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First-year START orientation

Health & Wellness Events - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 2:34pm
Tuesday, July 21, 2015 (all day event)

First-year START is an extensive two-day orientation, advising, and registration program with sessions offered June through September, attendance on both days is required. New Student Programs also offers a program for parents and family members of first-year students on the same day for an additional fee.

For more information, registration and other START session dates see First-Year START Information

Mechanized Thinning Demonstration and BBQ

Forestry Events - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 2:34pm
Friday, July 10, 2015 4:30 PM - 7:30 PM

A commercial thinning will be underway at Miller Woods this summer. Come view the active thinning operation and see Ponsse harvesting and forwarding equipment in action. BBQ following the tour. Hamburgers and hotdogs provided. Attendees are encouraged to bring a side dish. Sponsored by Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation District. Please RSVP

An Introduction to PNW Agroforestry Practices

Forestry Events - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, July 8, 2015 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM

Please join us for this multi-media informational forum! The day will be filled introducing you to Pacific Northwest Agroforestry and Woodland Practices. It is not just about growing trees. It is so much more!!!! We have prepared a day of short presentations, videos, and photo tours related to agroforestry, woodland management, riparian buffers and ecological conservation. We will also share with you several resources to inspire and improve your knowledge on agroforestry and woodland management. Organized by Marion and Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation Districts. FREE, but registration is required.

Advanced insect and disease field session

Forestry Events - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 2:34pm
Monday, July 6, 2015 - Thursday, July 9, 2015 (all day event)

This field session offers the most advanced and in-depth insect and disease training available in the Pacific Northwest. The attendees will spend one-on-one field time with top-level entomologists and pathologists from the Pacific Northwest region and gain real-life experience in developing management regimes and silvicultural measures. Each day will consist of site visits to infected stands for a first-hand look and discussion of particular insect and disease problems. Attendees will learn identification, biology, response to stand conditions and management options. Small group sessions will be used to develop management strategies and mock stand prescriptions. The region’s leading entomologists and pathologists will be on hand to provide assistance and advice as the prescriptions are developed.

For more information, click HERE

Pop-up Dinner

Gardening Events - Sat, 07/04/2015 - 6:10am
Friday, July 24, 2015 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
The Food Innovation Center invites you to join us for the first ever Pop-Up dinner. Come celebrate Oregon’s summer bounty and enjoy a delicious meal developed by the chefs in our world class kitchen.

Imagine yourself eating a multi-course meal with 100 of your fellow food lovers on the plaza outside of the Food Innovation Center.  Experience sustainable agriculture fresh from the field!

Mix and mingle with people who know and love food and give us feedback on what you think by participating in the Pop-Up Dinner data collection. Leave with a full stomach and some new ideas to use at home.

Providing a majority of the vegetables you’ll find at our Pop-Up are local farmers Marieta and Brandon Easley of Slice of Heaven Farm in Sandy, Oregon.  Providing fresh, responsibly farmed vegetables to their community has always been their goal as well as using sustainable practices that respect nature, reigniting our interconnectedness with nature, and setting good lifestyle examples for our next generation.

The meal features some of Oregon’s finest Specialty Crops in addition to other amazing foods for you to feast on. Don’t hesitate because seats are limited and you’ll want to be the first to signup.                                                                        Sign-up @ Eventbrite link by July 22

Reviewing a Timberland Appraisal for Accuracy and Credibility

Forestry Events - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 2:39pm
Tuesday, June 30, 2015 - Wednesday, July 1, 2015 (all day event)
For more information, click HERE

Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans

Breaking Waves - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 1:15pm

(This post was co-written by Kelsey Adkisson, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Fellow and Ivan Kuletz, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Intern. )
Oregon doesn’t stop at the beach. In fact, the shoreline is just the beginning of an incredibly complex and thriving marine environment full of colorful rockfish, towering kelp forests, expansive sandy flats, jagged rocky reefs, and a diversity of unique invertebrates.

To ensure this environment remains healthy and vibrant, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and Oregon Sea Grant (OSG) teamed up and developed a successful partnership that focuses on enhancing the intersection of science and management. This partnership has fostered fellowships and scholarships that support science-based resource management issues. As part of this collaboration, two OSG Fellows, Kelsey Adkisson and Ivan Kuletz, worked with ODFW on a great example of Oregon’s support for science-based ocean resource management- the Oregon Nearshore Strategy.

The Oregon Nearshore Strategy is a set of prioritized recommendations for conservation, management, and research of species and habitats that occur within state waters. Oregon’s nearshore environment is home to a vast array of species and habitats. All of which are integral components of a complex nearshore ecosystem. This ecosystem is interconnected through food webs, ocean currents, and a multitude of other biological, physical, chemical, geological and human use factors.

Originally developed in 2005, and currently undergoing a ten year revision, the Nearshore Strategy was created via a collaborative process led by ODFW. Members of the public, ocean-related businesses, recreational interests, conservation groups, government agencies, tribes, universities, and many other sectors helped contribute to the Strategy.

“At its core, the Nearshore Strategy is intended to contribute to the larger domain of marine resources management and focus actions towards priority issues and areas that have not already received the attention they deserve,” explained Caren Braby, the ODFW Marine Resources Program Manager. “Ultimately, the Strategy’s effectiveness hinges on public input, which helps shape the document, and also ensures that diverse perspectives, values, visions and concerns for the nearshore environment are represented.”

As part of the 2015 revision process, Kelsey and Ivan worked with ODFW Project Leader, Greg Krutzikowsky, to review and update the enormous body of scientific knowledge that underpins the document. This information was used to develop recommendations that support Oregon’s diversity of marine life. As Sea Grant Scholars, it was a unique experience to be part of something that is used by such a broad variety of interest groups, including federal agencies, policy makers, citizen groups, fishermen, conservation organizations, and researchers.
The Nearshore Strategy is currently undergoing public review and the update is due to be completed by October 1, 2015. Public input is essential to shaping and prioritizing resource needs for the next ten years and ODFW is seeking input on the Strategy. To review the Oregon Nearshore Strategy, provide input, or find out more about the revision process please visit the ODFW Oregon Nearshore Strategy website: (http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/nearshore/index.asp).

Learn more:

(Photo credits: Janna Nichols)

The post Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans

Sea Grant - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 1:15pm

(This post was co-written by Kelsey Adkisson, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Fellow and Ivan Kuletz, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Intern. )
Oregon doesn’t stop at the beach. In fact, the shoreline is just the beginning of an incredibly complex and thriving marine environment full of colorful rockfish, towering kelp forests, expansive sandy flats, jagged rocky reefs, and a diversity of unique invertebrates.

To ensure this environment remains healthy and vibrant, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and Oregon Sea Grant (OSG) teamed up and developed a successful partnership that focuses on enhancing the intersection of science and management. This partnership has fostered fellowships and scholarships that support science-based resource management issues. As part of this collaboration, two OSG Fellows, Kelsey Adkisson and Ivan Kuletz, worked with ODFW on a great example of Oregon’s support for science-based ocean resource management- the Oregon Nearshore Strategy.

The Oregon Nearshore Strategy is a set of prioritized recommendations for conservation, management, and research of species and habitats that occur within state waters. Oregon’s nearshore environment is home to a vast array of species and habitats. All of which are integral components of a complex nearshore ecosystem. This ecosystem is interconnected through food webs, ocean currents, and a multitude of other biological, physical, chemical, geological and human use factors.

Originally developed in 2005, and currently undergoing a ten year revision, the Nearshore Strategy was created via a collaborative process led by ODFW. Members of the public, ocean-related businesses, recreational interests, conservation groups, government agencies, tribes, universities, and many other sectors helped contribute to the Strategy.

“At its core, the Nearshore Strategy is intended to contribute to the larger domain of marine resources management and focus actions towards priority issues and areas that have not already received the attention they deserve,” explained Caren Braby, the ODFW Marine Resources Program Manager. “Ultimately, the Strategy’s effectiveness hinges on public input, which helps shape the document, and also ensures that diverse perspectives, values, visions and concerns for the nearshore environment are represented.”

As part of the 2015 revision process, Kelsey and Ivan worked with ODFW Project Leader, Greg Krutzikowsky, to review and update the enormous body of scientific knowledge that underpins the document. This information was used to develop recommendations that support Oregon’s diversity of marine life. As Sea Grant Scholars, it was a unique experience to be part of something that is used by such a broad variety of interest groups, including federal agencies, policy makers, citizen groups, fishermen, conservation organizations, and researchers.
The Nearshore Strategy is currently undergoing public review and the update is due to be completed by October 1, 2015. Public input is essential to shaping and prioritizing resource needs for the next ten years and ODFW is seeking input on the Strategy. To review the Oregon Nearshore Strategy, provide input, or find out more about the revision process please visit the ODFW Oregon Nearshore Strategy website: (http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/nearshore/index.asp).

Learn more:

(Photo credits: Janna Nichols)

The post Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Pacific Northwest Drought of 2015

Forestry Events - Tue, 06/30/2015 - 2:40pm
Tuesday, June 30, 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

After a warm winter and dry spring, the Governors of Oregon and Washington have declared drought in parts of both states. There will be severe water shortages across the region, but the largest cities of Seattle and Portland expect to have sufficient water supply for the summer and beyond.

Our first webinar will feature a brief climate update and speakers from Seattle Public Utilities and Portland Water Bureau, who will talk about the summer of 2015 from the perspective of their water utility and how this year’s conditions relate to future climate change in the region.

Speakers:

Kathie Dello, Deputy Director, Oregon Climate Service

James Rufo-Hill, Climate Adaptation Specialist, Seattle Public Utilities

Kavita Heyn, Climate Science & Sustainability Coordinator, Portland Water Bureau

Meeting link: https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/118731581

Probing attosecond electron emission dynamics at solid surfaces

Environment Events - Tue, 06/30/2015 - 2:40pm
Tuesday, June 30, 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Prof. Jürg Osterwalder
Department of Physics, University of Zurich, Switzerland (currently on sabbatical at Stanford/SLAC)

The response of conduction electrons in solids upon excitation by light occurs on the attosecond time scale. An interferometric measurement using XUV attosecond pulse trains for pump and femtosecond IR pulses as probe (Reconstruction of Attosecond Beating By Interference of Two-photon Transitions - RABBITT) provides timing information about the photoemission process. An experimental setup for simultaneous RABBIT measurements on a gas phase and a solid target will be described [1]. Measurements on different noble metal surfaces will be presented [2]. Data measured on Cu(111) using different incidence directions show that the macroscopic Fresnel equations can describe the observed phase of the probe field on an atomic length and attosecond time scale [3]. 

[1] R. Locher et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 85, 013113 (2014).
[2] R. Locher, L. Castiglioni et al., Optica 2, 405 (2015).
[3] M. Lucchini et al., submitted.
http://www.physik.unizh.ch/groups/grouposterwalder/

Advanced Vegetable Gardening

Gardening Events - Tue, 06/30/2015 - 6:10am
Saturday, June 6, 2015 10:00 AM - 3:30 PM
Are you ready to take your vegetable gardening to the next level?  Learn important concepts and skills to help you maximize production in your plot including the following:
  • Practice garden bed preparation and planting.
  • Explore effective methods for pest and weed management.
  • Practice tool usage for safety and efficiency.
  • Discover the importance of crop planning and how timing your plantings throughout the seasons can help ensure healthy harvests year around.
  • Understand the nutrient needs of various crops for plant health and production.
  • Learn how to utilize cover crops in the summer and fall.
  • Observe various season extension techniques for maximizing the growing season.

 

Gardening Made Easy-Adaptive Gardening

Gardening Events - Tue, 06/30/2015 - 6:10am
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM

What We'll Cover:

  • Learn strategies and techniques so you may continue to garden without injury.
  • Gain insight on ways to keep gardening safely and maintaining a lifelong passion and a healthy activity.
  • Examples of adaptive tools will be demonstrated                            
                            

Free! Lectures are open to the public — no registration required 

    Instructors: Jerry Anderson & Mary Felix, Bridgett Shaw, Jeannine Rychlik, & Lynn Wagner

Summer Fruit Tree Care

Gardening Events - Tue, 06/30/2015 - 6:10am
Saturday, June 13, 2015 10:00 AM - 3:30 PM
Fruit Tree Care - Summer
Thinking of growing your own fruit trees at home? Already growing fruit trees you want to make sure are well cared for? This workshop will cover the most important things to do to support your fruit trees during the summer season here in the Willamette Valley.  You will learn the following skills:
  • Pune fruit trees for greatest health, beauty, and productivity
  • Employ proper thinning technique for a quality crop
  • Properly mulch and remove competing plants from around fruit trees

 

Pacific Northwest Native Reflections on Lewis & Clark Discoveries

Gardening Events - Tue, 06/30/2015 - 6:10am
Thursday, June 25, 2015 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

What We'll Cover:

  • Most acclimated to our region
  • Provide habitat
  • Disease resistance
  • Cleanse our water
  • Hold valuable cultural significance
  • Features of native garden                                      
                            

Free! Lectures are open to the public — no registration required 

    Instructor: Mary French

Growing Edibles in Your Home Landscape-Getting Started

Gardening Events - Tue, 06/30/2015 - 6:10am
Saturday, June 27, 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

What We'll Cover:

  • Demonstrate ways to incorporate edibles into the landscape at the WCMGA Learning Garden
  • Provide an overview of the process to plan to add edibles to the landscape
  • Provide tips for garden design, plant selection, plant placement
  • Share how to incorporate research based sustainable gardening practices
  • Provide references for additional resources                                  
                           

Free! Lectures are open to the public — no registration required 

    Instructor: Sue Ryburn

Milkweed for Monarchs: does it make sense in Oregon?

Master Gardener Blog - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 4:57pm
(Originally published in the March 2015 issue of The Gardener's Pen newsletter)

Larvae (left) and adult (right) of the Monarch butterfly, Danaus plexipuss.  Photo Credit:  Dr. Jeffrey Miller, Oregon State University Professor of Entomology.

Ecology of the Monarch Butterfly, Danaus plexippus,  in the Pacific Northwest:  Monarchs are common on the east side of the Cascade Mountains, but very uncommon on the west side.  Monarch caterpillars feed on milkweed during the early summer.  Adults fly from spring to fall when they migrate south.  Found in open habitats, particularly along roadsides and fencerows. (Adapted from: Miller and Hammond, 2003. Lepidoptera of the Pacific Northwest. USDA FHTET-03-11)

Monarch butterflies are specialist insects, with specialized digestive systems and feeding behaviors that are adapted for feeding on plants in the genus Asclepias (milkweed plants).

Asclepias plants have toxic chemicals (cardiac glycosides) and a latex sap that deters most insect feeding.  Monarchs store the cardiac glycosides in their exoskeleton, which circumvents the need to metabolize these nasty chemicals and also makes them poisonous to vertebrate predators.

The latex sap of milkweeds gums up the mouthparts of many insects ~ causing them to starve.  Monarchs deal with the latex sap by clipping the veins on milkweed leaves, allowing the latex to ‘bleed out’ of the plant before they feed.

Monarch adults are migratory.  East of the Rocky Mountains, monarch butterflies fly south to overwintering sites in Mexico each the fall, and return north in the spring.  Scientists have have noted that overwintering populations of Monarchs in Mexico have significantly declined over the last two decades (Brower et al. 2012).  Three factors have been implicated in the decline of eastern monarchs:  (1) loss of forest habitat in Mexico, where the butterfly overwinters; (2) loss of breeding habitat/milkweed plants in the United States due to land development and increased use of herbicides in Roundup-Ready crop fields; (3) occasional extreme weather conditions that decrease the length of the breeding season.

Known migration routes, breeding territories and overwintering areas for Monarch butterflies.  Map reproduced courtesy of MonarchWatch.org.
Although most North American monarchs overwinter in Mexico, those that live west of the Rocky Mountains generally overwinter at one more than 300 sites along the California coast.  These monarch ‘groves’ tend to be within a few km of the ocean, which is thought to moderate temperature, and are usually protected from the elements in some fashion.  Unlike eastern monarchs, who may fly thousands of miles from Canada to Mexico, western monarchs usually migrate no more than 100 miles.  Their breeding sites are thought to range as far north as western Canada, and as far south as southern Arizona, in the mountains and foothills of California, the Pacific Northwest and the Great Basin States.  General dogma has been that monarchs may wander into southern Oregon, during their spring migration to breeding sites or their fall migration to overwintering sites in California.  But the truth is, we really don’t know that much about where western monarchs breed.

Still, many groups have advocated that Oregon gardeners plant native milkweed plants to support western monarchs ~ particularly because there has been about an 80% decline in western monarch numbers recorded from California overwintering sites since 1997.  The factors implicated in western monarch decline include:  (1) milkweed loss following prolonged drought, (2) land development that reduces overwintering habitat and/or breeding habitat, and (3) pesticide use.

Does it make sense for Oregon gardeners ~ particularly those in Western Oregon ~ to plant milkweed to support western monarchs, given that conventional dogma suggests that monarchs don’t migrate through or utilize breeding sites in Western Oregon?

I suggest that it can’t hurt for Oregon gardeners to plant milkweed in an effort to support the Western Monarch.  Although monarchs may not be common outside of southern Oregon, what little data there is suggests that monarchs may at least be migrating through ~ and in some cases may be breeding in ~ broad areas of Oregon.  What data do I have to support this assertion?


  1. A map of the known and potential monarch breeding areas in the western U.S. includes (as best as I can read) monarch breeding records in Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Harney, Lane, Benton, Washington, Multnomah, Wasco and Deschutes counties.  I do not have access to the data that was used to construct the map, but it appears as if the researchers are relying on museum records.  So, the identified breeding sites probably represent a record of a monarch specimen from a museum, which was collecting during the summer at a particular locale.  If this is true, there are records of summer monarchs in both eastern and western Oregon locales.  These may be ‘vagrants’ that wander off of their migration path, but they may also be breeding adults.
  2. The Butterflies and Moths of North America site has user-verified records (with photos) of monarchs reported for nearly every Oregon county.  I was able to access details for the three most recent sitings.  I’ve paraphrased the details of the sitings, below, so that you can see that there is evidence of monarch breeding in southern Oregon (caterpillars in Josephine County) and adult migration through the Willamette Valley (strong adult flights ~ rather than tattered-winged vagrants).
    • June 10, 2014, Benton County, OR, one adult monarch sipping nectar from showy milkweed (Asclepias speciosa).
    • June 21, 2014, Black Bear Bar along a wild and scenic section of the Rogue River, OR.  Monarch caterpillars munching on showy milkweed.
    • June 20, 2014, Lane County, OR, one adult monarch flying around and sipping nectar from Buddleia.  Flight was strong and direct.  Perhaps a migrant. Over the past few years, several organizations have been promoting the planting of milkweed plants, in order to provide host plants for monarch butterflies.
  3. The adults I've seen in Oregon (Douglas County, Lane County, Linn County) have had intact wings and scales - not what I expect from strays far from their host plants/flight path.

What type of milkweed should you plant?  Opt for native milkweeds, and avoid tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica).  The Xerces Society has a wonderful publication that details the milkweed plants native to Oregon.  These include:

  • Asclepias cordifolia (purple milkweed):  scattered in south and southwest Oregon
  • Asclepias cryptoceras ssp. Davisii (Davis’ milkweed): scattered in central and eastern Oregon
  • Asclepias fascicularis (narrow-leaved milkweed):  scattered across Oregon
  • Asclepias speciosa (showy milkweed):  widespread across Oregon

You will most easily be able to find seed of Asclepias speciosa from local nurseries, who may also have Asclepias tuberosa (butterfly weed, native to the Eastern US) and Asclepias syriaca (common milkweed, native to Europe).  Asclepias tuberosa and Asclepias syriaca, like many milkweeds, can have weedy tendencies.  They are called milkWEEDS, after all.  But, with this weediness comes the potential to invade areas outside of your garden.

Thus, when selecting milkweed, try to stick to native species that are appropriate for your area ~ such as Asclepias speciosa ~ in order to limit the introduction of non-native plants in natural areas.  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Knowledge is personal

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 2:56pm

Knowledge is personal!

A while ago I read a blog by Harold Jarche. He was talking about knowledge management (the field in which he works). That field  makes the claim that knowledge can be transferred; he makes the claim that knowledge cannot be transferred.  He goes on to say that we can share (transfer) information; we can share data; we cannot share knowledge. I say once we share the information, the other person has the choice to make that shared information part of her/his knowledge or not. Stories help individuals see (albeit, briefly) others’ knowledge.

Now,  puzzling the phrase, “Knowledge is personal”.  I would say, “The only thing ‘they” can’t take away from you is knowledge.” (The corollary to that is “They may take your car, your house, your life; they cannot take your knowledge!”).

So I am reminded, when I remember that knowledge is personal and cannot be taken away from you, that there are evaluation movements and models which are established to empower people with knowledge, specifically evaluation knowledge. I must wonder, then, if by sharing the information, we are sharing knowledge? If people are really empowered? To be sure, we share information (in this case about how to plan, implement, analyze, and report an evaluation). Is that sharing knowledge?

Fetterman (and Wandersman in their 2005 Guilford Press volume*) says that “empowerment evaluation is committed to contributing to knowledge creation”. (Yes, they are citing Lentz, et al., 2005*; and Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995*., just to be transparent.) So I wonder, if knowledge is personal and known only to the individual, how can “they” say that empowerment evaluation is contributing to knowledge creation. Is it because knowledge is personal and every individual creates her/his own knowledge through that experience? Or does empowerment evaluation contribute NOT to knowledge creation but information creation? (NOTE: This is not a criticism of empowerment evaluation, only an example using empowerment evaluation of the dissonance I’m experiencing; in fact, Fetterman defines empowerment evaluation as “the use of evaluation concepts, techniques, and findings to foster improvement and self-determination”. It is only later in the volume cited that the statement of knowledge creation)

Given that knowledge is personal, it would make sense that knowledge is implicit and implicit knowledge requires interpretation to make sense of it. Hence, stories because stories can help share implicit knowledge. As each individual seeks information to become knowledge, that same individual makes that information into knowledge and that knowledge implicit.  Jarche says, “As each person seeks information, makes sense of it through reflection and articulation, and then shares it through conversation…” I would add, “and shared as information”.

Keep that in mind the next time you want to measure knowledge as part of KASA on a survey.

my .

molly.

  1. * Fetterman, D. M. & Wandersman, A. (eds.) (2005). Empowerment evaluation principles in practice. New Y0rk: Guilford Press.
  2. Lentz, B. E., Imm, P. S., Yost, J. B., Johnson, N. P., Barron, C., Lindberg, M. S. & Treistman, J. In D. M. Fetterman & A. Wandersman (Eds.), Empowerment evaluation principles in practice. New York: Guilford Press.
  3. Nonaka, I., & Takeuchi, K. (1995). The knowledge creating company. New York: Oxford University Press.

The post Knowledge is personal appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Twilight Tour to Fort Hoskins

Forestry Events - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 2:34pm
Monday, June 29, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Work has been underway at the Fort Hoskins Historic Park, to restore and enhance its ecological and historical legacy. Small Woodland Owners are invited along with the general public, to join us to learn about operations to expand remnant prairie habitat and enhance structural diversity through a variable density thinning of Douglas-fir.

Speakers to include Adam Stebbins (Benton County Natural Areas and Parks), Mark Miller (Trout Mountain Forestry) and Bill Mahr (Oregon Department of Forestry).

Presented by Benton County, OSU Extension, Oregon Department of Forestry and the Benton Chapter of the Small Woodlands Association. 

Anyone wanting to car pool from Corvallis can meet like-minded people at the Benton County Extension office around 4:45.

First-year START orientation

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 06/29/2015 - 2:34pm
Monday, June 29, 2015 (all day event)

First-year START is an extensive two-day orientation, advising, and registration program with sessions offered June through September, attendance on both days is required. New Student Programs also offers a program for parents and family members of first-year students on the same day for an additional fee.

For more information, registration and other START session dates see First-Year START Information

First-year START orientation

Health & Wellness Events - Sun, 06/28/2015 - 2:33pm
Sunday, June 28, 2015 (all day event)

First-year START is an extensive two-day orientation, advising, and registration program with sessions offered June through September, attendance on both days is required. New Student Programs also offers a program for parents and family members of first-year students on the same day for an additional fee.

For more information, registration and other START session dates see First-Year START Information