OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land Workshop Series

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 17 min ago
Tuesday, June 5, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are 5 classes in the series:

May 8Land Stewardship Planning

May 15 - Woodlands and Riparian Area Management

May 22 - Pasture and Manure Management

May 29 - Soils and Weeds

June 5 - Water Rights and Well Water       

Cost: $10/class, $30 for series, OR $45 for 2 farm partners 

Register online at http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/mid-valley/events  

This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Marion County and the Silverton Grange #748.  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land Workshop Series

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 17 min ago
Tuesday, May 29, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are 5 classes in the series:

May 8Land Stewardship Planning

May 15 - Woodlands and Riparian Area Management

May 22 - Pasture and Manure Management

May 29 - Soils and Weeds

June 5 - Water Rights and Well Water       

Cost: $10/class, $30 for series, OR $45 for 2 farm partners 

Register online at http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/mid-valley/events  

This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Marion County and the Silverton Grange #748.  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land Workshop Series

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 17 min ago
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are 5 classes in the series:

May 8Land Stewardship Planning

May 15 - Woodlands and Riparian Area Management

May 22 - Pasture and Manure Management

May 29 - Soils and Weeds

June 5 - Water Rights and Well Water       

Cost: $10/class, $30 for series, OR $45 for 2 farm partners 

Register online at http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/mid-valley/events  

This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Marion County and the Silverton Grange #748.  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land Workshop Series

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 17 min ago
Tuesday, May 15, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are 5 classes in the series:

May 8Land Stewardship Planning

May 15 - Woodlands and Riparian Area Management

May 22 - Pasture and Manure Management

May 29 - Soils and Weeds

June 5 - Water Rights and Well Water       

Cost: $10/class, $30 for series, OR $45 for 2 farm partners 

Register online at http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/mid-valley/events  

This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Marion County and the Silverton Grange #748.  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land Workshop Series

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 17 min ago
Tuesday, May 22, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are 5 classes in the series:

May 8Land Stewardship Planning

May 15 - Woodlands and Riparian Area Management

May 22 - Pasture and Manure Management

May 29 - Soils and Weeds

June 5 - Water Rights and Well Water       

Cost: $10/class, $30 for series, OR $45 for 2 farm partners 

Register online at http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/mid-valley/events  

This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Marion County and the Silverton Grange #748.  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

The Science of Yogurt and Fermented Dairy Products

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 17 min ago
Tuesday, May 15, 2018 - Wednesday, May 16, 2018 (all day event)
The course begins with an on-line lecture component and is followed by hands-on sessions on the OSU campus. The workshop will provide attendees with information in key areas related to milk quality and its impact on finished dairy products, product evaluation and defects, ingredients in cultured dairy products, and product processing and formulation. New this year, we are including demonstrations on impact of starter cultures, stabilizers, milk fat content, end pH, stirred vs set, incubation temperature, and more. Registration:https://dairyextension.foodscience.cornell.edu/content/0515-162018-science-yogurt-basic-level-oregon-state-university  
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Haying and Grazing Management

Small Farms Events - 5 hours 17 min ago
Tuesday, May 8, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Haying and Grazing Management  

How grass grows

Rotational grazing

Ranch Resources – water, fencing, etc.

Planning for hay harvest

Haymaking on the West Side

Presenters: Shelby Filley and Melissa Fery, OSU Extension Service

Location:  Lane Community College: 4000 E. 30th Avenue, Eugene. Building 17, Room 309

Cost per Ranch:  $15.00

For more information CLICK HERE Click HERE to Register
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Renovating Pasture and Hay Ground

Small Farms Events - Tue, 04/24/2018 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, April 24, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Renovating Pasture and Hay Ground

Determining need for renovation

Matching forages with soil conditions

Planting techniques

Presenters: Shelby Filley and Melissa Fery, OSU Extension Service

Location:  Lane Community College: 4000 E. 30th Avenue, Eugene. Building 17, Room 309

Cost:  $15.00

For more information CLICK HERE  Click HERE to Register
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Historical Truth

Terra - Mon, 04/23/2018 - 4:11pm

Before a sold-out crowd of more than 3,000 people in Portland’s Keller Auditorium on April 21, OSU historian Christopher McKnight Nichols laid out the case for the urgent power of historical knowledge.

At the TEDx Portland event, Nichols described how isolationist policies have evolved in the United States since the earliest days of the republic. During the 1930s, the term “America First,” signaled a broad popular movement that all but disappeared after the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941.

It is ironic, he noted, that after another attack on Sept. 11, 2001, following a century of increasing international engagement and leadership, the country began an inward turn reflected in the resurrection of that term.

Listen to Nichols’ presentation in this video of the event captured by KGW TV.

Nichols is an associate professor of history and Director of the Humanities Center at Oregon State University.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Robots Gone Soft

Terra - Tue, 04/17/2018 - 10:41am

By Leto Sapunar

After seeing the creations in Yigit Mengüç’s robotics lab at Oregon State University, you’d be forgiven for thinking you had wandered into a sci-fi film. Tentacle arms wave, synthetic snakes wiggle and a hanging underwater machine, at first glance, resembles a living octopus. These aren’t sights most people expect when they think of robotics. However, they are typical for researchers in mLab Robotics, the Oregon State soft robotics laboratory. Here, on the cutting edge — although there isn’t a solid edge to be found on most of these creations — the group is finding revolutionary new ways to fabricate and design robots that look and feel more like flesh than concrete.

A robotic snake slithers around obstacles. (Courtesy of mLab Robotics, Oregon State University)

Often inspired by biomimicry — the design of practical systems modeled on living organisms — soft robotic researchers look for ways to make robots safer, cheaper and more versatile than ever before. Where a conventional rigid robot arm is difficult to program, complex and expensive to fabricate, a soft robotic arm has the potential to perform the same tasks with none of those limitations. This kind of design, which is particularly useful for delicate tasks like grasping coral samples on the sea floor or handing something to an elderly person, is just one of many possible applications for soft robotic technologies.

Soft robots are made from silicone, similar to the kind used in soft phone cases or ice cube trays and sometimes infused with liquid metal gallium wires. Researchers can control the motion of these soft robotic limbs by pressurizing internal pneumatic or hydraulic channels. A tentacle with four pneumatic chambers within can flex in any direction depending on which hollow chamber is inflated with air. This principle also works to make soft robotic snakes, which can locomote in a variety of different snake “gaits” depending on how its air chambers are pressurized and de-pressurized.

Researchers made this multi-armed machine with a 3D printer. (Photo: mLab Robotics, Oregon State University)

Most current robots are designed to encounter specific environments — a wheeled robot for flat surfaces or a propeller driven underwater craft. These robots can function spectacularly in the specific circumstances they were designed for, but they often lack the versatility to do much else. Soft robots, in their elastic and dexterous forms, could offer major improvements. For instance, many living snakes can swim as well as traverse flat, rocky or sandy terrain. A soft robot made to mimic that motion, like the kind Callie Branyan, a Ph.D. candidate in the lab, is working on, can already move across flat surfaces as well as through granular media like millet seeds, sand and river rocks. It can also slither through a pipe and escape from being buried under millet seeds. Branyan is tweaking the design proportions as well, in an attempt to build thinner, faster locomoting robots. “More like a garter snake than a python,” she says, “quick and small.”

Currently, the snake’s component pieces are made using a time-consuming molding process, but the lab is actively working on perfecting silicone 3D printing methods, allowing for any device configuration to be made cheaply and quickly. Osman Dogan Yirmibesoglu, another Ph.D. candidate, is using a massive 3D printer that he built to create a meter-long octopus-like soft robotic arm. “It’s actually more powerful than an octopus arm,” he corrects, explaining that an octopus arm doesn’t do well outside of water, whereas this arm will be able to support its own weight in air. Although it won’t look much like a tentacle, the arm will be able to flex in any direction and hold its position.

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The material used is, as Yirmibesoglu puts it, “radiation transparent,” meaning it doesn’t interact strongly with most types of high-intensity radiation. This could make it preferable for radiological testing or emergency response robots for nuclear incidents. In such situations, high versatility is required to face intense radiation, pass over irregular terrain, investigate underwater reactor pools and operate controls. To find out how the material to responds to radiation, Yirmibesoglu printed samples of the silicone for Tyler Oshiro, an OSU nuclear engineering master’s student, who irradiated them in the university’s research reactor. Oshiro’s goal was to study how the mechanical properties of the silicone changed with high radiation exposure for his master’s thesis. He found the samples stiffened after exposure to very large amounts of radiation, but deal well with it overall. Oshiro finds soft robotics interesting because the field is, as he puts it, “The epitome” of finding “different ways to approach traditional problems.”

A soft, stretchable sensor embedded with liquid wire. (Photo: Hana Maiah)

Yirmibesoglu previously worked on hybrid soft sensors and is first author on the paper, “Hybrid soft sensor with embedded IMUs to measure motion,” published in IEEE Xplore in 2016. The publication outlines soft sensors made from silicone embedded with liquid-metal gallium wires. In the lab, Yirmibesoglu shows me one of the sensors and deforms the gray circuit board lattice in the middle by pressing it with his thumb. It stretches like a gummy worm but pops back into place as soon as it’s released.

As the material stretches, the small channels inside containing liquid metal become warped, making the wires thinner or thicker while the material is flexed in different ways. Because wires of different thicknesses have different electrical resistance, a computer hooked up to the electrodes can measure this value and determine how distorted the sensor is from its normal shape. This way a robot can tell where each of its limbs are. The technology has promise in other avenues like wearable electronics. The sensors are cheap, relatively light weight and versatile.

Building a silicone structure with internal channels of liquid metal isn’t easy. Previously, it required a difficult, multi-stage molding and gluing process with 2D printed liquid metal wires. However, the lab has recently devised a way to 3D print freestanding liquid metal and hopes to build a duel-headed printer, capable of constructing both the silicone body of a robot limb or sensor and its liquid metal veins simultaneously.

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Nick Bira, another Ph.D. student, is working on figuring out the design for “soft valves” to precisely control airflow used to activate the limbs of a small octopus robot. The tricky part is building smart controls for pressure that don’t rely on conventional electrical valves. Elegant design here is key. He says the lab space reached “peak awe factor” a few months ago when, on top of the usual high-ceiling workspace filled with 3D printers, squishy limbs and actuators, aquatic prototypes were floating in an underwater testing tank.

The group has been involved in several collaborative projects, most recently the paper, “Using an environmentally benign and degradable elastomer in soft robotics,” published in the International Journal of Intelligent Robotics and Applications. The project introduced an elastomer suitable for soft robotic construction which can biodegrade non-toxically.

In 2017, Mengüç wrote an overview piece on the field of soft robotics, published in American Scientist. In it, he describes the many avenues of a new and growing field such as electrorheological fluids — fluids which can change between liquid and solid based on an electric field — and the possibility of artificial muscles being implemented into future robots. Among already existing soft robot technologies, he mentions applications including maritime robots for inspection and welding, stealthy naval surveillance robots, safer industrial manufacturing robots, surgical tools like endoscopes and prosthetics or orthotics.

Yigit Menguc, far left, directs mLab Robotics at OSU. (Courtesy of mLab Robotics, Oregon State University)

He also puts the octopus center stage: “Many of my colleagues and I have chosen to take inspiration from one of the most alien mascots: the octopus. As soon as we take as our goal technology that is entirely soft, squishy, and stretchy, yet dynamic, agile, and intensely intelligent, we are forced to reevaluate what is possible.”

Mengüç also works with Oculus Rift, a virtual reality company in Seattle, but the assistant professor in Mechanical Engineering continues to direct the lab’s seven full-time grad students and commute to mLab Robotics meetings.

_________________________________

Note: Leto Sapunar is a senior in physics at Oregon State University.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Dairy Industries Conference

Small Farms Events - Wed, 04/11/2018 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, April 10, 2018 - Wednesday, April 11, 2018 (all day event)
Registration: https://www.oregondairy.org
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Weed ID and Control for Pasture and Hay Ground

Small Farms Events - Tue, 04/10/2018 - 2:37pm
Tuesday, April 10, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Weed ID and Control

Weed Biology

Weed Calendars and Mapping

Weed ID Lab Session

Matching Herbicides to Weeds

Series Info: 

Pasture and hayground inputs and management are costly activities. Strategic methods can help you get the most out of your inputs. This program covers the basics of assessing pasture and hay ground, as well as advanced concepts in management to fit your goals. Participants will be guided through custom assessments of their own land. Sign up for one or more of these classes for information on agronomic-economic approaches to your forage production and harvest management.

Presenters: Shelby Filley and Melissa Fery, OSU Extension Service

Location:  Lane Community College: 4000 E. 30th Avenue, Eugene. Building 17, Room 309

Cost:  $15.00

For more information CLICK HERE  Click HERE to Register
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New trends in dairy and food

Small Farms Events - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 2:41pm
Monday, April 9, 2018 (all day event)
Registration info TBD.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Visit to Rickreall Dairy (2018 National Outstanding Dairy Farm Sustainability Award recipient)

Small Farms Events - Mon, 04/09/2018 - 2:41pm
Monday, April 9, 2018 (all day event)
Registration info TBD.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Visitor Center at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center to fully reopen March 24

Breaking Waves - Mon, 03/19/2018 - 4:15pm

3-19-18

By Tiffany Woods and Mark Floyd

The popular public education wing of Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport will fully reopen on March 24 after closing for repairs in early December.

A giant decal of an octopus greets the public as they enter the Visitor Center at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. Oregon Sea Grant operates the Visitor Center. (Photo by Tiffany Woods)

The front part of the facility, known as the Visitor Center, reopened in February for festivities celebrating OSU’s 150th anniversary while work in the back half continued. Crews replaced the rusting, 21-year-old metal stands under many of the saltwater tanks, removed some exhibits, and created artificial rockwork modeled after real formations in Yachats.

Although the tank stands are now finished, additional renovations are ongoing and many of the tanks’ denizens are still in other locations at Hatfield. Oregon Sea Grant, which operates the Visitor Center, plans to create a “habitat” theme around the tanks so that as visitors walk through they will move from shore to shallows to deep sea. Exhibits will be created to display examples of research taking place in each of those environments, said the center’s manager, Maureen Collson.

Every year, Collson said, about 150,000 people pass through the doors of the Visitor Center, where they can touch aquatic critters in an indoor tidepool, crash simulated tsunami waves against Lego structures, or watch an aquarist feed the octopus.

A giant Pacific octopus is on display at the Visitor Center at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. This octopus was on display in 2011 but others have since replaced it. (Photo by Pat Kight)

Oregon Sea Grant commissioned an analysis in 2017 by Bruce Sorte, an economist with the OSU Extension Service, to find out the economic impact of the center. He surveyed 131 visitors and found that 39 percent said that half or more of their reason for visiting Lincoln County was to go to the center. Based on that and other numbers, he estimated that the Visitor Center annually supports $7.6 million in income for Oregonians, $13.2 million in sales for businesses in Oregon, and 156 jobs throughout the state. About three-quarters of those impacts occur in Lincoln County, Sorte said.

These figures include the salaries paid to employees at the center and a multiplier effect of those dollars, the amount of money visitors spend on food and lodging, and the household expenditures of Oregon Sea Grant employees and people who supply goods and services linked to the center.

“Since 1965, the Visitor Center has been teaching children and adults about marine science through fun, hands-on exhibits,” said Shelby Walker, the director of Oregon Sea Grant. “Although you can’t put a price tag on the value of that experience, as Bruce’s analysis shows, we can estimate the important economic contribution of the Visitor Center to Lincoln County and the state.”

The total annual cost to operate the center is $460,000, funded by the federal government, OSU and donations from visitors. The facility is staffed by Oregon Sea Grant faculty, who are assisted by more than 60 volunteers.

The Visitor Center is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. from Thursday-Monday through Memorial Day, then from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily until Labor Day.

The post Visitor Center at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center to fully reopen March 24 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Recap of the 2018 Oregon Forest Health Conference

Tree Topics - Mon, 03/05/2018 - 3:18pm

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension – Columbia, Washington, & Yamhill Counties

Last week I attended Forest Health: State of the State, a biannual conference put on by OSU College of Forestry. A packed agenda covered insects, diseases, fire, drought, invasive species, climate change, and other topics. I always look forward to this meeting as an opportunity to brush up on my knowledge of these issues. The speakers came from various backgrounds, representing the many forest ecosystems and ownership types we have across the state, and the audience was equally diverse. With that in mind, I’ve tried to distill the takeaways from the conference that seem most relevant to small woodland ownerships in northwest Oregon.

ODF conducts an annual insect and disease aerial survey. Click on the image to be taken to a short video from the air.

What is forest health, anyways?  Our own Extension Specialist Dave Shaw kicked things off by reminding us that forest health is subjective, and based on our experiences, instincts, and goals. It’s easy to agree on whether an individual tree is healthy, but forest health is less concrete.

Resilience:  A common theme across many speakers was that of resilience: that a healthy forest is one that is capable of recovering after a stressful episode, such as a drought, fire, or insect outbreak, and is still able to provide the benefits that the owner and society desire.  A.J. Kroll, a wildlife biologist from Weyerhaeuser, suggested that resilience includes maintaining the productive capacity of a site. Using coarse woody debris (CWD) to illustrate his point, he suggested that a resilient forest has the ability to produce large trees that will eventually become CWD. While he didn’t elaborate, I interpreted that to include maintaining soil quality and productivity. Austin Himes, another speaker with industry background, added that forests also must be resilient to market changes or societal pressures.

“There’s a universe of small things that rely on coarse woody debris” said A.J. Kroll. CWD retained after a clearcut will later provide shelter for long-toed salamanders, once the forest regrows. Left photo: Amy Grotta; Right photo: Kathy Munsel, Oregon Dept of Fish & Wildlife A bumble bee on a salal flower. Photo: Jim Rivers, flickr.com

Pollinators:  Maintaining populations of pollinating insects is a key to the resilience of our society: without pollinators, we wouldn’t have many of the foods that we eat every day. Jim Rivers from OSU summarized some of the new and ongoing research about the value of westside forests to native pollinators. Most of our native bees nest in the ground, and of course they need flowering plants. Therefore, the short window of approximately four years post-harvest can be very valuable for pollinators.  This is when flowering plants thrive in full sun, and there are more areas of exposed ground for nesting sites.

Beyond these big-picture concepts, there was plenty to hear about “bugs, crud, and critters” – the things that often come to mind as forest (or tree) health issues.

Insects:  Forests on the westside have far fewer insect problems than east of the Cascades. Christine Buhl from the Oregon Department of Forestry emphasized that the best management of insect pests is preventative, by maintaining vigorous trees. This includes managing the Douglas-fir beetle, our primary westside insect pest, which likes stressed trees. But, Michelle Agne, another PhD researcher pointed out that climate change may create conditions that increase Douglas-fir beetle damage in the future. That’s because with hotter, drier summers, trees will be living in more stressful conditions; and as extreme weather events such as storms become more frequent, major windthrow episodes which precipitate beetle outbreaks could become more common.

The intensity of Swiss needle cast in any given year is often weather dependent. Map: Swiss Needle Cast Cooperative

Diseases:  Swiss needle cast can be found everywhere in western Oregon, but currently it only impacts tree growth on the west side of the Coast Range and a few isolated spots in the Cascade foothills. That’s because for the fungus to thrive and spread it needs warm, moist conditions in the winter and spring like those along the foggy coast. These types of conditions are likely to be more common in the future, so Swiss needle cast severity is likely to intensify in the areas where it is currently a problem. Whether the impacted zone will expand eastward is less certain.

Invasive species:  Exotic species of plants, insects, and pathogens are introduced all the time through the commerce and transport of live plants, wood packing material (such as pallets and crates), and firewood. Some of these become invasive and create huge problems (see: sudden oak death). The Oregon Invasive Species Hotline is an easy way for anyone to submit a report of an unfamiliar plant or insect that you think might be an invasive species. An expert will review your report and respond appropriately.

Browsing animals:  There is an interesting and complicated study now in its sixth year, looking at the interaction between herbicide use in young plantations and deer and elk browse. Thomas Stokely, a PhD candidate at OSU explained the results. Some, including myself, have wondered whether reducing herbicide use after a clear-cut could help reduce deer and elk browse on seedlings, because there would be other forage for them to eat. However, in Thomas’s study, seedlings were browsed regardless of the level of herbicide application. And, where it was applied lightly, seedlings didn’t perform as well, due to the double whammy of being browsed and competition from other vegetation.

Are more trees dying in Oregon?  The perception around here may be “yes”, but the research says “no”. Forest mortality rates have remained relatively constant (around 2%) since the late 1990’s, says Andy Gray of the US Forest Service.

With that, I feel a little more educated about forest health for the time being, and I hope you do too. May your forests be healthy…and resilient.

The post Recap of the 2018 Oregon Forest Health Conference appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs