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Wildfire Preparedness Workshop for Farm/Forest Owners

Forestry Events - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 2:40pm
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Oregonians live in a fire-prone environment, but there are effective practices for minimizing impacts of fire in your neighborhood.  Are you and your community prepared for wildfire?  Do you want to know how you can give your home and property the best chance to survive it? 

To learn more, attend this program in any of three locations. The sessions will be led by OSU Extension Forester, Glenn Ahrens joined by representatives from Oregon Department of Forestry at each location. Presentation, discussion, and reference material will cover:

  • Firewise practices for creating defensible space around homes and buildings.
  • Thinning, pruning, and groundcover management practices to reduce fire hazards in woodlands.
  • Community Wildfire Protection Planning for neighborhoods.
  • Sources of assistance for assessing risk, planning and implementing fuels reduction and other treatments to reduce hazards.
  • Fuels reduction grants and cost-sharing opportunities for the future.

There is no fee, but space is limited and pre-registration is required. Or call 503-655-8631 or email jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu.

Oregon Season Tracker: An OSU Extension Citizen Science Program

Forestry Events - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 2:40pm
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

As a citizen scientist volunteer you will gather scientific data on precipitation and seasonal plant changes (phenology) at your home, woodland, farm, ranch or school to share with other observers and research partners statewide. Do you like the outdoors and like the idea of contributing to science research? If so, join us and become an OST citizen scientist volunteer!

Registration link on website, or questions email

$40 per individual or family sharing materials. $30 for Linn County residents requesting a discount from LCEA grant. Includes program-approved rain gauge. 

Season Tracker - Clatsop

Forestry Events - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 2:40pm
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

This training program connects volunteers to OSU researchers studying weather and ecology.

Volunteers collect and report data on precipitation and native plant seasonal changes from their backyard, farm,
woodland or schoolyard.
1. Register and complete online training at home (approx. 2-3 hrs.)
2. Attend the Nov 15th hands-on skill building session and pick up your rain gauge.
3. Start tracking!

Register by Nov 1st at http://bit.ly/ORSeasonTrackerTraining

Willamette Valley Agriculture Expo

4-H Events - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 2:40pm
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Largest Agriculture Expo in the Pacifici NW!  Over 175 exhibitors featuring over 140,000 square feet of exhibits.  Classes and CORE training, goods and services for the agriculture industry 3 Big Days, 4 BIG Buildings FULL of displays.

Free Admission for Agriculture students (pre arrangements requirement)

Willamette Valley Agriculture Expo

Food Events - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 2:40pm
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Largest Agriculture Expo in the Pacifici NW!  Over 175 exhibitors featuring over 140,000 square feet of exhibits.  Classes and CORE training, goods and services for the agriculture industry 3 Big Days, 4 BIG Buildings FULL of displays.

Free Admission for Agriculture students (pre arrangements requirement)

Willamette Valley Agriculture Expo

Small Farms Events - Wed, 11/15/2017 - 2:40pm
Wednesday, November 15, 2017 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Largest Agriculture Expo in the Pacifici NW!  Over 175 exhibitors featuring over 140,000 square feet of exhibits.  Classes and CORE training, goods and services for the agriculture industry 3 Big Days, 4 BIG Buildings FULL of displays.

Free Admission for Agriculture students (pre arrangements requirement)

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Willamette Valley Agriculture Expo

4-H Events - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Largest Agriculture Expo in the Pacifici NW!  Over 175 exhibitors featuring over 140,000 square feet of exhibits.  Classes and CORE training, goods and services for the agriculture industry 3 Big Days, 4 BIG Buildings FULL of displays.

Free Admission for Agriculture students (pre arrangements requirement)

2017 OSU Land Steward Training

Forestry Events - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Early Bird Registration before Aug. 1 save $50:   Register online here
Registration Deadline Aug. 15; Cost Full Registration price: $200 individual, $275 Couple.

For more information visit The Land Steward Web Page or call 541-776-7371

Apply today to participate in this fun and informative, field-based educational program that helps landowners learn what they have, decide how to manage it, and make a plan to get there. The program is based out of the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, 569 Hanley Road, Central Point.

 
The Land Steward Program, is an 11-week field-based course.  It is designed to help landowners, from small plots to large acreage, develop a management plan to accomplish their goals.
 
The program covers a full spectrum of land management considerations, from forests to farms, soils, water, pasture management, fire awareness, wildlife, economics and connection to resources that help landowners implement their plans.  Participants receive handouts, references, resources, professional presentations and site visits to bring the learning alive!

Basic Forest Measurement Tools Workshop

Forestry Events - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

This hands-on workshop introduces participants to tools commonly used to measure trees, forests, and the land they grow on. Instruction will include proper tool use, general accuracy, choosing a tool, and available resources. Tools covered include: clinometer, Woodland Stick, compass, loggers tape, diameter tape, increment borer, and GPS.

Register Online (credit/debit) at:  http://extension.oregonstate.edu/douglas/classes-events

 

 

 

Willamette Valley Agriculture Expo

Food Events - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Largest Agriculture Expo in the Pacifici NW!  Over 175 exhibitors featuring over 140,000 square feet of exhibits.  Classes and CORE training, goods and services for the agriculture industry 3 Big Days, 4 BIG Buildings FULL of displays.

Free Admission for Agriculture students (pre arrangements requirement)

Farmer Workshop

Small Farms Events - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM
The High Desert Food & Farm Alliance is partnering up with OSU Extension's Clare Sullivan to put on an amazing workshop at Seed to Table Farm in Sisters next Tuesday Nov 14th from 3-5 PM. This is a great opportunity to learn how OSU Extension can benefit your farm through programs and research. 
We will have discussions on soil fertility and best management practices of season extendersand invite all of you to share knowledge of getting the most out of season extenders. We'll also tour several different styles of high tunnels and have information on how to get funding for them (that's the big question isn't it?)! 
Tom Bennett from NRCS will be there to answer any questions about the High Tunnel Initiative, which is a fabulous grant opportunity that could help you get a High Tunnel on your farm. We will also discuss another funding opportunity through HDFFA. 
We're happy to announce that we've made this exciting professional development opportunity FREE and open to everyone (so invite your farmer friends and farm crew/interns). We'll also be providing light refreshments. PLEASE RSVP by calling (542) 390-3572 or emailing shaili@hdffa.org  
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training Course- HERMISTON, OR

Small Farms Events - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 (all day event)

Event Details

Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training Course – HERMISTON, OR

 

Tuesday, November 14, 2017 (All Day Event)

 

Registration cost: $25, includes PSA Grower Training manual (printed and electronic copies); Certificate of Completion, morning coffee and refreshments, and lunch.

Registration is required. Register by Nov. 7, 2017 on-line at: PSA Grower Training

Location:
Eastern Oregon Trade & Event Center

1705 E. Airport Road

Hermiston, OR 97838

 

Questions? Contact Stuart Reitz: 541-881-1417, stuart.reitz@oregonstate.edu or Sue Davis: 503-807-5864, sdavis@oda.state.or.us

Who Should Attend

Fruit and vegetable growers and others interested in learning about produce safety, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule, Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs), and co-management of natural resources and food safety. The PSA Grower Training Course is one way to satisfy the FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirement outlined in § 112.22(c) that requires ‘At least one supervisor or responsible party for your farm must have successfully completed food safety training at least equivalent to that received under standardized curriculum recognized as adequate by the Food and Drug Administration.’


What to Expect at the PSA Grower Training Course

The trainers will spend approximately seven hours of instruction time covering content contained in these seven modules:

  • Introduction to Produce Safety
  • Worker Health, Hygiene, and Training
  • Soil Amendments
  • Wildlife, Domesticated Animals, and Land Use
  • Agricultural Water (Part I: Production Water; Part II: Postharvest Water)
  • Postharvest Handling and Sanitation
  • How to Develop a Farm Food Safety Plan

In addition to learning about produce safety best practices, key parts of the FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirements are outlined within each module. There will be time for questions and discussion, so participants should come prepared to share their experiences and produce safety questions.


Benefits of Attending the Course

The course will provide a foundation of Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and co-management information, FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirements, and details on how to develop a farm food safety plan. Individuals who participate in this course are expected to gain a basic understanding of:

  • Microorganisms relevant to produce safety and where they may be found on the farm
  • How to identify microbial risks, practices that reduce risks, and how to begin implementing produce safety practices on the farm
  • Parts of a farm food safety plan and how to begin writing one
  • Requirements in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule and how to meet them.

After attending the entire course, participants will be eligible to receive a certificate from the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO) that verifies they have completed the training course. To receive an AFDO certificate, a participant must be present for the entire training and submit the appropriate paperwork to their trainer at the end of the course.

Location:

 Eastern Oregon Trade & Event Center, 1705 E. Airport Road Hermiston, OR 97838

Contact:

Stuart Reitz, 541-881-1417

This event appears on the following calendars:

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Willamette Valley Agriculture Expo

Small Farms Events - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, November 14, 2017 9:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Largest Agriculture Expo in the Pacifici NW!  Over 175 exhibitors featuring over 140,000 square feet of exhibits.  Classes and CORE training, goods and services for the agriculture industry 3 Big Days, 4 BIG Buildings FULL of displays.

Free Admission for Agriculture students (pre arrangements requirement)

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Home from the Sea

Terra - Mon, 11/13/2017 - 8:51am

A multi-year study of the marbled murrelet, a threatened West Coast seabird that nests as far as 50 miles inland, aims to discover the animal’s habitat needs and understand the reasons for the species’ ongoing population decline in the Northwest.

In addition to determine the needs of this elusive bird, the study aims to help forest managers on public and private lands balance habitat conservation with timber land management.

Illustration by Brian Woodbridge

The project is possible because of an increase in funding for research in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University provided by the state Legislature in 2015 with broad support from the timber industry and conservation groups. “We are investing in this project because all interests want to know the breeding habitat requirements of the marbled murrelet, so that land management decisions in our productive coastal forests benefit from the best data and science available,” said Thomas Maness, dean of the college.

“Managing our forests is not just about producing timber. It’s also about habitat. We need to understand where these birds go to nest and the best way to protect this species while actively managing our forests to produce timber revenue that is vital to state and local economies.”

The project is managed through the Institute for Working Forest Landscapes at Oregon State and is a joint effort between researchers at the College of Forestry and the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife in the College of Agricultural Sciences. It aims to answer questions about how forests can be managed for both murrelets and timber. “Murrelets prefer mature, late-successional forests, but they may not be restricted to old growth,” said James Rivers, professor of animal ecology in the college and the lead scientist on the project.

“The goal of our project is to determine the murrelets’ requirements for nesting, to learn more about where the birds are located on the landscape and to understand the factors that influence nest success and their relationship to active forest management.”

The long-lived, dove-sized marbled murrelet spends most of its time in coastal waters dining on krill, other invertebrates and forage fish such as herring, anchovies, smelt and capelin. They nest in mature and old-growth forests and typically produce only one offspring per year, if the nest is successful.

Solitary Birds

Many seabird species, such as common murres, terns and gulls, tend to nest in colonies, but murrelets are comparatively solitary, nesting in the forest and sometimes within small groups. They typically lay their single egg high in a tree on a horizontal limb that is at least 4 inches in diameter, said Rivers.

Globally, marbled murrelets are one of the few seabirds that nest in this fashion. Scientists don’t know why the birds have evolved this particular habit. “The end goal for these birds is to be very secretive and quiet so predators don’t find their nests and they can produce young,” said Rivers.

Researchers monitor radio-tagged marbled murrelets on the Oregon coast (Photo courtesy of Kim Nelson)

“We know we have nesting habitat for murrelets throughout our coastal forests. But we don’t have large sample sizes of nests. If you look at data along the coast from California to Washington, central Oregon has the highest population based on surveys of birds at sea. The Siuslaw National Forest is in that area, and we think the birds may be going in there to nest.”

Only 75 nests have been documented in Oregon since OSU avian ecologist Kim Nelson, a scientist on the project, identified the first one in 1990. “I was on Marys Peak in 1985 when I heard a seabird and wondered what this bird is doing so far from the ocean,” said Nelson. She saw murrelets that year at some of her study sites in the Coast Range.

Three years later, she began a series of systematic murrelet surveys funded by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the U.S. Forest Service. Progress was slow, since identifying the birds required people to be physically present at specific locations by dawn for extended periods of time and to listen for the birds’ smooth, high-pitched call. Nonetheless, they found more than 20 active nests and hundreds of occupied sites throughout the Oregon Coast Range.

Tree Climbers

In a project funded in the 1990s by the Oregon Department of Forestry and the National Council for the Advancement of Air and Stream Improvement, a forest-products industry research organization, Nelson and other scientists climbed about 5,000 trees in a search for murrelet nests. That study identified an additional 45 nests in Oregon and more in Washington, although most of those nests were not active. “Thus, there is limited information about whether those nests were successful and what factors played a role in any nesting failures that may have occurred,” said Rivers.

Researchers listen for signals from marbled murrelet tags. (Photo courtesy of Kim Nelson)

Along the West Coast, marbled murrelets have been found as far south as Baja California, where they winter, and as far north as the Aleutian Islands. Their populations have been declining by about 4 percent a year in Washington, Oregon and California.

In California, the birds are federally listed as threatened, primarily because of low recruitment of new individuals into the population. The Alaska population is not considered endangered, although population declines have been documented there as well.

The first known murrelet nest was found in the California redwoods in 1974. Based on studies of known nests in the listed range, scientists have found that Steller’s jays and other corvids, such as crows and ravens, are the main predators of murrelet nests.

The researchers aim to learn more about how human activities in the forest affect the risk that predators pose to murrelets. Little is known regarding the effects of logging, camping and the presence of garbage dumps on predator numbers and the chances that predators will find and depredate murrelet nests.

Other unknowns about the birds include how long they live (estimated to be 10 to 15 years), the juxtaposition of nesting to foraging areas and whether individual birds shift their primary feeding areas along the coast from one place to another.

Illustration by John Megahan

To answer such questions, members of the OSU research team have been capturing murrelets on the ocean, tagging the birds with miniature VHF radio transmitters and tracking where they go. Only adult birds with a “brood patch,” a spot with little or no feathers on the breast, are tagged. Such patches indicate that the bird is preparing to breed and incubate an egg.

Last spring, researchers succeeded in capturing and tagging 61 birds. “That was a huge success. We weren’t even sure we’d be able to capture birds on the open ocean,” said Rivers.

Other research methods include the use of infrared cameras to watch nests 24/7, drone-mounted cameras to search for nests in the forest canopy and a customized audio recorder that can record murrelet calls and help researchers document inland movements.

When the birds are stressed by a lack of food, they have been known to forgo reproduction and not lay any eggs, said Nelson. This year, some of the birds that were captured on the central Oregon coast have been tracked to areas south of Cape Blanco where foraging conditions may be better.

Long-term studies such as this enable scientists to understand how birds adjust to unpredictable ocean conditions, which can influence murrelet behavior from year to year. “We will be able to document rare conditions that might not be detected by a typical two- to three-year study,” said Rivers. “Those conditions might have important consequences for the population.”

Other scientists on the project include Dan Roby, ornithologist in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. In the College of Forestry, participating researchers include Matt Betts, associate professor and specialist in landscape ecology; Joe Northrup, postdoctoral scientist; and Cheryl Horton and Lindsay Adrean, faculty research assistants.

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The post Home from the Sea appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Community Forestry Days at Hopkins Demonstration Forest

Forestry Events - Sat, 11/11/2017 - 2:36pm
Saturday, November 11, 2017 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM

We need your help to create, support, and maintain
forestry education opportunities at Hopkins. is is your chance to learn by doing a variety of projects in a sustainably managed woodland. Learning by doing – it’s the Hopkins way we manage our forest.


Upcoming Projects and Events include:
• Preparing thousands of “tree cookies” for holiday fundraising to support Hopkins Demonstration Forest, in
partnership with the Aveda Institute and Dosha Salon.
• Installing long-term measurement plots in the Red Alder Plantation Demonstration Area – the plantation is now going on 12 years old.
• Marking trees for thinning in “Margaret’s Unit”, the 15 acre plantation named aer Margaret Hopkins, planted by students and volunteers in 1992-1993 after harvesting that was done to facilitate Margaret’s donation to create Hopkins Demonstration Forest.
• On the grounds: winterization chores, clean gutters, water lines, road drainage, and culvert inspection.
• In Everett Hall: set-up and decorate Christmas tree, swag and other holiday decorations
• In the Shop: winter inventory of all tools (both power and hand). The power tools will be tested to make sure they work and winterized if appropriate.

LEARN BY DOING—IT’S THE HOPKINS WAY WE MANAGE
OUR FOREST!
Registration is requested. Contact jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu or Jean
at 503-655-8631

A delicious hot lunch will be provided. Contact Peter Matzka at peter.matzka@oregonstate.edu

Wildfire Preparedness Workshop for Farm/Forest Owners

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 2:35pm
Thursday, November 9, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Oregonians live in a fire-prone environment, but there are effective practices for minimizing impacts of fire in your neighborhood.  Are you and your community prepared for wildfire?  Do you want to know how you can give your home and property the best chance to survive it? 

To learn more, attend this program in any of three locations. The sessions will be led by OSU Extension Forester, Glenn Ahrens joined by representatives from Oregon Department of Forestry at each location. Presentation, discussion, and reference material will cover:

  • Firewise practices for creating defensible space around homes and buildings.
  • Thinning, pruning, and groundcover management practices to reduce fire hazards in woodlands.
  • Community Wildfire Protection Planning for neighborhoods.
  • Sources of assistance for assessing risk, planning and implementing fuels reduction and other treatments to reduce hazards.
  • Fuels reduction grants and cost-sharing opportunities for the future.

There is no fee, but space is limited and pre-registration is required. Or call 503-655-8631 or email jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu.

Native Tree Indentification and Fall Basket Workshop

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 2:35pm
Thursday, November 9, 2017 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Come learn how to identify native trees & shrubs around your woodland, and make a festive fall centerpiece basket utilizing the specimens we collect!

This event is free! Snacks provided!

Registration Required: Tiffany.fegel@oregonstate.edu or 971-409-4030

Woodland Management Shortcourse - Linn County

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 2:35pm
Thursday, November 9, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

The Basic Woodland Management Shortcourse is an Extension program ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property. It gives a broad introduction to woodland ownership activities. It is offered in four evening sessions with a Saturday fieldtrip. Course themes include:
     • Getting Started - Assessing your property and your site
     • What’s Going on in Your Woods? - Understanding tree biology and forest ecology
     • Taking Care of Your Woods - Tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control
     • Getting it Done - Safety, timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations.

 

Registration by October 20th. Register online or call the Benton County Extension 541-766-6750  

Space is limited and registration is required.

Citizen Fire Academy - Douglas County

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 2:35pm
Thursday, November 9, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Congratulations!!!   It is Graduation day!

What the Health Film Screening

Health & Wellness Events - Thu, 11/09/2017 - 2:35pm
Monday, November 20, 2017 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Filmmaker Kip Andersen uncovers the secret to preventing and even reversing chronic diseases, and he investigates why the nation's leading health organizations doesn't want people to know about it. 
Join us in Milam 219 on Monday, Nov. 20th at 5pm to get vegucated! Snacks will be provided.