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Weed Management Methods in Reforestation and Restoration

Forestry Events - Sat, 04/08/2017 - 2:42pm
Saturday, April 8, 2017 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM

Weed control is often the key to success or failure in establishing trees and maintaining tree growth. This field tour will cover principles and practices of vegetation management for establishing and maintaining trees in forestry and forest restoration.

The focus is on illustrating and demonstrating methods and tools for controlling blackberry, Scotch broom, and native brush, along with grasses, groundsel, thistles, and other weedy herbaceous species. Field stops will feature common weed situations in reforestation and riparian forest restoration.
Key topics include:
• Vegetation management with herbicides
• Mechanical and non-chemical methods
• Integrated pest management approaches for selecting and combining methods.


This will be an opportunity for sharing lessons learned among woodland owners. The goal is to help you to plan
and implement weed management strategies for the long-term success of your trees.


Please dress for the field, bring your own lunch, and be prepared to ride in vans to sites nearby. There is a $15
fee to cover transportation and workshop materials. Registration is limited to 20 people. Please contact Jean
at 503-655-8631 or jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu for more information.

Excellence in Stewardship

Forestry Events - Sat, 04/08/2017 - 2:42pm
Saturday, April 8, 2017 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Family forestland owners are widely recognized for their outstanding land stewardship, and deservedly so.  Their love of and commitment to the land often creates some of the finest examples of state-of-the-art land management.  For example, in December the Defrees family from Sumpter was awarded the 2016 National Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year Award at the annual American Tree Farm System (ATFS) Conference in Washington D.C.  This is the first time in the 70 year history of the ATFS that anyone from eastern Oregon has received this prestigious award, which speaks to the truly amazing work they have done on their land.  And, it was just recently announced that the Heffernan family from North Powder was selected to receive the 2016 Private Landowner Wildlife Stewardship Award from the Oregon Chapter of the Wildlife Society (OCWS) in recognition of their outstanding contributions! 

The Excellence in Stewardship conference will highlight the Defrees and Heffernans amazing achievements and provide a format for participants to learn how to improve their stewardship through good land management and learn about the additional resources available through membership in private lands oriented organizations such as the ATFS and the Oregon Small Woodlands Association and natural resource agencies like the Oregon Department of Forestry and OSU Extension Forestry. 

Walk in the Woods tour

Forestry Events - Sat, 04/08/2017 - 2:42pm
Saturday, April 8, 2017 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Join us for a walk on the South Slough trail system to explore and discuss this unique coastal forest ecosystem including native tree and plant species, forest health issues and invasive species management.

Register by April 6th! Free lunch included!

http://extensionweb.forestry.oregonstate.edu/WOWNet

CPHHS Etiquette Dinner

Health & Wellness Events - Sat, 04/08/2017 - 2:42pm
Saturday, April 8, 2017 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Interviews don’t always happen in a conference room; how will you navigate a job interview over a meal?

The CPHHS Etiquette Dinner will be a fantastic opportunity for you to learn how to manage a professional meal with a mouthful of food, brush up on your networking skills, and get feedback and insight from employers, too. And a free, catered dinner doesn’t hurt!

This event is just for CPHHS students, so make sure to bring all your specific career-related questions. Registration is mandatory and limited to 40 participants. Don’t miss your chance, register now

Soil School

Small Farms Events - Sat, 04/08/2017 - 2:42pm
Saturday, April 8, 2017 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Soil School 2017 will be held at the Portland Community College Rock Creek campus Event Center.  The day will again be kicked off by Dr. Soil, James Cassidy, OSU Soil Scientist, who will give us an overview of soil – what it’s made of and why.

We’ll have 12 sessions featuring expert speakers on a wide variety of topics related to soil health including but not limited to invasive species, landscaping with native plants, cover crops and irrigation, composting and fungi.

Registration will be open soon so please watch your mailbox or check our website, www.wmswcd.org/projects/soil-school/.  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

WELDING & BASIC METAL WORK FOR FARMS-FULL

Small Farms Events - Sat, 04/08/2017 - 2:42pm
Saturday, April 8, 2017 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Limited to 8 people. The class is FULL. If you'd like to be on a waiting list, please call Paula, 541-776-7371, ext. 208

Hands on class held at Dunbar Farms. Instructor: David Mostue
Register: http://bit.ly/JacksonSmallFarms

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Aging and Technology: From the Laboratory to the Real World

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 04/07/2017 - 2:41pm
Friday, April 7, 2017 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

"Aging and Technology: From the Laboratory to the Real World" Andrew Sixsmith, PhD, Professor and Director, The Gerontology Research Centre, Simon Fraser University. He is also Deputy Director of the SFU Interdisciplinary Research in the Mathematical and Computational Sciences Centre and President of the International Society for Gerontechnology from 2014-2016.

Andrew's research has two main themes.

First, he has extensive research experience within the area of health and quality of life of older people and the role of health and social care services.

Second, he has been involved in the strategic development of research in the area of technology for independent living.

Andrew has used gerontological knowledge, theories and methods to provide input into user centered design and development of community care technologies (telecare) to facilitate and deliver health and social care services for older and disabled people.

Andrew has been a member of the British Society of Gerontology Executive Committee and has been UK representative on the EU's COST-A5 Committee on Ageing and Technology. Since 2000 he has developed research and teaching links with 26 universities worldwide and has actively collaborated with over 30 major commercial and government organizations.

Woodland Discovery Plan Workshops

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 2:45pm
Thursday, April 6, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

This two-evening OSU Extension workshop helps families discover the potential of their property and explore their relationship with their land. See flyer for more details. Offered in two locations:

Dallas: Thursdays April 6 & 20, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Polk County Extension Office

Corvallis: Thursdays April 13 & 27, 6:30 - 8:30 pm, Benton County Extension Office

Cost: $20 per family sharing materials

Register online  

For more information call the Benton Extension office 541-766-6750 or email Jody

Portland | National Public Health Week Happy Hour

Health & Wellness Events - Thu, 04/06/2017 - 2:45pm
Thursday, April 6, 2017 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Alumni and friends are invited to join the College of Public Health and Human Sciences in celebrating National Public Health Week. Mingle with fellow Beavers while getting the latest news from Oregon's first accredited college of public health. There will be free appetizers and a chance to win college swag.

Details and registration

Register by April 2 to receive a free drink ticket. Walkups accepted. Cash bar available.

Woodland Management – Basic Forestry Shortcourse

Forestry Events - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 2:56pm
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This five-session course is ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property.

Topics covered:
-Getting Started: Assessing your property and your site.
-What’s Going on in Your Woods? Understanding tree biology and forest ecology.
-Taking Care of Your Woods: Tree planting, care for an established forest,weed control.
-Getting it Done: Safety, timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations.
-Saturday Field Trip to see first hand examples of what you've learned.

Register: R.S.V.P by April 5th call 503-325-8573
or email valerie.grant@oregonstate.edu

Wood Castle Tour

Forestry Events - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 2:56pm
Wednesday, April 5, 2017 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

The Wood Castle has an industrial scale Wood-Mizer mill which can cut 50 to 60 mbf of hardwood lumber a month; kilns for drying this lumber; and a plant that manufactures custom furniture from their processed wood. We'll thus see everything from the raw logs to the finished products. Sponsored by Linn County Small Woodlands chapter.
 

Space is limited and RSVP required by email (please include phone and number attending) or call 541-766-6311 

Innovation, again.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Wed, 04/05/2017 - 11:47am
Innovation, again, leads to two thoughts for today:
  1. Innovation is the first one, from the first Monday video from Scott Reed : Do something. Try anything.  and
  2. the other from Harold Jarche who sites the book, Only Humans Need Apply about automation and intelligent machines.

This does relate to evaluation. Just wait. Patiently.

Where would evaluation be if evaluators didn’t question? Didn’t try anything or something? Evaluators would still be thinking separately; in silos. Would any of the current approaches be available? Would evaluation as a field be where it is today? Not if evaluators didn’t do something; try anything; innovate. Fortunately, evaluators do something.

Only humans need apply.

This is an interesting post.

Jarche presents this as a book review.

In this review, Jarche says that “…the authors identify five ways that people can adapt to automation and intelligent machines. They call it ‘stepping'”. Jarche added in parentheses the main attributes he thinks are needed for each option. The five steps are:

  1. Step-up: directing the machine-augmented world (creativity);
  2. Step-in: using machines to augment work (deep thinking);
  3. Step-aside: doing human work that machines are not suited for (empathy);
  4. Step narrowly: specializing narrowly in a field too small for augmentation (passion); and
  5. Step forward: developing new augmentation systems (curiosity).

I think all of these attributes are needed by the evaluation profession.

Evaluation

Evaluation would not be where it is today without creativity. Evaluators think deeply to answer difficult questions. Where would evaluators be without empathy? We certainly have passion and curiosity.

I’ve been an evaluator for a long time. I have seen the evolution of this field.

When I first came to evaluation as a graduate student, the AEA was not even a figment in any ones eye.

There were two associations, one for practice and one for research.

In 1986, they merged, making the AEA.

Bob Ingle had been organizing the joint meeting between those two organizations since 1981.

Then there were only several hundred members (200-300 maybe). Austin could hold us all, easily. (Not so, today.)

Since 1981, the field has slowly and tenaciously become a major player in the evaluation of programs, policies, personnel, products, performances, and proposals (thank you Michael Scriven   ).  As Scriven points out, evaluation as a profession has “…its own Library of Congress classification”.

There are new topical interest groups being founded. And affiliate organizations popping up all over the country. The organization, once a completely volunteer organization, is now managed by a firm specializing in such activities.

Evaluation has come a long way, baby.

The profession will continue to evolve as innovations continue.

 

The post Innovation, again. appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Season Tracker Training

Forestry Events - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 3:25pm
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

OSU Extenison citizen science program observing and reporting precipitation and seasonal plant changes like leaf buds.  Participants take a self paced online training at home (approx. 2 hrs) and then attend one classroom hands-on session to practice protocols, ask questions, and pick up you rain gauge.

Attend one classroom sessions:
     Wednesday March 22, 2017 in Stayton, 6:00 - 8:00 pm
     Tuesday April 4, 2017 in Wren, 6:00 - 8:00 pm
     Saturday May 13, 2017 in Portland, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Cost: $40 per family sharing materials/$30 for Linn County residents requesting a LCEA grant discount
Register: online 
For information contact Jody or call 541-766-6311

Woodland Management - Mapleton

Forestry Events - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 3:25pm
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM

This six-session course is ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property. Topics covered include:

•Getting started: Assessing your property and your site •What’s going on in your woods? Understanding tree biology and forest ecology •Taking care of your woods: Tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control •Getting it done : Safety, timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations •Field trip :  See real examples of things learned in class

Information and Registration 

UNDERSTANDING FARM MARKET REPORTS

Small Farms Events - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 3:25pm
Tuesday, April 4, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

REGISTER ON LINE: cancelled

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Recipes for Growing a Diverse Forest

Tree Topics - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 12:28pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson and Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension.

 

Many landowners are interested in growing a diverse forest as discussed in the previous post.  Their reasons may include having an attractive woodland retreat, providing habitat for wildlife or having a more resilient forest.  Whatever the reason, knowing what different parts of forest diversity look like is a key step towards getting it.

There are several key parts to diversity: those things that grow and live in a forest, how those things are arranged and when those things happen. Each is shaped or influenced by the physical environment (like soils or elevation) and natural processes (like competition, storms or fire).  Many kinds of diversity can also be enriched by us.

Probably the first thing people think about as diversity is the number and types of plants and animals in the forest. Certainly, what is growing in the forest (the species composition) is an important part of diversity.  A mix of trees which includes cedar and maple along with Douglas-fir is more diverse than monocrop of Douglas-fir alone in the forest canopy.  You can think of the different kinds of plants as the building blocks of a forest, or maybe better, ingredients in a recipe.  An oatmeal raisin cookie is more diverse than an oatmeal cookie.  But not twice as much.  There are many ingredients in cookies that go unobserved or unseen.  While trees are the most obvious and the defining elements of the forest (like the oatmeal and raisins), understory plants, soil microorganisms, fungi, and other elements play less glamorous but essential roles (like the flour, sugar and baking powder) in making the cookie a cookie.

 

 

Another easily observed feature of diversity is the forest’s structure, or how things are arranged.   Looking up and down you may see one or more layers of vegetation from the tree canopy to the leafy plants growing on the forest floor.  Looking at these layers, you are looking at the vertical diversity.  An Oreo cookie has more of it than our oatmeal cookie does. This structure affects how the woods look, but also how things work. Having more vertical diversity can be visually appealing.  And because different animals use different parts of this vertical forest structure to forage, roost or nest, it may mean more types of animals using your woods too.

 

Likewise, looking side to side we can see the texture of the forest (its horizontal diversity).  The woods may be quite uniform throughout, with little difference from place to place.  Or the woods may be uneven, with groups or patches of different things scattered about. These could  be areas with different ages, sizes or species of trees. To picture this horizontal diversity, let’s think about cookies with a similar variety of ingredients but different horizontal structure: chocolate and chocolate chip.  Chocolate cookies are uniform throughout, but chocolate chip cookies are patchy, and more diverse. Like vertical structure, this horizontal structure provides different conditions that may be visually appealing or suit different animals.

Perhaps the least obvious part of woodland diversity is time, or perhaps better, processes that take time. It may be cheating a bit to include time as part of diversity, but as an observer of nature and care-taker of a woodland, it is important for you to recognize its impact on the different parts of diversity.   Some kinds of diversity can happen quickly, others just take time to develop.  Cookie dough is great, but it is not a cookie until it has spent some time in the oven.

Imagine a riparian restoration plantation along a stream. You can quickly create species diversity by planting a mix of species, and horizontal diversity by planting patches of different trees or shrubs rather than blending them together. However, to get vertical diversity with layers including large trees (desired to shade more of the stream longer and/or have large logs to fall in the steam), you need decades, maybe even a century or more for that to fully develop.

As a landowner, you have many opportunities (such as planting, controlling invasives or thinning) to shape your woodland property.  Each is a choice between paths that take you to different destinations, with different outcomes, depending on the recipe you pick. We hope this introduction will help you choose a path to your destination. Coming up in our next article: specific steps you can take to enhance your woodland’s diversity according to you objectives.

But now, it is time for a cup of coffee. And a cookie!

The post Recipes for Growing a Diverse Forest appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

College of Public Health Speakers' Series: Biopsychosocial Aging

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 04/03/2017 - 2:50pm
Thursday, March 30, 2017 6:00 PM - Monday, April 3, 2017 7:50 PM
This 10-week long speaker series will highlight 10 public health issues important for all Oregonians taught by experts from the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. The following speakers with tentative topics for their lectures are listed below. Refreshments provided.

April 10, 2017: Carolyn Aldwin – "Biopsychosocial Aging: How Stress Gets Under the Skin"

April 17, 2017: Kate MacTavish – "Health trajectories: Why zipcodes matter more than genetic codes"
April 24, 2017: Javier Nieto – “Sleep and Health”
May 1, 2017: Sunil Khanna – “You Just Don’t Understand: Cultural Humility, Communication and Health”
May 8, 2017: Rick Settersten – “Journey to Adulthood: The long and winding road"

May 15, 2017: Stephanie Grutzmacher – “Local Food, Good Nutrition”
May 22, 2017: Dave Dallas – “Human Milk and Your Baby’s Health”
June 5, 2017: Carolyn Mendez-Luck – "Caregiving in Cultural Context”
June 12, 2017: Jeff Luck – “Health Care System, What's next for Obamacare?”

College of Public Health Speakers' Series: Biopsychosocial Aging

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 04/03/2017 - 2:50pm
Thursday, March 30, 2017 6:00 PM - Monday, April 3, 2017 7:50 PM
This 10-week long speaker series will highlight 10 public health issues important for all Oregonians taught by experts from the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. The following speakers with tentative topics for their lectures are listed below. Refreshments provided.

April 10, 2017: Carolyn Aldwin – "Biopsychosocial Aging: How Stress Gets Under the Skin"

April 17, 2017: Kate MacTavish – "Health trajectories: Why zipcodes matter more than genetic codes"
April 24, 2017: Javier Nieto – “Sleep and Health”
May 1, 2017: Sunil Khanna – “You Just Don’t Understand: Cultural Humility, Communication and Health”
May 8, 2017: Rick Settersten – “Journey to Adulthood: The long and winding road"

May 15, 2017: Stephanie Grutzmacher – “Local Food, Good Nutrition”
May 22, 2017: Dave Dallas – “Human Milk and Your Baby’s Health”
June 5, 2017: Carolyn Mendez-Luck – "Caregiving in Cultural Context”
June 12, 2017: Jeff Luck – “Health Care System, What's next for Obamacare?”

Growing a Diverse Forest: Choosing your path

Tree Topics - Mon, 04/03/2017 - 2:45pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson and Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension.

We often hear from landowners that that they want a diverse, natural-looking forest. Their reasons vary.  Some folks are aware of the many ecological benefits that diversity brings to a woodland property, while others may have been inspired by the beauty of an old growth forest.

Old growth forest at HJ Andrews Experimental Forest, Blue River OR

Of course, it takes centuries for an old growth forest to develop and many of our readers have young stands planted within the last decade or two that may look more like this:

Young D-fir plantation in foothills of the Coast Range

So how do you move from one situation to another?

Happily, a landowner has many ways to influence and encourage diversity in their woodlands. Even if you have just bought some recently cut-over land, it does not have to remain a simple timber plantation if you do not want it to be.  You can grow a diverse forest.  And it can be done within decades rather than centuries.  No, it will not be old growth, but it may help reach many of the diversity-related objectives landowners commonly mention, including an attractive forest setting, better habitat for a variety of animals and a resilient forest.

A network of paths leads from any starting point in a woodland’s development. Each crossing is an event or decision that leads in a different direction and towards a different woodland condition.

In this series, we will be exploring the pathways to a diverse forest in western Oregon. These ideas also apply to an oak woodland, a riparian forest as well as an upland conifer-dominated forest.  In our next post we look at what makes a forest diverse and why it matters.  In later posts we will consider turns you can take throughout the life of the forest to restore, enhance and maintain woodland diversity to match your particular objectives.

Another view of pathways, incorporating competitive zones leading to certain outcomes.

 

The post Growing a Diverse Forest: Choosing your path appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

OSU to host Marine Science Day this Saturday, April 8

Breaking Waves - Mon, 04/03/2017 - 10:00am

Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center will hold its annual Marine Science Day on Saturday, April 8, giving visitors an opportunity to see laboratories behind the scenes, interact with student scientists and learn more about current marine research.

The event is free and open to the public, and takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the center, located in Newport southeast of the Highway 101 bridge over Yaquina Bay. It will feature interactive, hands-on exhibits and opportunities to talk with researchers from OSU and other federal and state agencies.

The theme is “Celebrating Student Research,” and student scientists will be among the researchers presenting exhibits on marine mammals, oyster aquaculture, ocean acidification, ocean noise, seagrass ecology, fisheries, deep-sea vents and more. Visitors can learn about research diving with the OSU Dive Team, observe microscopic plankton, tour a genetics lab and hear about the NOAA Corps’ 100th year as a commissioned service.

Special activities for children will be offered by Oregon Sea Grant and the Oregon Coast Aquarium. The Oregon Coast STEM Hub and representatives from OSU and Oregon Coast Community College will also be available to engage K-12 students interested in pursuing marine studies.

Special events include:

  • A lecture at 2:30 p.m. by José R. Marín Jarrín, Charles Darwin Foundation, Galápagos, Ecuador, on “From Hatfield to the Charles Darwin Foundation: The importance of student research experiences”
  • Opening celebration at 10:30 a.m. for the Experimental Seawater Facility, funded by the National Science Foundation
  • A public feeding of Opal the octopus at 1 p.m. in the Visitors Center

Visitors may also learn about the progress of OSU’s Marine Studies Initiative, which seeks to host 500 students-in-residence in Newport by 2025.

“With a new teaching and research facility in the fundraising and design phase, Marine Science Day offers a great opportunity to understand why we are so excited about OSU’s Marine Studies Initiative,” said Bob Cowen, director of the Hatfield Marine Science Center.

“It is also a chance to learn about our scientists – who we are, what we do, and how we, as university, state and federal partners, work together and with communities to better understand and solve our marine and coastal challenges.”

More information about the event is available here.

(From a news release provided by Maryann Bozza, HMSC)

Photo caption: An octopus will be among the many exhibits and activities during Marine Science Day at the OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center. (Photo courtesy of Oregon State University)

 

The post OSU to host Marine Science Day this Saturday, April 8 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs