Feed aggregator

The Ins & Outs of Special Forest Products

Forestry Events - Sat, 02/18/2017 - 2:36pm
Saturday, February 18, 2017 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Learn the basics of setting up a small business for the purpose of marketing your non-timber forest products—the greenery, berries, medicinals, fungi and landscape plants—that you might like to sell from your forest. Look at different marketing strategies and methods commonly used in this business. This is a “no-spin” class... just the skills you need to know to be successful. Find out about the laws and regulations, time management realities to accommodate, contracting, personnel management, and get a tour of the product warehouse and much more.....

Information and Registration

Oregon Small Farms Conference

Small Farms Events - Sat, 02/18/2017 - 2:36pm
Saturday, February 18, 2017 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

The Oregon Small Farms Conference is a daylong event geared toward farmers, agricultural professionals, food policy advocates, students and managers of farmers markets.  Thirty educational sessions are offered on a variety of topics relevant to the Oregon small farmers and include a track in Spanish. Speakers include farmers, OSU Extension faculty, agribusiness, and more.

More information available here:  http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/sfc

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Sleep, Chronic Disease and Health: Still Emerging as a Research Field?

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 2:40pm
Friday, February 17, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

"Sleep, Chronic Disease and Health: Still Emerging as a Research Field?" Javier Nieto, MD, PhD, MHS, MPH, Dean, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University.

Javier Nieto has developed an extensive and significant body of work in the areas of survey research, epidemiologic methods, cardiovascular disease epidemiology, and epidemiology and health consequences of sleep disorders.

Specific areas of research interest include the relationship between sleep breathing disorders and inadequate sleep on chronic diseases (including clinical and subclinical cardiovascular disease, cancer, and mood disorders) as well as furthering our understanding of upstream determinants of health.

He has been the principal investigator and collaborator on numerous research projects and has written over 250 publications and book chapters. Javier has also served as the director of the Division of Primary Health Care in the Province of Segovia in Spain, as a founding director of the Survey of the Health of Wisconsin (SHOW), and as a consultant for a variety of organizations including the NIH, CDC, American Heart Association, Sleep Research Society, Pan American Health Organization, and others.

Javier Nieto joined the College of Public Health and Human Sciences as the Dean in Fall 2016. He earned his MD from the University of Valencia in Spain and his PhD in Epidemiology from John Hopkins University. He also holds a Master in Health Sciences degree from John Hopkins and an MPH degree from the University of Havana, Cuba.

The college-wide research seminar is Co-Sponsored by the College Research Office; the Hallie Ford Center; the Center for Healthy Aging; the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods Nutrition and Preventive Health; and the Center for Global Health.

The seminar series provides a forum for faculty in the College of Public Health & Human Sciences and other researcher to present and discuss current research in public health and human sciences in an environment conducive to stimulating research collaboration and fostering student learning.

Faculty and students from the Division of Health Sciences and other colleges, research centers and institutions are encouraged to participate. 

Webinar: Timber tax filing for the 2016 tax year

Forestry Events - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 2:40pm
Friday, February 17, 2017 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Join this webinar to get the latest tax information, filing season updates, and tax tips. Log in at http://www.forestrywebinars.net/.

On-Farm Food Safety Project

Small Farms Events - Fri, 02/17/2017 - 2:40pm
Friday, February 17, 2017 (all day event)

The OSU Center for Small Farms has teamed up with FamilyFarmed to bring their On-Farm Food Safety Project to Oregon in February in three day-long workshops: February 16, 17, and 19.

These workshops, taught by Atina Diffley, nationally known farmer & on-farm food safety expert, will cover practical food safety strategies for your farm, along with up-to-date guidance on FSMA requirements and compliance strategies.

Workshop #1 is designed for mid-scale produce farmers

  • February 16, 2017
  • OSU North Willamette Research & Extension Cente, Aurora, OR

Workshop #2 is designed for small-scale, diversified produce farmers

  • February 17, 2017
  • Food Innovation Center, Portland, OR

Workshop #3 is designed for small-scale diversidied produce farmers

  • February 19, 2017
  • OSU Alumni Center, Corvallis, OR

 

For more information or to register, contact Heidi Noordijk (heidi.noordijk@oregonstate.edu) or visit this info & registration page

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Woodland Talk: Update on Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine

Forestry Events - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 2:36pm
Thursday, February 16, 2017 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM
This class will provide an overview of past efforts to restore Willamette Valley ponderosa pine and discuss the current issues facing pine in the Valley. Highlights of lessons learned will be discussed, along with guidance on why, where, and how to manage ponderosa pine here.

The Willamette Valley Ponderosa Pine Conservation Association (WVPPCA) formed in 1994 to protect and restore a species that appeared threatened in the Willamette Valley. In the 22 years since, the Association has accomplished its initial objectives and defined a new set of targets to address its mission.

Instructors: Mike Barsotti, Executive Director WVPPCA, Joe Holmberg, Board Member WVPPCA, Jim Merzenich, Ponderosa Pine Grower, Linn County, OR and Bill Marshall, Cascade Timber Consulting.

Sponsored by the Linn Chapter of OSWA and OSU Extension.

Woodland Management – Basic Forestry Shortcourse

Forestry Events - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 2:36pm
Thursday, February 16, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This five-session course is ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property. It also serves as preparation for the OSU Master Woodland Manager Training. Topics covered include:
•Getting Started: Assessing your property and your site
•What’s Going on in Your Woods? Understanding tree biology and forest ecology
•Taking Care of Your Woods: Tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control
•Getting it Done: Safety, tools and techniques, timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations.

Instructor: Glenn Ahrens, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent.

Registration required: Cost for the course is $40 for one participant/$50 for two or more participants from the same family. Please pre-register no later than February 5. Use the form on the next page or contact Jean at
503-655-8631 or jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu.

Questions? Contact Glenn Ahrens, 503-655-8631 or glenn.ahrens@oregonstate.edu.

Master Woodland Manager Course

Forestry Events - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 2:36pm
Thursday, February 16, 2017 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Do you want to make sure your forest is resilient to fire, pests or diseases?  Are you interested in how your land can better suit wildlife, timber production, or recreation? Would you like to make sure your roads are well-built, and know that you filed your taxes correctly? The Master Woodland Manager (MWM) program shows you how to “read” your woodland by understanding local ecological factors as well as how to conduct assessments to determine where your woodland is heading as it grows and matures. You will learn how various management activities can help you meet your long term vision for the property.   This is the flagship course of the OSU Extension Forestry program.  MWM volunteers represent a 20 year legacy, and include a wide array of people and woodlands throughout Oregon. Whether you own 5 or 1,000 acres, the MWM program will help you gain skills for tending your woodland and provide opportunities to share your passion for stewardship.  View the Master Woodland Manager application/registration brochure.

On-Farm Food Safety Project

Small Farms Events - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 2:36pm
Thursday, February 16, 2017 (all day event)

The OSU Center for Small Farms has teamed up with FamilyFarmed to bring their On-Farm Food Safety Project to Oregon in February in three day-long workshops: February 16, 17, and 19.

These workshops, taught by Atina Diffley, nationally known farmer & on-farm food safety expert, will cover practical food safety strategies for your farm, along with up-to-date guidance on FSMA requirements and compliance strategies.

Workshop #1 is designed for mid-scale produce farmers

  • February 16, 2017
  • OSU North Willamette Research & Extension Cente, Aurora, OR

Workshop #2 is designed for small-scale, diversified produce farmers

  •  February 17, 2017
  • Food Innovation Center, Portland, OR

Workshop #3 is designed for small-scale diversidied produce farmers

  • February 19, 2017
  • OSU Alumni Center, Corvallis, OR

 

For more information or to register, contact Heidi Noordijk (heidi.noordijk@oregonstate.edu) or visit this info & registration page

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Cider & Perry Orcharding

Small Farms Events - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 2:36pm
Thursday, February 16, 2017 8:45 AM - 4:00 PM

Back by popular demand, NABC offers a workshop tailor made for the Orchardist wanting to grow cider & Perry fruit in marine climates. Gary Moulton, local Pomologist & Orchardist, will take you throught everything you need to know at this one-day workshop, addressing the critical issues for marine climate orcharding of these specalty fruits. Topics include:

  • Cider & Perry Varietals (discussion, sampling)
  • Soil Fertility and Amendmants
  • Planning, Planting & Orchard Layout
  • Rootstock, Irrigation, Harvest Methods
  • Pest Control
  • Grafting
  • Pruning, Training & Fruit Thinning

If you have unidentified fruit from your orchard, please feel free to bring a sample for indentification.

Workshop Registration Fee: $95.00

Refreshments and lunch will be provided.

Register online at: www.agbizcenter.org (Classes & Workshops) 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Amber reflections from the scientist who inspired Jurassic Park

Terra - Thu, 02/16/2017 - 8:56am

By Katharine de Baun, College of Science

George Poinar, Jr., a courtesy professor in the Department of Integrative Biology, together with his wife, Roberta, inspired the original science behind the book and movie Jurassic Park when they published a paper in Science showing that chromatin-like material in nuclei of a 40-million-year-old fly in Baltic amber was still recognizable. The paper provided author Michael Crichton with a plausible scientific basis for the fiction of obtaining dinosaur DNA from mosquitoes preserved in 100-million-year-old amber.

Over a long and storied career, Poinar has made some extraordinary discoveries.

Alien-looking 100-million-year-old insect recently discovered in amber

In 2006 he discovered the oldest bee ever known, a 100-million-year-old specimen preserved in amber that called for the classification of a new hybrid wasp-bee family, Melittosphecidae, supporting the theory that bees evolved from meat-eating wasps. In 2014 he unveiled an ancient flower which might have been pollinated by such a bee, providing the oldest evidence of sexual reproduction in a flowering plant – a Cretaceous-period angiosperm replete with pollen tubes and pollen-dusted stigma, the same mechanisms used by flowers to reproduce today. And in 2017, he discovered a bizarre and alien-looking insect with bulging eyes and a 180-degree-swiveling triangular head, features so unusual that the bug required the creation of a new order of insects.

Many of Poinar’s discoveries were launched here at Oregon State University, home to Poinar and his wife and co-author Roberta since 1995. Recently, he offered us some “amber” reflections on his extensive career and life to date.

 What brought you to OSU?

There were several reasons. My wife Roberta and I wanted to get away from the congestion in the Bay Area, and Corvallis seemed the ideal college town, like the one I grew up in in Berea, Ohio (home to Baldwin-Wallace College). There were also some scientists up here I wanted to work with regarding amber fossils.  One of these was paleobiologist Art Boucot. We eventually wrote a book together titled Fossil Behavior Compendium.

I also wanted to work on amber flowers with Ken Chambers in Botany (College of Agricultural Sciences). Since then we have published a number of papers on flowers from Dominican, Mexican, Baltic and Burmese amber. I also wanted to finish my book on life in the Pacific sand dunes. I had studied the dunes in California and needed to study the northern ones in Oregon and Washington. So Roberta and I purchased a little dune house in Waldport where I set up a laboratory and every weekend went over there or to other Oregon and Washington beaches to study the plant and insect life. The final book, entitled A Naturalist’s Guide to the Hidden World of Pacific Northwest Dunes, was published last year by Oregon State University Press.

How have you been involved over the years with the university?  

Ever since 1995, when I arrived and was offered a position as Courtesy Professor, I have conducted all of my research at OSU and given several lectures in Paleontology and Entomology over the years. Also, I donated several ancient fossilized gum and amber specimens from New Zealand, along with cones and leaves of the rare Kauri tree (Agathis sp.)(Araucariaceae) to the Botany Department.

As a paleobiologist, you’ve examined the remains of many extinct species. Where are we headed now as a planet/life form in terms of extinction?

Extinction is bound to come to all species in one way or another. There are many reasons why species become extinct and today humans are but another cause of extinctions, aside from those caused by natural events (volcanism, comets, earthquakes, diseases, etc.). Our goal, as humans, is to live peaceful, healthy, productive lives as long as we can. There is much we can do to mitigate our worst effects.

How has your work influenced how you think about your life  today?

I was very fortunate to have a mother interested in nature and teachers and professors who encouraged my interests in biology. Serendipity has also played a large part in my life. It involves having the nerve to jump at opportunities that come only once in a lifetime. I have no regrets.

Are movies like Jurassic Park the best way to convey scientific research and its implications to the general public? 

Movies and fiction stories do convey messages, but the messages are more futuristic than realistic, and often exaggerate the menacing aspects to elicit an emotional reaction. Based on my experience teaching nature to kids at YMCA camps years ago, we are born with an inquisitive nature and are fascinated with life around us.  It is just that later, many of us fall under the influence of commercialization and find it difficult to amalgamate our lives with the natural world.

What advice would you give a young scientist today, just starting out?

Choose a subject that interests you and study it as long as you can, no matter what life throws at you.  As long as you are fascinated with your work, it isn’t really work and that part of your life can be exciting and at least bearable. The education process never ends, even when you finish your formal education. New discoveries show that there is always more to learn

When you look at creatures from 100 million years ago preserved in amber, do they speak to you?  If so, what is the message?  

These strange, amazing life forms from the past, most of which differ from anything around today, challenge our present classification of organisms. When I look at them, frozen in time millions of years before we evolved, I imagine them saying, you will never be able to understand what I was, how long I survived and what caused my demise. And they are right.

The post Amber reflections from the scientist who inspired Jurassic Park appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

El Arrecife Heroico

Terra - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 2:42pm

Por David Baker / Fotos de Darryl Lai y David Baker

Valeria Pizarro deja salir el aire de su chaleco y respira por su regulador de buceo a medida que se sumerge en aguas verdes que parecen una sopa de arvejas. Aunque el fondo del mar queda solo a unos pocos metros debajo, ella no puede verlo. El sedimento y las algas que se encuentran en la superficie del agua le dan un color café-verdoso al agua. Ella está a la caza de corales, pero ella sabe que estas volubles criaturas prefieren aguas prístinas, de condiciones óptimas; sus esperanzas de encontrar corales no son altas.

Es el año 2013 y Pizarro, una bióloga colombiana especializada en ecosistemas marino costeros, está buceando en la entrada de la Bahía de Cartagena, una de las más contaminadas de América Latina. Es una Bahía con alto tráfico de botes y grandes barcos, a donde llegan aguas negras y grises de los residentes de la Bahía, y es uno de los puertos más antiguos del hemisferio. Sus aguas son turbulentas por el tráfico constante de inmensos barcos cargueros. Y en fotos satelitales, se observa cómo la pluma del Canal del Dique (aguas del río Magdalena) entran a la Bahía y cómo sus aguas cafés van invadiendo como un abanico las aguas azules brillantes del Caribe. Es el último lugar donde uno espera encontrar corales.

Después de renunciar a su puesto en la academia, Pizarro fue contratada por una firma que estaba encargada de realizar los primeros pasos para dragar el segundo canal de acceso a la Bahía de Cartagena siguiendo la locomotora de desarrollo del gobierno nacional. El plan era relocalizar las pocas colonias de coral que pudieran estar en el área donde se iba a dragar el canal.

Sin embargo, a Pizarro y a su empleador les espera una sorpresa. Lo que descubrieron llevó a la coalición de un pequeño grupo de apasionados por los corales con el fin de proteger un arrecife que florece en un lugar tan inesperado. Estos científicos quieren entender cómo estos corales se han adaptado a la contaminación, la misma que está acabando con los arrecifes del mundo. El equipo incluye investigadores colombianos, pescadores locales e investigadores de reconocimiento internacional de dos universidades de Estados Unidos: Universidad Estatal de Pensilvania y Universidad Estatal de Oregon.

Durante su inmersión fatídica, mientras Pizarro se sumerge a través de la oscuridad, el agua de repente se aclara. La capa nubosa sólo se mantiene en la parte superior, y a medida que ella descienda, es recibida por una vista panorámica de colonias de coral gigantes. Se encuentra en medio de un arrecife próspero que se extiende en todas las direcciones hasta donde ella puede ver.

Al terminar su buceo de búsqueda de corales, cuando Pizarro sale a la superficie dice “tenemos un problema, acá no hay uno o unos cuantos corales, acá hay un arrecife coralino”. La persona en el bote revisó y confirmó las coordenadas, estaban en donde tenían que estar. Pizarro le dice a la firma consultora que no se puede proceder con la movilización de los corales. Ahí hay un arrecife coralino saludable en el área. Pero le piden que siga su trabajo. Pizarro continua la evaluación y cuando la buscan para hacer parte de equipos de trabajo para hacer un canal alterno, declina las ofertas. Poco tiempo después está trabajando con Ecomares, una ONG dedicada a la conservación y restauración de la diversidad biológica. Su mayor proyecto es proteger el arrecife que descubrió recientemente.

Lo que Pizarro encontró abre un nuevo frente en la pelea global que hay para salvar y proteger los arrecifes coralinos del mundo, que en la actualidad se encuentran en peligro de desaparecer. La mitad de estos ecosistemas han desaparecido en los últimos cincuenta años, y ninguna región ha sido tan afectada como el Caribe. El descubrimiento de Pizarro podría ser la clave para descifrar como los corales pueden sobrevivir el riesgo que están enfrentando como resultado de las actividades antrópicas.

jQuery(document).ready(function($){ var img = $('.aesop-parallax-sc.aesop-parallax-sc-21709-1 .aesop-parallax-sc-img') , setHeight = function() { img.parent().imagesLoaded( function() { var imgHeight = img.height() , imgCont = img.parent() imgCont.css('height', imgHeight) }); } setHeight(); $(window).resize(function(){ setHeight(); }); }); // end jquery doc ready ">

Recompensa por la Biodiversidad

El arrecife es conocido localmente como Varadero. Y mientras son pocos los investigadores que conocen su existencia, los pescadores de la zona saben de ella hace mucho tiempo. Estos arrecifes son centros de biodiversidad. Los corales son colonias compuestas por pequeños animales llamados pólipos, estos animales son capaces de secretar exoesqueletos de carbonato de Calcio, un compuesto que en tiempos geológicos pueden convertirse en piedra caliza y mármol. En un arrecife, los corales forman grandes estructuras llamadas arrecifes, donde se crean hábitats para una gran cantidad de organismos: crustáceos, moluscos, esponjas, pulpos y algas. Y por supuesto peces, muchos, muchos peces.

Por generaciones los pescadores de la población de Bocachica (Isla de Tierra Bomba) han transitado esta agua, algunas veces sin conocer que debajo de esa capa de lodo hay un colorido paisaje submarino, pero sabiendo que hay algo allá abajo que atrae peces como un imán.

Bocachica se encuentra en el extremo de una isla, al lado del canal de entrada de grandes embarcaciones a la Bahía de Cartagena. Las casas colindan con el Fuerte de San Fernando, una construcción española del Siglo 17, desde donde se vigilaba el ingreso de las embarcaciones. Las calles de Bocachica son de lodo y están cubiertas por vidrios rotos. Las casas destartaladas pero pintadas de colores brillantes, el fuerte restaurado y una estrecha playa delimitada por palmas dan la idea de un paraíso trópical.

En el pueblo hay pocos servicios, comparados a los que encontramos en las grandes ciudades: no hay calles pavimentadas, no hay un lugar donde se pueda disponer la basura adecuadamente y casi nulo servicio de salud. La llegada de la electricidad es tan reciente que los niños lo recuerdan.

Sin embargo, los isleños son expertos en sobrevivencia. Además de pescar, muchos subsisten del turismo, la mayoría trabajando en los botes que ofrecen el servicio de transporte para turistas que llegan a la ciudad de Cartagena y que buscan playas con aguas transparentes, lejos de las aguas de la bahía de Cartagena. Y aunque a Bocachica solían llegar estos turistas, la ampliación del canal de acceso existente y el cambio del azul turquesa de las aguas por el café de la bahía, ha resultado en la reducción de los visitantes a la zona. El dragado del segundo canal podría ser desastroso, reduciendo el número de peces y de turistas.

“¿Qué va a pasar con nosotros cuando destruyan el arrecife? Las cosas van a ser más complicadas. ¿De qué vamos a vivir?” pregunta Hector Avendaño. Él es un pescador y negociante, con una sonrisa generosa. Él es uno de los Ocho Hermanos, empresa de ocho hermanos (como su nombre indica) que tienen unas embarcaciones de pesca y otras de turismo. Además, Hector tiene un pequeño local con su mamá en la playa donde ofrece el servicio de restaurante, y que presta para dar clases a los niños cuando es necesario. Está siempre listo para vender una gaseosa o una cerveza helada, o dar un paseo en lancha hasta el muelle del otro lado de la isla por unos cuantos pesos. A Hector le gusta su vida en la isla.

“Me gusta la tranquilidad que siempre hemos tenido. Es un lugar calmado, tranquilo. Por ahora. Aún cuando no sepamos qué es lo que está pasando mar afuera,” dice, mirando a la distancia los buques que esperan ingresar a la bahía.

Por ahora, los Ocho Hermanos se las arreglan. Sus botes están en buen estado; sus motores andan suavemente. Y cuando se dañan, los hermanos tienen el conocimiento para repararlos en el camino con una cuerda y un par de alicates. Pero como el resistente arrecife donde ellos pescan, no están muy seguros que puedan aguantar la fuerza del progreso.

¿Qué les pediría a las autoridades que están planeando dragar el canal? “les pediría que pongan sus manos en el corazón. ¿Cómo pueden destruir algo que ha estado allí creciendo por tantos años?”.

jQuery(document).ready(function($){ var img = $('.aesop-parallax-sc.aesop-parallax-sc-21709-2 .aesop-parallax-sc-img') , setHeight = function() { img.parent().imagesLoaded( function() { var imgHeight = img.height() , imgCont = img.parent() imgCont.css('height', imgHeight) }); } setHeight(); $(window).resize(function(){ setHeight(); }); }); // end jquery doc ready ">

Secretos de Varadero

Recientemente, los Ocho Hermanos han encontrado nuevos clientes para sus servicios, un creciente número de científicos que están fascinados por la existencia y sobrevivencia de Varadero ante la cantidad de presiones antrópicas en las que viven. Este resistente arrecife y su vigor exuberante desafía todo lo que los investigadores han aprendido sobre los corales. Valeria Pizarro no quiere adivinar el por qué este arrecife está en tan buen estado allí, “no tenemos una respuesta”, dice “creo que tenemos que estudiarlo para entender que está pasando allí”.

A nivel mundial los arrecifes coralinos están amenazados por estresores locales que incluyen el desarrollo costero, sobrepesca y polución. En Varadero estas tres actividades se llevan a cabo desde hace varios siglos. La bahía recibió a los conquistadores españoles a finales del siglo XVII y se volvió un centro importante de su imperio. El Canal del Dique es construido en 1582 y desde ese momento comenzó a transportar sedimentos y contaminantes a la bahía. A unos cuantos metros del arrecife los entonces esclavos construyeron el fuerte de San Fernando. Dichos constructores son los ancestros de los habitantes de la Bocachica actual, quienes han sobrevivido gracias a la pesca que realizan en las aguas circundantes.

Pero las presiones sobre los arrecifes no sólo provienen de estresores locales, sino también del cambio climático. Alrededor del 80% de la cobertura coralina del Caribe se ha reducido, en muchos casos a causa de eventos de blanqueamiento que han ocurrido por el aumento de la temperatura en los mares. Los arrecifes coralinos son melindrosos cuando se trata de sus preferencias de clima, y por esto es que sólo se encuentran en un área muy pequeña del mundo, cerca al Ecuador donde las temperaturas se mantienen relativamente constantes.

El arrecife del Varadero se desarrolla de manera exitosa a pesar de las presiones humanas y el aumento de la temperatura. A diferencia de otros corales en el Caribe, este arrecife ha mostrado pocas señales de blanqueamiento. Y esto último es de gran interés para los científicos, quienes quieren saber el por qué.

“Por alguna razón estos corales están saludables, están tolerando una gran cantidad de insultos ambientales”, dice Mónica Medina, investigadora de la Universidad Estatal de Pensilvania que consiguió fondos de “RAPID” (fondos reservados para propuestas de investigación urgentes) de la Fundación Nacional de la Ciencia (Estados Unidos, NSF son sus siglas en inglés) para estudiar lo más que se pueda este arrecife antes que lo destruyan con el dragado. Nacida en Colombia, Medina se siente como en casa bajo el techo del local de los Avendaño. Le sonríe a una mujer mayor de edad que anda dando vueltas ofreciendo cocadas para la venta, cocadas que están derritiéndose con el calor que hace. Medina compra algunas cocadas para colaborarle a la señora, pero también para probar los dulces de casa.

Medina no hace solo ciencia, en su cabeza también está la conservación. “No es sólo importante estudiar este arrecife, pero también es importante protegerlo porque estamos tratando de encontrar relictos de arrecifes que son resistentes, que son resilientes, que son realmente robustos ante el cambio climático y las actividades antrópicas, y este parece ser uno de ellos”.

La red de trabajo de Medina es global. Ella trabaja con Rebecca Vega Thurber de la Universidad Estatal de Oregon, experta en microbiología de corales, en otro proyecto financiado por la NSF. Juntas han estado colectando datos a nivel global para mapear los corales a nivel microbiano y así aprender los secretos que les permite a algunos corales sobrevivir, mientras que otros mueren bajo las presiones humanas. Vega Thurber ha colectado muestras de todas partes del mundo para procesar en su laboratorio en Oregon, pero considera que Varadero es vital. “Ese es un lugar muy especial y por eso tenemos que voltear nuestra mirada hacía allá”, dice, “si podemos comprender algunos de las razones mecanísticas por la que los corales pueden vivir bajo las condiciones que viven, entonces de pronto podamos ayudar a otros corales cuando las presiones ambientales provocadas por el hombre aumenten”.

Salvar los corales se ha vuelvo algo más que personal para Vega Thurber, conmoviéndola a medida que ha viajado por el mundo colectando datos. Ella ha sido testigo de la dependencia que tienen las comunidades locales de los arrecifes que los rodean. “Esto me ha hecho entender que nuestro trabajo se puede sumar a esfuerzos que las agencias y comunidades locales están haciendo para salvar sus arrecifes”.

Vega Thurber y Medina concuerdan que ya no es sólo ciencia. Es la sobrevivencia del hombre. Es por esto que Medina se ha aliado con un contingente local. Valeria Pizarro maneja el proyecto y ella considera que Hector Avendaño y los otros Ocho Hermanos son parte del equipo, no son sólo los que proveen el servicio de transporte a los investigadores desde Cartagena a Varadero. Ella considera que su conocimiento tradicional y experiencia en esta agua es un activo invaluable.

Y es cierto, mientras que la pérdida de Varadero tan poco tiempo después de su descubrimiento puede ser un duro golpe para la ciencia, es para Avendaño y sus hermanos, quienes viven allí los que más perderían de ser dragado el canal alterno. Ellos son los que nadan sus riscos y cañones en busca de los pargos rojos y los pulpos. Ellos son los que van a verse forzados a ir cada vez más lejos, a trabajar por más tiempo y en algunos casos, a usar artes o métodos de pesca más riesgosos para su vida. Su ya escaso turismo será aún menor si se aumenta el número de buques que acceden a la bahía y continúan los procesos de erosión costera. Para Medina, explorar este arrecife y conocer la gente que depende de él se ha vuelto un punto decisivo en su carrera. “Yo siempre me pregunto, ‘por qué hice un doctorado?’” confiesa Medina. Pero después de hablar largo y tendido con los pescadores de Bocachica, ella encuentra la respuesta a su pregunta. “Ayer, cuando íbamos de regreso a Cartagena, pensé, ‘por esto es que tengo un doctorado’. Se siente sincero, en mi corazón”, dice, respirando hondo y volteando a mirar a los niños que se han reunido alrededor del local, atraídos por las luces usadas para la entrevista y los extraños que han vuelto a su isla una vez más.

jQuery(document).ready(function($){ var img = $('.aesop-parallax-sc.aesop-parallax-sc-21709-3 .aesop-parallax-sc-img') , setHeight = function() { img.parent().imagesLoaded( function() { var imgHeight = img.height() , imgCont = img.parent() //imgCont.css('height',Math.round(imgHeight * 0.69)) imgCont.css('height',Math.round(imgHeight * (0.80-0.06*1))) if ( $(window).height < 760 ) { imgCont.css('height',Math.round(imgHeight * (0.70-0.06*1))) } }); } setHeight(); $(window).resize(function(){ setHeight(); }); var img = $('.aesop-parallax-sc.aesop-parallax-sc-21709-3 .aesop-parallax-sc-img'); img.parallax({speed: 0.1}); }); // end jquery doc ready

Las consecuencias no deseadas de la paz

Hay presiones globales y presiones locales. Y hay políticas nacionales y un conflicto interno. Todos estos factores moldean el futuro de Varadero. Colombia está surgiendo de de uno de los conflictos más largos del hemisferio. La tentativa de paz entre las Fuerzas Revolucionarias de Colombia (FARC) y el gobierno central es la puerta para el desarrollo en áreas que antes estaban bajo el mando de los rebeldes. Esto a su vez crea una necesidad para expandir la infraestructura portuaria y la capacidad de transporte marítimo, como el nuevo canal alterno que destruiría Varadero.

Pizarro entiende bien la complicada historia de su país. Su tío, Carlos Pizarro, fue uno de los fundadores del M-19, un grupo guerrillero que se armó y lucho en contra del gobierno entre las décadas de 1970 y 1980. Carlos Pizarro eventualmente cambió sus combates en el campo por una sonrisa política, y fue candidato presidencial después que el grupo armado dejo las armas y firmó la paz con el gobierno de turno, y trató de integrarse al proceso político. Poco después en abril de 1990, cuando estaba liderando las encuestas, fue asesinado.

La familia de Valeria Pizarro siempre ha tenido un enfoque sobre los problemas sociales. “Las discusiones en las reuniones familiares siempre han sido sobre como cambiamos las cosas para ‘salvar el mundo’ y solucionar los problemas del país”, explica. Ella cree que proteger extraordinaria biodiversidad de Colombia es clave para el futuro del país. Ella lleva el espíritu guerrero de su familia con la causa de salvar los arrecifes coralinos.

Después de guiar a los visitantes en un tour subacuático por Varadero para que su improbable magnificencia sea vista de primera mano, Pizarro los lleva a conocer a otro miembro de la coalición. En un apartamento acogedor que queda cerca al aeropuerto de Cartagena, conocen a Rafael Vergara. Con pelo largo y canoso, cogido en una cola hacía atrás, con una voz gruesa y una mirada brillante que sugiere que no siempre hay que tomarlo en serio, él ha vivido una buena parte de la historia colombiana.

El apartamento de Vergara está lleno de arte del Amazonas, pequeños fetiches y grandes pinturas de sirenas con los senos a la vista sobre su cama. Una foto a blanco y negro, colgada en una de las paredes, muestra a Vergara en la montaña sentado al lado del apuesto Carlos Pizarro, quien a vista de pájaro uno puede confundir con el Che Guevara por su barba y boina. Vergara también hizo parte del grupo M-19. Pero ahora él ha canalizado su espíritu revolucionario en el papel de abogado ambientalista y periodista que usa la columna del periódico que lo publica para luchar por la protección del arrecife de Varadero.

“Este es un arrecife heroico. Ha resistido todo. Ha resistido polución. Ha resistido sedimentación. Ha resistido aguas polutas. Y ha continuado resistiendo, pero ahora es nuestro turno”, Dice, golpeando su pecho como un comandante rebelde llamando a sus seguidores en la selva.

Sus comentarios hacen referencia al apodo de Cartagena, la ciudad Heroica, que sostiene desde los tiempos en que sus murallas resistieron las invasiones piratas. Tanto es así que el fuerte cerca al pueblo de Bocachica se construyó para proteger la bahía y el primer canal de acceso que fue dragado durante la colonia hace 500 años. Durante las invasiones, los esclavos que mantenían en los fuertes debían levantar una cadena enorme que iba de un fuerte a otro a través del canal, bloqueando efectivamente la entrada de embarcaciones enemigas. Varadero, con sus riscos naturales de carbonato de calcio depositado por los corales, sirvieron como una extensión natural a estas fortificaciones. La geografía y biología fundidas para hacer parte integral de la historia de la ciudad.

Que el idealismo de la generación de Rafael Vergara y Carlos Pizarro haya pasado de forma pragmática al activismo ambiental de Valeria Pizarro y Mónica Medina es parte de una trayectoria de esperanza en Colombia. En un momento la toma de armas para la resolución de conflictos pareció la única solución. Pero los colombianos ahora sienten que pueden trabajar con el sistema en vez de coger las armas. “Ahora tenemos que salir en su defensa porque ellos no pueden moverse”, dice Vergara sobre los arrecifes coralinos. “Su fuerza es su belleza para sobrevivir. Nuestra defensa tiene que ser un imperativo ético”.

Cartagena no solo un lugar donde la preservación de la biodiversidad de Colombia está en peligro, sino es la casa simbólica de otro enorme cambio: la firma del acuerdo de paz entre el gobierno y las FARC. El lunes 26 de noviembre 2016, el presidente Juan Manuel Santos y el líder de las FARC Rodrigo Londoño, ambos vestidos de blanco, apretaron sus manos acordando terminar cinco décadas de guerra civil. El evento estuvo marcado por el simbolismo. Con la muralla de la ciudad vieja como fondo, la multitud de observadores, también vestidos de blanco, vieron como las palomas alzaban vuelo mientras los jets pasaban sobre sus cabezas dejando tres columnas de humo amarillo, azul y rojo, los colores de la bandera de Colombia, mientras sonaba de fondo la “Oda a la Alegría” de Beethoven.

Pizarro estaba presente. “Para mí, estar allí fue muy emocionante – y un poco sobrecogedor”, cuenta. Ella estaba sentada con algunas de las víctimas del conflicto. “No podía dejar de pensar en lo maravilloso y al mismo tiempo, en los difíciles tiempos que nos esperan”.

Será maravilloso porque hablar de paz después de 50 años puede sólo inspirar esperanza – y difícil porque una transición así nunca es fácil. Y su preocupación es acertada. Una semana después de la firma, en un referendo nacional no se aceptó el acuerdo de paz. Muchos sintieron que el acuerdo era demasiado indulgente para las guerrillas armadas que habían causado tanto daño al país.

“Estuve deprimida por días y semanas. Era sobre lo único que hablaba con mis amigos y mi familia”. Dice Pizarro.

El pasado noviembre, el parlamento colombiano finalmente aprobó un acuerdo de paz revisado, dando así nuevas luces de esperanza. Irónicamente, este titubeo de paz puede haber ayudado a retrasar la destrucción de Varadero mientras inversionistas esperan y miran el progreso del proceso de paz antes de comprometerse con proyectos de gran infraestructura.

jQuery(document).ready(function($){ var img = $('.aesop-parallax-sc.aesop-parallax-sc-21709-4 .aesop-parallax-sc-img') , setHeight = function() { img.parent().imagesLoaded( function() { var imgHeight = img.height() , imgCont = img.parent() imgCont.css('height', imgHeight) }); } setHeight(); $(window).resize(function(){ setHeight(); }); }); // end jquery doc ready ">

Rutas alternativas de acceso

El futuro de Varadero no está definido. El desarrollo aún no ha comenzado, y hay otras opciones posibles. Una ruta más larga puede ser dragada para que los buques entren por Bocagrande, pero será mucho más costosa para dragar, más costosa para proteger de la erosión costera y por su localización los buques pasarían cerca de algunas de las construcciones más costosas de la ciudad, donde se elevan los rascacielos más altos de Cartagena. En Bocachica, sólo hay barro, ladrillos y casas pequeñas de pescadores.

Varadero aún se acurruca debajo de esa capa de agua lodosa. Los pescadores siguen derivando sobre sus corales, pescando desde pequeñas canoas y botes. Mónica Medina, Valeria Pizarro y su gran coalición de investigadores, pobladores locales y hasta un ex-guerrillero, realizan muestreos y transectos, toman datos, sacan fotografías en un intento de mapear y explorar el misterio que permite que estas colonias florezcan en un sitio tan poco común. Ellos esperan que al tener los ojos del mundo en su país, a medida que avanza el proceso de paz, haya un rayo de luz sobre los esfuerzos que están haciendo.

El arrecife heroico ha sobrevivido, en gran medida escondido a la vista, a lo largo de medio milenio de explotación y conflicto humano. Pero Medina cree que es tiempo de compartir el secreto de Varadero con el mundo. Este arrecife le da a los científicos esperanza. En un momento donde los corales están desapareciendo en todo el mundo, más rápido que nunca antes, con casi la mitad de los arrecifes del planeta casi desaparecidos o altamente degradados, Varadero ofrece la promesa que algunos corales pueden sobrevivir el embate. Teniendo el tiempo suficiente, los investigadores podrían descubrir las claves para que los humanos y los corales coexistan otros quinientos años.

Pero a medida que los buques de carga pasan lentamente por Bocachica, los científicos y los pescadores comprenden que algún día, el dragado del segundo canal puede empezar y Varadero puede volverse solo un recuerdo, un artefacto, otra parte de la historia trágica de la bella ciudad Heroica.

The post El Arrecife Heroico appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Christmas Tree Genetics & Tree Improvement Webinar Series

Forestry Events - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 2:38pm
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 10:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Understanding genetics and tree improvement is critical to the success of your Christmas tree farm, whether you know it or not. From selecting the right species for your site to starting your own seed orchard, tree genetics impact your operation every day.


In this five part webinar series, leading Christmas tree scientists from throughout the U.S. will present an in-depth discussion of the critical elements of Christmas tree improvement and how genetic selection can improve the growth, health, and quality of your trees and make your farm more profitable.


Webinar schedule:
Feb. 1 The Tree Improvement Process: Selection, Testing & Breeding
Feb. 8 Capturing Genetic Gain: Seed Collection Zones & Seed Orchards
Feb 15 Tree Improvement Techniques: Grafting, Controlled-pollination & Tissue Culture
Feb. 22 Tree Improvement Case Studies From Around the Country and Around the World
March 1 Future Issues: Genetic Engineering and Genomics of Fir Species


Presenters:

Rick Bates - Penn State University

Gary Chastagner - Washington State University

Bert Cregg - Michigan State University

John Frampton - North Carolina State University

Chal Landgren - Oregon State University

Lilian Matallana - North Carolina State University

Jim Rockis - Reliable Source Seeds and Transplants


Cost: No charge - registration is required. Register by January 25 at:
https://events.anr.msu.edu/ChristmasTreeWebinar2016/

Contact: Bert Cregg cregg@msu.edu 517-353-0335
Accommodations for persons with disabilities may be requested by contacting Jill O’Donnell, 231-779-9480 by January 25, 2017 to make arrangements. Requests received after this date will be fulfilled when possible.

Starker Lecture Series

Forestry Events - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 2:38pm
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
See website for details  

 

Dates:  

Thurs., January 19, Film. "Pedal Driven" at the Whiteside

Wed. Feb. 15. Dr. Nina Roberts, "The Big Picture"

Wed. Mar. 8. John Allen, "Managing Impacts of Recreation"

Wed. Apr. 12. Paul Jakus, "Economics"

Wed. May 17 Capstone Tour. "Local Perspectives"

Basic Woodland Management - Washington County

Forestry Events - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 2:38pm
Wednesday, February 15, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This five-session course is ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property. Topics covered include:
• Getting Started: Assessing your property and your site
• What’s Going on in Your Woods? Understanding tree biology, forest ecology and habitat
• Taking Care of Your Woods: tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control
• Getting it Done: Timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations.
• Field trip to see first-hand examples of what you’ve learned

Details...

• Cost for the course is $50 for one participant/$60 for two or more participants from the same family.
• Course is taught in a blended online/in person format. Participants will be given short online assignments to complete prior to each class session.
• Instructor is Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent - Columbia, Washington & Yamhill Counties
• To attend you must pre-register no later than January 25th. Use the form below or register online at: http://tinyurl.com/basicwoodlandmanagement.
• Questions? Contact Amy Grotta, (503) 397-3462 or amy.grotta@oregonstate.edu
Basic Woodland

What’s That Taste?

Terra - Wed, 02/15/2017 - 9:28am

Taste buds contain receptors to detect molecules in food and are concentrated on the tip, sides and back of the tongue.

SWEET

The sensation of sweetness is usually caused by sugars such as fructose, lactose, aspartame and saccharin. Other substances (alcohols, amino acids) can also activate cells that respond to sweetness.

SOUR

Sour flavors are generated mostly by acidic solutions such as lemon juice or organic acids. The sensation is linked to hydrogen ions in solution.

SALTY

Food containing table salt is mainly what we taste as salty. Mineral salts (potassium or magnesium) can also cause a sensation of saltiness but can also be bitter.

BITTER

A bitterness sensation is brought about by many different substances, such as quinine or caffeine. About 35 different proteins in sensory cells respond to bitter substances.

SAVORY

The “umami” taste is somewhat similar to the taste of meat broth. Glutamic is largely responsible for these flavors. Ripe tomatoes, meat and cheese all contain glutamic acid.

STARCHY (UNCONFIRMED)

Complex carbohydrate molecules are thought to be too large to interact with our taste receptors. Juyun Lim and her research team at Oregon State have found that carbs in rice, potatoes and other starchy foods generate a taste response. (See A Sense for Starch)

Adapted from the U.S. National Library of Medicine

The post What’s That Taste? appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

ODF, District Foresters Presentation

Forestry Events - Tue, 02/14/2017 - 2:34pm
Tuesday, February 14, 2017 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Jennifer Erdmann and Jeff Classen from the Dallas office on what you need to know for your next harvest and staying within the law.

Fruit Tree Pruning Workshop

Small Farms Events - Tue, 02/14/2017 - 2:34pm
Tuesday, February 14, 2017 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Professor emeritus, Ross Penhallegon has more than 50 years of orchard management experience—come learn from the best! Classes will be held rain or shine, so dress weather appropriate. There will be an opportunity for a hands-on activity after the workshops, so bring your gloves and pruners. Please register for one of the following classes. To register by phone call 541-967-3871. You may register online at http://tinyurl.com/jj57qsv, or drop by the Benton or Linn County OSU Extension Service office 
4077 SW Research Way, Corvallis (Benton)
33630 McFarland Rd, Tangent (Linn)
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Master Woodland Manager Training is coming to Central Oregon!

Forestry Events - Tue, 02/14/2017 - 6:11am
Thursday, March 30, 2017 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Master Woodland Manager (MWM) is our Forestry and Natural Resources Extension premier forest stewardship and volunteer program. This program has been running for over 25 years, serving more than 500 landowners around the state, and in 2017 it is coming to Central Oregon.

This program only comes around to a given region about every 10 years, so take advantage of this opportunity!

During the Master Woodland Manager program, you will:

• Visit woodlands and ranches around the region. Field days will occur in the Sisters, La Pine, Bend, and Prineville areas.

• Meet and learn from other woodland owners.

• Get to know our region’s forest and natural resource professionals from various agencies.

• Learn from Oregon’s State University’s forest, river, and wildlife experts!

• Gain knowledge and skills that you can apply on your property.

• Become part of Central Oregon’s tremendous woodland owner and forestry community.

This unique training combines at-home readings and videos, online discussions, and field days. This allows us to focus our face-to-face time in the field (instead of in the classroom enduring long lectures!), reinforcing concepts and practicing new skills.

Field days are spaced out so that there is enough time to do the pre-session preparation, and for you to apply concepts at home and ask questions as needed in between sessions.

Central Oregon MWM Agenda:

February 23: Introduction, Landscape Setting and Fire Ecology

March 15: Upland Ecology and Management

March 30: Business Management and Taxes

April 13: Riparian And Watershed Systems

May 4: Reforestation and Young Forests

May 25: Harvesting, Marketing Forest Products and Roads

June 15: Forest Health, Graduation Dinner

Master Woodland Manager Training is coming to Central Oregon!

Forestry Events - Tue, 02/14/2017 - 6:11am
Wednesday, March 15, 2017 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Master Woodland Manager (MWM) is our Forestry and Natural Resources Extension premier forest stewardship and volunteer program. This program has been running for over 25 years, serving more than 500 landowners around the state, and in 2017 it is coming to Central Oregon.

This program only comes around to a given region about every 10 years, so take advantage of this opportunity!

During the Master Woodland Manager program, you will:

• Visit woodlands and ranches around the region. Field days will occur in the Sisters, La Pine, Bend, and Prineville areas.

• Meet and learn from other woodland owners.

• Get to know our region’s forest and natural resource professionals from various agencies.

• Learn from Oregon’s State University’s forest, river, and wildlife experts!

• Gain knowledge and skills that you can apply on your property.

• Become part of Central Oregon’s tremendous woodland owner and forestry community.

This unique training combines at-home readings and videos, online discussions, and field days. This allows us to focus our face-to-face time in the field (instead of in the classroom enduring long lectures!), reinforcing concepts and practicing new skills.

Field days are spaced out so that there is enough time to do the pre-session preparation, and for you to apply concepts at home and ask questions as needed in between sessions.

Central Oregon MWM Agenda:

February 23: Introduction, Landscape Setting and Fire Ecology

March 15: Upland Ecology and Management

March 30: Business Management and Taxes

April 13: Riparian And Watershed Systems

May 4: Reforestation and Young Forests

May 25: Harvesting, Marketing Forest Products and Roads

June 15: Forest Health, Graduation Dinner