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Landtype Association Mapping in the PNW National Forests

Forestry Events - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, January 26, 2016 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Please join me in the following Adobe Connect Meeting.

Meeting Name: Landtype Association Mapping

Invited By: Cheryl Friesen

To join the meeting:
https://usfs.adobeconnect.com/landtypemapping/

 If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before:

Test your connection: https://usfs.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Get a quick overview: http://www.adobe.com/go/connectpro_overview

Nutrient Management Workshop: Keeping Nitrogen in the Crop and Dollars in the Pocket

Small Farms Events - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, January 26, 2016 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Join us for an interactive, one-day nitrogen workshop for Oregon Growers on nutrient management solutions. Local experts from Oregon State University Extension and local fertilizer companies will share information and tools to increase nitrogen use efficiency. Grower participation is the backbone of this workshop as grower knowledge and needs are the drivers for applicable solutions to nitrogen management. This workshop is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided. Certified Crop Advisor CEUs will be available.

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/5080d4cadad22a57-oregon

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Story

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 3:25pm

Alan Rickman  died this month. He was an actor of my generation; one that provided me with much entertainment. I am sad. Then I saw this quote on the power of stories. How stories explain. How stories can educate. How stories can help reduce bias.  And I am reminded how stories are evaluative.

Dick Krueger did a professional development session (then called a “pre-session”) many years ago. It seems relevant now. Of course, I couldn’t find my notes (which were significant) so I did an online search, using “Dick Krueger and stories” as my search terms. I was successful! (See link.) When I went to the link, he had a whole section on story and story telling. What I remember most about that session is what he has listed under “How to Analyze the Story”. Specifically the four points he lists under problems with credibility:

  • Authenticity – Truth
  • Accuracy – Memory Problems
  • Representativeness and Sampling
  • Generalizability / Transferability

The next time you tell a story think of it in evaluative terms. And check out what Dick Krueger has to say.

I’ve started aggregating my blog posts (no easy task, to be sure) in preparation for developing the “modules” for a WECT-like approach to evaluation. The first section is Program Planning and Logic Modeling. The following posts are relevant (and presented in no particular order):

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/11/09/relevant-resources/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2010/01/05/101/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/04/19/timely-topic-planning-your-evaluation/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2012/05/30/perpetual-beta/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/10/12/stories-as-evaluation/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/04/01/how-do-you-find-the-answer/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/03/25/language-what-does-it-really-mean-and-how-do-you-know/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/03/02/all-of-the-people-all-of-the-time/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/01/27/standard-evaluation-tools/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2015/02/04/logic-models-good-tool/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2012/03/09/causal-relationships-evaluation-and-logic-models/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2012/01/23/logic-models-again/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2010/12/21/logic-model-revisited/

There may be more that are remotely related to Program Planning and Logic Modeling. This was my first pass. The URLs work and will take you to a longer post. You may have to cut and paste.

my .

molly.

 

 

 

The post Story appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

On-Campus Employment Fair

Environment Events - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 2:38pm
Monday, January 25, 2016 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Interested in a student job on-campus? Join us at the On-Campus Employment Fair to network with departments and secure on-campus employment for next academic year! See who's attending here.

Attend the following break-out sessions for a more in depth look at various job search techniques as well as how to handle group interviewing:
  • 11:00-12:00 Job Search Strategies hosted by the Career Development Center and Human Resources
  • 12:00-1:00 Group Interviewing hosted by UHDS 
  • 1:00-2:00 Job Search Strategies hosted by the Career Development Center and Human Resources
  • 2:00-3:00 Group Interviewing hosted by UHDS

Strengths Based Leadership

Environment Events - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 2:38pm
Monday, January 25, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

This session requires advanced completion of a 30-minute online assessment, the Clifton StrengthsFinder, by all attendees. Thus, registration is due by January 6th. Those who have signed up will receive an exclusive access code to allow them to take the Strengths assessment between Jan 7th and Jan 14th. The actual session on Jan 18th will then utilize the data from your assessment in helping you understand your strengths as a leader!

This assessment has helped more than 8 million people around the world discover their talents and become better leaders. After you take the Clifton StrengthsFinder, you'll receive a customized report that lists your top five talent themes, along with action items for development and suggestions about how you can use your talents to achieve academic, career, and personal success. In a highly interactive workshop, Melissa Yamamoto (Gallup Certified Strengths Coach) will help you understand your strengths and how to utilize this knowledge to maximize your practices as a leader. Attendees can expect to:

Increase your self-awareness. Effective leaders know what they do well, and they find ways to apply their talents authentically and productively. Understanding your talents is an important step in cultivating self-awareness as a leader.

Deepen your knowledge and appreciation of others' talents. As you learn more about your own talents, you will begin to see the unique talents in others. You'll also appreciate others for the different perspectives they offer because of their talents. The best leaders understand that teams with a diversity of talents achieve the best outcomes.

Form and maximize your teams. Although leaders need not be well-rounded, teams should be. Understanding each team members' talents is crucial to getting the most out of a team -- and in a way that honors the contributions each person can make. Understanding each team members' talents will give you new insights into how the team can perform to its full potential.

Help others to affirm, develop, and apply their talents. As a leader who understands your own talents and how to apply them productively, you can lead others to develop and apply their talents.

 

Details are available in the Academy Portal for members.

Not a member?  Submit your application today!

(All OSU engineering students in good academic standing with a minimum of 45 total earned credits are eligible to apply)

Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28

Breaking Waves - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 7:00am

NEWPORT – The OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center and the Union of Concerned Scientists will host a reception and panel discussion on the environmental and economic impacts of ocean acidification on our coastal communities. The event is from 5-7 pm this Thursday, January 28  in the HMSC Visitor Center’s Hennings Auditorium.

Expert panelists will discuss the science of ocean acidification, local impacts and potential solutions with community members and elected officials.

Panelists are:

  • Dr. George Waldbusser, Assistant Professor, OSU College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Alan Barton, Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery
  • Dr. Francis Chan, Associate Professor and Senior Researcher, OSU College of Science
  • Emily Heffling, Western States Outreach Coordinator, Union of Concerned Scientists

Join us for a light reception and meet our panelists before the presentation.

The event, hosted by HMSC Director Bob Cowen and State Representative David Gomberg, is family-friendly, free and open to the public. RSVP requested – eheffling@ucsusa.org or 510-809-1584.

Learn more: Current and recent Oregon Sea Grant-funded research on ocean acidification

The post Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28

Sea Grant - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 7:00am

NEWPORT – The OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center and the Union of Concerned Scientists will host a reception and panel discussion on the environmental and economic impacts of ocean acidification on our coastal communities. The event is from 5-7 pm this Thursday, January 28  in the HMSC Visitor Center’s Hennings Auditorium.

Expert panelists will discuss the science of ocean acidification, local impacts and potential solutions with community members and elected officials.

Panelists are:

  • Dr. George Waldbusser, Assistant Professor, OSU College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Alan Barton, Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery
  • Dr. Francis Chan, Associate Professor and Senior Researcher, OSU College of Science
  • Emily Heffling, Western States Outreach Coordinator, Union of Concerned Scientists

Join us for a light reception and meet our panelists before the presentation.

The event, hosted by HMSC Director Bob Cowen and State Representative David Gomberg, is family-friendly, free and open to the public. RSVP requested – eheffling@ucsusa.org or 510-809-1584.

Learn more: Current and recent Oregon Sea Grant-funded research on ocean acidification

The post Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

CCFFA Winter Potluck and Program Fireline Stories

Forestry Events - Sat, 01/23/2016 - 2:37pm
Saturday, January 23, 2016 11:30 AM - 2:30 PM

Get the inside story on major fires in our area from 2013-2015. How did they start, why did they spread, and what problems did the firefighters have? You will see photos and learn details that weren’t in the news. Mike Haasken is the presenter and is a Certified Fire Behavior Analyst as well as an ODF Stewardship Forester. He will also share financial valuations and estimates for recovery.
Bring your favorite potluck food to share. Registration required.

Benton Chapter OSWA Annual Meeting

Forestry Events - Sat, 01/23/2016 - 2:37pm
Saturday, January 23, 2016 11:30 AM - 3:00 PM
Please RSVP

Many young stands too crowded

Tree Topics - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 3:40pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

In my travels around the mid-Willamette Valley, I am seeing a lot of young conifer stands (generally Douglas-fir up to 20 something years old) with just too many trees. Why do I say there are too many trees?
I know many people in this part of western Oregon who are patiently waiting for their trees to grow, hoping to do a commercial thinning (meaning sell the harvested trees to make at least a small profit) when their stand is about 25 years old.

 

All too often it is not working out that way. Instead, as the stand approaches the target age they find that trees have already become too crowded, with too many small, slow growing trees in the stand. The trees are still too small to support a profitable thinning operation yet. To thin at that point is to do so at a cost, although it may be best for the woodland in the long-run. To delay the thinning and wait for the trees to grow enough to make the thinning operation profitable is appealing. It may avoid the short term expense but is likely to weaken the stand at a long-term cost of growth, stand stability and future options. It is a classic “pay now or pay later” situation.


In young stands, the idea is to have the “right” number of well-spaced trees to allow the trees in the stand to grow more or less unchecked until they are big enough to support a commercial thinning, and to do it “on time”, that is before future opportunities are affected by intense competition. This should leave the landowner with a healthy, stable and vigorously growing stand easily shaped to meet any of a wide range of long term objectives that family landowners commonly aim for. These common objectives (see related article about objectives) including habitat diversity, recreational opportunities as well as periodic income, are generally best met by growing trees in longer rotations (>45 yrs) and with multiple thinnings over time. So it is important to get off on the right foot.


Of course there are many nuances in choosing the right spacing for any stand, but I’m saying there is a lot less nuance in the decision leading up to the first commercial thinning of a young stand than there is in later thinning decisions. It is fairly simple. In a young stand, we want to have the right number of trees to support a timely commercial thinning while avoiding excessive competition. This will keep the most options open for the landowner in the future.
We’ll look at what that number might be in another article.

The post Many young stands too crowded appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Portland Trip to Daimler

Environment Events - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 2:33pm
Friday, January 22, 2016 6:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Members of the Leadership Academy will visit Daimler, interacting with industry leaders and learning about opportunities. Transportation and lunch will be provided. This event is being hosted in partnership with the College of Business Career Success Center and space is limited. 

Academy Pillar: PURPOSEFUL

Details are available in the Academy Portal for members.

Not a member?  Submit your application today!

(All OSU engineering students in good academic standing with a minimum of 45 total earned credits are eligible to apply) 

Timber Tax Filing for the 2015 Tax Year

Forestry Events - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 2:33pm
Friday, January 22, 2016 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Timber tax laws have changed due to the new tax law that was passed by Congress in December 2015. Brand new tax provisions on capital gains for timber corporations will affect timber businesses and owners. Business deductions on equipment costs have been increased significantly. Special charitable donation deduction on qualified conservation easement was extended. To help the 2015 tax return filing, this one-hour webinar will cover the rules for timber tax reporting, including the latest law changes. It will cover the 1099 filing that the foresters must know. Bring your tax questions to get answers from the presenter. Learn more here...

 For information on timber taxes visit http://www.timbertax.org

CPHHS Research Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 2:33pm
Friday, January 22, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

"Recruitment, Retention, and Reminder Strategies in a Targeted, Text Message-Based Nutrition Education Program for Low-Income Parents" Stephanie Grutzmacher, PhD, Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Community Health, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University.

Dr. Grutzmacher's work focuses on food security, nutrition literacy and the development and evaluation of family, school and community-based nutrition education programs for low-income populations. 

Dr. Grutzmacher has conducted training programs with women in Afghanistan to improve family food security and dietary quality through backyard gardening. She has served as a faculty advisor for Public Health without Borders and the University of Maryland Alternative Breaks program, fostering experiential service learning experiences for undergraduate students in the areas of health and development.

Faculty Profile

ResearchGate Profile

Jackson Josephine Small Woodlands Association

Forestry Events - Thu, 01/21/2016 - 2:37pm
Thursday, January 21, 2016 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Speaker: Dave Larson, District Forester, Oregon Department of Forestry

Dave Larson, the new Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) District Forester for Southwestern Oregon will give a presentation entitled "Changing of the Guard".  Dave, who replaces Dan Thorpe, has over 25 years of experience in the area, with a long ODF background in fire and forestry operations of all types. He will describe upcoming directions for ODF in 2016, with a special emphasis on areas of interest for small woodland owners.  This will be a great opportunity for attendees to "meet and greet" Dave and to hear how ODF is moving forward with the many issues and lands that they are involved with.  It’s also an chance for attendees to share with Dave some of the issues and interests that are front and center for small woodland owners in our area.

Dinner:  Hawaiian-style plate (chicken and pork) with salads, rice, dessert.  Yaki soba vegetarian option. Must receive dinner reservation by Tuesday, January 19, 2016.

Please RSVP and see the flyer for a registration-dinner reservation form and more details.    

Wood in Building Design and Construction at WOU Tour

Forestry Events - Wed, 01/20/2016 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, January 20, 2016 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

A great opportunity to see some of the new ways that wood is being used in building design and construction. Work is underway on the Richard Woodcock Education Center at Western Oregon University in Monmouth using a wide array of materials and methods including the very first Oregon-produced cross laminated timber (CLT), as well as laminated decking, stud and plywood framing. WOU construction manager Brad Huggins will host a tour of the project and explain the choices and applications of various wood products.

Vans leave Corvallis at 2:45pm.

Estimation of job creation and economic activity from investment in hybrid poplar bio-jet fuel

Forestry Events - Wed, 01/20/2016 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, January 20, 2016 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

This study estimates the net economic impacts of short-rotation poplar for bio-jet fuel production in California, Washington, and Oregon. Regional impacts such as potential biofuel output and employment opportunities are explored as well as poplar production, displacement of existing crops, handling and transportation of poplar, biorefinery construction and operation.  We employed a suite of models including a Statewide Agricultural Production (SWAP) model, which a hydro-economic model for crop adoption, a Geospatial Bioenergy Systems Model (GBSM) to identify the optimal location of the biorefinery facility in each State, and IMPLAN, an input-output model of the regional economies to conduct the economic impact analysis. Results indicate the poplar production has the potential to replace some incumbent crops in the study areas at sufficiently high prices with net benefits in local employment, value added (gross domestic product), and output.

Register HERE

Hummingbird Citizen Science Project

Forestry Events - Wed, 01/20/2016 - 2:34pm
Friday, January 1, 2016 - Wednesday, January 20, 2016 (all day event)
Audience: 6-8 Educators
Curricula: Flying WILD, pollination ecology resources, citizen science protocols and data
Description: Want to involve your students in authentic science projects? This workshop is for you. We invite you and your students to join us in a hummingbird citizen science project. During this one-day workshop, we will introduce the hummingbird project, review hummingbird protocols, practice pollinator games, and explore hummingbird data.
Register Here

Winter Farming Series

Small Farms Events - Wed, 01/20/2016 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, January 20, 2016 12:00 PM

Are you interested in exploring whether winter production would be a good addition to your farm business? There are several crops that can be harvested during the winter months in Oregon. This class series will cover the basics of winter production including season extension tips and tools, planting dates and varietal selection that you will need to get started in winter production. We’ll also walk you through the process of keeping records to track production costs and analyzing whether winter production can be a profitable enterprise for your farm.

You’ll have a chance to visit with farmers that are experienced with winter production to get perspectives from the field. Our goal is to support you with testing out winter production on your farm to determine whether it is a feasible enterprise for your operation. Classes are spread out over a whole year and timed so that you can apply what you learn for your winter plantings in 2016.

For more information:
http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/southern-willamette-valley-program/winter-farming
Registration opens in November!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

NO CLASSES- MLK Day

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 01/18/2016 - 2:35pm
Monday, January 18, 2016 (all day event)

OSU’s 34-year-old celebration is one of the oldest continuous events in the state celebrating the civil rights leader. Events are open to the public and most are free.

The objectives for Oregon State University's celebration are simple, but important. They are

  • Provide opportunities for our community to learn about and reflect on the life and legacy of Dr. King and collaboratively envision ways to carry his work forward.
  • Provide opportunities for our community to participate in an impactful, inclusive, and engaging celebration of the life and legacy of Dr. King.
  • To provide opportunities for our community to collaboratively learn about, reflect on and carry on the legacy of Dr. King in a way that is relevant to today’s generations.

The planning team is made up of stakeholders (students, staff, and faculty) who are engaged in planning a celebration that will be meaningful and inclusive, and that will provide opportunities for our community to come together in celebration, in reflection, and in service.

The planning process is open to anyone who would like to lend their voice and their energy to make this year's celebration meaningful and impactful.  Please contact the Office of Equity and Inclusion if you would like to participate.

Recipe to Market: Brand and Market Planning Food Business

Food Events - Mon, 01/18/2016 - 6:06am
Monday, February 1, 2016 12:00 AM - Sunday, February 21, 2016 12:00 PM

Innovative entrepreneurs are changing our food and drink choices for the better. Often with a focus on regionally sourced ingredients, vivid branding and values that resonate with consumers, startup companies from Portland, Oregon to Portland, Maine are seeing big growth. Our Recipe to Market: Brand and Market Planning course is designed to help combine your passion (and amazing ideas) for a food/drink business with affordable and accessible insight and guidance with a legendary industry pro.

These are just a few examples of the food and drink businesses we can help you launch or grow:

  • Energy drinks or energy bars
  • Baked goods/doughnuts
  • Bottled teas or kombucha
  • Nut butters
  • Salsas
  • Granola bars
  • Honey
  • Ice cream
  • Yogurt
  • Pickles
  • Plus, many more!

We'll help you refine your brand to connect with the market and build the capability to collect and respond to feedback and market data.

Identify the best strategies for reaching your audience and understand your place within the market. With this strategy in your apron pocket, start to develop the branding for your start-up food business. Learn the best channels to promote and sell your product. This course will give you a structure and understanding of marketing and branding for small food entrepreneurs that will align strategic goals with practical business planning.

Enroll in this resource-rich online course now or learn more about our complete Recipe to Market Certificate program's collaborative series of small food entrepreneur courses.

Go here for further information and to register for this online course!