OSU Extension Blogs

Spanish Pesticide Laws & Safety

Small Farms Events - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Thursday, April 7, 2016 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Designed to prepare agriculture workers to take the State of Oregon Department of Agriculture pesticide applicator exam.   Class provides in-depth training and support for those who may be interested in pursuing pesticide applicator certification/license. 

Call: 541-917-4929 for more information and to register.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Agripreneurs

Small Farms Events - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Thursday, April 7, 2016 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

 Growing Agripreneurs is a seven month program, beginning April 7, designed for beginning farmers interested in gaining theoretical and practical knowledge
through classes, field work, marketing, food preservation, farm tours and one-on-one mentoring.

Over the course of a season, students will be exposed to all aspects of sustainable, small-scale farming.  Participants will gain extensive field experience at
OSU Extension’s Franklin Teaching Farm, growing  annual fruits and vegetables, flowers, seed crops and cover crops.  This exciting series of classes gives students an opportunity to learn from many teachers, each specializing in something different.  Participants will tour many of the most beautiful and successful small farms in our region, gaining invaluable inspiration and learning lessons from the farmers themselves. Individuals interested in pursuing a farming career will have the opportunity to experience a full farming season and receive direct consultation on their own projects. 

For more information, to visit the Franklin Teaching Farm or to apply, contact
Dana Kristal
dana.kristal@oregonstate.edu
541-776-7371, ext. 208
Applications due March 25, 2016.
Join us in the spring!
Become an Agripreneur!

This program was made possible by a grant through the Oregon Department of Agriculture. All classes held in with Rogue Farm Corp.

For more information visit
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/sorec/farms

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

West coast science panel issues report, call for action on ocean acidification, hypoxia

Breaking Waves - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 10:00am

Although ocean acidification and hypoxia are global phenomena, the US-Canada West Coast will face some of the most severe changes, with impacts extending through marine food webs and threatening ocean-dependent industries and coastal communities.

So says a report released today by a panel of 20 scientific experts from Oregon, California, Washington and British Columbia charged with summarizing what’s known about the problem and what options the region has for coping with it.

Major findings:

  • Acidification and hypoxia will have severe environmental, ecological and economic consequences for the West Coast, and will require a concerted regional focus.
  • Global carbon emissions are the dominant cause of acidification
  • There are actions that can be taken to lessen exposure to acidification, and to enhance the ability of ecosystems and organisms to cope.
  • Investing in acidification science will expand the available management options.
  • Inaction now will reduce those options and impose higher costs later.

Among the panelists are Oregon State University researchers Frances Chan, who co-chaired the group, George Waldbusser, Burke Hales and Jack Barth, all of whom have received research funding support from Oregon Sea Grant.

The panel’s report provides a comprehensive analysis, along with technical guidance for ocean program managers and a summary of foundational science about how acidification and hypoxia affect individual species, populations and ecosystems, the science needs of managers and challenges and opportunities in the realm of water quality.

Learn more:

The post West coast science panel issues report, call for action on ocean acidification, hypoxia appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

West coast science panel issues report, call for action on ocean acidification, hypoxia

Sea Grant - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 10:00am

Although ocean acidification and hypoxia are global phenomena, the US-Canada West Coast will face some of the most severe changes, with impacts extending through marine food webs and threatening ocean-dependent industries and coastal communities.

So says a report released today by a panel of 20 scientific experts from Oregon, California, Washington and British Columbia charged with summarizing what’s known about the problem and what options the region has for coping with it.

Major findings:

  • Acidification and hypoxia will have severe environmental, ecological and economic consequences for the West Coast, and will require a concerted regional focus.
  • Global carbon emissions are the dominant cause of acidification
  • There are actions that can be taken to lessen exposure to acidification, and to enhance the ability of ecosystems and organisms to cope.
  • Investing in acidification science will expand the available management options.
  • Inaction now will reduce those options and impose higher costs later.

Among the panelists are Oregon State University researchers Frances Chan, who co-chaired the group, George Waldbusser, Burke Hales and Jack Barth, all of whom have received research funding support from Oregon Sea Grant.

The panel’s report provides a comprehensive analysis, along with technical guidance for ocean program managers and a summary of foundational science about how acidification and hypoxia affect individual species, populations and ecosystems, the science needs of managers and challenges and opportunities in the realm of water quality.

Learn more:

The post West coast science panel issues report, call for action on ocean acidification, hypoxia appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Biodiversity Rocks: Art, Music and Poetry from the Farm

Small Farms Events - Sun, 04/03/2016 - 2:38pm
Sunday, April 3, 2016 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM
OSU’s Farmscaping for Beneficials Program and the Spring Creek Project are teaming up to provide an evening of farmers art inspired by the awesome, beautifulness of our Oregon farms and farmers.  Please come enjoy this  this lovely show of all the things creative our multi-talented farmers will be sharing. There will be displays of articles made from resources the farm provides such as bowls, scultures, paintings and more!  Farmers will also be performing music, poetry and spoken word. local refreshments will be served.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Don’t forget about pre-commercial thinning

Tree Topics - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 10:01am
Many aesthetic and habitat objectives of family forest landowners come with older, less dense stands like this stand of about 70 years. It is important to get on this path early.

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

In previous segments I argued that many people have too many trees in their young stands   which may be costly and harmful to the long term growth of the stand. Most importantly, having too many trees at this stage can undermine common landowner objectives of growing attractive, longer rotation diverse forest habitats and can force landowners into shorter rotations than imagined.

While this suggests that people should think about planting fewer trees per acre in the future (a step deserving some careful consideration), it highlights the need for pre-commercial thinning in many existing stands to correct overstocking at an early age. This may include your stand.

But pre-commercial thinning (PCT) seems to have fallen out of common practice lately. It has come to be seen (mistakenly, I think) as an avoidable expense rather than an important investment in the stand. An investment that begins to shape how the stand will look and behave in the future and which adds resilience and options to the landowners’ woodland portfolio.

The idea of PCT is to avoid harmful overcrowding later by removing excess trees early on. PCT lets the remaining “leave trees” grow faster and larger before serious crowding sets in. This means that trees reach a usable size sooner, and hopefully allows the very important first thinning harvest (also called a commercial thinning) to be done “on time” when the stand is in its 20’s.  This first thinning harvest  is costly and the difference between it being another  big expense for the landowner rather than breaking even or even paying some small profit, often comes down to the size of the trees harvested.  PCT is meant to ensure that this very important thinning harvest operation can pay for itself.

Ideally, young Douglas-fir stands in Western Oregon should be thinned when the dominant trees are about 15 feet tall, or about 10 years old around here.  Yikes, that seems early.  Frankly I don’t know many people who are thrilled about thinning trees they just barely got established and free to grow.  People are looking forward to the trees’ shade suppressing hated weeds like blackberries and broom and are inclined to postpone PCT until the weeds decline and the stand begins to “look crowded”.

Why thin so early? Even by the time trees are 15 feet, you can already begin to distinguish the good trees from the bad.  The trees are past browse and should be beating the weeds.  Once that has happened, the sooner you remove the extras and limit competition among trees, the stronger the beneficial effects and the less the costs of the PCT will be.  Yes, it may be possible to delay until trees are 30 feet tall, but waiting until crowns close and competition begins means a loss of some growth that you would rather have on your leave trees.  Also by the time trees look crowded to many people, it is getting very late.

Referring to the illustrations of the previous article, the recommended  timing of a PCT is meant to occur well down in the uncrowded green zone, well before competition gets going in the Goldilocks zone.   The PCT is meant to shift your stand from the right-hand column to the left-hand column, with more room and  new growth potential until it is time to you your first thinning harvest.

An earlier PCT also means it can be done more efficiently and cheaply. Small trees can be felled much more quickly with less slash building up. There is little concern about stand stability, or delayed growth response when trees are thinned early.

My point is that if an area was planted at a 10×10 spacing (440 TPA) and had good survival, the stand will get too crowded before the trees are big enough for a thinning harvest.  If that is the case, it should be PCT’ed down to at least 300 TPA, meaning you may need to remove a quarter to a third of the trees (110 to 145 TPA).  This is a lot of work, even when trees are small, which takes us to some good advice for many family forest landowners: “Thin early and thin often”.

I’ll give some strategies for thinning in a later article.

The post Don’t forget about pre-commercial thinning appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs