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Need to dispose of old pesticides or empty containers?

Forestry Events - Fri, 04/29/2016 - 2:35pm
Friday, April 29, 2016 (all day event)
Safely and anonymously dispose of old and unusable pesticides. For agricultural, forestry and commercial waste pesticides in the mid and southern Willamette Valley and Oregon Coast Range will be accepted.
Dates: April 28th in Philomath
            April 29th in Harrisburg 
Pre-registeration required by April 16th using a confidential system with the disposal service so they can prepare to receive the chemicals.

To register, contact Clean Harbors or access it on OSU Extension’s web page: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/linn/free-pesticide-and-container-collection-event  

Obtain, complete and submit your registration to Clean Harbors Environmental Services.
You must register by April 16 and will be notified when to deliver.

No registration needed for triple rinsed containers.

Intellectual Property

Environment Events - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, April 28, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

An essential part of innovation is protecting your work.  In this session, students were introduced to Intellectual Property law and related areas (such as contracts, etc.) that are highly pertinent to success in engineering and business.      

Carsten Grellmann is a 2009 OSU graduate with an Honors Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering. He earned his Juris Doctor from Michigan State University College of Law in 2012 and currently works as an associate at Klarquist Sparkman, LLP.

For more information regarding Mr. Grellmann, view his profile on the Klarquist website:    Mr. Carsten Grellmann

 

Details and required event registrations are available in the Academy Portal for members.

Not a member?  Submit your application today!

(All OSU engineering students in good academic standing with a minimum of 45 total earned credits are eligible to apply)

Need to dispose of old pesticides or empty containers?

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, April 28, 2016 (all day event)
Safely and anonymously dispose of old and unusable pesticides. For agricultural, forestry and commercial waste pesticides in the mid and southern Willamette Valley and Oregon Coast Range will be accepted.
Dates: April 28th in Philomath
            April 29th in Harrisburg 
Pre-registeration required by April 16th using a confidential system with the disposal service so they can prepare to receive the chemicals.

To register, contact Clean Harbors or access it on OSU Extension’s web page: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/linn/free-pesticide-and-container-collection-event  

Obtain, complete and submit your registration to Clean Harbors Environmental Services.
You must register by April 16 and will be notified when to deliver.

No registration needed for triple rinsed containers.

Weed Watcher Trainings

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, April 28, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Worried about invasive plants and other weeds? Our FREE Weed Watcher workshops will train you to identify the species of most concern now and report them. Meet these plants up close and personal in our Speed Dating round, and take home a free weed id guide. All workshops run from 6-8pm and include a light snack. Please RSVP at www.swcd.net/workshops-education/weed-watchers/ or via Facebook.

Cedar Creek Family Forest Tour

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, April 28, 2016 3:00 PM - 5:30 PM

Tour Rob Blickensderfer’s property, a mature, naturally regenerated small forest managed for family recreation, while engaging in low volume selective thinning to improve stand quality. Scott Ferguson of Trout Mountain Forestry will be on hand to discuss the selection process used for thinning, and will be marking trees to be cut.

Rob's background is in engineering; see a bridge he designed and modifications made to his bulldozer to allow safer single-handed yarding of logs.

Much of the property is on a steep slope. Tour will be hiking up a skid road, so be prepared to do some vigorous climbing. Boots or hiking shoes are recommended.

Location: parking is limited; a carpool will leave at 2:45pm from the True Value (old grocery store) parking lot in Philomath. Plan to arrive a few minutes early.

Rural Living Basics: Living with Your Well & Septic System

Small Farms Events - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, April 28, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
FREE Class & Screening
Bring 1/2 cup of untreated well water for nitrate screen. All results are confidential.

This class is designed for rural residents to learn the basics of groundwater, water wells, and septic systems. Learn steps to protect the health of your family, neighbors, animals, your property investment, and the safety of groundwater resources. 

When: April 28th, 2016 6:30pm to 8:30pm
Where: Stayton Community Center, 400 W. Virginia St., Stayton, Oregon

RSVP’s Appreciated
Chrissy.Lucas@oregonstate.edu
See all of our events at http://wellwater.oregonstate.edu

Questions? Chrissy at 541-766-3556

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Sea Grant publication wins Silver Award of Distinction

Breaking Waves - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 9:00am

Oregon Sea Grant has won a Silver Award of Distinction in the 2016 Communicator Awards competition, for its field guide Key Aquatic Invasive Species Watch: Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris in the Eastern Pacific.

According to the Communicator Awards’ website, the competition is sanctioned and judged by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts, “an invitation-only group consisting of top-tier professionals from acclaimed media, communications, advertising, creative and marketing firms.” The competition, which receives “over 6,000 entries from companies and agencies of all sizes,” honors work that “transcends innovation and craft – work that made a lasting impact.”

The Award of Distinction is presented for “projects that exceed industry standards in quality and achievement.”

You can download a free PDF or order printed copies of Key Aquatic Invasive Species Watch here.

The post Oregon Sea Grant publication wins Silver Award of Distinction appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Sea Grant publication wins Silver Award of Distinction

Sea Grant - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 9:00am

Oregon Sea Grant has won a Silver Award of Distinction in the 2016 Communicator Awards competition, for its field guide Key Aquatic Invasive Species Watch: Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris in the Eastern Pacific.

According to the Communicator Awards’ website, the competition is sanctioned and judged by the Academy of Interactive and Visual Arts, “an invitation-only group consisting of top-tier professionals from acclaimed media, communications, advertising, creative and marketing firms.” The competition, which receives “over 6,000 entries from companies and agencies of all sizes,” honors work that “transcends innovation and craft – work that made a lasting impact.”

The Award of Distinction is presented for “projects that exceed industry standards in quality and achievement.”

You can download a free PDF or order printed copies of Key Aquatic Invasive Species Watch here.

The post Oregon Sea Grant publication wins Silver Award of Distinction appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

MATE ROV competition in North Bend this weekend

Breaking Waves - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 8:00am

NORTH BEND – Forty-three teams of elementary, middle school, high school and college students from across Oregon descend on the North Bend Community Pool and North Bend High Schoolthis Saturday, April 30, to try out their hand-built underwater robots in the Oregon regional section of the annual Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Remotely Operated Vehicle competition.

The event, which is open to the public, runs from 8:30 am to 4:30 p.m.

The Oregon competition is one of 24 regional contests held around the world under the coordination of the MATE Center. Top teams from upper level divisions will earn an opportunity to compete in MATE’s 15th annual international ROV competition June 23-25 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

This year’s contest highlights the role of ROVs in scientific research and exploration in the deep ocean and outer space. Students will pilot their RVs through missions designed to meet NASA-identified needs. Among other things, teams are challenged to build a robot that can survive transport to Jupiter’s moon, Europa, and operate in the ocean beneath the moon’s ice sheet to collect data and deploy instrumentation. Teams must also create a poster and be interviewed by engineering judges.

The competition promotes entrepreneurship and leadership skills by requiring students to organize their teams into a company, with each student taking on a specific roll as they design, manufacture and market their student-built robots. They must manage a project and budget, brainstorm innovative solutions and work as a team – all important workforce skills.

The Oregon Regional MATE ROV Competition is supported by numerous partners and more than 50 volunteers who serve as divers, judges and support staff. This year’s competition is sponsored by the Oregon Coast Stem Hub.

Learn more:

 

 

The post MATE ROV competition in North Bend this weekend appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

MATE ROV competition in North Bend this weekend

Sea Grant - Thu, 04/28/2016 - 8:00am

NORTH BEND – Forty-three teams of elementary, middle school, high school and college students from across Oregon descend on the North Bend Community Pool and North Bend High Schoolthis Saturday, April 30, to try out their hand-built underwater robots in the Oregon regional section of the annual Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Remotely Operated Vehicle competition.

The event, which is open to the public, runs from 8:30 am to 4:30 p.m.

The Oregon competition is one of 24 regional contests held around the world under the coordination of the MATE Center. Top teams from upper level divisions will earn an opportunity to compete in MATE’s 15th annual international ROV competition June 23-25 at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas.

This year’s contest highlights the role of ROVs in scientific research and exploration in the deep ocean and outer space. Students will pilot their RVs through missions designed to meet NASA-identified needs. Among other things, teams are challenged to build a robot that can survive transport to Jupiter’s moon, Europa, and operate in the ocean beneath the moon’s ice sheet to collect data and deploy instrumentation. Teams must also create a poster and be interviewed by engineering judges.

The competition promotes entrepreneurship and leadership skills by requiring students to organize their teams into a company, with each student taking on a specific roll as they design, manufacture and market their student-built robots. They must manage a project and budget, brainstorm innovative solutions and work as a team – all important workforce skills.

The Oregon Regional MATE ROV Competition is supported by numerous partners and more than 50 volunteers who serve as divers, judges and support staff. This year’s competition is sponsored by the Oregon Coast Stem Hub.

Learn more:

 

 

The post MATE ROV competition in North Bend this weekend appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Terra + Spring 2016

Terra - Tue, 04/26/2016 - 3:31pm

Mother Whales Meet Seafloor Drilling
Pygmy blues face industrial hazards in a New Zealand gulf

In New Zealand there shines a gulf the color of indigo where whales live. Geographically, it glistens at the nexus of two islands and two seas. Politically, it sits at a different nexus, the classic clash of nature and commerce. Read More

Exclusive video
Aerial drone may show blue whale calf nursing.

Gorgeous new footage may shed light on one of the mysteries of the largest animal that ever lived: How do blue whales nurse? Read More

The Internet of Things
OSU is part of a coalition of more than 200 companies and technical supporters that develop standard interfaces for “Internet of Things” projects. Read More

A West Coast Wake-Up Call
The West Coast is a hotspot for acidification because of coastal upwelling, which brings nutrient-rich, low-oxygen and high carbon dioxide water from deep in the water column to the surface near the coast. Read More

Writing Instructor Wins Oregon Book Award
David Biespiel, an OSU instructor of English and creative writing, won an Oregon Book Award for a collection of essays from his long-running poetry column in The Oregonian. Read More

  Pulled from the Headlines

Every day, breaking news from OSU researchers makes headlines around the world. Here’s a handful of recent examples:

Picking grapes for perfect pinot means hitting the sweet spot for aroma. Biochemists Michael Qian and Fang Yuan of OSU found four aromatic compounds that hold the key to great pinot noir. Read about it in The Economist.

Hatchery and wild steelhead have stark genetic differences, a new study by Michael Blouin of OSU confirms. Get the details in Newsweek.

Fear of large predators keeps smaller animals in check. OSU forest ecologist Bill Ripple is cited in a story in The Washington Post.

Visit the Terra Website

Watch for the next issue of Terra magazine, which will give you a sweeping look inside the university’s extensive marine research program. You’ll visit a Corvallis lab where massive ocean-sensing equipment is designed and built. You’ll journey with us to the Pibilof Islands in the Bering Sea where vast colonies of seabirds and fur seals raise their young. You’ll learn about research underway in Oregon’s five marine reserves and hear from the fishermen who are impacted. Another story takes you to the iciest places on the planet, where scientists are collecting clues about climate change. You’ll read about the “blue economy” in Oregon and beyond and get an introduction to OSU’s fledgling Marine Studies Initiative. All of this is packaged with stunning photos and creative design to enhance your reading experience.

If you’re not yet receiving the print version of Terra magazine, email us at terra.magazine@oregonstate.edu to request a free subscription. These stories also will be available online at www.blogs.oregonstate.edu/terra in late-May.

New Research Enterprises

Oregon State University is Oregon’s leading public research university, receiving $308.9 million in research funding for fiscal year 2015. Here we highlight a few of our most recent grant-funded projects:

Dunes and Coastal Ecosystems
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: PETER RUGGIERO, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS, COLLEGE OF EARTH, OCEAN, AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES
The National Science Foundation has awarded $385,000 to Oregon State University for a study on the influence of intertidal sandbar welding on dune growth. Coastal dunes play an important role in coastal communities and ecosystems by helping to conserve native species, defend against flooding and boost local economies by attracting tourists.

Ambitious Math and Science
PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: THOMAS DICK, PROFESSOR OF MATHEMATICS AND DEPARTMENT CHAIR, COLLEGE OF SCIENCE
The National Science Foundation has awarded nearly $1.4 million for a project called Ambitious Math and Science Teaching Fellows. The goal of the project is to support every student across racial, ethnic, gender and linguistic boundary to learn key ideas within a discipline that will in turn enable authentic problem solving.

Metals Manufacturing
PRINCIPAL INVETIGATOR: JULIE TUCKER, ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, MATERIALS SCIENCE PROGRAM, COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
The Oregon Metals Initiative has awarded $27,500 to Oregon State University for a study on corrosion and strength optimization of multi-tool alloys.

Oregon State University
Corvallis, OR 97331
541-737-1000
terranewsletter@oregonstate.edu
To unsubscribe click here

The post Terra + Spring 2016 appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Out of the Mud

Terra - Tue, 04/26/2016 - 6:35am
Artist’s rendering of how the Newport Ship might have appeared under sail. (Image courtesy of Toby Jones)

In 2002, the Welsh city of Newport was rocked by the discovery of a wooden ship buried in more than 20 feet of mud along the river Usk. Contractors had been digging a foundation for a new arts center when they struck solid oak timbers. A plan to dispose of the wood and get on with the construction project met with public protests and vigils, says Oregon State University alumnus Toby Jones.

So progress on the arts center slowed for a few months while archaeologists worked to retrieve what is now recognized as the most important 15th century ship in Europe. Jones, who grew up in Corvallis and received his bachelors in history from Oregon State in 2001, has become the curator of the project to document and analyze the Newport Ship.

“The ship is an amazingly well-preserved merchant vessel and is absolutely unique,” he says.

He will describe what he and his research team have learned about Medieval ship construction, trade and even 15th century forest management in the 2016 George and Dorothy Carson Memorial Lecture at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 27 in Milam Auditorium. The presentation is free and open to the public.

The Newport Ship before removal of timbers from a construction project along the Usk River. (Image courtesy of Toby Jones)

As an undergrad, Jones was considering a career teaching ancient history when a trip to Europe caused him to change plans. He was spending the summer in a language school in Germany. During a break, a backpacking trip through Greece and Turkey led him unexpectedly to the Bodrum Museum of Underwater Archaeology. “It was incredible. People were diving on these ancient shipwrecks in the eastern Mediterranean in this blue water,” he says, “and I decided that’s what I wanted to do. I could already dive. My parents had a marine biology business, so I grew up around that.”

After graduating from OSU, Jones attended the graduate Nautical Archaeology Program at Texas A&M University. In 2004, he had just received his master’s when he was hired to conduct a one-year pilot study cataloging and documenting the remains of the Newport Ship. Now, 12 years later, he is deep into the ship’s history through research on the more than 1,000 artifacts — seeds, pottery, coins, fish bones, leather shoes, wine casks, pollen, insects, plants — as well as the timbers themselves. He and his team have worked with specialists at universities across Europe to identify the origins of these materials.

The ship is as long as three double-decker buses and almost 20 feet tall. “The archaeologists were actually walking on the timbers when they found it. In most other ship projects,” he says, “the wood is like wet cardboard. Here it was like knocking on an old door.

“It’s such a massive amount of material and huge timbers, it takes time,” he adds. “You can’t rush the conservation work. You have one chance to do it right. Then it’s all gone. The payoff will come when we get it on display. Hundreds of thousands of people a year will come and see it.”

On a model of the Newport Ship, Toby Jones adjusts ribbands by eye.

The ship may hold particular interest for woodworkers. The timbers show lines made with awls and axes where shipbuilders made cuts. The iron nails have long since rusted away, but the depressions made by the shipwrights’ hammers are still clearly visible.

The researchers have determined that the ship was built in the Basque country of northern Spain and spent much of its time on trade routes between the Iberian Peninsula and Britain. Almonds and millet and pomegranate seeds were abundant in the ship’s bilges.

The oak timbers also tell a story about how the forests were managed. The trees from which they were cut were grown and pruned in a dense forest to produce long, straight logs for construction purposes. “This is happening a hundred years before the ships are built, two or three generations before the wood is harvested, by people who won’t see any benefit from it,” Jones says.

Archaeologists discovered a silver French coin embedded in the keel of the Newport Ship.

While the timbers show evidence of highly skilled joinery, the builders also took pains to put luck on their side. Embedded in the beech keel, Jones and his team discovered a couple of years ago, was a silver French coin emblazoned with a cross. The coin was produced over a two-month period in 1447. Archaeologists found it when they were painstakingly cleaning the wood.

“The attention to detail is amazing,” Jones says. “They took so much pride in their work.”

The post Out of the Mud appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs