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Benton Chapter OSWA Annual Meeting

Forestry Events - Sat, 01/23/2016 - 2:37pm
Saturday, January 23, 2016 11:30 AM - 3:00 PM
Please RSVP

Many young stands too crowded

Tree Topics - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 3:40pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

In my travels around the mid-Willamette Valley, I am seeing a lot of young conifer stands (generally Douglas-fir up to 20 something years old) with just too many trees. Why do I say there are too many trees?
I know many people in this part of western Oregon who are patiently waiting for their trees to grow, hoping to do a commercial thinning (meaning sell the harvested trees to make at least a small profit) when their stand is about 25 years old.

 

All too often it is not working out that way. Instead, as the stand approaches the target age they find that trees have already become too crowded, with too many small, slow growing trees in the stand. The trees are still too small to support a profitable thinning operation yet. To thin at that point is to do so at a cost, although it may be best for the woodland in the long-run. To delay the thinning and wait for the trees to grow enough to make the thinning operation profitable is appealing. It may avoid the short term expense but is likely to weaken the stand at a long-term cost of growth, stand stability and future options. It is a classic “pay now or pay later” situation.


In young stands, the idea is to have the “right” number of well-spaced trees to allow the trees in the stand to grow more or less unchecked until they are big enough to support a commercial thinning, and to do it “on time”, that is before future opportunities are affected by intense competition. This should leave the landowner with a healthy, stable and vigorously growing stand easily shaped to meet any of a wide range of long term objectives that family landowners commonly aim for. These common objectives (see related article about objectives) including habitat diversity, recreational opportunities as well as periodic income, are generally best met by growing trees in longer rotations (>45 yrs) and with multiple thinnings over time. So it is important to get off on the right foot.


Of course there are many nuances in choosing the right spacing for any stand, but I’m saying there is a lot less nuance in the decision leading up to the first commercial thinning of a young stand than there is in later thinning decisions. It is fairly simple. In a young stand, we want to have the right number of trees to support a timely commercial thinning while avoiding excessive competition. This will keep the most options open for the landowner in the future.
We’ll look at what that number might be in another article.

The post Many young stands too crowded appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Portland Trip to Daimler

Environment Events - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 2:33pm
Friday, January 22, 2016 6:00 AM - 6:00 PM

Members of the Leadership Academy will visit Daimler, interacting with industry leaders and learning about opportunities. Transportation and lunch will be provided. This event is being hosted in partnership with the College of Business Career Success Center and space is limited. 

Academy Pillar: PURPOSEFUL

Details are available in the Academy Portal for members.

Not a member?  Submit your application today!

(All OSU engineering students in good academic standing with a minimum of 45 total earned credits are eligible to apply) 

Timber Tax Filing for the 2015 Tax Year

Forestry Events - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 2:33pm
Friday, January 22, 2016 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

Timber tax laws have changed due to the new tax law that was passed by Congress in December 2015. Brand new tax provisions on capital gains for timber corporations will affect timber businesses and owners. Business deductions on equipment costs have been increased significantly. Special charitable donation deduction on qualified conservation easement was extended. To help the 2015 tax return filing, this one-hour webinar will cover the rules for timber tax reporting, including the latest law changes. It will cover the 1099 filing that the foresters must know. Bring your tax questions to get answers from the presenter. Learn more here...

 For information on timber taxes visit http://www.timbertax.org

CPHHS Research Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 01/22/2016 - 2:33pm
Friday, January 22, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

"Recruitment, Retention, and Reminder Strategies in a Targeted, Text Message-Based Nutrition Education Program for Low-Income Parents" Stephanie Grutzmacher, PhD, Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Community Health, College of Public Health and Human Sciences, Oregon State University.

Dr. Grutzmacher's work focuses on food security, nutrition literacy and the development and evaluation of family, school and community-based nutrition education programs for low-income populations. 

Dr. Grutzmacher has conducted training programs with women in Afghanistan to improve family food security and dietary quality through backyard gardening. She has served as a faculty advisor for Public Health without Borders and the University of Maryland Alternative Breaks program, fostering experiential service learning experiences for undergraduate students in the areas of health and development.

Faculty Profile

ResearchGate Profile

Jackson Josephine Small Woodlands Association

Forestry Events - Thu, 01/21/2016 - 2:37pm
Thursday, January 21, 2016 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Speaker: Dave Larson, District Forester, Oregon Department of Forestry

Dave Larson, the new Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) District Forester for Southwestern Oregon will give a presentation entitled "Changing of the Guard".  Dave, who replaces Dan Thorpe, has over 25 years of experience in the area, with a long ODF background in fire and forestry operations of all types. He will describe upcoming directions for ODF in 2016, with a special emphasis on areas of interest for small woodland owners.  This will be a great opportunity for attendees to "meet and greet" Dave and to hear how ODF is moving forward with the many issues and lands that they are involved with.  It’s also an chance for attendees to share with Dave some of the issues and interests that are front and center for small woodland owners in our area.

Dinner:  Hawaiian-style plate (chicken and pork) with salads, rice, dessert.  Yaki soba vegetarian option. Must receive dinner reservation by Tuesday, January 19, 2016.

Please RSVP and see the flyer for a registration-dinner reservation form and more details.    

Wood in Building Design and Construction at WOU Tour

Forestry Events - Wed, 01/20/2016 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, January 20, 2016 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

A great opportunity to see some of the new ways that wood is being used in building design and construction. Work is underway on the Richard Woodcock Education Center at Western Oregon University in Monmouth using a wide array of materials and methods including the very first Oregon-produced cross laminated timber (CLT), as well as laminated decking, stud and plywood framing. WOU construction manager Brad Huggins will host a tour of the project and explain the choices and applications of various wood products.

