Feed aggregator

Ties to the Land - Lane County

Forestry Events - Sat, 10/14/2017 - 2:34pm
Saturday, October 14, 2017 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Secure the future of your woods at the upcoming Ties to the Land workshop hosted by OSU Extension, EWEB, and McKenzie River Trust. Participants will learn skills to preserve their family lands and with each generation involve more family members in the ownership and operation of their small woodland or farm-based businesses. The workshop's mix of presentations and practical exercises will focus on developing a shared vision and passion for the land, keeping the land in the family, and identifying and addressing the challenges facing family business.

Topics Included:

·Developing a shared vision and passion for the land

·Keeping the land in the family -maintaining generational ties

·Identifying and addressing challenges facing family business

Information and Registration

Uncovering burden of dementia in Lebanon: What next?

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 2:36pm
Friday, October 13, 2017 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

"Uncovering burden of dementia in Lebanon: What next?" Monique Chaaya, DrPH, is a Professor of Epidemiology in the Faculty of Health Sciences, American University of Beirut, Lebanon.

Dr. Chaaya’s research interests focus on mental health and tobacco control. She has conducted cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the mental health of vulnerable populations including pregnant women, prisoners of war, and displaced and older adults in underprivileged communities. She has also validated in Arabic five mental health scales such as the Arabic Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), the Arabic Perceived Stress Scale, and A-RUDAS (Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale).

Her interest in mental health of older adults began in 2000 when she joined a multidisciplinary Urban Health Research Group and served as a co-investigator on a comprehensive survey examining the health of disadvantaged older persons. In 2011 she received an NIH R21 grant to study the prevalence of dementia in Lebanon, in collaboration with international researchers from Denmark and the UK. Building on the NIH grant, she developed a cohort study on dementia (COLDS) funded by the Lebanese National Council for Scientific Research.

The focus of this study is to determine the incidence of dementia and other health outcome including mortality, hospitalization and institutionalization

She received her DrPH from the Department of Mental Health at John Hopkins School of Public Health. She served for 6 years as the chair of the Epidemiology and Population Health Department and played a major role in developing the proposal for a PhD in Epidemiology program, and revising the MPH and MS programs in Epidemiology and Population Health.  For the last 6 years, she has been involved in coordinating a training program at King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) and other academic units at the King Saud Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) to build research capacity of junior medical’/clinical researchers at KAIMRC.

The college-wide research seminar is Co-Sponsored by the College Research Office; the Hallie Ford Center; the Center for Healthy Aging; the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health; and the Center for Global Health. The seminar series provides a forum for faculty in the College of Public Health & Human Sciences and other researchers to present and discuss current research topics in an environment conducive to stimulating research collaboration and fostering student learning. Faculty and students from the Division of Health Sciences and other colleges, research centers and institutions are encouraged to participate.

We also encourage you to attend this Friday’s Music A La Carte: “OSU Music Faculty Showcase” to enjoy a Friday with both Art & Science! This free, lunch-hour concert series has been a tradition at Oregon State University since 1969 and features a variety of OSU music ensembles, faculty and student musicians, as well as regional, national and international guest artists. The concerts take place in the beautiful Memorial Union Lounge, beginning at 12 pm and lasting for approximately 45 minutes.

Information Session: Human Research Protection Program

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 2:36pm
Friday, October 13, 2017 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Information Session with CPHHS Graduate Students about the Human Research Protection Program at OSU on Friday, October 13 from 3-4pm in HFC115.

Lisa Leventhal will present (Human Research Protection Program (HRPP) Administrator, Office of Research Integrity) and a Q&A session will follow.

Any questions can be directed to Deanne.Hudson@oregonstate.edu

UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles

Breaking Waves - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 10:21am

10/13/17

By Tiffany Woods

A study led by a University of Oregon marine biologist has moved the seafood industry one step closer to farming gooseneck barnacles, which are a pricey delicacy in Spain and a common sight on the West Coast.

Gooseneck barnacles grow on top of adult thatched barnacles. (Photo by Julia Bingham)

Funded by Oregon Sea Grant, researchers found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab grew at rates comparable to those of their counterparts in the wild.

Led by Alan Shanks, a professor with the UO’s Charleston-based Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB), the researchers glued juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside 12 plastic tubes that were about twice the height and diameter of a can of tennis balls. Unfiltered seawater was pumped in, vigorously aerated and allowed to overflow. After a week, the barnacles began secreting their own cement.

Twice a day for eight weeks, the researchers fed the barnacles either micro-algal paste or brine shrimp eggs; a third group of barnacles was not fed anything but was left to filter food out of the seawater. Once a week the researchers measured the barnacles’ growth. Those that were fed the brine shrimp eggs outgrew the other barnacles.

Seawater is pumped into plastic tubes containing juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab at the University of Oregon as part of a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers glued the juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside the tubes. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

“The experiment has demonstrated that feeding is not dependent on high water velocities, and barnacles can be stimulated to feed using aeration and will survive and grow readily in mariculture,” Shanks said.

He added that unlike high-flow systems, his low-flow “barnacle nursery” doesn’t use as much energy or have expensive pumps to maintain, so it has the potential to decrease operating costs.

Despite the findings, the researchers are cautiously optimistic.

“While our experiment showed promise, there is still a great deal of research which needs to be done to solve some of the barriers to successful and profitable mariculture,” said research assistant Mike Thomas. “For example, inducing settlement of gooseneck barnacle larvae onto artificial surfaces has historically proven difficult and this makes the implantation of barnacles a laborious task. There are other methods of mariculture which need to be explored further for their efficacy before deciding on the best method.”

Another part of Shanks’ project involved conducting field research to see if there are enough gooseneck barnacles in southern Oregon to sustain commercial harvesting. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife allows commercial harvesting of gooseneck barnacles on jetties but not on natural rock formations. Shanks hopes the agency will be able use the results of his work when regulating their harvesting.

A juvenile gooseneck barnacle grows on an acrylic plate in a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers at the University of Oregon found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in their lab grew at rates comparable to or greater than those for species in the wild. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

Researchers used photographs and transects to estimate the barnacle populations on eight jetties in Winchester Bay, Coos Bay, Bandon, Port Orford, Gold Beach and Brookings. They estimated that there are roughly 1 billion adult and juvenile gooseneck barnacles attached to these eight jetties but only about 2 percent are of commercially harvestable size.

“Our surveys suggest that wild populations are unlikely to sustain long-term commercial harvest should the market significantly expand beyond its current size,” researcher Julia Bingham wrote in a report about the project.

She added that with the exception of jetties in Coos Bay and Winchester Bay, the other six jetties had such limited numbers of barnacles that even a “very small-scale harvest” – about 500 pounds per year per jetty – could wipe out harvestable-sized goosenecks on them in five years.

With a second round of funding from Oregon Sea Grant that was awarded in 2017, Shanks and Aaron Galloway, an aquatic ecologist at the OIMB, are continuing the research. Their new work includes:

  • studying how long it takes for a population to return to pre-harvest densities
  • testing different glues and surfaces to see if harvested barnacles that are too small for market can be reattached to plates and returned to the ocean
  • testing out bigger tubes for rearing barnacles in the lab to make them feasible for larger-scale aquaculture
  • testing other diets, including finely minced fish waste from a seafood processing plant

Additional reporting by Rick Cooper.

The post UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles

Sea Grant - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 10:21am

10/13/17

By Tiffany Woods

A study led by a University of Oregon marine biologist has moved the seafood industry one step closer to farming gooseneck barnacles, which are a pricey delicacy in Spain and a common sight on the West Coast.

Gooseneck barnacles grow on top of adult thatched barnacles. (Photo by Julia Bingham)

Funded by Oregon Sea Grant, researchers found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab grew at rates comparable to those of their counterparts in the wild.

Led by Alan Shanks, a professor with the UO’s Charleston-based Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB), the researchers glued juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside 12 plastic tubes that were about twice the height and diameter of a can of tennis balls. Unfiltered seawater was pumped in, vigorously aerated and allowed to overflow. After a week, the barnacles began secreting their own cement.

Twice a day for eight weeks, the researchers fed the barnacles either micro-algal paste or brine shrimp eggs; a third group of barnacles was not fed anything but was left to filter food out of the seawater. Once a week the researchers measured the barnacles’ growth. Those that were fed the brine shrimp eggs outgrew the other barnacles.

Seawater is pumped into plastic tubes containing juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab at the University of Oregon as part of a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers glued the juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside the tubes. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

“The experiment has demonstrated that feeding is not dependent on high water velocities, and barnacles can be stimulated to feed using aeration and will survive and grow readily in mariculture,” Shanks said.

He added that unlike high-flow systems, his low-flow “barnacle nursery” doesn’t use as much energy or have expensive pumps to maintain, so it has the potential to decrease operating costs.

Despite the findings, the researchers are cautiously optimistic.

“While our experiment showed promise, there is still a great deal of research which needs to be done to solve some of the barriers to successful and profitable mariculture,” said research assistant Mike Thomas. “For example, inducing settlement of gooseneck barnacle larvae onto artificial surfaces has historically proven difficult and this makes the implantation of barnacles a laborious task. There are other methods of mariculture which need to be explored further for their efficacy before deciding on the best method.”

Another part of Shanks’ project involved conducting field research to see if there are enough gooseneck barnacles in southern Oregon to sustain commercial harvesting. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife allows commercial harvesting of gooseneck barnacles on jetties but not on natural rock formations. Shanks hopes the agency will be able use the results of his work when regulating their harvesting.

A juvenile gooseneck barnacle grows on an acrylic plate in a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers at the University of Oregon found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in their lab grew at rates comparable to or greater than those for species in the wild. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

Researchers used photographs and transects to estimate the barnacle populations on eight jetties in Winchester Bay, Coos Bay, Bandon, Port Orford, Gold Beach and Brookings. They estimated that there are roughly 1 billion adult and juvenile gooseneck barnacles attached to these eight jetties but only about 2 percent are of commercially harvestable size.

“Our surveys suggest that wild populations are unlikely to sustain long-term commercial harvest should the market significantly expand beyond its current size,” researcher Julia Bingham wrote in a report about the project.

She added that with the exception of jetties in Coos Bay and Winchester Bay, the other six jetties had such limited numbers of barnacles that even a “very small-scale harvest” – about 500 pounds per year per jetty – could wipe out harvestable-sized goosenecks on them in five years.

With a second round of funding from Oregon Sea Grant that was awarded in 2017, Shanks and Aaron Galloway, an aquatic ecologist at the OIMB, are continuing the research. Their new work includes:

  • studying how long it takes for a population to return to pre-harvest densities
  • testing different glues and surfaces to see if harvested barnacles that are too small for market can be reattached to plates and returned to the ocean
  • testing out bigger tubes for rearing barnacles in the lab to make them feasible for larger-scale aquaculture
  • testing other diets, including finely minced fish waste from a seafood processing plant

Additional reporting by Rick Cooper.

The post UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence

Breaking Waves - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 8:45am

10-13-17

By Tiffany Woods

Registration has opened for Oregon Sea Grant’s annual State of the Coast conference, which will be held Oct. 28 in Florence.

Shelby Walker addresses the audience at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference at Gleneden Beach in 2016. She is the director of Oregon Sea Grant. (Photo by Charles Robinson)

Billed as Oregon’s coastal conference for everyone, the event aims to bring together the public, scientists, fishermen, resource managers, teachers, students and conservationists. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn, network and talk about the current status and future of Oregon’s marine environment.

The keynote speaker will be Rick Spinrad, the chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from 2014 to January 2017. He was also the vice president of research at Oregon State University from 2010 to 2014.

Under this year’s theme of “innovation,” presentations and hands-on activities will include the following topics:

  • invasive European green crabs
  • pyrosomes, the jelly-like, tube-shaped organisms that were seen off the Oregon coast in unusually large numbers this year
  • coastal governance and coastal-related legislation
  • the science behind fresh and frozen seafood
  • innovations in observing marine mammals
  • marine gear and technology
  • engaging communities in art
  • tracking local and global seafood across the supply chain
  • forecasting ocean conditions for recreation, profit and safety
  • managing estuaries for everyone

Marie Kowalski, a former master’s student at Oregon State University, talks about her research on mitigating microplastics at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference in Coos Bay in 2015. (Photo by Anne Farrell-Matthews)

Additionally, students from various universities in Oregon will talk about their coastal research. Also, a coastal chef will demonstrate how to prepare various types of seafood.

Registration in advance is recommended as space is limited. Cost is $35 for the public and $25 for students. It includes refreshments, lunch and a raffle ticket. The conference begins at 8:30 a.m. and concludes with a reception that starts at 4 p.m. For more information and to register, visit www.stateofthecoast.com. The event will take place at the Florence Events Center at 715 Quince St.

The post ‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence

Sea Grant - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 8:45am

10-13-17

By Tiffany Woods

Registration has opened for Oregon Sea Grant’s annual State of the Coast conference, which will be held Oct. 28 in Florence.

Shelby Walker addresses the audience at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference at Gleneden Beach in 2016. She is the director of Oregon Sea Grant. (Photo by Charles Robinson)

Billed as Oregon’s coastal conference for everyone, the event aims to bring together the public, scientists, fishermen, resource managers, teachers, students and conservationists. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn, network and talk about the current status and future of Oregon’s marine environment.

The keynote speaker will be Rick Spinrad, the chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration from 2014 to January 2017. He was also the vice president of research at Oregon State University from 2010 to 2014.

Under this year’s theme of “innovation,” presentations and hands-on activities will include the following topics:

  • invasive European green crabs
  • pyrosomes, the jelly-like, tube-shaped organisms that were seen off the Oregon coast in unusually large numbers this year
  • coastal governance and coastal-related legislation
  • the science behind fresh and frozen seafood
  • innovations in observing marine mammals
  • marine gear and technology
  • engaging communities in art
  • tracking local and global seafood across the supply chain
  • forecasting ocean conditions for recreation, profit and safety
  • managing estuaries for everyone

Marie Kowalski, a former master’s student at Oregon State University, talks about her research on mitigating microplastics at Oregon Sea Grant’s State of the Coast Conference in Coos Bay in 2015. (Photo by Anne Farrell-Matthews)

Additionally, students from various universities in Oregon will talk about their coastal research. Also, a coastal chef will demonstrate how to prepare various types of seafood.

Registration in advance is recommended as space is limited. Cost is $35 for the public and $25 for students. It includes refreshments, lunch and a raffle ticket. The conference begins at 8:30 a.m. and concludes with a reception that starts at 4 p.m. For more information and to register, visit www.stateofthecoast.com. The event will take place at the Florence Events Center at 715 Quince St.

The post ‘State of the Coast’ conference set for Oct. 28 in Florence appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land - Lane County

Forestry Events - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 2:34pm
Thursday, October 12, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are 5 two hour classes in the series, 6-8pm. You can take just one class for $10, or all of the classes for $30. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water and Electric Board. 

Topics covered include: land stewardship planning, soils, and water resources; well and septic systems; woodlands and wildlife; pasture and grazing management; weed management

Information and Registration

Managing Mud and Manure

Small Farms Events - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 2:34pm
Thursday, October 12, 2017 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

The rainy season will be here soon and livestock in small pastures, paddocks, or other confined spaces benefit from proper management of mud and manure. Now is the time to identify those areas that need treatment, such as high traffic areas and roof drip lines. Sign-up for this two part workshop to learn how to reduce mud around your cattle, sheep, horse, or other livestock pastures this year. Composting and fertilizer value of manure will also be discussed.

Oct. 12th:  6 —9 pm, Evening educational program, Lookingglass Grange Hall, Roseburg

Oct. 13th: 9 am—12 pm, Tour of ranches in the Lookingglass area (you must attend the workshop on Oct. 12th to participate in the farm tour)

Register on-line here.

or by calling the Extension Office at 541-672-4461

Instructors:

Sara Runkel, Small Farms & Food Systems, OSU Extension Service

Shelby Filley, Livestock & Forages, OSU Extension Service

Walt Barton, Hydrologist, Douglas Soil & Water Conservation District

Questions?  Contact Sara Runkel at 541-236-3049 or sara.runkel@oregonstate.edu

 

 

 

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - Thu, 10/12/2017 - 2:34pm
Thursday, October 12, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Wells & Septic Systems

Bring well water for nitrate screening .Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for   small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Science with a Human Face

Terra - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 3:24pm

By Nick Houtman, Terra editor

When I was a boy, I cared more about Willie Mays and the San Francisco Giants than just about anything else. My grandfather, a chemical engineer, had other ideas. He bought me a chemistry set. The metal case opened to show rows of small bottles filled with powders and solutions. There were test tubes for concocting mixtures and a kind of cookbook to guide me through the wonders of chemical reactions.

1940s Gilbert chemistry set

One year, Opa (as Dutch kids call their grandfather) gave me a 4-inch-thick edition of Van Nostrand’s Scientific Encyclopedia. He sprinkled iron filings on a piece of paper to show me how magnets work. However, despite his best efforts to inspire another scientist in the family, I followed a different path. I was attracted to ideas and events with a human face: history, politics, language — in short, the humanities.

So I pursued journalism and economics in college and worked as a reporter for a local newspaper in rural Wisconsin. I wrote stories about education and the struggling farm economy. But I was also drawn to questions about how things work: a farmer’s computerized milking system, pesticide contamination in local wells, an inventor’s claim of a perpetual motion machine.

I enjoy stories that connect people with science. I learned why the inventor’s machine would eventually stop and how a pesticide might wind up in someone’s drinking water. But while physical principles illuminate a process, it’s the human story that brings them to life.

Such stories are central to the liberal arts. In recognition of OSU150, the celebration of Oregon State’s land grant designation, this issue of Terra looks at the arts and humanities at OSU (see “From the Margins to the Center”). Gordon Gilkey was a leading figure in the drama. He led the transformation of the liberal arts from “lower division” standing to a full and equal partnership with other colleges. I expect he’d be thrilled to see OSU’s ongoing efforts to integrate the arts and humanities with science and engineering, especially plans to create the “great hall” for education and the performing arts that he envisioned.

Opa once told me that the chemists who worked for him knew their science but often lacked the writing skills to share their knowledge. Research needs to be communicated so that people can understand and appreciate the benefits. The liberal arts and the sciences need each other.

The post Science with a Human Face appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon State Earns Record $441 Million in Research Revenues

Terra - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 3:01pm
OSU researchers tested a cross-laminated timber structure in July.

In the wake of a federal grant to design and build a new regional research vessel, Oregon State University crossed the $400 million threshold in grants and contracts for the first time in the fiscal year that ended June 30.

Oregon State received $441 million from state and federal governments, businesses and foundations for research on a wide range of projects in natural resources, health, engineering and science across the state and around the world. That represents a 31 percent increase over last year’s record-breaking total of $336 million. Over the past 10 years, Oregon State’s research revenues have more than doubled.

OSU research totals took a dramatic leap in June with a $122 million grant from the National Science Foundation for a  new regional research vessel, which will be stationed at the university’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport. It was the largest single grant ever received by the university.

Oregon State wave energy researchers are developing a new testing center in Newport.

Revenues from business and industry — including technology testing, sponsored contracts and licensing of innovations developed at the university — grew to $34 million last year, up 10 percent from the previous year.

OSU’s Go Baby Go program adds zip to kids with mobility limitations.

“Investment in research pays back dividends in economic growth for Oregonians. Researchers are starting new businesses and assisting established companies. Our latest success is the result of hard work and strategic decisions by our faculty and partners in business, local and state government and the federal delegation,” said Cynthia Sagers, vice president for research.

Based on past OSU research, startup companies such as Agility Robotics (animal-like robot motion), Outset Medical (at-home kidney dialysis) and Inpria (photolithography for high-performance computer chips) are attracting private investment and creating jobs. Advances in agricultural crops (winter wheat, hazelnuts, small fruits and vegetables) and forest products (cross-laminated timber panels for high-rise construction) are bolstering rural economies as well.

Since it began in 2013, the Oregon State University Advantage program has provided market analysis and support services to more than 70 local technology businesses and startup companies.

var tag = document.createElement('script'); tag.id = 'iframe-demo'; tag.src = 'https://www.youtube.com/iframe_api'; var firstScriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; firstScriptTag.parentNode.insertBefore(tag, firstScriptTag); var aseYTBplayer1; function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady1() { aseYTBplayer1 = new YT.Player('aesop-ytb-25410-1', { events: { 'onReady': onAesopYTPlayerReady1, } }); } if (typeof document.AesopYTReadyFuncs == 'undefined') { document.AesopYTReadyFuncs =[]; } document.AesopYTReadyFuncs.push(onYouTubeIframeAPIReady1); function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady() { if (typeof document.AesopYTReadyFuncs != 'undefined') { for (var i = 0; i < document.AesopYTReadyFuncs.length; i++) { document.AesopYTReadyFuncs[i](); } } } function onAesopYTPlayerReady1(event) { jQuery(document).ready(function($){ $('#aesop-video-25410-1').waypoint({ offset: '30%', handler: function(direction){ aseYTBplayer1.playVideo(); } }); $('#aesop-video-25410-1').waypoint({ offset: '100%', handler: function(direction){ if (direction == 'up') { aseYTBplayer1.pauseVideo(); } } }); $('#aesop-video-25410-1').waypoint({ offset: '-70%', handler: function(direction){ if (direction == 'down') { aseYTBplayer1.pauseVideo(); } } }); }); }

The post Oregon State Earns Record $441 Million in Research Revenues appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

2017 OSU Land Steward Training

Forestry Events - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 2:36pm
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Early Bird Registration before Aug. 1 save $50:   Register online here
Registration Deadline Aug. 15; Cost Full Registration price: $200 individual, $275 Couple.

For more information visit The Land Steward Web Page or call 541-776-7371

Apply today to participate in this fun and informative, field-based educational program that helps landowners learn what they have, decide how to manage it, and make a plan to get there. The program is based out of the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, 569 Hanley Road, Central Point.

 
The Land Steward Program, is an 11-week field-based course.  It is designed to help landowners, from small plots to large acreage, develop a management plan to accomplish their goals.
 
The program covers a full spectrum of land management considerations, from forests to farms, soils, water, pasture management, fire awareness, wildlife, economics and connection to resources that help landowners implement their plans.  Participants receive handouts, references, resources, professional presentations and site visits to bring the learning alive!

2017 OPHA Annual Conference

Health & Wellness Events - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 2:36pm
Tuesday, October 10, 2017 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

The OPHA Annual Conference & Meeting is the premier public health event in Oregon. Since 1944 public health leaders, professionals, educators, advocates, students and stakeholders have come together to share the latest in research, programs, and information. Join us for this important, informative, and inspiring public health event!

View conference site for full details

Download the 2017 OPHA Annual Conference & Meeting flyer

At OPHA 2017 you'll find the latest in public health research and trends, focused learning sessions, thought-provoking speakers, and plenty of networking opportunities.

Highlights include:

Education: Over 100 presentations on key functional areas of public health; facilitated discussion forums to learn from your peers; and an interactive poster session. Continuing education credits will be available - Stay tuned for more information!

Networking Events: Connect with other public health professionals and stakeholders from around the Northwest during plentiful breaks, receptions, and evening events.

Association Awards: Join OPHA in recognizing Oregon's public health advocates and leaders.

Professional Opportunities, Products & Services: Connect with OPHA Sponsors and visit the Exhibit Hall.

Life of Beer

Terra - Tue, 10/10/2017 - 9:52am

By Nick Houtman

The next time you sip a beer with friends, consider the source: barley prompted to sprout, only to have its development arrested; yeast that turns barley sugars into alcohol and carbon dioxide; hops bred to produce fragrant oils for flavor and aroma. These are the tools of the brewer’s art, which turns grain, microbes and flowers into a liquid feast.

Oregon State University assists the brewing industry by developing new varieties of barley and hops. And like chefs in a gourmet kitchen, students and faculty in OSU’s fermentation science program — key to the new $18 million Oregon Quality Food and Beverage Center being built on the Corvallis campus — collaborate with craft beer-makers on new recipes for this ancient drink.

Like all fermented foods, beer is the result of a finely tuned living process. It reflects the same biochemical principles that lead a seed to become a plant, make bread rise and enable us to savor and digest a meal.

While there are endless variations to the brewer’s art, here are the simplified steps, courtesy of Tom Shellhammer, the Nor’Wester Professor of Fermentation Science in the College of Agricultural Sciences and an internationally recognized expert in hop chemistry.

Origins: Making Malt


1. Barley soaked in water begins to germinate.

2. In the awakening seed, a hormone (gibberellin) triggers the development of enzymes within the barley that turn complex starches and proteins into nutrition — simple sugars and amino acids — for the growing embryo.

3. But before the new shoot can emerge, the maltster dries the wet grain to stop this enzymatic action and preserve it for the brewer.

4. For pale beers, the malt is lightly kilned. For darker brews, such as porters and stouts, the malt is kilned hotter and longer to develop more color and flavor.

In the Brewery — Mashing and Boiling


5. The brewer grinds the malt into a coarse grist and combines it with warm water to create a thin soup, aka mash. Sugars produced during mashing can be fermented by yeast while the remaining starches cannot. 7:3 is the average ratio of what’s fermentable to what’s non-fermentable in wort. Fermentable sugars will ultimately yield alcohol, while the non-fermentables will affect the beer’s flavor, mouthfeel and satiating quality.

6. The enzymes created during malting begin breaking down the malted barley’s starch to produce a rich broth containing sugars, amino acids and an array of compounds that provide flavor and aroma.

7. Separated from the spent grains, which are often sold off as animal feed, this liquid called wort is the foundation for the final product.

8. The brewer boils the wort to sterilize it and to extract essential oils and acids from hops, which are added as the liquid cooks. The female flower of the hop plant, Humulus lupulus, includes lupulin glands. Found deep inside the hop cone, these glands contain the oils that deliver herbal, floral, citrus and tropical aromas and acids that can pack a bitter punch in the finished beer. Boiling hops in wort produces iso-alpha acids which contribute bitterness and antimicrobial properties to beer. Brewers sometimes add hops after boiling or during fermentation in an effort to turn up the hoppy aroma while minimizing their bitter contribution in the final product.

Yeast in Time

9. Enter a single-celled microbe, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the workhorse of alcoholic fermentation. With the wort cleared of all microorganisms by sterilization, yeast provides the last critical transformation, turning simple starches and sugars into ethanol at a ratio of two units of sugar to one of ethanol.

10. Yeast also produces a host of other compounds (organic acids, esters and alcohols) that lend winey, fruity and other flavors to beer. Brewers reuse their yeast from previous fermentations in a process that can take two to 10 days. Choosing one of the thousands of yeast strains is part of the art.

Editor’s note: For a thorough review of OSU’s beer-making research from barley to hops, see the fall 2017 issue of Oregon’s Agricultural Progress magazine

The post Life of Beer appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

From the Margins to the Center

Terra - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 4:36pm

Oregon State University is celebrating 150 years of achievement as the state’s land grant university. Enjoy the journey with Terra as we recognize examples of OSU’s legacy and ongoing impact in Oregon and the world.

By Nick Houtman

At the beginning of World War II, as German tanks were rumbling into Czechoslovakia, an artist living in New York sent a letter to President Franklin Roosevelt. If the U.S. “got involved in the war in Europe,” he wrote, “there should be knowledgeable people along with the troops to tell them what not to blow up.” Roosevelt agreed, and the idea led eventually to creation of the Monuments Men, a corps dedicated to rescuing art stolen by the Nazis.

Gordon Gilkey, printmaker and first dean of the OSU College of Liberal Arts

The artist was Gordon Gilkey. Born on a ranch near Scio, Gilkey was not part of the famous group but became the sole member of the Propaganda Confiscation Unit and recovered more than 8,000 pieces of art after the war.

In 1947, he headed back west to lead the art department at Oregon State College. At that time, liberal arts classes were limited, and no degrees were offered. The arts and humanities were seen as service units to science and engineering. But by the time Gilkey retired 30 years later, the College of Liberal Arts comprised 15 degree-granting departments, ranging from art and English to speech communication and psychology. Gilkey was its first dean.

In 2016, U.S. Senator Ron Wyden posthumously presented the Congressional Gold Medal to OSU President Ed Ray and Larry Rodgers, dean of the College of Liberal Arts, to honor Gilkey and Mark Sponenburgh, for their heroic actions during and after the war. A member of the Monuments Men, Sponenburgh taught art history at OSU from 1961 to 1983.

Gilkey’s story illustrates OSU’s liberal arts legacy: its global connections, relevance, rapid growth and future promise. The arts and humanities focus on people, creativity and their relationship to technology and decision-making. Artists, scholars, philosophers and social scientists at Oregon State bring the human element into the Earth sciences, engineering and biomedical fields. As faculty members and students, they explore ideas, express the meaning and beauty of the human experience and make lasting contributions to communities. Here are a few of their milestones.

COMMUNICATION
The heart of storytelling

Elocution and Rhetoric

The liberal arts were key to an education in the early years at Corvallis College. In 1866, all first-year students took elocution (the art of speech), leading to what would become one of the first departments of speech communication on the West Coast. The debate team is OSU’s oldest student club. In 1872, faculty members offered classes in moral philosophy and physics, languages and mathematics. Juniors were required to take rhetoric and logic.

OSU’s Bard in the Quad performances included Two Gentlemen of Verona. Elizabeth Barnes, theater program director, right, and others applies makeup to actors prior to a performance in 1925.

On Stage

Theater at Oregon Agricultural College dates back to the 1870s. The student drama society (the university’s second oldest club) and members of the senior class took their productions out to logging camps. In the 1920s and 1930s, Elizabeth Barnes, one of the first female directors in a field dominated by men, produced Shakespeare plays outdoors, foreshadowing today’s Bard in the Quad productions. For nearly 40 years, the Mitchell Playhouse (now the Gladys Valley Gymnastics Center) was home to productions on campus before the theater moved to its current home in Withycombe Hall. All OSU students can participate
in theater.

Bernard Malamud

Literary Roots

A New Life (1961) tells the story of a young professor from the East who arrives at a rural western college to begin his teaching career. Bernard Malamud’s third novel was written while the author was a faculty member in the English department at Oregon State College. Thought to be autobiographical, the book raised eyebrows with details about romantic affairs and academic tensions. Malamud also wrote The Natural at OSU and in 1967, after leaving Oregon for a position at Bennington College, received the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for The Fixer.

 

Elena Passarello American poet Rita Dove received the Stone Award at OSU in 2016.

Nurturing Creative Writers

The Masters of Fine Arts degree program in creative writing has become one of the nation’s most competitive. This year, 428 students applied for 14 available spots. In addition to full tuition support, the program links aspiring writers to exceptional faculty, such as Elena Passarello, essayist and winner of the Whiting Award for Nonfiction; Marjorie Sandor, winner of the Oregon Book Award and author of four books; and poet and essayist Karen Holmberg, whose work has been featured in magazines such as The Paris Review, Slate and The Nation. The Stone Award, given biannually to an acclaimed American writer, provides one of the most substantial awards for lifetime literary achievement of any university in the country. Recipients have included Joyce Carol Oates, Tobias Wolff and Rita Dove.

Digital Humanities

A 19th-century explorer’s field notes emerge from decayed, nearly unreadable records. The Great Exhibition of 1851 at London’s Crystal Palace opens to anyone with a cell phone or desktop computer. Data about the culture of laboring-class poets — their writings, occupations and locations — illuminate the lives of writers throughout the British Isles. An analysis of questions posted to the popular internet site Reddit reveals how people respond to social media. These are among the results of an ongoing collaboration between humanities and computer science researchers at Oregon State. Digital humanities provide a powerful window on art and literature.

IDEAS
Concepts and choices

Habits of Mind
Oregon Agricultural College offered its first psychology course in 1872, taught in the School of Moral Science. The field was in its infancy in the latter 19th century, but psychology was required of seniors from 1889 to 1906. In recent years, undergraduates have been key to studies on topics such as how first impressions are formed when people meet, how people experience differences in ability and appearance and how adolescents face risks associated with depression, sex and other stresses. A new Ph.D. program offers students opportunities to pursue projects in human-machine systems (such as multitasking on mobile devices and driving), applied cognition (human-robot interactions, the effects of trauma on attention) and health (disability, substance abuse and gender).

Ideas of God

“How people think about God matters,” Marcus Borg told a reporter in 1998. “Some concepts of God make God incredible and result in atheism. Other concepts make God seem remote and irrelevant. And still other concepts of God, grounded in experience, make God the central reality in human life.” As a professor in the Department of Philosophy, Borg became one of the nation’s foremost Biblical and historical Jesus scholars. He published 21 books and organized conferences — Jesus at 2000 and God at 2000 — that captured international attention. Borg, who died in 2015 was named the first Hundere Chair of Religion and Culture at OSU and was the first College of Liberal Arts faculty member to be designated an OSU Distinguished Professor.

Decisions for the Common Good

Collaboration over natural resources has come to be known as The Oregon Way. In every corner of the state, people from different walks of life meet to hash out issues over water, wolves, rangeland, forests and fish. With the only master’s in rural policy program in the nation, OSU attracts students from around the United States and the world to learn how to replicate the state’s signature approach to environmental management. Alumni of the School of Public Policy work in Washington D.C. and in governments and communities around the world. A partnership between the school and nuclear engineering brings disarmament negotiator and U.S. Ambassador Thomas Graham to OSU to teach a class from his frontline perspective on nuclear weapons. Through the Marine Studies Initiative, researchers will expand their collaboration with coastal communities.

Think Tank for the Humanities

Christopher McKnight Nichols, right, director of the OSU Center for the Humanities, talks with Andrew Su, an undergraduate in the School of History, Philosophy and Religion.

For more than 30 years, brisk conversations on art, history, poetry, philosophy and other human-centered disciplines have flowed through a Tudor-style house just east of the Corvallis campus. Established in 1984, the OSU Center for theHumanities has been a gathering place and supportive community for scholars to explore the meaning and expression of the human experience. “We need the humanities to understand how we arrived at this moment, to sort fact from fiction, to find shared values, and to ask and address profound questions about society, nature, justice, religion, art, community and so much more,” says Andrew Carnegie Fellow Christopher McKnight Nichols, center director, historian, member of the Council on Foreign Relations.

Medical Dilemmas

When should doctors intervene? And when should they let nature take its course? Who gets access to expensive medical treatments? Who decides? These are some of the issues confronted by biomedical ethicist Courtney Campbell, who has worked with Good Samaritan Hospital, Benton Hospice and other organizations. The Hundere Professor in Religion and Culture has addressed Oregon’s Death with Dignity law, the Oregon Health Plan and other policies that have life-and-death implications for all.

var tag = document.createElement('script'); tag.id = 'iframe-demo'; tag.src = 'https://www.youtube.com/iframe_api'; var firstScriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; firstScriptTag.parentNode.insertBefore(tag, firstScriptTag); var aseYTBplayer2; function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady2() { aseYTBplayer2 = new YT.Player('aesop-ytb-25229-2', { events: { 'onReady': onAesopYTPlayerReady2, } }); } if (typeof document.AesopYTReadyFuncs == 'undefined') { document.AesopYTReadyFuncs =[]; } document.AesopYTReadyFuncs.push(onYouTubeIframeAPIReady2); function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady() { if (typeof document.AesopYTReadyFuncs != 'undefined') { for (var i = 0; i < document.AesopYTReadyFuncs.length; i++) { document.AesopYTReadyFuncs[i](); } } } function onAesopYTPlayerReady2(event) { jQuery(document).ready(function($){ $('#aesop-video-25229-2').waypoint({ offset: '30%', handler: function(direction){ aseYTBplayer2.playVideo(); } }); $('#aesop-video-25229-2').waypoint({ offset: '100%', handler: function(direction){ if (direction == 'up') { aseYTBplayer2.pauseVideo(); } } }); $('#aesop-video-25229-2').waypoint({ offset: '-70%', handler: function(direction){ if (direction == 'down') { aseYTBplayer2.pauseVideo(); } } }); }); } BEAUTY
For the ear and the eye

Musical Beginnings

The OSU Marching Band and the Corvallis-OSU Orchestra were among the first such musical groups in the West. Founded in 1891, the marching band is the oldest in the Pac-12. Oregon’s longest continually operating orchestra started as a collegiate group in 1906 with nine male members. Today, under the direction of Marlan Carlson, its 110 musicians perform five concerts each season.

The Right Note

Ron Jeffers

In 1890, every student at Oregon Agricultural College was required to participate in choral singing. Daily practice was obligatory, and choir classes met three times a week in the chapel. As OAC grew, student choral groups — the Men’s Glee Club and Women’s Madrigal Group — gave concerts and combined to perform operas on campus and throughout the state. Robert Walls transformed the music program into an academic department. Student choirs first traveled abroad during his tenure. Under Ron Jeffers, Walls’ successor, the OSU Chamber Singers participated in the prestigious St. Moritz International Choir Festival in Switzerland. Music director Kathryn Olson arranged for the choir to travel to China where it performed in Shanghai, Beijing and other cities. The music education program has a nearly 100 percent placement rate for graduates who teach music and choral singing at high schools throughout the country.

Art for the World

Harrison Branch OSU art professor Shelley Jordon works with encaustic, which combines pigments and wax.

The visual arts grew slowly in the early years. Not until 1889 was drawing (freehand, mechanical and perspective) offered to students. But through the art department (created in 1901), OSU faculty provided students with a transformative look into a worldwide art culture. Educated in Paris, John Leo Fairbanks became chair in 1923. The namesake of OSU’s Fairbanks Hall grew up in Utah and had already established a reputation as a landscape painter and a sculptor. In addition to teaching, he continued a productive artistic career. In his footsteps, OSU faculty members continued to inspire students. They included photographer Harrison Branch, whose iconic large-format images have been exhibited in North America and Europe, and art historian Henry Sayre, author of A World of Art and a PBS television series of the same name. Today, the Fairbanks Art Gallery hosts shows by national artists as well as OSU faculty and students.

Envelope Please

In 1988, animator and production designer Harley Jessup, a 1976 OSU art graduate, won an Oscar for Best Visual Effects honoring his work as art director of Innerspace. Jessup also won an Emmy and an Ani (for animation). His credits include Monsters, Inc.; Ratatouille; Cars2; Up; Toy Story 2; and The Hunt for Red October.

Performing Arts Center

Spurred by a $25 million gift from an anonymous donor, Oregon State will expand the LaSells Stewart Center on campus to create a state-of-the-art space for education, performance and technology in the performing arts. With additional private and public support, the $60 million project fulfills a vision expressed by Gordon Gilkey, first dean of the College of Liberal Arts, to establish a “great hall” on the OSU campus. The new center will serve all OSU students, regardless of their field of study, who participate in band, symphony and choral groups and other endeavors.

CULTURE
Shaping the human experience Spring Creek flows into the Marys River in the Oregon Coast Range.

Sustainability Studies

It takes the insights of the sciences and the creative wisdom of the arts to address thorny environmental issues. Two initiatives — The Spring Creek Project for Ideas, Nature and the Written Word; and the Environmental Arts and Humanities graduate program — gather writers, poets, artists, scientists and citizens to grapple with the human footprint in a changing world. In places across the Northwest — the slopes of Mount St. Helens, a cabin in the Oregon Coast Range, the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the Cascades, the Oregon State campus — Spring Creek fosters conversation and reflection, sometimes deep into the night. Students in the new master’s program in Environmental Arts and Humanities combine the rigors of science with the creative insight of the humanities. In a time of extinction and global change, they ask, how shall we live?

History of Film

Jon Lewis Mila Suo

“There’s something communal about going to the movies,” says Jon Lewis, distinguished professor of film studies. “It’s like church.” Lewis is one of America’s foremost authorities on censorship, film history and Hollywood institutions. His work (more than a dozen books on the film industry, including a best-selling film anthology) has formed the basis for OSU’s growing film program. Assistant professor Mila Zuo addresses gender, culture and sexuality stereotypes in her work. This year, film studies provide a platform to explore the decade of the 1960s through a course taught by Lewis and Robert Santelli, director of popular music and performing arts.

OSU researchers recovered this spear point at Cooper’s Ferry along the lower Salmon River.

Human Origins in North America

The first peoples of North America may have traveled from Asia overland or along an icy ocean shore. Evidence of their presence has been found by OSU anthropologists and colleagues at places like Fort Rock and Paisley Caves south of Bend and at Cooper’s Ferry along the lower Salmon River in Idaho. The search continues offshore where people could have settled at a time when the oceans were 300 to 400 feet lower than they are today. As noted by the discovery of mammoth bones at OSU in 2016, humans shared the land with ice-age animals. Over thousands of years, their descendants developed diverse cultures and languages. Encounters with Europeans brought disease and conflict and led to the modern system of Indian reservations. Researchers, including OSU students, have documented Civil War-era artifacts at the sites of Fort Hoskins and Fort Yamhill in the Oregon Coast Range.

Julie Green’s project, The Last Supper, has been shown in galleries around the country.

The Last Supper

The plates are simple, white porcelain painted with deep blue images of food. Oregon State artist Julie Green has made more than 500, each honoring the memory of a prisoner executed on death row in the United States. Featured in national media and displayed at galleries arounds the country, Green’s work recognizes the humanity of people often portrayed as monstrous and unworthy.

Cultural Competency

Traders and migrants have crossed cultural boundaries for centuries, but world events are bringing people closer together than ever before. In the 1990s, Oregon State took steps to foster understanding and collaboration through creation of an Ethnic Studies department. In the face of institutional budget cuts, the university expanded its commitment to exploring the dynamics of race, gender, sexuality and social justice. In addition to preparing students to participate in an ethnically diverse society, Ethnic Studies connects minority communities to OSU for academic and other programs often affiliated with OSU’s seven cultural resource centers.

Susan Shaw is a professor in  Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies at OSU. She is co-editor with Janet Lee of a new academic journal for the ADVANCE program of the National Science Foundation.

At the Intersections

In 1972, a sex discrimination lawsuit over a hiring decision at OSU led to the creation of a Women Studies program and the Women’s Center. One of the first academic programs of its type in the country and staffed by a single tenure-track position through the 1990s, the program has expanded. Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies is one of 19 programs in the nation that grants a Ph.D. in this field. Its 14 core faculty take an inclusive approach to studies of race, class and sexual identity as well as gender. The program has editorial responsibility for Feminist Formations, a leading national journal, and helps to facilitate the OSU ADVANCE project, funded by the National Science Foundation to expand female participation in STEM fields (science, technology,
engineering and mathematics).

Serious about Discrimination

In 1990, a series of racially motivated incidents led Oregon State to create what has become a national model for education about social systems of discrimination. Known as Difference, Power and Discrimination, or DPD, the program offers courses required of all OSU students. It certifies additional courses across the curriculum to guide faculty and students in a deep dive into the inherent biases and beliefs that affect relationships among people of dominant and marginalized cultures. DPD leaders are regularly asked to advise colleges and universities in developing their own approaches to this topic.

Practicing Mindfulness

In fields from biology and geoscience to psychology and philosophy, students and faculty are using meditation and other “contemplative practices” to inspire their thinking and creativity. Researchers are investigating the effectiveness of meditation techniques and the relationship between Buddhism and science, among other topics. The Contemplative Studies Initiative is supported by a fund established to honor James Blumenthal, a Buddhist scholar and professor in the School of History, Philosophy and Religion, who died in 2014.

Dick Fosbury set a world record in the high jump and earned a Gold Medal in the 1968 Olympics.

Experience the Sights and Sounds of OSU at the Oregon Historical Society

Listen to the music and voices from the past. Spin the wheel to explore historical events such as the Walk Out by the Black Student Union in 1968. Measure yourself against the high-jump bar crossed against all expectations by Olympic gold medalist Dick Fosbury. The OSU150 exhibit runs from February 9 to September 9 at the Oregon Historical Society, 1200 SW Park Avenue in Portland.

var tag = document.createElement('script'); tag.id = 'iframe-demo'; tag.src = 'https://www.youtube.com/iframe_api'; var firstScriptTag = document.getElementsByTagName('script')[0]; firstScriptTag.parentNode.insertBefore(tag, firstScriptTag); var aseYTBplayer3; function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady3() { aseYTBplayer3 = new YT.Player('aesop-ytb-25229-3', { events: { 'onReady': onAesopYTPlayerReady3, } }); } if (typeof document.AesopYTReadyFuncs == 'undefined') { document.AesopYTReadyFuncs =[]; } document.AesopYTReadyFuncs.push(onYouTubeIframeAPIReady3); function onYouTubeIframeAPIReady() { if (typeof document.AesopYTReadyFuncs != 'undefined') { for (var i = 0; i < document.AesopYTReadyFuncs.length; i++) { document.AesopYTReadyFuncs[i](); } } } function onAesopYTPlayerReady3(event) { jQuery(document).ready(function($){ $('#aesop-video-25229-3').waypoint({ offset: '30%', handler: function(direction){ aseYTBplayer3.playVideo(); } }); $('#aesop-video-25229-3').waypoint({ offset: '100%', handler: function(direction){ if (direction == 'up') { aseYTBplayer3.pauseVideo(); } } }); $('#aesop-video-25229-3').waypoint({ offset: '-70%', handler: function(direction){ if (direction == 'down') { aseYTBplayer3.pauseVideo(); } } }); }); }

Editor’s note: Joseph Donovan and Rebecca Olson contributed to the story about Gordon Gilkey. Thanks to Celene Carillo, communications director in the College of Liberal Arts, for her guidance.

The post From the Margins to the Center appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Collisions Are Normally To Be Avoided

Terra - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 3:00pm

By Britt Hoskins, OSU Marketing

At the Advanced Technology and Manufacturing Institute, they happen naturally, they’re going to happen more often, and their impacts are positive — for faculty and students, industry and Oregon’s economy.

Located on the HP campus in Corvallis, ATAMI provides an ideal meeting ground for makers of all types, where they can produce and test their inventions. Oregon State University has occupied the building for over a decade, when it was the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute. This year, it is remodeling and equipping the facility to accommodate the growing needs of innovators, researchers and industry partners, effectively doubling the usable square footage. Simultaneously, the Advantage Accelerator program, which is currently based in downtown Corvallis, will take over the second floor.

Karl Mundorff, co-director of OSU Advantage Accelerator, says the space will facilitate “natural collisions” between young startups and more established companies. For example, Inpria is developing advanced semiconductor patterning materials, called photoresists, for high-performance electronics.

Inpria received an infusion of $23.5 million in venture capital funding last summer. COO Ann Carney Nelson remembers the challenges of being a new startup and of people telling them they were “crazy for starting a photoresist company.” It was a tall order in an industry dominated by large public corporations. She credits much of their success to an early and strong relationship with Oregon State faculty and students and access to campus facilities.

As the company continues to grow, Carney Nelson hopes to give a leg up to the next generation. She sees Inpria acting as a “big sibling company” for the Advantage Accelerator and other ATAMI residents.

Several professors from the College of Engineering will also move into the building. They will join faculty researchers like Brian Paul, a leader in the national effort to reinvigorate the U.S. economy through advanced manufacturing. Paul is developing modular chemical plants that can be assembled from Lego-like pieces and shipped just about anywhere. Thanks to a multimillion-dollar, multiyear Department of Energy grant, Paul’s work will continue to expand at ATAMI.

Cindy Sagers, vice president for research, expects ATAMI to stimulate faculty and student innovation. “It’s not simply commercialization. It’s not simply creating new businesses and new jobs. It’s really about expanding the role of the university in training our students and grad students,” she says. “It’s creating opportunities for them to work more closely with industry, to get exposure to entrepreneurial startups and that mindset.”

The Advantage Accelerator plans to be completely moved in by the end of 2018, but Mundorff estimates that it may be done in phases, starting as soon as next spring. He’s excited to watch the

The post Collisions Are Normally To Be Avoided appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Citizen Fire Academy - Douglas County

Forestry Events - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 2:35pm
Monday, October 9, 2017 12:00 AM - 11:55 PM
Online modules from the comfort of your own home. Each online module includes reading and video tutorials, review exercises, discussion board. Throughout the course, you will work on your own fire preparedness plan and present your final plan at the graduation session.

2017 OPHA Annual Conference

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 2:35pm
Monday, October 9, 2017 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

The OPHA Annual Conference & Meeting is the premier public health event in Oregon. Since 1944 public health leaders, professionals, educators, advocates, students and stakeholders have come together to share the latest in research, programs, and information. Join us for this important, informative, and inspiring public health event!

View conference site for full details

Download the 2017 OPHA Annual Conference & Meeting flyer

At OPHA 2017 you'll find the latest in public health research and trends, focused learning sessions, thought-provoking speakers, and plenty of networking opportunities.

Highlights include:

Education: Over 100 presentations on key functional areas of public health; facilitated discussion forums to learn from your peers; and an interactive poster session. Continuing education credits will be available - Stay tuned for more information!

Networking Events: Connect with other public health professionals and stakeholders from around the Northwest during plentiful breaks, receptions, and evening events.

Association Awards: Join OPHA in recognizing Oregon's public health advocates and leaders.

Professional Opportunities, Products & Services: Connect with OPHA Sponsors and visit the Exhibit Hall.

Small Farms Kickoff Party

Small Farms Events - Mon, 10/09/2017 - 2:35pm
Thursday, October 12, 2017 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM
We at the Mid-Willamette Small Farms team still feel fairly green. We've thoroughly enjoyed our work with small farmers in Marion, Polk, and Yamhill counties and we still need to meet many of you. So we’re throwing a party! Join us for food, fun, and farm games at Minto Island Growers on October 12, from 4-6pm. We’re looking forward to meeting you or seeing you again, and learning about how OSU Extension Small Farms can support you.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs