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Caneberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Tue, 06/28/2016 - 2:41pm
Wednesday, June 29, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Annual Caneberry Field Day! Agenda with details!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Blueberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Tue, 06/28/2016 - 2:41pm
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Annual Blueberry Field Day!  

Agenda with all the details!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Native Seed Collection

Small Farms Events - Tue, 06/28/2016 - 2:41pm
Wednesday, July 6, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Suzie Savoie.
Learn how to save seed from our Southern Oregon native plants.   Useful for restoration and native horticulture.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Vegetable Insect IPM Series - Cucumber, Flee Beetles, & Symphylans

Small Farms Events - Tue, 06/28/2016 - 2:41pm
Wednesday, July 20, 2016 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Are you interested in learning more about managing vegetable insect pests on your farm? Join us for one, two or all three workshops this growing season.

All classes will be held at the North Willamette Research and Extension Center 

 

Pleae visit: http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/vegetable-insect-ipm-series-aurora for registration information and the workshop agenda

Each workshop will cover Integrated Pest Management principles, pest and beneficial id, scouting and trapping, insect life cycles, disease transmission and organic strategies for managing pests.

Participants will receive a hand lens, handouts, and a SARE thumb drive loaded with IPM resources.

Instructors include Nick Andrews, Heather Stoven, Heidi Noordijk; OSU Extension, John Maurer; Evergreen Growers Supply, Michelle Armstrong; Wilbur-Ellis, Hillary Sardinas; Xerces Society.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New curriculum explores microplastics in the sea

Sea Grant - Tue, 06/28/2016 - 9:25am

A new middle school science curriculum from Oregon Sea Grant guides teachers and their 6th- through 8th-grade students through the growing threat to our oceans posed by microplastics – tiny particles of plastic which wind up in the sea.

Microplastics – particles less than five millimeters in size that deteriorate from larger plastic pieces, as well as plastic “microbeads” used in personal care products such as face and body scrubs – have emerged as a growing ocean pollution concern due to their small size and persistence in the environment.

A 2015 study published in Environmental Science & Technology estimated that eight trillion microbeads were entering aquatic environments throughout the United States every day. When consumed by crustaceans, shellfish and other marine animals, the plastics can affect reproduction, growth and survival.

The new, 70-page curriculum, compiled by Marie Kowalski, a graduate student in OSU’s Marine Resource Management program in collaboration with Oregon Sea Grant’s marine program manager, Tracy Crews, includes three lessons designed to engage students with the issue by analyzing the problem and investigating possible solutions.

The lessons include opportunities for student inquiry, as well as collaboration and engagement with real data collected by researchers working in the field. Each lesson includes an estimated length, which will vary by classroom. The entire curriculum is designed to take about one week, but may be extended by including a project at the end of the curriculum.

The curriculum is available, free of charge, as an accessible .pdf download from the Oregon Sea Grant Website.

Learn more:

The post New curriculum explores microplastics in the sea appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Master Naturalist Program

Forestry Events - Sun, 06/26/2016 - 2:54pm
Friday, June 24, 2016 12:00 PM - Sunday, June 26, 2016 12:00 PM
For information on 2016 course schedule in the Klamath Basin, http://oregonmasternaturalist.org/eastcascades

NWREC Public Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - Fri, 06/24/2016 - 2:49pm
Friday, June 24, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Every last Friday of the month, from May through October, North Willamette Research and Extension Center (NWREC)
will provide two-hour afternoon farm tours. Anyone interested in seeing the latest research and education activities taking place at the farm are encouraged to attend.
  •  Tours begin at 2:00pm and conclude by 4:00pm. Bring friends, family or neighbors.
  • Call 503-678-1264 or stop by the Main office from 8:00am until 4:30pm daily to reserve your spot.
  • Alltours are provided free of charge as a public service.

Larger groups (up to 24) can be accommodated, too. Call ahead to schedule a convenient time.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Shrubs for wildlife: Snowberry

Tree Topics - Fri, 06/24/2016 - 10:11am

By Brandy Saffell and Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension

Snowberry leaves and fruit in the fall. Photo: Pat Breen, OSU

If one of your land management goals is to provide wildlife habitat, you’ll want to consider keeping a mix of native shrub species on your property. Shrubs provide a host of services to wildlife, including shelter or cover, nesting space, and food from their twigs, leaves, flowers, and fruit. With thought given to species selection and location, retaining existing shrubs or planting them can benefit wildlife without compromising timber growth or forest operations. This is the second article in our Shrubs for Wildlife series (first is here). Each article will highlight one species that benefits wildlife in northwest Oregon forests.

Species Name: Common snowberry – Symphoricarpos albus

Description: Snowberry is a medium sized shrub, growing in thickets and up to six feet tall. The leaves are simple, opposite, deciduous, and variable in shape. They are generally oval but can be nearly round (3/4 – 2 1/2” long). The leaf edges vary from entire to shallowly lobed on the same plant and same stem. The flowers are small (1/4”), pink-white, bell-shaped, and found in clusters at the end of the branch. The round, white, waxy berries persist into the winter; they are non-edible to humans and toxic due to the saponin they contain. Twigs are opposite, slender, smooth, and yellow-brown.

Small pink blossoms are present this time of year. Photo: A. Grotta

Wildlife Value: Snowberry is useful to pollinators as a host and food plant. The flowers attract Anna’s and rufous hummingbirds, as well as various insects including bees. Several birds have been observed eating the berries, such as towhees, thrushes, robins, grosbeaks, and waxwings. Birds also use snowberry thickets for cover. In addition, the Vashti sphinx moth (Sphinx vashti) relies on it as a food plant in its larval stage.

Management Considerations: Following harvest, snowberry resprouts readily from belowground.  To ensure optimum survival and growth of planted trees, control snowberry where it is likely to overtop planted seedlings.  Consider retaining snowberry plants on the site where they are not in direct competition with seedlings.  For those who would like to actively enhance wildlife habitat by planting snowberry, it tolerates a variety of environments, and can be planted in coarse sand to fine-textured clay, full sun to dense understory, dry well-drained slops to moist stream banks, and low to high nutrient soils.  It also establishes readily and tolerates general neglect.

Plant habit and fruit in winter. Photos: Pat Breen, OSU

If you are interested in learning more about creating wildlife habitat on your property, check out the Woodland Fish and Wildlife website.

 

 

The post Shrubs for wildlife: Snowberry appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Making a difference

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Thu, 06/23/2016 - 4:40pm

We close every rehearsal and concert with the song, “Be the change”. Using the words from Gandhi, I try to remember to make a difference; to be the change I want to see in the world.

That is not easy. I ride my bike all the time. (Yep. Really.) I compost. I grow my own vegetables in the summer and support my farmers’ market and CSA (both of which, thankfully, run through Thanksgiving). But I ask my self, “Am I making a difference?”

The same mantra applies to this blog. In the almost seven years since I started blogging, my readership has grown and not just among evaluators (though certainly among them).  I regularly get posts that tell me that if I provide something that is interesting, enlightening, creative, informative, (you get the idea…) that I am making a difference because I blog. Yet, I look at the state of the world and wonder.

Gandhi’s  seven dangers to human virtue (called by Wikipedia the Seven Social Sins) come to mind. (The title listed below is not mine.)

The political systems in the world (at least in the US) seem to be broken (see number 7); large scale destruction happens both humon made (e.g., the shooting in Orlando, the destruction in the middle east) (see number 3 and 6) and nature driven (e.g., hurricane, tsunami, earthquake, fire) (see number 3, 4, 5); and then there is all the rest (e.g., climate change, fracking, species extinction, poverty, hunger) (see number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) .  I have to wonder. Can I make a difference with one little blog?

Yet, I keep on (and not because I was told to blog; I find I enjoy blogging). I blog. I tie my blog to evaluation. It is a form of speaking truth to power. It is a form of Satyagraha (from the Sanskrit “words satya [meaning “truth”] and Agraha [“insistence”, or “holding firmly to”].  Everyday, people evaluate, even if those evaluations cannot be considered rigorous by academics. The difference is that everyday people do not (cannot?) articulate the criteria that they use. Everyone has criteria. Not everyone articulates those criteria. That is the difference between evaluating everyday and evaluating as a professional. Professional evaluators have guiding principles, criteria. By teaching people to be critical (by example, by practice), I think I can make a difference. So I continue.

The post Making a difference appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Outstanding Woodland Farmer Twilight Tour

Forestry Events - Thu, 06/23/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, June 23, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Join us for a summer twilight tour featuring the impressive accomplishments of the Bugni family after more than 20 years of their woodland stewardship. An easy walking tour will feature a variety of recent activities across about 60 acres of their woodland parcels, including:
•Results of their 2014 thinning project and post-thinning tree planting
•Benefits attained using a skyline yarding system for logging over the creek
•Wildlife management practices for developing down woody debris andsnags for bird habitat
•Pruning and other management activities in a 25 year old stand
•Large woody debris structures placed in the creek
•Plans for placement of boulders to retain spawning gravels in the creek inJuly
•Shade Our Streams plantings with the Clackamas River Basin Council alongSuter Creek
•Results of various methods for protecting seedlings from mountain beaver predation


There is plenty of parking at the meeting place on their property. Refreshments will be available during introductory remarks. Please dress for the woods and weather and be prepared for a two-hour walking tour.

Directions: From Eagle Fern Park near Eagle Creek, OR, proceed up SE George Rd, heading southeast for about three miles, through a sharp curve to the
right about 100 feet past the George Fire Station, turn left on SE Clausen Rd, proceed about 3/4 mile and turn right onto a gravel landing. Look for “Tree Tour” signs to guide you.

Registration: The event is free. Registration is requested so we know how many are coming.


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Your Legacy, Your Land

Forestry Events - Thu, 06/23/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, June 23, 2016 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Join us for our monthly Your Legacy, Your Land Webinars.  We are partnering with OSU and their Ties to the Land program to connect you with experts as you work through your plans.  On the fourth Thursday of every month at 11 pm (PST), we will discuss a different topic associated with your legacy plan, from setting goals to communicating with your family to understanding the different estate planning tools.   Register for each webinar: http://mylandplan.org/content/your-legacy-your-land-monthly-webinar-series

Rural Living Basics: Living with Your Well and Septic System

Small Farms Events - Thu, 06/23/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, June 23, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:15 PM

This class is designed for rural residents to learn about the basics of groundwater, water wells, and septic systems. Learn steps to protect the health of your family, neighbors, livestock, your property investment, and the saftey of groundwater resources.

 Please RSVP as space can be limited

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Tree health in your neighborhood

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/22/2016 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

What’s causing tree dieback in your neighborhood this season? What can be done about it?

Attend this evening session to learn and share about forest and tree health problems in the region this year. Bring your examples, photographs, and questions for discussion. 

The session will be in the Board Room, upstairs in the Oregon Farm Bureau Building, 1320 Capitol St NE, Salem, Oregon http://extension.oregonstate.edu/marion/find-us.

Space is limited. Registration is required. There is no fee to attend this program. To register call 503-655-8631 or email jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu.

Herbicide Best Practices for OR Forest Management

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/22/2016 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Listen in to this four-part series of Web TV events as senior foresters share how their best practices for herbicide application have been developed over the years, how they've adapted to new regulations, and how a forester's current practice can (and should) proactively exceed legislative requirements.

Along with the foresters, subject matter experts from industry and university discuss the science behind controlling a broad range of weeds, and how to control them without impacting sensitive environments.

Original in-cockpit helicopter video footage shows the latest application techniques and demonstrates GPS technologies for precision guidance and self-archiving event reporting.

Regulators, legislators, and public interest groups join the discussion with new ideas for maintaining healthy, productive forests, while also maintaining great relationships with neighbors and the Oregon public.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:

This course if for you if you will be:

...working with or regulating herbicide application

...called upon to explain to a friend or acquaintance: 

  • Why herbicide is applied to forests
  • How it's done
  • The care and attention to safety that is effectively delivered by foresters, application contractors, and regulators.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS: This is all new material. Oregon Department of Agriculture is currently evaluating course materials to determine eligibility for continuing education credits.


REGISTRATION IS OPEN: Pre-registration is required. http://ow.ly/9yP4300MrcC

 

Herbicide Best Practices for OR Forest Management

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/22/2016 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 8:30 AM - 10:30 AM

Listen in to this four-part series of Web TV events as senior foresters share how their best practices for herbicide application have been developed over the years, how they've adapted to new regulations, and how a forester's current practice can (and should) proactively exceed legislative requirements.

Along with the foresters, subject matter experts from industry and university discuss the science behind controlling a broad range of weeds, and how to control them without impacting sensitive environments.

Original in-cockpit helicopter video footage shows the latest application techniques and demonstrates GPS technologies for precision guidance and self-archiving event reporting.

Regulators, legislators, and public interest groups join the discussion with new ideas for maintaining healthy, productive forests, while also maintaining great relationships with neighbors and the Oregon public.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND:

This course if for you if you will be:

...working with or regulating herbicide application

...called upon to explain to a friend or acquaintance: 

  • Why herbicide is applied to forests
  • How it's done
  • The care and attention to safety that is effectively delivered by foresters, application contractors, and regulators.

CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDITS: This is all new material. Oregon Department of Agriculture is currently evaluating course materials to determine eligibility for continuing education credits.


REGISTRATION IS OPEN: Pre-registration is required. http://ow.ly/9yP4300MrcC

 

Small Bites Happy Hour featuring Dr. Emily Ho

Health & Wellness Events - Wed, 06/22/2016 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

The OSU Alumni Association and College of Public Health and Human Sciences are partnering to bring you "Small Bites” a series of presentations on the latest health research in an informal atmosphere where you can interact with experts and network with fellow Beavers. This event will be held at the Red Star Tavern in Portland.

Details and registration

Woodland Talk/Twilight Tour

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/22/2016 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, June 22, 2016 12:00 PM
Save the Date: Wednesday, June 22, Details TBD. Hosted by Linn Chapter OSWA

Oregon Master Naturalist Program

Forestry Events - Sun, 06/19/2016 - 2:36pm
Friday, June 17, 2016 12:00 PM - Sunday, June 19, 2016 12:00 PM
For information on 2016 course schedule in Central Oregon, http://oregonmasternaturalist.org/eastcascades

Jackson Josephine Small Woodlands Association Annual Tour & Picnic

Forestry Events - Sat, 06/18/2016 - 2:34pm
Saturday, June 18, 2016 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Join us for a tour of the Birdseye Creek property of Dennis and Victoria Morgan, the 2015 Jackson Josephine County Tree Farmers of the Year – Non-members welcome!

The beautiful 96-acre property features a wide variety of vegetation types, from oak woodlands to streamside areas to mixed hardwood and conifer forests, including some of the largest madrone trees you’ve ever seen. In their 13 years of stewarding their property, the Morgans have accomplished a huge amount, including non-commercial thinning and slash treatment over 88 acres. Tour topics and highlights:

● Planning & building a home

● Home fire protection & defensible space

● Solar power, geothermal heat pump

● Oak woodlands & hardwood management

● Roadside fuels reduction

● Non-commercial thinning

● Strategies for utilization and disposal of slash

● What to do with all those dead trees?

● Riparian area management

● Managing the tree farm as a business

See the flyer for details and directions.  Please RSVP. 

Forest Health: Identification and Management of Forest Insects and Diseases

Forestry Events - Thu, 06/16/2016 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, June 15, 2016 9:00 AM - Thursday, June 16, 2016 2:00 PM
For more information, http://westernforestry.org/upcoming-conferences/forest-health-identification-and-management-of-forest-insects-and-diseases-2