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WHOLESALE PROFITABILITY FARM TRIP

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 51 min ago
Monday, December 8, 2014 9:00 AM - Tuesday, December 9, 2014 6:00 PM

10/21 Update: ONLY 5 SPOTS LEFT
This trip is being organized by OSU Extension Small Farms and Thrive. The $25 fee is being used to offset the costs of the presentations, farm tours and van transportation arranged by OSU Extension and Thrive.  Participants are responsible for costs of their own food and lodging. Exception, lunch Tuesday at Persephone Farm is included in the $25 fee.  READ MORE...
Ever wonder if selling wholesale might be a profitable alternative or addition to your farmers market sales? Are you selling some wholesale currently but don't know you're really making money from it? Are you interested in being a solution to the food security issue in our valley? Are you interested in getting contract to grow your crops?

Monday, Dec. 8
9 am  Meet to carpool at the OSU Extension Office, 569 Hanley Rd Central Point. Travel by van to Corvallis
12 pm  lunch (bring a packed lunch)
2-4 pm  Tour Denison Farm, Corvallis
5-7 pm  Wholesale Profitability talk with Tanya Murray, OSU

Tuesday, Dec. 9
10-noon  Tour Persephone Farm
12:30-1:30 pm Lunch at Persephone Farm (provided) and discussion "Bringing It Back Home"

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 51 min ago
Tuesday, December 2, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

 For more information, contact the OSU Lane County Extension office at (541)344-5859, or stop by the office at 996 Jefferson Street in Eugene, to pick up an application.

Office hours are Monday-Thursday, 10am-1pm and 2-5pm.

Cost of session is $25.00.  Pre-registration is required.

For payment with a credit card see the website: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

 

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Nano-cellulose Based InnofreshTM Coatings for Preserving Pre- and Post-harvest Fruit Quality

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 51 min ago
Monday, December 1, 2014 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Fall 2014 Faculty Seminar Schedule, Dept. of Food Science & Technology

Presenter: Yanyun Zhao, Professor

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Disposable Electrochemical Microchip for On-Farm Detection of E.coli from Agricultural Water

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 51 min ago
Monday, November 3, 2014 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Fall 2014 Faculty Seminar Schedule, Dept. of Food Science & Technology

Presenter: Fei Hei, Postdoctoral Research Associate

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 51 min ago
Tuesday, November 4, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE            Contact: Brooke Edmunds

October 14, 2014                              Phone: 541-344-5859

 

[Eugene, Oregon] – The OSU Extension Service in Lane County is starting a Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series of classes. The first class “Pasture Management” will be held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014, 6-8:30 p.m. at 996 Jefferson Street, Eugene (enter on 10th at the ramp). Cost of each session is $25 per person. This class is for the small acreage landowner who is managing pasture and livestock. You will learn how to improve pasture productivity by managing soil health, fertilizing and liming, and grazing systems.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

RECIPE TO MARKET-Creating a Food Business

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 51 min ago
Saturday, November 1, 2014 10:00 AM - Saturday, November 15, 2014 5:00 PM

FLYER
The aim of this Southern Oregon four-part series is to help small farmers, local "foodies" and would-be entrepreneurs transform their passion for food into an artisan & value-added food business. The series will provide critical, useful and time saving information needed to launch a successful food business.
Oct. 15 Kick Off at the Tap Rock was a big success.  If you missed it you may still join us for the first class on Nov. 1 fro 10 am to 5 pm at the Josephine County Extension Center.  $40 for Nov. 1 only or register on line below for all 3 classes ($55)

READ THE DETAILS...

REGISTER

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

AG SQUARED-Farm Record Keeping Tool Training

Small Farms Events - 1 hour 51 min ago
Friday, November 21, 2014 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM

FLYER
This class is offered by OSU Extension Small Farms, Thrive and AgSquared to train farmers in best management practices. Learn how to use this online tool to both plan and manage an increase in production, plus keep the records needed in order to track farm growth over a period of time. Instructors: Drew Katz and David Wides, AgSquared Customer Success Team. And, Jeff Higley, a local Applegate Valley farmers will talk about his experience using AgSquared.
Location: RCC/SOU Higher Education Center
101 South Bartlett Street; Medford

REGISTER ON LINE

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Go Garden, Go Green

Gardening Events - 1 hour 53 min ago
Saturday, October 11, 2014 (all day event)

"Go Garden"...

Saturday, October 11 from 9AM-2:30PM, two Master Gardeners, Mary Jacobs and Jordan Dawn, will be sharing their gardens and the organic practices used in achieving the production of various fruits and vegetables.  This will be a great opportunity to learn by observing and to ask questions on how to begin gardening or to be more successful in what you have growing.

Mary will also talk about chickens and the eggs that she harvests as a result.  You will be able to see the creative way in which she has incorporated chickens into her garden.

and "Go Green"

We will begin the afternoon with a healthy lunch prepared by our Oregon State University nutrition expert on the South Coast, Stephanie Polizzi, and then she will teach us about the value of eating your greens and just how they affect our general health with NO--the nitric oxide they provide and the role that this substance plays in eating more healthfully.

Sustainable Landscape Training - Lane County

Gardening Events - 1 hour 53 min ago
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 9:00 AM - Thursday, October 23, 2014 5:00 PM
Lear practical information to create sustainable/green/ecological landscapes. Participants will learn to utilize landscape practices that can be applied to their own yards and will benefit by improving their soil biology and reducing erosion. Class will meet both days, October 22-23, 2014 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Registration form and credit card payment option is available on the website: extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

Washington County Small Woodlands Association Meeting

Forestry Events - Tue, 10/28/2014 - 6:49am
Tuesday, October 28, 2014 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Topic:  Harvest Equipment

The presentation will cover both new and established methods of harvesting, where the methods may be appropriate, what equipment is used, and how much you might expect things to cost.  If you're about to harvest, have never harvested, or plan to harvest someday, this is the presentation for you.

Steve Bowers is a forester for the OSU Extension Service, serving Douglas County.  Better known as "Treeman" in the OSWA Northwest Woodlands publication, he frequently provides practical advice to small woodland owners.

Students debate wave energy at coastal conference

Breaking Waves - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 2:42pm

FLORENCE – Oregon State University Fisheries and Wildlife students exchanged arguments about whether wave energy should be supported in Oregon at last weekend’s State of the Coast conference – and  every statement had to to be backed by a scientific source.

“We are trying to emphasize critical thinking skills,” said professor Scott Heppell,  who taught the debate class. “This is not about memorizing facts, but to learn how to objectively evaluate the evidence available for any given natural resource issue and come to a rational conclusion.”

Fisheries and Wildlife students debate wave energy in Oregon at the State of the Coast Conference.

The eight students were randomly assigned to one side of the issue in class regardless of their personal opinion, and tasked with finding ways to support their arguments. The two teams of four sat at adjacent conference tables on the Florence Events Center theatre stage. Heppell started the session off with an overview of the issue to the audience of about 60 conference attendees.

Team Yes hit the ground running with data suggesting that wave energy would significantly reduce Oregon’s reliance on coal and natural gas. Jordan Ellison, one of the undergraduate students on the team, reinforced the science with an economic incentive.

“Wave energy is expected to produce thousands of engineering jobs, as well as business for the coastal communities,” she said.

Following a strong opening by their opponents, Team No retaliated with dollars and cents. Estimates vary, but the cost of one facility would be upwards of $300 million, they said.

Team Yes also made a case for establishing marine reserves  around the devices and asserted that the structure would be beneficial to marine organisms. Team No shot back with concerns about disrupted migration patterns, and an overall lack of knowledge as to how these impacts would actually play out.

“We think the ecological and economic costs of these structures outweighs the benefit,” said Michelle Huppert, a member of Team No, in her closing argument. “Really what we need is more research on the marine environment before we make these costly decisions.”

While there was no clear winner in the debate, Huppert’s view was recently corroborated by Ocean Power Technology’s decision to withdraw its support for wave energy in Oregon, citing the exorbitant cost.

OSU scientists deploy wave energy test device

Research on the environmental and economic impacts are still ongoing at OSU, however, and organizers hoped the debate would help both students and community members understand the issue as renewable resources continue to gain popularity.

“Most of these questions aren’t science question; they are societal questions,” Heppell said following the debate. “Science can answer the question: ‘if we want to have wave energy, what are the expected outcomes?’”

Both teams said the exercise taught them to look at problems objectively. The future of wave energy on the Oregon coast is uncertain, but critical thinking skills will benefit these students as they tackle other marine issues throughout their careers.

 

The post Students debate wave energy at coastal conference appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Students debate wave energy at coastal conference

Sea Grant - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 2:42pm

FLORENCE – Oregon State University Fisheries and Wildlife students exchanged arguments about whether wave energy should be supported in Oregon at last weekend’s State of the Coast conference – and  every statement had to to be backed by a scientific source.

“We are trying to emphasize critical thinking skills,” said professor Scott Heppell,  who taught the debate class. “This is not about memorizing facts, but to learn how to objectively evaluate the evidence available for any given natural resource issue and come to a rational conclusion.”

Fisheries and Wildlife students debate wave energy in Oregon at the State of the Coast Conference.

The eight students were randomly assigned to one side of the issue in class regardless of their personal opinion, and tasked with finding ways to support their arguments. The two teams of four sat at adjacent conference tables on the Florence Events Center theatre stage. Heppell started the session off with an overview of the issue to the audience of about 60 conference attendees.

Team Yes hit the ground running with data suggesting that wave energy would significantly reduce Oregon’s reliance on coal and natural gas. Jordan Ellison, one of the undergraduate students on the team, reinforced the science with an economic incentive.

“Wave energy is expected to produce thousands of engineering jobs, as well as business for the coastal communities,” she said.

Following a strong opening by their opponents, Team No retaliated with dollars and cents. Estimates vary, but the cost of one facility would be upwards of $300 million, they said.

Team Yes also made a case for establishing marine reserves  around the devices and asserted that the structure would be beneficial to marine organisms. Team No shot back with concerns about disrupted migration patterns, and an overall lack of knowledge as to how these impacts would actually play out.

“We think the ecological and economic costs of these structures outweighs the benefit,” said Michelle Huppert, a member of Team No, in her closing argument. “Really what we need is more research on the marine environment before we make these costly decisions.”

While there was no clear winner in the debate, Huppert’s view was recently corroborated by Ocean Power Technology’s decision to withdraw its support for wave energy in Oregon, citing the exorbitant cost.

OSU scientists deploy wave energy test device

Research on the environmental and economic impacts are still ongoing at OSU, however, and organizers hoped the debate would help both students and community members understand the issue as renewable resources continue to gain popularity.

“Most of these questions aren’t science question; they are societal questions,” Heppell said following the debate. “Science can answer the question: ‘if we want to have wave energy, what are the expected outcomes?’”

Both teams said the exercise taught them to look at problems objectively. The future of wave energy on the Oregon coast is uncertain, but critical thinking skills will benefit these students as they tackle other marine issues throughout their careers.

 

The post Students debate wave energy at coastal conference appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

State of the Coast Draws 200 Coastal Stakeholders

Breaking Waves - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 11:26am

FLORENCE – Roughly 200 people from around Oregon came together on Saturday at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast conference to discuss ocean change and adaption.

The conference, at the Florence Events Center, began with a welcome from Oregon Sea Grant’s director, Shelby Walker, and 9th District State Representative, Caddy McKeown. The keynote speaker was author Paul Greenberg, who informed the “fishy crowd” about the inspiration behind his best-selling books, “Four Fish” and “American Catch.”

Among the audience were students from Oregon State University and University of Oregon, along with professors, scientists, representatives from NOAA, Oregon Parks and Recreation. the Nature Conservancy, and legislators.

This year’s conference was the 10th annual of what used to be called the Heceta Head Coastal Conference. Unlike previous years, multiple break-out sessions characterized State of the Coast, a change that was met with positive feedback from participants. The morning was filled with “stage-setting talks” focused on changes the coast has experienced in the past several decades. A new component of the conference focused on food concerns, a theme reflected in a presentation by Newport’s Local Ocean restaurant owner Laura Anderson as well as in break-out sessions.

The event offered students an opportunity to share their marine-related research. Student researchers from the OSU Marine Resource Management and the U of O School of Law programs presented their poster projects to attendees who helped judge the content. The categories were effectiveness in communicating research, accessibility of the information presented, and overall design for reaching a general and diverse audience.

The afternoon allowed attendees to choose break-out sessions based on their interests. These included seafood cooking demos, a student debate on wave and wind energy by the OSU Fisheries and Wildlife department, a hands-on educational session on oysters, and a discussion of the sea star wasting syndrome that is sweeping the west coast, among others.

State of the Coast was filled with multi-faceted learning, networking, and cooperative exchange between Oregon’s coastal stakeholders. The one-day conference was concluded by 5th District State Senator Arnie Roblan, whose remarks highlighted the importance of addressing coastal change.

“We have a major need to better understand the environment we live in,” Roblan said. “This is a place where local people and the entire coast can come to learn about coastal issues.”

The post State of the Coast Draws 200 Coastal Stakeholders appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

State of the Coast Draws 200 Coastal Stakeholders

Sea Grant - Mon, 10/27/2014 - 11:26am

FLORENCE – Roughly 200 people from around Oregon came together on Saturday at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast conference to discuss ocean change and adaption.

The conference, at the Florence Events Center, began with a welcome from Oregon Sea Grant’s director, Shelby Walker, and 9th District State Representative, Caddy McKeown. The keynote speaker was author Paul Greenberg, who informed the “fishy crowd” about the inspiration behind his best-selling books, “Four Fish” and “American Catch.”

Among the audience were students from Oregon State University and University of Oregon, along with professors, scientists, representatives from NOAA, Oregon Parks and Recreation. the Nature Conservancy, and legislators.

This year’s conference was the 10th annual of what used to be called the Heceta Head Coastal Conference. Unlike previous years, multiple break-out sessions characterized State of the Coast, a change that was met with positive feedback from participants. The morning was filled with “stage-setting talks” focused on changes the coast has experienced in the past several decades. A new component of the conference focused on food concerns, a theme reflected in a presentation by Newport’s Local Ocean restaurant owner Laura Anderson as well as in break-out sessions.

The event offered students an opportunity to share their marine-related research. Student researchers from the OSU Marine Resource Management and the U of O School of Law programs presented their poster projects to attendees who helped judge the content. The categories were effectiveness in communicating research, accessibility of the information presented, and overall design for reaching a general and diverse audience.

The afternoon allowed attendees to choose break-out sessions based on their interests. These included seafood cooking demos, a student debate on wave and wind energy by the OSU Fisheries and Wildlife department, a hands-on educational session on oysters, and a discussion of the sea star wasting syndrome that is sweeping the west coast, among others.

State of the Coast was filled with multi-faceted learning, networking, and cooperative exchange between Oregon’s coastal stakeholders. The one-day conference was concluded by 5th District State Senator Arnie Roblan, whose remarks highlighted the importance of addressing coastal change.

“We have a major need to better understand the environment we live in,” Roblan said. “This is a place where local people and the entire coast can come to learn about coastal issues.”

The post State of the Coast Draws 200 Coastal Stakeholders appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

CPHHS Research Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 10/24/2014 - 4:01pm
Friday, October 24, 2014 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

"Animal Assisted Adapted Physical Activity for Children with Motor Disabilities" Wendy Baltzer, DVM, PhD, DACVS, Associate Professor, College of Veterinary Sciences; Monique Udell, PhD, Assistant Professor, College of Agricultural Sciences; Megan MacDonald, PhD, Assistant Professor, College of Public Health & Human Sciences

 

A good conference

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 2:49pm

Having just returned from the annual AEA conference (Evaluation 2014) in Denver, I am taking this moment to reflect, process, and apply.

For years my criteria for a “good” conference was the following

  • See three long time friends and spend some time catching up;
  • Meet three people I didn’t know before and would like to continue to know;
  • Get three new ideas that I can use.

I think this year’s conference was a success (despite the difficulty in identifying who was doing what when because the management corporation minimized the program in an attempt to be ecological, if excluding). If I were to ask my daughters to rate the conference on a scale of one (1) to 10 (ten), one being not “good”, 10 being “good”, I think they would have said an 8 – 8.5. (They have their own following of friends and their own interests.)

I saw and talked to three long time friends, although I missed those who have chosen not to attend AEA any more (I must be getting old) and those with whom I didn’t spend time.

I met more than three people I didn’t know before and I must say, if they are any indication (and I think they are) of the evolution of the association, the association is in good hands (even though I miss the intimacy I “grew up with”).

Most importantly, I did get at least three new ideas.

  • Competencies is a topic that evokes a lot of discussion both pro and con. One cannot talk about accreditation, certification, and credentialing without talking about competencies  (the skills and knowledge that make evaluators distinct).
  • Blogging is challenging. (I keep at it, even though.) Folks who blog about evaluation are a special lot. Blogging is probably no easy task; blogging on evaluation is challenging. It is one way to get ideas “out there”. Chris Lysy  (one of those folks I finally actually met–he is the cartoon guy) says it so eloquently in his blog post on Freshspectrum. He says it helps him stay connected with colleagues all year. He uses the metaphor of analog vs. digital (read his post). Being in the digital world is definitely challenging for a digital immigrant like me. Still I blog.
  • I thought I knew a lot about focus groups (and I do). Yet I learned new things from Michelle Revels  in her session on Focus Group  Research. Although she talked about using focus groups for collecting  research data, focus groups are a wonderful tool for gathering qualitative data for evaluation questions, too.
  • Certainly, my thinking and knowledge about needs assessments (needs as a noun, not verb) was increased. I think the fallacy is that too many people want to get it done quickly and don’t think of strengths of the target audience. Every time I do a professional development session on needs assessment with my long time friend and colleague, Jim Altschuld , I learn something about the process. This year was no different. (I really must finish his new book…)

There were other things which I have used in the last three days, for sure, and although they need to be mentioned, I’ve exceeded my self-imposed limit of 500 words.

If you went to AEA, let me know what you thought. Did you have a good conference? If so, what did you learn?

my .

molly.

The post A good conference appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Fall All Majors Career Fair Oct. 22, Engineering Fair Oct 23

Food Events - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 6:50am
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 - Thursday, October 23, 2014 (all day event)

Attend the Career Fair to meet over 100 employers interested in hiring OSU students and alumni! Bring your best elevator pitch, a few resumes, and look sharp-many companies have already set up interviews for the day after the fair to see what potential you can bring to their organization. See you there!

 

Would you like to volunteer for this event? Click here for the 22nd and here for the 23rd.

2014 Land Stewards Program

Forestry Events - Thu, 10/23/2014 - 6:50am
Thursday, October 23, 2014 1:00 PM - 5:30 PM

The Jackson County OSU Extesnion Service and Jackson Soil and Water Conservation District is please to offer the 2014 Land Steward Program.

This is an 11-week training course - weekly classes will meet at the OSU Extension auditorium, on Thursday afternoon, September 11 - December 4 from 1:00 - 5:30 p.m.. (With a break for the Thanksgiving holiday).

Land Steward training will help local small-acreage landowners learn about ways to create a healthy environment on their property through classroom sessions, field trips and the creation of a personalized management plan for their property, the course is targeting owners who want to learn how to balance sustainability with their rural lifestyle.

Land Stewards will be equipped to design and implement programs to help people:

  • Live safely in wildfire-prone areas
  • Identify and eradicate noxious weeds
  • Promote and develop wildlife habitat
  • Conserve water and reduce runoff
  • Reduce yard waste and wood biomass
  • Make their own mulch and compost
  • Maintain healthy trees and forest

Applications received before August 28th save $25 ($150 per person, or $20 for couples).

Applications received on/after August 29th, subject to standard fee ($175 per person, or $225 for couples).

For application please go to:  http://extension.oregonstate.edu/sorec/sites/default/files/ls_application_course_info_2014.pdf

Yamhill County Small Woodland Association

Forestry Events - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 6:48am
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
On Wednesday, 22 October 2014, the Yamhill County Small Woodlands Association and the OSU Extension Service are featuring John Kelly, Naturalist, who will present a slide show of wild edible plants, and those that are not, of the Pacific Northwest.  John has taught his program at Linn Benton Community College.

The Social half hour will start at 6:30 pm and the presentation will start at 7:00 pm at the OSU Yamhill County Extension Auditorium, 2050 NE Lafayette Avenue, McMinnville, OR 97128.  You do not have to be a member to attend

Free refreshments and door prizes by Elmer Parker will be provided.  All woodland owners and the general public are invited to attend.  Applications will be at the meeting or downloadable at OSWA.org.  The YSWA pays $25 for new members, so bring your application to the meeting.

The YSWA is also co-sponsoring a round table discussion of candidates at the "2014 Fall Candidates Forum", Wednesday, 15 October, 6:30pm to 8:30pm at the Senior Center on McDaniel Lane in McMinnville.

Understanding Fire Ecology

Forestry Events - Wed, 10/22/2014 - 6:48am
Wednesday, October 22, 2014 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Wildfire has become a topic of ever-greater importance to people living in Oregon. This class will delve into the main issues surrounding wildfire today in fire-adapted landscapes.  The following concepts will be discussed during this hands-on class:  pre-settlement forest conditions, outcomes from historic fire suppression, principles of fire ecology (fuels,oxygen, heat, fire behavior), immediate impacts from a wildfire, ecosystem recovery post-widlfire, fire as a management tool, wildland urban interface, and implications of wildfire in a changing climate.  The field trip will visit several locations to illustratre these concepts first hand.

Instructors:  John Bailey (OSU Professor of Silviculture and Fire Management, College of Forestry); Steve Fitzgerald (Statewide Silviculture Specialist - OSU Extension Forestry & Natural Resources); Janean Creighton (OSU Professor & administrative Director, Northwest Fire Science Consortium)

Visit:  http://bit.ly/1q1d594 to researve your spot today!

Enrollment restricted to those who have completed an Oregon Master Naturalist Ecoregion

This class is a join effort between the Northwest Fire Science Consortium, OSU Extension Forestry & Natural Resources Extesnion, OSU College of Forestry, Citizen Fire Academy & the Oregon Master Naturalist Program.