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Spanish Pesticide Laws & Safety

Small Farms Events - Fri, 04/08/2016 - 2:45pm
Friday, April 8, 2016 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Designed to prepare agriculture workers to take the State of Oregon Department of Agriculture pesticide applicator exam.   Class provides in-depth training and support for those who may be interested in pursuing pesticide applicator certification/license. 

Call: 541-917-4929 for more information and to register.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Hello world!

Terra - Fri, 04/08/2016 - 11:19am

Welcome to blogs.oregonstate.edu. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

The post Hello world! appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Hello world!

Terra - Fri, 04/08/2016 - 11:19am

Welcome to blogs.oregonstate.edu. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start blogging!

The post Hello world! appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New Sea Grant publication encourages collaborative engagement

Breaking Waves - Fri, 04/08/2016 - 10:19am

A new publication from Oregon Sea Grant, Collaborative Science-Stakeholder Engagement, encourages collaboration among scientific disciplines and extending that collaboration to include participants outside the academic world.

The 20-page publication outlines various types of collaboration, both among researchers of diverse disciplines and among researchers and stakeholders. It explores collaborations seeking to achieve different goals in natural-resource research and management (sustainability, climate change adaptive management, decision-making tool development, alternative futures exploration). In also provides examples of stakeholder engagement in these contexts for the understanding and management of various natural resources, and summarizes literature from other research on science-stakeholder engagement elements.

Finally, the guide lists the lessons learned, necessary elements and impacts from these case studies.

The guide is intended as a resource for anyone interested in connecting science producers and science users. It summarizes literature from a broad swatch of research with science-stakeholder engagement elements.

The research was conducted and text written by Laura Ferguson, Oregon State University Marine Resource Management program, with review and contributions by Samuel Chan, Mary Santelmann and Maria Wright.

Collaborative Science-Stakeholder Engagement is available as a free, downloadable PDF here.

The post New Sea Grant publication encourages collaborative engagement appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New Sea Grant publication encourages collaborative engagement

Sea Grant - Fri, 04/08/2016 - 10:19am

A new publication from Oregon Sea Grant, Collaborative Science-Stakeholder Engagement, encourages collaboration among scientific disciplines and extending that collaboration to include participants outside the academic world.

The 20-page publication outlines various types of collaboration, both among researchers of diverse disciplines and among researchers and stakeholders. It explores collaborations seeking to achieve different goals in natural-resource research and management (sustainability, climate change adaptive management, decision-making tool development, alternative futures exploration). In also provides examples of stakeholder engagement in these contexts for the understanding and management of various natural resources, and summarizes literature from other research on science-stakeholder engagement elements.

Finally, the guide lists the lessons learned, necessary elements and impacts from these case studies.

The guide is intended as a resource for anyone interested in connecting science producers and science users. It summarizes literature from a broad swatch of research with science-stakeholder engagement elements.

The research was conducted and text written by Laura Ferguson, Oregon State University Marine Resource Management program, with review and contributions by Samuel Chan, Mary Santelmann and Maria Wright.

Collaborative Science-Stakeholder Engagement is available as a free, downloadable PDF here.

The post New Sea Grant publication encourages collaborative engagement appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Heartwood: Inquiry and Engagement with Pacific Northwest Forests.

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Thursday, April 7, 2016 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Heartwood: Inquiry and Engagement with Pacific Northwest Forests. The OSU Libraries and Press Special Collections and Archives Research Center explores our deep and complicated connections with forests. Participants include the US Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station and the Spring Creek Project. Thursday, April 7, 5 – 6:30 pm, OSU Valley Library – 5th floor.

Oregon Forest Pest Detector (OFPD) Program

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Thursday, April 7, 2016 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM

The Oregon Forest Pest Detector (OFPD) training program is designed to help with early identification of exotic forest pests in Oregon, including the emerald ash borer (EAB) and Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). Oregon Forest Pest Detectors are the front line of defense against these potentially high-risk forest pest invasions. We need people who are skilled in recognizing the signs and symptoms of EAB and ALB so that we can quickly respond before they become established in Oregon. The training will teach participants how to identify these insects, their hosts, and their signs and symptoms; and what to do if they find an infested tree.

This free course is great for anyone who is involved with tree care in urban or natural areas. The training has two parts: a self-paced, online prerequisite course followed by a field workshop. CEUs are available for ODA/WSDA pesticide applicators, ISA, SAF, and Master Gardeners/ Naturalists. OFPD has four upcoming workshops in April 2016, in Portland, Hillsboro, Salem, and Eugene. For a full course schedule and registration visit our website: http://pestdetector.forestry.oregonstate.edu/

Starker Lecture Series - Burning Questions: Forest, Fires & People

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Thursday, April 7, 2016 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Over the past several years, there has been an increase in the number and severity of wildfires in Oregon.  This trend is expected to continue as the Pacific Northwest become increasingly vulnerable to the effects of a changing climate including, decreased snowpack, higher temperatures and drought, and declining forest health.  These environmental changes increase the risk of catastrophic wildfire impacting communities living in the wildland-urban interface. Wildfire was once considered to be a risk only for people living in rural areas; however it is quickly becoming a reality for urban neighborhoods.  Recent fires in Corvallis and Portland illustrate the need for rural and urban communities alike to adapt to the changing conditions of their environment in which they live. The 2016 Starker Lecture will address the “new normal” of living with fire, and will offer individuals, neighborhoods, and communities useful information and strategies for living in a changing environment.

April 7, 2016, 3:30pm, La Sells Stewart Center C&E Hall, Living with Fire, Speaker: Ed Smith, Natural Resource Specialist, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension

Extension Sustainability Summit 2016

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Tuesday, April 5, 2016 - Thursday, April 7, 2016 (all day event)

Held for the first time in 2013, this popular event promises an exciting two-day Summit addressing sustainability and Cooperative Extension's outreach activities and opportunities. Plus field trips! And all the local foods and sustainably-created fun the Rose City has to offer!

For updates: http://wrdc.usu.edu/

Join the mailing list!

Cigarette Butts Cleanup

Health & Wellness Events - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Thursday, April 7, 2016 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM

Cigarette Butts Cleanup. Come help us keep our campus and environment clean! Environmental health is the assessment and control of the upstream factors that influence everyone’s health downstream. Creating healthy environments is a Generation Public Health core value. Environmental health work ensures that both natural and man-made environments are safe so what flows downstream does not harm our health.

Spanish Pesticide Laws & Safety

Small Farms Events - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Thursday, April 7, 2016 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Designed to prepare agriculture workers to take the State of Oregon Department of Agriculture pesticide applicator exam.   Class provides in-depth training and support for those who may be interested in pursuing pesticide applicator certification/license. 

Call: 541-917-4929 for more information and to register.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Agripreneurs

Small Farms Events - Thu, 04/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Thursday, April 7, 2016 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

 Growing Agripreneurs is a seven month program, beginning April 7, designed for beginning farmers interested in gaining theoretical and practical knowledge
through classes, field work, marketing, food preservation, farm tours and one-on-one mentoring.

Over the course of a season, students will be exposed to all aspects of sustainable, small-scale farming.  Participants will gain extensive field experience at
OSU Extension’s Franklin Teaching Farm, growing  annual fruits and vegetables, flowers, seed crops and cover crops.  This exciting series of classes gives students an opportunity to learn from many teachers, each specializing in something different.  Participants will tour many of the most beautiful and successful small farms in our region, gaining invaluable inspiration and learning lessons from the farmers themselves. Individuals interested in pursuing a farming career will have the opportunity to experience a full farming season and receive direct consultation on their own projects. 

For more information, to visit the Franklin Teaching Farm or to apply, contact
Dana Kristal
dana.kristal@oregonstate.edu
541-776-7371, ext. 208
Applications due March 25, 2016.
Join us in the spring!
Become an Agripreneur!

This program was made possible by a grant through the Oregon Department of Agriculture. All classes held in with Rogue Farm Corp.

For more information visit
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/sorec/farms

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Portland Business Roundtables

Environment Events - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 2:33pm
Wednesday, April 6, 2016 8:20 AM - 3:30 PM

Members of the Leadership Academy are invited to attend the Portland Business Roundtable (BRT) with Dr. Scott Paja on Wednesday, April 6th. There is no cost and travel will be provided, but you would have to arrange with your professors and work schedules to be gone from about 8:20am until 3:30pm. This is a great chance to continue building your professional network and hone critical skills! 

Participation in this event counts towards one of the three required Mentoring Interviews, as well as one experience in the Leadership Academy Pillar: PROFESSIONAL. It is a double duty experience and spaces are very limited! Any member can attend--even if you did last year. 

Details and required event registrations are available in the Academy Portal for members

Not a member?  Submit your application today!

(All OSU engineering students in good academic standing with a minimum of 45 total earned credits are eligible to apply)

National Public Health Week event 2

Health & Wellness Events - Wed, 04/06/2016 - 2:33pm
Wednesday, April 6, 2016 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Join the Public Health Club in watching a documentary about barriers high school students face to graduate. When asked for one thing that his community should do to improve the health of its residents, Dr. Adewale Troutman, former director of the health department in Louisville, Kentucky, said: “Make sure that everyone graduates from high school.” So, why would someone from the city’s health department have schools on his mind?

High school graduates tend to lead longer and healthier lives than their peers who drop out. This is partly due to a graduate’s ability to earn more money and afford better health care and housing in safer neighborhoods. But by completing a high school education, graduates also have an opportunity to learn more about healthy behaviors such as healthy eating and physical activity. Graduates are more likely to practice these healthy behaviors and ultimately have a better chance of growing a strong social support network.

Dropout rates in the U.S. are decreasing. Still, about 6,000 students are pushed out, pulled out or just give up on school every day. Many of these students don’t graduate because they have to get a job or provide care for a relative or child. Common barriers to graduation include bullying, absenteeism, undiagnosed or unmanaged physical and mental health issues, and chronic stress related to social and environmental circumstances.

Many of the reasons teens don’t graduate high school are directly related to public health. That’s why APHA supports the kind of school-based health centers (SBHCs) that help students stay physically and mentally healthy throughout their teenage years so they can stay in school, graduate and grow into healthier adults. Consider just this small handful of results:

  • Students who receive mental health services at SBHCs have 50 percent fewer missed days of school.
  • Black boys enrolled in SBHCs are three times more likely to stay in school.

Visit National Public Health Week see what you can do to help all young people graduate from high school - which will work towards our goal to become the healiest nation by 2030

West coast science panel issues report, call for action on ocean acidification, hypoxia

Breaking Waves - Mon, 04/04/2016 - 10:00am

Although ocean acidification and hypoxia are global phenomena, the US-Canada West Coast will face some of the most severe changes, with impacts extending through marine food webs and threatening ocean-dependent industries and coastal communities.

So says a report released today by a panel of 20 scientific experts from Oregon, California, Washington and British Columbia charged with summarizing what’s known about the problem and what options the region has for coping with it.

Major findings:

  • Acidification and hypoxia will have severe environmental, ecological and economic consequences for the West Coast, and will require a concerted regional focus.
  • Global carbon emissions are the dominant cause of acidification
  • There are actions that can be taken to lessen exposure to acidification, and to enhance the ability of ecosystems and organisms to cope.
  • Investing in acidification science will expand the available management options.
  • Inaction now will reduce those options and impose higher costs later.

Among the panelists are Oregon State University researchers Frances Chan, who co-chaired the group, George Waldbusser, Burke Hales and Jack Barth, all of whom have received research funding support from Oregon Sea Grant.

The panel’s report provides a comprehensive analysis, along with technical guidance for ocean program managers and a summary of foundational science about how acidification and hypoxia affect individual species, populations and ecosystems, the science needs of managers and challenges and opportunities in the realm of water quality.

Learn more:

The post West coast science panel issues report, call for action on ocean acidification, hypoxia appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Don’t forget about pre-commercial thinning

Tree Topics - Wed, 03/30/2016 - 10:01am
Many aesthetic and habitat objectives of family forest landowners come with older, less dense stands like this stand of about 70 years. It is important to get on this path early.

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

In previous segments I argued that many people have too many trees in their young stands   which may be costly and harmful to the long term growth of the stand. Most importantly, having too many trees at this stage can undermine common landowner objectives of growing attractive, longer rotation diverse forest habitats and can force landowners into shorter rotations than imagined.

While this suggests that people should think about planting fewer trees per acre in the future (a step deserving some careful consideration), it highlights the need for pre-commercial thinning in many existing stands to correct overstocking at an early age. This may include your stand.

But pre-commercial thinning (PCT) seems to have fallen out of common practice lately. It has come to be seen (mistakenly, I think) as an avoidable expense rather than an important investment in the stand. An investment that begins to shape how the stand will look and behave in the future and which adds resilience and options to the landowners’ woodland portfolio.

The idea of PCT is to avoid harmful overcrowding later by removing excess trees early on. PCT lets the remaining “leave trees” grow faster and larger before serious crowding sets in. This means that trees reach a usable size sooner, and hopefully allows the very important first thinning harvest (also called a commercial thinning) to be done “on time” when the stand is in its 20’s.  This first thinning harvest  is costly and the difference between it being another  big expense for the landowner rather than breaking even or even paying some small profit, often comes down to the size of the trees harvested.  PCT is meant to ensure that this very important thinning harvest operation can pay for itself.

Ideally, young Douglas-fir stands in Western Oregon should be thinned when the dominant trees are about 15 feet tall, or about 10 years old around here.  Yikes, that seems early.  Frankly I don’t know many people who are thrilled about thinning trees they just barely got established and free to grow.  People are looking forward to the trees’ shade suppressing hated weeds like blackberries and broom and are inclined to postpone PCT until the weeds decline and the stand begins to “look crowded”.

Why thin so early? Even by the time trees are 15 feet, you can already begin to distinguish the good trees from the bad.  The trees are past browse and should be beating the weeds.  Once that has happened, the sooner you remove the extras and limit competition among trees, the stronger the beneficial effects and the less the costs of the PCT will be.  Yes, it may be possible to delay until trees are 30 feet tall, but waiting until crowns close and competition begins means a loss of some growth that you would rather have on your leave trees.  Also by the time trees look crowded to many people, it is getting very late.

Referring to the illustrations of the previous article, the recommended  timing of a PCT is meant to occur well down in the uncrowded green zone, well before competition gets going in the Goldilocks zone.   The PCT is meant to shift your stand from the right-hand column to the left-hand column, with more room and  new growth potential until it is time to you your first thinning harvest.

An earlier PCT also means it can be done more efficiently and cheaply. Small trees can be felled much more quickly with less slash building up. There is little concern about stand stability, or delayed growth response when trees are thinned early.

My point is that if an area was planted at a 10×10 spacing (440 TPA) and had good survival, the stand will get too crowded before the trees are big enough for a thinning harvest.  If that is the case, it should be PCT’ed down to at least 300 TPA, meaning you may need to remove a quarter to a third of the trees (110 to 145 TPA).  This is a lot of work, even when trees are small, which takes us to some good advice for many family forest landowners: “Thin early and thin often”.

I’ll give some strategies for thinning in a later article.

The post Don’t forget about pre-commercial thinning appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs