the field.  Below are two screenshots from my phone, showing a waypoint and a track that I recorded.

After I was done for the day, the next step was to get these features from my phone into Google Earth.  In Motion X-GPS you can share locations, tracks and waypoints to an email address.  I simply emailed the tracks to myself.

Opening up the .kmz attachment automatically opens the feature in Google Earth.  From there I could save it to my map of the property.  Here is my Google Earth map now, with all the features that I mapped in the field imported and saved.

In summary, I give Google Earth Pro and Motion X-GPS two thumbs up.  I’ve been using the latter for biking and running as well.  To conserve my phone’s battery charge while in the field, I turned off the cellular receiver (there’s little to no cell signal on the Matteson Forest anyhow).  Using the GPS app for 90 minutes consumed about 40% of my battery.  Unfortunately, Motion X-GPS is not available for Android devices, but there are other GPS tracking apps that function similarly and are Android compatible.

The post Mapping your forest with Google Earth and a GPS phone app appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs