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New Video: Responding to the Risks of . . . Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris

Breaking Waves - Tue, 09/02/2014 - 11:26am

Marine debris – trash, refuse, stuff lost at sea — can often seem like a problem that’s difficult to make headway against. New short videos produced by Oregon Sea Grant can change that impression.

Responding to the Risks of Marine Debris: Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris, documents the aftermath of the devastating 2011 tsunami that washed millions of tons of personal belongings, along with other industrial and structural debris, in to the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Japan. Since then, Japanese tsunami marine debris both large and small has come ashore along the U.S. West Coast, providing a unique window on the ways in which debris moves throughout the oceans, the risks associated with marine debris, including invasive species, and the responses people — from scientists to citizens — are making to marine debris.

The 10-minute documentary video is online at the Oregon Sea Grant Vimeo channel in high definition at vimeo.com/98582981

. . . and on our YouTube channel (where closed captioning is also available):

This video was produced by Oregon Sea Grant in a cooperative project with NOAA West and the West Coast Sea Grant programs.

 

The post New Video: Responding to the Risks of . . . Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New Videos: Derelict Fishing Gear: Oregon fishermen interviews

Sea Grant - Thu, 08/28/2014 - 10:20am

Extended interviews are now online with two Oregon fishermen, Al Pazar and Nick Furman, who reflect on derelict gear programs with the Dungeness crab fleet in which they were directly involved.

The interviews are in high definition at the Oregon Sea Grant Vimeo channel:

Al Pazar, former chairman, Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission

Nick Furman, former Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission exec. director

The videos were produced by Oregon Sea Grant in cooperation with NOAA West, the NOAA Marine Debris Program, and the Sea Grant programs of Washington, California, and the University of Southern California.

The post New Videos: Derelict Fishing Gear: Oregon fishermen interviews appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New Videos: Derelict Fishing Gear: Oregon fishermen interviews

Breaking Waves - Thu, 08/28/2014 - 10:20am

Extended interviews are now online with two Oregon fishermen, Al Pazar and Nick Furman, who reflect on derelict gear programs with the Dungeness crab fleet in which they were directly involved.

The interviews are in high definition at the Oregon Sea Grant Vimeo channel:

Al Pazar, former chairman, Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission

Nick Furman, former Oregon Dungeness Crab Commission exec. director

The videos were produced by Oregon Sea Grant in cooperation with NOAA West, the NOAA Marine Debris Program, and the Sea Grant programs of Washington, California, and the University of Southern California.

The post New Videos: Derelict Fishing Gear: Oregon fishermen interviews appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Evaluation, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, and social media

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Wed, 08/27/2014 - 3:08pm

From Social Networks: What Maslow Misses | Psychology Today – via @mslogophiliac

“Humans are social animals for good reason. Without collaboration, there is no survival. It was not possible to defeat a Woolley Mammoth, build a secure structure, or care for children while hunting without a team effort. It’s more true now than then. Our reliance on each other grows as societies became more complex, interconnected, and specialized. Connection is a prerequisite for survival, physically and emotionally.”

This statement, which I found on Harold Jarche ‘s blog, applies to evaluation as much as it applies to the example provided by Psychology Today.

Evaluation is a collaborative effort; a team effort, a social effort. Without the collaboration, evaluation lacks much. I’m not sure that survival is dependent on evaluation and collaborative effort; perhaps. The evaluator may know all about evaluation and yet not be able to solve the problem presented by the client because the evaluator doesn’t know about the topic needing to be evaluated. The evaluator may know about something similar to and different from what the client needs and yet, not know about the specific problem. Let me give you an example.

I’ve done a lot of evaluation in the natural resources area and as a result, I’ve learned much about various natural resource topics, including horticulture, plant science, crop science, marine science. I do not know much about potatoes. A while back, a colleague called me and asked if I could/would serve as the evaluator on a ZEBRA CHIP project. Before I said, Sure, I asked about ZEBRA CHIP. Apparently, it is a potato disease transmitted by bacteria carrying psyllid that is causing much economic devastation among growers. It shows up best when the potatoes are made into chips (hence the name). It looks like this: . To me, it isn’t particularly stripped like the animal which offers its name, yet it doesn’t look like potato chips I’m used to seeing.  I”m told that there is an unpleasant flavor to the chips as well. I knew a lot about growing things, not about potatoes, even though I’ve worked with potato growers before, just not about this disease.

So, I said sure, only to discover that I have 11 lines in which to write a cogent evaluation section for the work that Extension will be doing (if the grant is funded). If the grant is funded, it will be a five year effort. A continuation actually, which brings me full circle–a collaboration of multiple universities, multiple disciplines, multiple investigators. So what could I say cogently in 11 lines? I suggested that perhaps looking at intention and confidence would be appropriate because we (remember, I said, “Sure”) would not be able to measure actual behavior change. And to overcome the psyllids and eradicate this problem (not unlike the spotted wing drosophila which is affecting the soft fruits of the NW, specifically blueberries), we would need to get as close to behavior change as possible once the teaching has occurred. How can social media be used here? Good question–something to explore. At what level of Maslow’s hierarchy is this collaboration?  Survival, sure. Somehow I don’t think Maslow was focused on economic survival.

my .

molly.


 

 

 

 

The post Evaluation, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, and social media appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New Video: Responding to the Risks of Marine Debris: Derelict Fishing Gear

Sea Grant - Wed, 08/27/2014 - 10:26am

Marine debris – trash, refuse, stuff lost at sea — can often seem like a problem that’s difficult to make headway against. New short videos produced by Oregon Sea Grant can change that impression.

Responding to the Risks of Marine Debris: Derelict Fishing Gear, highlights the dramatic success that the Washington-based Northwest Straits Foundation has had in removing lost commercial fishing nets in the Puget Sound vicinity.

The six-minute documentary-style video is online at the Oregon Sea Grant YouTube channel (where closed captioning is also available):

Oregon Sea Grant Presents: Derelict Fishing Gear

. . . and in  high definition on Vimeo:  Derelict Fishing Gear (Vimeo HD version)

The documentary was produced by Oregon Sea Grant in cooperation with NOAA West, the NOAA Marine Debris program, and the Sea Grant programs of Washington, California, and the University of Southern California.

Stay tuned for additional videos in coming days.

The post New Video: Responding to the Risks of Marine Debris: Derelict Fishing Gear appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New Video: Responding to the Risks of Marine Debris: Derelict Fishing Gear

Breaking Waves - Wed, 08/27/2014 - 10:26am

Marine debris – trash, refuse, stuff lost at sea — can often seem like a problem that’s difficult to make headway against. New short videos produced by Oregon Sea Grant can change that impression.

Responding to the Risks of Marine Debris: Derelict Fishing Gear, highlights the dramatic success that the Washington-based Northwest Straits Foundation has had in removing lost commercial fishing nets in the Puget Sound vicinity.

The six-minute documentary-style video is online at the Oregon Sea Grant YouTube channel (where closed captioning is also available):

Oregon Sea Grant Presents: Derelict Fishing Gear

. . . and in  high definition on Vimeo:  Derelict Fishing Gear (Vimeo HD version)

The documentary was produced by Oregon Sea Grant in cooperation with NOAA West, the NOAA Marine Debris program, and the Sea Grant programs of Washington, California, and the University of Southern California.

Stay tuned for additional videos in coming days.

The post New Video: Responding to the Risks of Marine Debris: Derelict Fishing Gear appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Propagating native shrubs from seed or cuttings

Amy Grotta's Tree Topics - Tue, 08/26/2014 - 12:50pm

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension, Columbia, Washington & Yamhill Counties, and Paul Wilson & Linda Farris, Columbia County Master Woodland Managers

Flowering currant seedlings awaiting transplant. Photo: Paul Wilson

When Paul Wilson and Linda Farris bought their small property about 10 years ago, it was a reforestation failure. But they have succeeded in beating back immense Scotch broom and other invasives and have planted a diverse mix of trees. Not stopping there, they continue adding diversity by releasing native shrubs that don’t get in the way of their planted trees, and by planting more native shrubs and herbaceous plants to occupy gaps where the invasives used to be.

Paul and Linda propagate most of their own plants from seed and cuttings, having learned over time what methods work for different species. They shared their experience on a recent Twilight Tour, and afterwards agreed to write up and share their propagation tips (in the rest of this article). Thank you Paul and Linda. If you want to try your hand at this, fall is a good time to start.

How to take cuttings (adapted from Washington Native Plant Society guidelines):

We use a very low-tech approach to propagate dormant deciduous native shrubs which come readily from cuttings.  By taking cuttings after the leaves have fallen, the cuttings focus on developing roots and require little care.

Use sharp pruning shears.  Clean shears with rubbing alcohol or a 10% bleach solution (one part bleach to nine parts water).

Select young straight shoots about the diameter of a pencil (except trailing snowberry, which can be thinner). Collect long branches– you will be dividing them into individual cuttings later.  Cut just above a leaf node.  As you collect, put the cuttings in a plastic bag or the ends in a bucket of water, and keep them cool, moist, and out of direct sunlight.

To prepare individual cuttings from the long branches, clean your shears again.  Cut the branches into pieces long enough to have at least three or four leaf nodes (for most species, cuttings will be about six inches long). The end of the cutting closest to the roots (the “bottom”) should be cut at a 45° angle just below a node.  To not confuse the bottom with the top of the cutting (essential), cut the top at a right angle (straight across) slightly above a node.

While not essential, for some species success is improved by dipping the bottom (angled) end of the cutting in rooting hormone (Rootone, Hormex and similar), tapping off the excess.

Fill a pot (we use 1 gal. pots or treepots depending on the length of the cutting) with an unfertilized fast-draining soil mix (and in many cases perlite, sharp sand or vermiculite alone will work but cuttings need soil after rooting).  Poke holes in the soil with a stick a bit larger than the cutting diameter, insert cuttings with at least 2 nodes in soil and 1 or 2 nodes above soil level, tamp soil and water in.  We put 5 cuttings of most species in a gallon pot.

Leave out all winter, protecting from slugs and deer in the spring.  Wait until leaf growth unfurls and gently check for substantial root development.  If you have leaves or roots but not the other reinsert the cutting and wait.  Cuttings can be transplanted to a soil mix in a larger container, or transplanted into native soil.  During a dry spring keep the rooting medium moist. During the following summer, supplemental water will improve survival and development.

Paul and Linda’s plant nursery. Woody plants under the wire frame and herbaceous perennials in the foreground. Photo: Paul Wilson

Propagation tips for individual species

Among these shrubs, red-osier dogwood, Nootka rose, cascara, snowberry, hazel, oceanspray and tall Oregon grape (in order from generally wetter to drier habitat) are ‘restoration superstars’ – they tolerate moisture fluctuations and disturbance and generally provide a higher success rate after planting. These brief propagation guidelines are adapted from Robson, Richter and Filbert, Encyclopedia of Northwest Native Plants for Gardens and Landscapes (2008).

Red-osier dogwood (Cornus sericea)
Easiest from hardwood cuttings taken late fall to late winter, no hormone required.  Can also be grown from ripe fruit collected in the fall, fleshy part need not be removed unless seeds are being stored.  Plant outside to stratify over winter.

Nootka rose (Rosa nutkana)
Easiest from seed removed from hips just as they ripen, planted out for winter stratification to germinate the following spring.  Lower success from hardwood cuttings mid to late fall, treated with hormones and set to root over winter.

Oceanspray in September. Photo: OSU Dept. of Horticulture

Oceanspray (Holodiscus discolor)
Easiest: hardwood cuttings in late fall or early winter, dip in rooting hormone and root in pumice or other medium.  Seeds have a low germination rate: plant thickly in fall; need cold and moisture to germinate the following spring.

Beaked hazel (Corylus cornuta)
Easiest from seed; harvest slightly green before the squirrels get them; plant in fall; need cold and moisture to germinate the following spring.

Indian plum/Osoberry (Oemleria cerasiformis)
Easy from seed: Collect fruit in early summer, dry the fruits, plant in fall; need cold and moisture to break dormancy and germinate the following spring.  Or, take hardwood cuttings in late winter, treat with hormone.

Serviceberry (Amelanchier alnifolia)
Collect and clean seed, plant seed in fall; need cold and moisture to germinate the following spring.

Common snowberry (Symphoricarpos albus)/Trailing snowberry (Symphoricarpos mollis)
Hardwood cuttings late fall/early winter; treat with hormone and put in soil to root.  Seed requires 2 winters to germinate.

Dwarf Oregon-grape (Berberis nervosa)/Tall Oregon-grape (Berberis aquifolium)
Collect ripe berries in summer; remove some of the pulp and plant seed soon after harvest; need cold and moisture to germinate the following spring.  Hard to grow from cuttings.

Blue Elderberry (Sambucus nigra)
Hardwood cuttings mid-fall to early winter, treat with hormone and root in pumice or other medium.  Or, collect seed in late summer or fall, remove some of the pulp and plant seed soon after harvest; need cold and moisture to germinate the following spring

Bitter Cherry (Prunus emarginata)
Collect seed in late summer or fall, remove some of the pulp and plant seed in fall; need cold and moisture to germinate the following spring.  Difficult to grow from cuttings.

Cascara (Rhamnus purshiana)
Collect ripe fruit in the fall; remove some of the pulp and plant seed in fall; need cold and moisture to germinate the following spring.  Expect 2-3 seeds in each fruit.

Red-flowering currant (Ribes sanguineum)
Collect berries and remove seeds; plant seeds in flats of potting soil in fall; need cold and moisture to germinate the following spring.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Dark Horse releases new comic about earthquake preparedness

Sea Grant - Tue, 08/26/2014 - 9:40am

Dark Horse Comics, the Oregon-based publisher of such iconic titles as Star Wars, Sin City and Buffy the Vampire Slayer, has teamed with the Oregon Office of Emergency Management and the Cascadia Region Earthquake  Group to produce a new, free comic about earthquake preparedness.

Without Warning tells the story of a girl who lives on the Oregon Coast and is trying to reunite with her family after a major Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. The digital version of the 16-page, full-color comic, written for audiences age 12 and up, can be downloaded free from Dark Horse; free printed copies are available from the Office of Emergency Management.

Oregon is located in the Cascadia Subduction Zone, a 600 hundred mile earthquake fault stretching from offshore Northern California to Southern British Columbia. Experts predict a large 9.0 or higher earthquake could strike Oregon at any time. Oregon Sea Grant, through its coastal natural hazards program, works to help coastal towns and residents prepare for the Big One. Learn more:

The post Dark Horse releases new comic about earthquake preparedness appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Dark Horse releases new comic about earthquake preparedness

Breaking Waves - Tue, 08/26/2014 - 9:40am

Dark Horse Comics, the Oregon-based publisher of such iconic titles as Star Wars, Sin City and Buffy the Vampire Slayer, has teamed with the Oregon Office of Emergency Management and the Cascadia Region Earthquake  Group to produce a new, free comic about earthquake preparedness.

Without Warning tells the story of a girl who lives on the Oregon Coast and is trying to reunite with her family after a major Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. The digital version of the 16-page, full-color comic, written for audiences age 12 and up, can be downloaded free from Dark Horse; free printed copies are available from the Office of Emergency Management.

Oregon is located in the Cascadia Subduction Zone, a 600 hundred mile earthquake fault stretching from offshore Northern California to Southern British Columbia. Experts predict a large 9.0 or higher earthquake could strike Oregon at any time. Oregon Sea Grant, through its coastal natural hazards program, works to help coastal towns and residents prepare for the Big One. Learn more:

The post Dark Horse releases new comic about earthquake preparedness appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs