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Position opening: Marine education volunteer coordinator

Breaking Waves - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 3:25pm

Oregon Sea Grant is seeking a full-time (1.00 FTE), 12-month Marine Education Volunteer Coordinator to work at our Visitor Center at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science center in Newport. The coordinator oversees adult volunteers and serves as the Visitor Center’s liaison to the public, current and potential donors and community partners. The application deadline is March 3, 2015.

This position serves a key role at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center Visitor Center, overseeing its most essential resources, its volunteers, assisting with the center’s operations and serving as its liaison to the public, potential and current donors adn community parthers.

For a full position description and to apply, visit the OSU Jobs site.

The post Position opening: Marine education volunteer coordinator appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Position opening: Marine education volunteer coordinator

Sea Grant - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 3:25pm

Oregon Sea Grant is seeking a full-time (1.00 FTE), 12-month Marine Education Volunteer Coordinator to work at our Visitor Center at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science center in Newport. The coordinator oversees adult volunteers and serves as the Visitor Center’s liaison to the public, current and potential donors and community partners. The application deadline is March 3, 2015.

This position serves a key role at Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center Visitor Center, overseeing its most essential resources, its volunteers, assisting with the center’s operations and serving as its liaison to the public, potential and current donors adn community parthers.

For a full position description and to apply, visit the OSU Jobs site.

The post Position opening: Marine education volunteer coordinator appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Workshop: How can we partner to increase the pace and scale of restoration in Lake and Klamath Counties?

Forestry Events - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, February 17, 2015 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM

The purpose of this meeting is to explore opportunities to increase the pace and scale of forest health/restoration across landscape ownerships within Lake and Klamath Counties.

This initial workshop is for potential partners, landowners, and agencies in Lake and Klamath Counties

 

Woodland Management

Forestry Events - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, February 17, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This five-session course is ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property.  It serves as preparation for the OSU Master Woodland Manager Training.  Topics covered include:

  • Getting Started: Assessing your property and your site
  • What's Going on in Your Woods? Understanding tree biology and forest ecology
  • Take Care of Your Woods: Tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control
  • Getting it Done: Safety, tools and techniques, timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations.
Instructors are Glenn Ahrens, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, and Julie Woodward, Forest Education Program Manager, Oregon Forest Resources Institute.

Please pre-register no later than February 3.

https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/832

Speed Mock Interviews

Food Events - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, February 17, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM

One of a kind opportunity to practice interviewing with employers and Career Specialists to receive valuage feedback and prepare you for the real thing. Resumes are recommended for practice interview

Register through Beaver Careers for a confirmed 30 minute appointment. Walk-ins are welcome. First come first serve, as space and time permits. 

FST Career Fair

Food Events - Tue, 02/17/2015 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, February 17, 2015 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Spring Visit

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 2:35pm
Monday, February 16, 2015 (all day event)

Whether you are just starting your college search or are already admitted to Oregon State, our Spring Preview Programs can accommodate you needs. You will have the opportunity to meet with current students, learn about the admissions process, next steps for admitted students, explore different academic interests, find out about our on-campus living options, and much more.

Register here for Spring Preview

Silviculture information – from low tech to the world of apps

Amy Grotta's Tree Topics - Mon, 02/16/2015 - 10:38am

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension – Columbia, Washington & Yamhill Counties

How do you like your silviculture served? In a book, a pamphlet, a video, or an app?

A sampling of silviculture manuals dating from the 1970’s and 80’s

My office shelves are lined with decades-old research reports, mostly left behind by my predecessors; and having neither the time to sort through them nor the ability to fully shake my packrat tendencies, I hang on to them. Besides the information they contain, these volumes form a historical record of sorts, and so while they don’t come off the shelf too much these days, they are worth keeping around.

An example is Douglas-fir: Stand Management for the Future (1986). The title makes me consider whether the Future of Douglas-fir stand management has turned out the way the authors expected, when this was published nearly 30 years ago. Coincidentally, Dr. Chad Oliver, one of the co-authors of Douglas-fir: Stand Management for the Future will be at OSU next month, presenting a Starker Lecture titled A Contemporary View of Douglas-fir Silviculture (as with all the Starker Lectures, one need not attend in person; the lectures are videostreamed live and archived for later viewing). The abstract of his talk implies that forest management can, should, and has evolved, in concert with society’s changing demands on forests.

Recently, Brad touched on the importance of having management objectives drive management decisions in the woods. A key point in that article is that silvicultural approaches (planting, vegetation management, thinning, harvest) should be tailored to the landowner’s specific combination of objectives. Family forest owners’ objectives often are quite different from those of larger private or public landowners, and thus management on the ground should differ accordingly.

Successful regeneration following a group selection harvest

While we know a lot about intensive forest management as it applies to even-aged, short rotation forestry, using silviculture to create more complex and diverse forest structures is more nuanced, and often very site specific. A cookbook approach does not always work. To address this, OSU Extension recently produced a series of Alternative Forest Management case studies designed to help landowners learn from working examples. The case study approach requires an examination of landowner objectives, site factors, stand conditions, and results beyond the initial silviculture treatment. There are four case studies in the series (two of which are in westside, Douglas-fir dominated forests), with the promise of more to come.

As with forest management, our ways of obtaining information have evolved. Anymore, people use YouTube or another internet site, rather than an owner’s manual or a printed research report, for finding out how to do something. (Admittedly, that is one reason for this blog; to put information online, where people are looking.) OSU Extension is increasingly looking at new formats for delivering information, and the Alternative Forest Management series represents a foray into the world of apps and interactive media.

The case studies are available in three formats, recognizing that viewers have different preferences. Each one can be downloaded (and printed) as a traditional PDF publication. Three of them have also been made interactive, with video clips, virtual forest panoramics, and added graphics that illustrate dimensions of the case studies. The interactive versions can be downloaded as an app for an Apple or Android tablet. Or, they can be viewed in an internet browser of a “regular” computer.

Since I don’t have a tablet I used the third option. I went to the Alternative Forest Management page in the Extension catalog. Then I selected one of the case studies (for example, Mixed Conifer and Hardwood Management in Southwest Oregon, EM 9084) and on its home page, the three options (PDF, interactive, and App) all appear. Below is a screen shot from the interactive version (left), alongside the corresponding text in the PDF version (right).

Both the interactive and PDF versions contain the same text, but the interactive version also includes videos and additional graphics to be explored.

 

So back to the opening question of this post: How do you like your silviculture served? I am actually really curious about this. At the end of the day, it is effective delivery and use of information that we are after with our materials. Time and again, people tell me that seeing an example on the ground, in person, is the best learning experience for them. Are the videos and other interactive features a good substitute? How well do they add to your understanding of forest management, if at all? You can weigh in by commenting on this post, or sending me an email.

Kudos to Jeff Hino and Stephen Ward at Extension & Experiment Station Communications for their innovative and creative work on the Alternative Forest Management series, and to Extension Silviculture Specialist Steve Fitzgerald for leading the project.

The post Silviculture information – from low tech to the world of apps appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Hopkins Community Forest Day

Forestry Events - Sat, 02/14/2015 - 6:37am
Saturday, February 14, 2015 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM

Community Forestry Days are your chance to learn by doing a variety of projects in a sustainably managed woodland - it's sort of like a "dude ranch" in the forest. Volunteers help with tree planting and pruning; reducing fire hazards and controlling invasive weeds; repairing trails and maintaining facilities - projects vary with the seasons.

http://www.demonstrationforest.org/community-forestry-days

CPHHS Research Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 02/13/2015 - 2:35pm
Friday, February 13, 2015 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

"From Classrooms to Communities: Extending the Public Health Mission" The Graduate Student Council will be sponsoring the college research seminar on February 13th. This seminar will include presentations of ongoing projects associated with the Oregon State University Extension Service and an open forum on the role of research for community impact.

Graduate students are especially encouraged to attend to hear about the real-world, community-focused work and join in on the conversation of university-community collaboration. Graduate students and faculty are welcome to stay for the second hour to enjoy coffee and conversation.

Introduction
Roger Rennekamp, Associate Dean for Outreach & Engagement

Panel Members:
Mary Arnold, Professor & 4-H Program Specialist
Kathy Gunter, Associate Professor & Extension Specialist
Tonya Johnson, Faculty, Family & Community Health (Marion County)
Ana Lu Fonseca, 4-H Latino Outreach Coordinator (Benton County)
Siew Sun Wong, Assistant Professor & Extension Nutrition Specialist

 This college-wide research seminar, is Co-Sponsored by the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs; the Center for Healthy Aging; the Hallie Ford Center; the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health and the Center for Global Health. The seminar series provides a forum for faculty in the College of Public Health & Human Sciences and other researcher to present their current research in public health and human sciences in an environment conducive to stimulating research collaboration and fostering student learning. Faculty and students from the Division of Health Sciences and other colleges, research centers and institutions are encouraged to participate.

Watch previous seminars

 

Webinar! Timber Tax Update

Forestry Events - Fri, 02/13/2015 - 2:35pm
Friday, February 13, 2015 9:00 AM - 10:00 AM

This webinar is designed to help woodland owners, foresters and their tax advisors prepare for the filing of their 2014 federal tax returns. In addition to providing useful tax tips and covering the latest changes to tax law, the webinar will also cover these important issues: tax deductions, timber income reporting, 1099-S filing, basis, loss, and the filing of Form T.

For more information, click HERE

Center for Global Health Thematic Group Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 02/13/2015 - 2:35pm
Friday, February 13, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM

"Thematic Group Seminar - Environment and Health" Profs. Molly Kile and Perry Hystad will present their current international research, as well as opportunities for future collaborative work with faculty and students, including international internships.

Faculty research, teaching and outreach activities in the Environment and Health thematic group respond to the growing call to address global water, air and other environmental health issues. Oregon State faculty have expertise in several related areas including evaluating water quality, access to safe water, adequate sanitation and the interaction with hygiene behavior to reduce the burden of both communicable and non-communicable diseases.

The College of Public Health and Human Sciences' Center for Global Health is pleased to announce the first in a new series of Thematic Group Seminars. The Center currently has 11 Thematic Groups, pooling expertise in the college and beyond in support of multidisciplinary research and programs in global health.

Please R.S.V.P. to cfgh@oregonstate.edu

Natural Resource Policy Fellowship: Applications due March 17

Breaking Waves - Fri, 02/13/2015 - 10:57am

Oregon Sea Grant is seeking qualified applicants with a strong interest in marine resource policy for our 2015-16 Natural Resource Policy Fellowship. Applications are due to the Oregon Sea Grant office no later than 5 pm on March 17.

This fellowship, which gives a student first-hand experience working on natural resource policy at the state level, is open to graduate students from any college or university with a physical campus located in Oregon, who have completed their graduate degree within since September 2013 or are within a year of completing it; preference will be given to those who have wrapped up their degrees by the time the fellowship starts.

The successful candidate will interview with multiple agency hosts to determine the best fit for both. The one-year, non-renewable fellowship, which includes a $31,200 stipend in monthly installments, plus travel, begins between May and July 2015, depending on the needs of the fellow and the agency with whom he or she is matched.

The post Natural Resource Policy Fellowship: Applications due March 17 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Natural Resource Policy Fellowship: Applications due March 17

Sea Grant - Fri, 02/13/2015 - 10:57am

Oregon Sea Grant is seeking qualified applicants with a strong interest in marine resource policy for our 2015-16 Natural Resource Policy Fellowship. Applications are due to the Oregon Sea Grant office no later than 5 pm on March 17.

This fellowship, which gives a student first-hand experience working on natural resource policy at the state level, is open to graduate students from any college or university with a physical campus located in Oregon, who have completed their graduate degree within since September 2013 or are within a year of completing it; preference will be given to those who have wrapped up their degrees by the time the fellowship starts.

The successful candidate will interview with multiple agency hosts to determine the best fit for both. The one-year, non-renewable fellowship, which includes a $31,200 stipend in monthly installments, plus travel, begins between May and July 2015, depending on the needs of the fellow and the agency with whom he or she is matched.

The post Natural Resource Policy Fellowship: Applications due March 17 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Winter Storm Damage

Amy Grotta's Tree Topics - Thu, 02/12/2015 - 7:43am

By Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry and Natural Resources Extension – Benton, Linn and Polk Counties

Winter storms seem to inflict damage to trees and forests somewhere in the area most years. Winds, snow and ice can damage individual trees or entire forest stands- breaking out branches, snapping the main trunk or tipping over whole trees, leaving landowners with a mess and many unexpected decisions.

This winter has been an exception in the severity of the November 2014 ice storm that battered a swath of the interior Coast Range from the Kings Valley area south to Mary’s Peak (see previous article).   This unusual event caused irregular and spotty damage reflecting fairly small differences in aspect and elevation.  Many landowners are still surveying the damage and considering their need to salvage and wondering if they can thin the damage out while leaving a healthy stand.  Damage is severe enough in some cases to be forcing the decision to clear cut and replant young stands rather than the early thinning they were due for.

Many factors will influence the decision of how to react to the damage including the extent of the damage to individual trees (how much of the trees crown was lost), the percent of trees damaged in a stand, the species, the terrain and availability of loggers and equipment.

Storm damage creates a clear immediate loss, but also many potential future losses.  Windthrow and breakage immediately reduce the value and market options of salvaged logs, while damage to surviving trees cause future losses to defect and increased rot.  Storm debris and may lead to beetle outbreaks that threaten undamaged trees in years ahead.  Yikes.

Beetles are a concern for two reasons 1) they may accelerate sapwood decay and associated degrading of the log, and 2) they may build up in dead and damaged trees to the point where they can attack otherwise healthy trees.  In this case we are talking about the Douglas-fir bark beetle.

It is important to keep the beetle’s life cycle and behavior in mind.  Douglas-fir bark beetles fly each year from April into the early summer.  They are looking for freshly down or stressed trees to colonize by boring through the bark and laying eggs in the inner bark.  There the beetle grubs will be protected and nourished as they develop into subadults by late fall.  They overwinter in the colonized log before emerging the following spring and repeating the cycle.  A couple other important things to know are that the Douglas-fir bark beetle has just one generation per year (as opposed to more rapidly growing fivespined ips in pine (see previous article), and that it needs fairly large material – logs that are 9 or 10 inches in diameter and greater – to develop into adults.  Also, abundance matters.  The numbers I’ve heard in the past and confirmed by Dave Shaw, OSU Extension Forest Health Specialist, is that there needs to be about 10 logs, 10 or more inches in diameter to lead to serious beetle damage to standing trees, although it is likely that damage is progressive with growing amounts of larger logs.  But the take home message is that you need some large material for this to become a problem, and that branches tops are not suitable nursery material for the bark beetle.  A silver lining, but a very thin and wispy one indeed.

Fine cinnamon-colored sawdust indicates bark beetle activity

So how does this factor into the salvage decision? For situation 1, where you hope to avoid decay and degrade of salvaged logs, it is important to remove vulnerable logs as soon as possible, and ideally before the spring 2015 beetle flight.  For situation 2, where you have significant amounts of downed or broken standing trees and hope to at least avoid a beetle population building up to damage the stand further, then it would be important to get out all suitable beetle rearing material (logs 10 inches and larger) before emergence of the storm-spawned generation in the spring of 2016.

You can anticipate one or more tours to consider options presented in a number of storm scenarios to be presented by Extension, the Small Woodlands Association and others. Please watch the Woodland Compass and Needle for details, or watch the Upcoming Events page  on our website for details.

 

The post Winter Storm Damage appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

David Douglas: The Collector and Naturalist at Work

Forestry Events - Thu, 02/12/2015 - 6:36am
Thursday, February 12, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM
Lecture and book signings by Jack Nisbet & Dick Hermann. Immediately following the lecture, please join us for a book signing event by Jack Nisbet & Richard Hermann.

Small-Scale & Urban farming Series

Small Farms Events - Thu, 02/12/2015 - 6:36am
Tuesday, February 24, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

OSU Extension Horticulturist Brooke Edmunds will explain the difference between sprouts, microgreens and baby greens.  This class will cover the latest research on the health benefits of microgreens, how to grow your own, and taste test different types. Participants will plant a container of microgreens to take home

For more information, contact the OSU Lane County Extension office at (541)344-5859, or stop by the office at 996 Jefferson Street in Eugene, to pick up an application.

Office hours are Monday-Thursday, 10am-1pm and 2-5pm.

Cost of session is $25.00.  Pre-registration is required.

For payment with a credit card see the website: extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Blogging and Writer’s Block

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 4:14pm

I don’t know what to write today for this week’s post. I turn to my book shelf and randomly choose a book. Alas, I get distracted and don’t remember what I’m about.  Mama said there would be days like this…I’ve got writer’s block (fortunately, it is not contagious). (Thank you, Calvin). There is also an interesting (to me at least because I learned a new word–thrisis: a crisis of the thirties) blog on this very topic (here).

So this is what I decided rather than trying to refocus. In the past 48 hours I’ve had the following discussions that relate to evaluation and evaluative thinking.

  1. In a faculty meeting yesterday, there was the discussion of student needs which occur during the students’ matriculation in a program of study. Perhaps it should include assets in addition to needs as students often don’t know what they don’t know and cannot identify needs.
  2. A faculty member wanted to validate and establish the reliability for a survey being constructed. Do I review the survey, provide the reference for survey development, OR give a reference for validity and reliability (a measurement text)? Or all of the above.
  3. There appears to be two virtual focus group transcripts for a qualitative evaluation that have gone missing. How much affect will those missing focus groups have on the evaluation? Will notes taken during the sessions be sufficient?
  4. A candidate came to campus for an assistant professor position who presented a research presentation on the right hand (as opposed to the left hand) [Euphemisms for the talk content to protect confidentiality.] Why even study the right hand when the left hand is what is the assessment?
  5. Reading over a professional development proposal dealing with what is, what could be, and what should be. Are the questions being asked really addressing the question of gaps?

I’m sure there are others. These jump to my mind. So I’ll give the references that relate to the above situations by number. Some of them I’ve given before; seems appropriate to do so again.

  1. Altschuld, J. W. (2014). Bridging the gap between asses/capacity building and needs assessment. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
  2. Dillman, D. A., Smyth, J. D., Christian, L. M. (2014). Internet, phone, mail, and mixed-mode surveys: The tailored design method. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.

2a. Salkind, N. J. (2005). Tests & measurement for people who (think they) hate tests and measurements.Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. (I show an image of the first edition; there is a second edition available.)

2b. Salkind, N. J. (2011). Statistics for people who (think they) hate statistics. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. (I include the statistics book by the same author because statistics is related.)

3. Carey, M. A. & Asbury, J-E. (2012). Focus group research. Walnut Creek, CA: Left Coast Press, Inc.

4. Walvoord, B. E. (2004). Assessment clear and simple: A practical guide for institutions, departments, and general education. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

4a. Schraw, G. & Robinson, D. R. (2011). Assessment of higher order thinking skills. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishing, Inc.

5. (See number 1).

Where have you found evaluation/evaluative thinking in your day?

Let me know.

my .

molly.

The post Blogging and Writer’s Block appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Beneficial insects in Christmas trees

Forestry Events - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 2:38pm
Wednesday, February 11, 2015 (all day event)

This workshop is for Christmas tree growers who face constant challenges in the management of damaging insects. Research and field trials are ongoing to test the use of beneficial insects as part of an integrated pest management program on Christmas tree farms. The program will highlight results of field trials led by OSU Extension and local growers. It will also cover the latest information on methods and results from similar efforts elsewhere in the world.

 

Itinerary and Registration HERE

Lane County Livestock Association Breakfast Educational Program

Small Farms Events - Wed, 02/11/2015 - 2:38pm
Wednesday, February 11, 2015 6:30 AM - 8:00 AM

 

For more information contact Shelby Filley (541) 672-4461  shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs