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Community Forestry Day

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/08/2015 - 2:37pm
Saturday, August 8, 2015 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM

Sundown Concert Series

Forestry Events - Thu, 08/06/2015 - 2:38pm
Thursday, August 6, 2015 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

In 2015, join us on First Thursdays for our sixth annual summer concert series. We’re pulling out all the stops: the best local bands, the most inspiring and tenacious organizations and businesses, lip-smacking food and drink, and kid’s activities galore. Plus, Sundown is free! You belong here.

http://www.ecotrust.org/project/sundown/

Twilight Tour to Linn County Seed Orchard

Forestry Events - Thu, 08/06/2015 - 2:38pm
Thursday, August 6, 2015 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Come learn about the production of improved seed at the Roseburg Forest Products’ seed orchard. Geneticist Sara Lipow will give a layman’s overview of how tree improvement programs work and talk about the availability of genetically improved seed/seedlings to small landowners. Orchard manager Mike Albrecht and Sara will then walk us through orchard blocks of various ages where we will view and discuss the various treatments used to encourage trees to produce cones, view some cross pollinations being carried out and give a general overview of how seed orchards are managed.

Educating for Systems Thinking - Level B

Forestry Events - Tue, 08/04/2015 - 2:37pm
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 (all day event)

Note: The Level A workshop on August 3 is a prerequisite for this workshop!

Purpose: To make systems thinking tools relevant to educators

Attendees will learn:

  • How to utilize systems thinking tools and concepts to deepen student understanding within their particular subject area.
  • How to address the systems thinking content strand of the Oregon Environmental Literacy Plan, and how it supports STEM

Details:

  • Free for formal and non-formal K-12 educators / administrators
  • Register early, space is limited.
  • more information

Participants will become more deeply acquainted with the tools and concepts introduced in Level A, and how these connect to the Oregon Environmental Literacy learning strands. They will expand their systems thinking toolbox with additional archetypes, feedback loops and an intro to dynamic computer modeling. They will report out about their progress using the tools introduced in Level A, and will have opportunity for collaborative planning.

Speaking of the weather…

Tree Topics - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 3:00pm

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension – Columbia, Washington & Yamhill Counties

I don’t need to tell you it’s hot out there today. (Oops! I just did. Sorry.)

Between the extreme heat and the very real fire danger, it’s not a good afternoon to be working in the woods.  Rarely do I say I’d rather be in the office than in the field, but today is one of those days that I’m appreciating the air conditioning.

Since everyone is talking about the weather anyhow, it seems appropriate to share some reading material that relates to it, which you can enjoy in the comfort of whatever cool spot you’ve found today.  Oregon Forests and Climate Change is the subject of a little writing project which a number of my Extension colleagues have taken on as a group.

Why this project?  OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension strives to provide objective, science-based education to help forest owners succeed in forest stewardship. The growing body of climate science means that a basic understanding of climate and climate variability are needed to guide key aspects of stewardship of managed forests, such as:

  • selecting appropriate tree species and types of forest,
  • determining the timing of management actions such as planting and thinning,
  • estimating rates of growth and productivity, and
  • anticipating climatic stress and threats to forest health.

We realize there are still a lot of unknowns that go along with all this, so our intention is not to be prescriptive but rather to explore what some of the key issues might be. We’re learning as we go and sharing what we learn through a series of short articles.  The first set of these stories are available to read now over on the Oregon Forests & Climate Change blog. To set the stage, we get some perspectives on the subject of climate change from a woodland owner who also happens to be a forest geneticist working in the timber industry.

Crater Lake snowpack in July circa 1915. Photo credit: TheOldMotor.com

The next three articles address some of the basic principles of climate science. One looks at Oregon’s weather and climate as we’ve experienced it in our lifetimes vs. what is projected for the future. The next uses snowfall at Crater Lake as an example, in analyzing long term trends vs. year-to-year fluctuations in our weather. Finally, we look at some of the underlying factors that create these fluctuations, such as the El Niño cycle we are in right now.

These articles lay the foundation for the next phase of our project, in which we’ll be exploring how our forests respond to climate variability, extremes, and long-term change, and how we as managers can respond in turn. Stay tuned over the next year or so as we continue.

Of course, climate change can be a loaded subject and discussions about the topic can quickly grow rather heated. (I could not resist that pun…) We will be staying above the fray and look objectively at what anticipated changes may – or may not – mean on the ground, here in Oregon. So grab another icy drink and click here for more.

Thanks to the USDA Pacific Northwest Climate Hub and the Oregon Forest Resources Institute for providing financial support for this ongoing project.

The post Speaking of the weather… appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs