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The Synergy of Science & Industry

Forestry Events - Thu, 08/25/2016 - 2:37pm
Monday, August 22, 2016 8:00 AM - Thursday, August 25, 2016 5:00 PM

Experience the Synergy…

Over the last several years, researchers have helped open up many promising avenues for biochar market development in North America. Likewise, many entrepreneurs and small business owners have made investments to develop commercial markets. With so much research being published on biochar (over 5000 publications in 2015 alone!), there is a need to bring together these two groups to share information, lessons learned, and to solicit ideas on the pathway forward for biochar commercial development. The US Biochar Initiative and Sustainable Obtainable Solutions aims to bring together stakeholders in the applied biochar research community and the private sector to further biochar market development.

Who should attend?

This event is designed for farmers, foresters, policymakers, biochar producers, industry professionals and entrepreneurs. Students and interested citizens will also benefit from this event.

Registration will open in May 2016. See the website for more details: http://www.usbi2016.org

Biochar 2016

Forestry Events - Thu, 08/25/2016 - 2:37pm
Monday, August 22, 2016 12:00 PM - Thursday, August 25, 2016 12:00 PM

Over the last several years, researchers have helped open up many promising avenues for biochar market development in North America. Likewise, many entrepreneurs and small business owners have made investments to develop commercial markets. With so much research being published on biochar (over 5000 publications in 2015 alone!), there is a need to bring together these two groups to share information, lessons learned, and to solicit ideas on the pathway forward for biochar commercial development. The US Biochar Initiative and Sustainable Obtainable Solutions aims to bring together stakeholders in the applied biochar research community and the private sector to further biochar market development.

Who should attend?
This event is designed for farmers, foresters, policy makers, biochar producers, industry professionals and entrepreneurs. Students and interested citizens will also benefit from this event.

For more information, http://usbi2016.org/

Tree health in your neighborhood

Forestry Events - Wed, 08/24/2016 - 2:38pm
Wednesday, August 24, 2016 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

What’s causing tree dieback in your neighborhood this season? What can be done about it?
Problems with dying trees or partial dieback are continuing through the summer, particularly in Douglas-fir and increasingly in western redcedar. Common problems include:
•Drought and stem canker fungus
•Drought, bark beetles, and wood borers
•Root diseases and drought
•Stand density stress
•Maladaptation and off-site tree problems
•Leaf diseases and foliage dieback
•Soil problems and poor drainage
•Too wet and then too dry


Attend this evening session to learn and share about forest and tree health problems in the region this year. Bring your examples, photographs, and questions for discussion.

This session will be led by Glenn Ahrens, OSU Extension Forester.


Space is limited so registration is required. There is no fee.

Nanotechnology in Manufacturing for Semiconductor Applications and Beyond

Environment Events - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 2:36pm
Tuesday, August 23, 2016 10:45 AM - 11:45 AM

Join Dr. Bahar Basim,assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Ozyegin University in Istanbul, in a seminar focused on nanotechnology implementations that will enable the next-generation semiconductor industry through atomic scale devices.

Learn how accomplishments in microelectronics applications of the Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) process are used for the development of current and future semiconductor applcations to enable multilayer metalization.  

A Market for Barnacles

Terra - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 1:40pm

In Spain, a plate of gooseneck barnacles will set you back more than the cost of a lobster dinner. Known as percebes, goosenecks “set the palate in ecstasy,” a Barcelona chef recently told a reporter. Nevertheless, Julia Bingham winced a little last spring when asked if she had ever tried the tube-shaped delicacies while she was studying them as an undergraduate at Oregon State University.

“I get that question a lot, and it kills me to say ‘no,’” said Bingham, who had gingerly navigated the wave-tossed shore of Cape Perpetua to collect barnacle samples for her University Honors College thesis. “It’s supposed to be sweeter than crab or lobster and taste like the ocean.”

Gooseneck barnacles dot rocks at Smelt Sands beach in Yachats. (Photo: Julia Bingham)

In Spain and other parts of the world, that reputation has been the barnacles’ downfall. Harvesters go to extremes to scrape the crustaceans (relatives of shrimp and krill as well as crab and lobster) from the rocks. The fishers wade into pounding surf or hang precariously on ropes just above the waves. Populations of Pollicipes pollicipes collapsed as prices reached as high as $50 per pound.

During a summer 2015 field course at Oregon State’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, Bingham learned about the gooseneck problem. She also discovered that a similar species, Pollicipes polymerus, grows abundantly on the West Coast. She wondered if this animal, which lives among mussels and extends what amounts to a leg into the passing surf, could pose an opportunity for fishermen. And if so, how could Oregon avoid overharvesting local populations?

Goosenecks are opportunists. They sometimes grow on top of acorn barnacles. (Photo courtesy of Julia Bingham)

Bingham found that there was little published information about goosenecks on the Oregon coast. She sought research advice from OSU marine biologists Bruce Menge, Sally Hacker and Sarah Henkel. With help from two friends and fellow students, Max Afshar and Levi Vasquez, she did preliminary population surveys at Cape Perpetua and Cape Foulweather.

Last winter and spring, as a student in assistant professor Mark Novak’s marine ecology lab, Bingham launched the first systematic evaluation of gooseneck barnacle biology in Oregon. She “chased the low tide,” she says, meaning that she sometimes got up in the middle of the night to arrive at her Cape Perpetua field site before dawn when the tides were out far enough for her to safely do her research.

In 2015, her work earned a “best undergraduate paper” award at a meeting of the Western Society for Naturalists in California.

This summer, she is building on her results with support from Oregon Sea Grant. In a collaboration with University of Oregon professor Alan Shanks at the Oregon Institute of Marine Biology in Charleston and with Tom Calvanese, director of Oregon State’s Port Orford Field Station, she is surveying populations on jetties — rock walls built to enhance navigation — where commercial harvesting would likely start. She is also testing methods to encourage goosenecks to reproduce and grow.

As part of the project, Calvanese and Port Orford Sustainable Seafood, an organization that supports local fishers, will explore the possibility of developing a West Coast market for goosenecks. By encouraging collaboration between scientists, fishers and the public, Bingham and her team aim to foster a sustainable approach to management.

Julia Bingham

“The barnacles need specific conditions to colonize and settle,” Bingham says. “And they don’t grow everywhere. As they develop into adults, there’s a lot of mortality along the way. It takes a long time for them to reach harvestable size. The recruits take at least a couple of years to become adults, and growth tends to slow.

“Part of what makes the barnacles’ life history traits so sensitive to overharvest is that they settle onto each other,” she adds. “Harvesting clumps kills not just adults but the juveniles, which would already take a long time to grow enough to replace the harvested adults in the population.”

Shelby Walker, Oregon Sea Grant director, says she was deeply impressed by Bingham’s persistence and enthusiasm. “This is exactly the type of work that Sea Grant strives to support, a project that truly integrates research and community engagement,” she said.

In Spain and Portugal, scientists and fishers have worked to restore gooseneck populations without closing the fishery. Oregon has a chance to learn from that experience and get ahead of a new opportunity before problems arise, adds Bingham.

It may be well worth the wait. “I finally tried the barnacles,” she says. “Members of our research team boiled up some goosenecks from the rocks at one of our field sites. I can confirm that they are sweeter than crab with a distinctly salty ocean taste.”

In 2016, Bingham received her undergraduate honors degrees in biology and international studies from Oregon State.

Goosenecks share tidepools at Yachats Smelt Sands beach. (Photo courtesy of Julia Bingham)

The post A Market for Barnacles appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Solar Eclipse 2017

Terra - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 1:22pm

YOUR COMMUNITY — YOUR ECLIPSE

Did you know that the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse will pass directly over Corvallis?

Please join a town hall meeting to learn about the science of eclipses and have a discussion with civic leaders about this inspiring event.

Where: International Living Learning Center, Room 155, 1701 SW Western Blvd., Oregon State University

When: Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016, 6:00 – 8:00 pm

Sponsored by: Multiverse at UC Berkeley and Google Making & Science

Questions? Please email multiverse@ssl.berkeley.edu

The post Solar Eclipse 2017 appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Leave a Legacy: Land Conservancy Agreements

Small Farms Events - Tue, 08/23/2016 - 6:11am
Wednesday, August 24, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Craig Harper of SOLC.
Want your land stewardship/management values to continue when you move on to greener pastures? Craig Harper of the Southern Oregon Land Conservancy will walk you through the possibilities and processes of this options and share some examples from SOLC.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Organic Hispanic Farmer Evening

Small Farms Events - Mon, 08/22/2016 - 2:40pm
Monday, August 22, 2016 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM

 22 Agosto de 6 a 7 PM
¡Bienvenidos a la primera reunión para granjeros Hispanos de pequeña escala! Usted participara en
demonstraciones técnicas de métodos para producción orgánica y podrá probar las distintas bayas y
frutas en producción en la parcela certificada para enseñanza orgánica.  El evento es en Español con los siguientes talleres:

Muestreo de suelo y de tejido para manejo de la fertilidad del suelo y nutrición para plantas. Javier Fernandez-Salvador. Oregon State University.

Insumos para producción orgánica y uso de la lista de OMRI. Ana Negrete, Organic Materials Review Institute.


Realidades del manejo de pequeñas fincas: mano de obra, planificación, coordinación, y que hacer con excedentes de la cosecha. Claudia Garcia, Administradora del Proyecto de Bayas Orgánicas.

¿Dónde?
Parcela de Bayas Organicas. Club Organico de OSU.
34306 NE Electric Rd. Corvallis, OR 97333
Para mayor información, contacte a: Javier Fernández-Salvador: javier.f-s@oregonstate.edu 503-373-3766

Welcome to the first Hispanic small farmer evening gathering! You will be able to see demonstrations on
production techniques and taste berry products and fruit from the certified organic teaching parcel. The event will be in Spanish with the following short workshops:

  • Tissue and soil sampling for fertility and plant nutrition management. Javier Fernandez-Salvador.
  • OMRI listed inputs for organic farming. Ana Negrete, Organic Materials Review Institute.
  • Realities of small farm management: labor, planning, coordination and what to do with surplus harvest. Claudia Garcia, Organic Growers Club Berry Project Manager.

Where:
OSU Organic Growers Club Berry Project Parcel
34306 NE Electric Rd. Corvallis, OR 97333
For more information, contact Javier Fernández-Salvador: javier.f-s@oregonstate.edu 503-373-3766

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Lincoln County 2016 Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 2:35pm
Saturday, August 20, 2016 8:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Neighbor to Neighbor Woods Tour - Nicholas and Megan Dahl, LLC. Nic and Megan are investing in the first generation of a timberland company. They purchased their first property in 2012 and now own three parcels. They will discuss firsthand silvicultural experiences in dealing with economic, social, and environmental challenges restoring unproductive forestland into a new young forest. Tour focus: property history, planning harvest & restoration, use of herbicides and fire controlling brush, working with neighbors, and rebuilding old legacy roads to today's standards.

Registration Required: email oswaevents@gmail.com of (503) 588-1813, Registration deadline has been extended, but please let them know if you are joining by Friday evening.

Benton County OSWA members can ride to this event on the Starker Bus leaving from the Starker office in Philomath. Bus leaves at 7:00 am promptly, contact Gary Springer by email  or call the Starker office at 541-929-2477 to reserve a spot.

Directions; Tour will begin and end at 247 W Hwy 20, Toledo – Large red shop across the street from the Toledo Police Station. Parking available. Coffee and donuts at 8:30 am. Buses will transport participants to woods tour locations and back to shop for lunch.

Tour Sponsors: Oregon Tree Farm System, Oregon Small Woodlands Association, OSWA Lincoln County Chapter, Oregon Forest Resources Institute, and OSU Forestry Extension

Tour information contact: Jim James, Executive Director, Oregon Small Woodlands Association Office: (503) 588-1813, Cell: (541) 619-4252 

Linn County Tree Farmer of the Year Tour

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/20/2016 - 2:35pm
Saturday, August 20, 2016 4:00 PM - 7:30 PM
2016 tour and picnic/potluck will be at Joe and Shirley Holmberg’s property.Save the date and watch for more details.

Possible? You bet!

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 08/19/2016 - 3:50pm
Probable? Maybe. Making a difference is always possible.

Oxford English Dictionary defines possible as capable of being (may/can exist, be done, or happen). It  defines probable as worthy of acceptance, believable.

Ray Bradbury : “I define science fiction as the art of the possible. Fantasy is the art of the impossible.”

Somebody asked me what was the difference between science fiction and fantasy. Certainly the simple approach is that science fiction deals with the possible (if you can think it, it can happen). Fantasy deals with monsters, fairies, goblins, and other mythical creatures, i.e., majic and majical creatures.

(Disclaimer: I personally believe in majic; much of fantasy deals with magic.) I love the Arthurian legend (it could be fantasy; it has endured for so long it is believable). It is full of majic. I especially like  the Marion Zimmer Bradley book, The Mists of Avalon . (I find the feminist perspective refreshing.)

Is fantasy always impossible as Bradbury suggests, or is it just improbable?  (Do the rules of physics apply?) This takes me back to Bradbury’s quote and evaluation after the minor digression. Bradbury also says that “Science fiction, again, is the history of ideas, and they’re always ideas that work themselves out and become real and happen in the world.” Not unlike evaluation. Evaluation works itself out and becomes real and happens. Usually.

Evaluation and the possible.

Often, I am invited to be the evaluator of record after the program has started. I sigh. Then I have a lot of work to do. I must teach folks that evaluation is not an “add on” activity. I  must also teach the folks how to identify the difference the program made. Then there is the issue of outputs (activities, participants) vs. outcomes (learning, behavior, conditions). Many principal investigators want to count differences pre-post.

Does the “how many” provide a picture of what difference the program made? If you start with no or few participants  and you end with many participants, have you made a difference? Yes, it is possible to count. Counts often meet reporting requirements. They are possible. So is documenting the change in knowledge, behavior, and conditions. It takes more work and more money. It is possible. Will you get to world peace? Probably not. Even if you can think it. World peace may be probable; it may not be possible (at least in my lifetime).

my .

molly.

 

The post Possible? You bet! appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Hopkins to mark 25 years!

Forestry Events - Wed, 08/17/2016 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, August 17, 2016 2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Everyone is invited to a public re-dedication of the Hopkins Demonstration Forest. The event will be held on
Saturday, September 17. Tours and displays will be available in the afternoon beginning at 2:00 pm. A re-dedication ceremony at Everett (Forest) Hall will be at 4:00 pm. Details for the program are being developed now. “Save the Date” and plan to join the celebration!

Mike Bondi, one of Forest Forever, Inc. charter Board members and still on the Board, recalls the original dedication of Hopkins in September, 1991. “We gathered in the parking lot. It wasn’t even all graveled, then. There weren’t any buildings. But, we did have a nice new gate with incredible stonework, a very impressive entrance sign, and a beautiful cedar split-rail fence. Almost 200 people came out to support us. I guess more than anything, we had a vision.”

“It’s hard to believe it has already been 25 years,” said Ken Everett, FFI’s Executive Director and the only other charter board member still actively involved. “But, it’s even harder to comprehend all that has occurred at Hopkins over these years—the number of people who have come to our forest for learning, all of the improvements we’ve been able to make, the countless volunteers and hours of service that have been provided, and all of the amazing financial contributors and donors that have made the Hopkins Demonstration Forest a very special place.”

Join the celebration on September 17 to re-live the memories, see the present, and help us think about the future!

Yamhill Small Woodlands Tours

Forestry Events - Tue, 08/16/2016 - 2:34pm
Tuesday, August 16, 2016 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Two THINNING tours and a MONROE OAK MILL tour

Ken Nygren of Bell Pole has arranged two tours of mechanized thinning in a 30 year old stand:

Tour #2  5:00-7:00pm, TUESDAY August 16th - Same as #1, but WITHOUT processor in action.

Thinning tours REQUIRE guests to wear a HARD HAT and CLOSED TOE SHOES/BOOTS. For thinning tours meet at the Chemeketa Community College parking lot, 288 SE  Norton Lane, McMinnville, OR 97128 (across from the McMinnville Hosp.) to carpool. We will leave the parking lot 15 minutes after the start time of the tour.

Tour #3  9:00am, FRIDAY, August 26th- Monroe Oak Mill tour at 1335 W. Main St., Sheridan.

For mill tour bring HARD HATS, CLOSED TOE SHOES, and EYE & EAR PROTECTION.

For more information, please email Hal and Elin Hagglund at Hal.Elin@gmail.com.

 

Yamhill Small Woodlands Tours

Forestry Events - Mon, 08/15/2016 - 2:35pm
Monday, August 15, 2016 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Two THINNING tours and a MONROE OAK MILL tour

Ken Nygren of Bell Pole has arranged two tours of mechanized thinning in a 30 year old stand:

Tour #1  2:00-4:00pm, MONDAY August 15th - Watch the processor in action, discuss tree selection, spacing, and pole opportunities in thinning.

Tour #2  5:00-7:00pm, TUESDAY August 16th - Same as #1, but WITHOUT processor in action.

Thinning tours REQUIRE guests to wear a HARD HAT and CLOSED TOE SHOES/BOOTS. For thinning tours meet at the Chemeketa Community College parking lot, 288 SE  Norton Lane, McMinnville, OR 97128 (across from the McMinnville Hosp.) to carpool. We will leave the parking lot 15 minutes after the start time of the tour.

Tour #3  9:00am, FRIDAY, August 26th- Monroe Oak Mill tour at 1335 W. Main St., Sheridan.

For mill tour bring HARD HATS, CLOSED TOE SHOES, and EYE & EAR PROTECTION.

For more information, please email Hal and Elin Hagglund at Hal.Elin@gmail.com.

 

Lane County Tree Farmer of the Year - Woods Tour

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/13/2016 - 2:35pm
Saturday, August 13, 2016 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM

This tour, hosted by Lane County Small Woodlands Association, will provide insight into the management, harvesting, and milling of coastal forests.  Topics will include challenges and losses when managing riparian areas; considering species, terrain, and markets when planning a harvest; thinning Douglas-fir plantations; and milling your own logs with a portable sawmill. 

 

Cost: Free! - Includes coffee and Lunch, but pre-registration is required  

RSVP: Dick Beers - rbeers2606@comcast.net - 541-729-2516 

Community Forestry Days

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/13/2016 - 2:35pm
Saturday, August 13, 2016 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM

This is your chance to learn by doing a variety of projects in a sustainably managed woodland. Volunteers help with all the essential seasonal tasks of managing a working demonstration forest. Learning by doing – it’s the Hopkins way we manage our forest.

August 13: Cleaning and staining outbuildings (pump house, shop, and Hopkins Hall) and resurfacing of trails inthe Native Plant Garden.

Registration is requested.

For more information contact Peter Matzka at peter.matzka@oregonstate.edu

Clackamas County 2016 Woodland Farmer of the Year

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/13/2016 - 2:35pm
Saturday, August 13, 2016 4:00 PM - 8:00 PM

The Thronson family farm began with a homestead in 1887. The farm is now managed by Jack Thronson, and his extended family. Their forest stewardship activities are extensive and directly address their ambitious goals and objectives. Thronsons are leaders in demonstrating how to grow western redcedar and other species resistant to laminated root rot, a common problem afflicting Douglas-fir in NW Oregon.


Agenda:
4:00 pm Arrivals and social time
5:00 pm Dinner
6:00 pm Tree Farm Tour, Focus on:
1)History – Century Farm to Tree Farm, Homestead era to present
2)Conversion of non-stocked/brush-filled areas to fully stocked commercial timber
3)Thinning and root disease management to maintain forest health and vigor
4)Lessons from 25 years of establishing western redcedar stands
5)Managing for mixed species and diverse wildlife habitat

Directions
32881 S. Bud Smith Road, Molalla, Oregon.
Head east toward Molalla on Hwy 211 to Mathias Rd.
Veer right on Mathias Rd. (.2 miles)
Veer left on Feyrer Park Rd. (2.1 miles)
Turn right on Wright Rd. (.7 miles)
Turn left onto S. Fernwood Rd. (also called Callahan Rd.) (1.9 miles)
Turn left onto S. Bud Smith Rd. and look for the “Tree Tour” signs


Tour Sponsors: Oregon Small Woodlands Association, Clackamas County Farm Forestry Association, Oregon Tree Farm System, Oregon Forest Resources Institute, and OSU Extension Forestry


Admission and dinner is free but registration is required.

Vulnerability

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 08/12/2016 - 3:23pm

AEA365 ran a blog on vulnerability recently (August 5, 2016). It cited the TED talk by Brené Brown  on the same topic. Although I really enjoyed the talk (I haven’t met a TED talk I didn’t like), it was more than her discussion of vulnerability that I enjoyed (although I certainly enjoyed learning that vulnerability is the birth place of joy and connection is why we are here .

She talked about story and its relationship to qualitative data. She says that she is a qualitative researcher and she collects stories. She says that “stories are just data with a soul”. That made a lot of sense to me.

See, I’ve been struggling to figure out how to turn the story into a meaningful outcome without reducing it to a number. (I do not have an answer, yet. If any of you have any ideas, let me know.) She says (quoting a former research professor) that if you cannot measure it, it does not exist. If it doesn’t exist then is what ever you are studying a figment of your imagination? So is there a way to capture a story and aggregate that story with other similar stories to get an outcome WITHOUT REDUCING IT TO A NUMBER? So given that stories are often messy, and given that stories are often complicated, and given that stories are rich in what they tell the researcher, it occurred to me that stories are more than themes and and content analysis. Stories are “data with a soul”.

Qualitative Data

Yet any book on qualitative data analysis (for example or or ) you will see that there is confusion in the analysis process. Is it the analysis of qualitative data OR is it the qualitative analysis of data. Where do you put the modifier “qualitative”? To understand the distinction, a 2×2 visual might be helpful. (Adapted from Bernard, H. R. & Ryan, G. W. (1996). Qualitative data, quantitative analysis. Cultural Anthropology Methods Journal, 8(1), 9 – 11. Copyright © 1996 Sage Publications.)

We are doing data analysis in all four quadrants. We are analyzing and capturing the deeper meaning of the data in cell A. Yes, we are analyzing data in other cells (B, C, and D) just not the capturing the deeper meaning of those data. Cell D is the quantitative analysis of quantitative data; Cell B is the qualitative analysis of quantitative data; and Cell C is the quantitative analysis of qualitative data. So the question becomes “Do you want deeper meaning from your data?” or “Do you want a number from your data?” (I’m still working on relating this to story!)

It all depends on what you want when you analyze your data. If you want to reduce it to a number, focus on cells B, C, and D. If you want deeper meaning, focus on cell A. Depending on what you want (and how you interpret the data) will be the place where the personal and situational bias occur. No, you cannot be the “objective and dispassionate” scientist. Doesn’t happen in today’s world (probably ever–only I can only speak of today’s world). Everyone has biases and they rear their heads (perhaps ugly heads) when least expected.

You have to try. Regardless.

my .

molly.

 

 

The post Vulnerability appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Scribner Log Rule: What you can & can't do about it

Forestry Events - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 2:37pm
Wednesday, August 10, 2016 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Audience: This program is for woodland owners, ranchers, loggers and contractors or anyone who is interested in how logs are measured and scaled.

What: Ever wanted to know more about how logs are measured/scaled at the mill and what the Scriber log rule is all about?  This is your chance to find out.  Steve has put together a straight forward and informative program that will cover the basic ways timber products are measured, including board foot and cubic foot rules, history of log scaling, the Scribner log rule and how it is applied, third party scaling, how logs are measured, log defect and how it is deducted, problems to avoid when processing logs, natural log defects, purchase orders and scaling, and tracking logs from stump to mill.

This is a great opportunity to learn more about how our current and future log measurement system works and how you can make the most out of it when selling your timber.

Please register!

Log Scaling Workshop

Forestry Events - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 2:37pm
Wednesday, August 10, 2016 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Audience: This program is for woodland owners, ranchers, loggers and contractors or anyone who is interested in how logs are measured and scaled.

What: Have you ever wanted to know more about how logs are measured/scaled at the mill and what the Scriber
log rule is all about? This is your chance to find out. Steve has put together a straight forward and informative
program that will cover the basic ways timber products are measured, including board foot and cubic foot
rules, history of log scaling, the Scribner log rule and how it is applied, third party scaling, how logs are measured,
log defect and how it is deducted, problems to avoid when processing logs, natural log defects, purchase
orders and scaling, and tracking logs from stump to mill.
This is a great opportunity to learn more about how our current and future log measurement system works and
how you can make the most out of it when selling your timber.

Registration is required.