Vans leave Corvallis at 2:45pm.

Estimation of job creation and economic activity from investment in hybrid poplar bio-jet fuel

Forestry Events - Wed, 01/20/2016 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, January 20, 2016 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

This study estimates the net economic impacts of short-rotation poplar for bio-jet fuel production in California, Washington, and Oregon. Regional impacts such as potential biofuel output and employment opportunities are explored as well as poplar production, displacement of existing crops, handling and transportation of poplar, biorefinery construction and operation.  We employed a suite of models including a Statewide Agricultural Production (SWAP) model, which a hydro-economic model for crop adoption, a Geospatial Bioenergy Systems Model (GBSM) to identify the optimal location of the biorefinery facility in each State, and IMPLAN, an input-output model of the regional economies to conduct the economic impact analysis. Results indicate the poplar production has the potential to replace some incumbent crops in the study areas at sufficiently high prices with net benefits in local employment, value added (gross domestic product), and output.

Register HERE

Hummingbird Citizen Science Project

Forestry Events - Wed, 01/20/2016 - 2:34pm
Friday, January 1, 2016 - Wednesday, January 20, 2016 (all day event)
Audience: 6-8 Educators
Curricula: Flying WILD, pollination ecology resources, citizen science protocols and data
Description: Want to involve your students in authentic science projects? This workshop is for you. We invite you and your students to join us in a hummingbird citizen science project. During this one-day workshop, we will introduce the hummingbird project, review hummingbird protocols, practice pollinator games, and explore hummingbird data.
Register Here

Winter Farming Series

Small Farms Events - Wed, 01/20/2016 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, January 20, 2016 12:00 PM

Are you interested in exploring whether winter production would be a good addition to your farm business? There are several crops that can be harvested during the winter months in Oregon. This class series will cover the basics of winter production including season extension tips and tools, planting dates and varietal selection that you will need to get started in winter production. We’ll also walk you through the process of keeping records to track production costs and analyzing whether winter production can be a profitable enterprise for your farm.

You’ll have a chance to visit with farmers that are experienced with winter production to get perspectives from the field. Our goal is to support you with testing out winter production on your farm to determine whether it is a feasible enterprise for your operation. Classes are spread out over a whole year and timed so that you can apply what you learn for your winter plantings in 2016.

For more information:
http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/southern-willamette-valley-program/winter-farming
Registration opens in November!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

NO CLASSES- MLK Day

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 01/18/2016 - 2:35pm
Monday, January 18, 2016 (all day event)

OSU’s 34-year-old celebration is one of the oldest continuous events in the state celebrating the civil rights leader. Events are open to the public and most are free.

The objectives for Oregon State University's celebration are simple, but important. They are

  • Provide opportunities for our community to learn about and reflect on the life and legacy of Dr. King and collaboratively envision ways to carry his work forward.
  • Provide opportunities for our community to participate in an impactful, inclusive, and engaging celebration of the life and legacy of Dr. King.
  • To provide opportunities for our community to collaboratively learn about, reflect on and carry on the legacy of Dr. King in a way that is relevant to today’s generations.

The planning team is made up of stakeholders (students, staff, and faculty) who are engaged in planning a celebration that will be meaningful and inclusive, and that will provide opportunities for our community to come together in celebration, in reflection, and in service.

The planning process is open to anyone who would like to lend their voice and their energy to make this year's celebration meaningful and impactful.  Please contact the Office of Equity and Inclusion if you would like to participate.

Recipe to Market: Brand and Market Planning Food Business

Food Events - Mon, 01/18/2016 - 6:06am
Monday, February 1, 2016 12:00 AM - Sunday, February 21, 2016 12:00 PM

Innovative entrepreneurs are changing our food and drink choices for the better. Often with a focus on regionally sourced ingredients, vivid branding and values that resonate with consumers, startup companies from Portland, Oregon to Portland, Maine are seeing big growth. Our Recipe to Market: Brand and Market Planning course is designed to help combine your passion (and amazing ideas) for a food/drink business with affordable and accessible insight and guidance with a legendary industry pro.

These are just a few examples of the food and drink businesses we can help you launch or grow:

  • Energy drinks or energy bars
  • Baked goods/doughnuts
  • Bottled teas or kombucha
  • Nut butters
  • Salsas
  • Granola bars
  • Honey
  • Ice cream
  • Yogurt
  • Pickles
  • Plus, many more!

We'll help you refine your brand to connect with the market and build the capability to collect and respond to feedback and market data.

Identify the best strategies for reaching your audience and understand your place within the market. With this strategy in your apron pocket, start to develop the branding for your start-up food business. Learn the best channels to promote and sell your product. This course will give you a structure and understanding of marketing and branding for small food entrepreneurs that will align strategic goals with practical business planning.

Enroll in this resource-rich online course now or learn more about our complete Recipe to Market Certificate program's collaborative series of small food entrepreneur courses.

Go here for further information and to register for this online course!

Last day to add a class via instructor & departmental signatures

Health & Wellness Events - Sun, 01/17/2016 - 2:33pm
Sunday, January 17, 2016 (all day event)

MLK Jr. Day of Service

Environment Events - Sat, 01/16/2016 - 2:37pm
Saturday, January 16, 2016 7:45 AM - 12:00 PM

Leadership Academy Pillar: ETHICAL

The OSU Center for Civic Engagement has organized numerous projects for the OSU community to come together on Saturday, January 16th, to honor the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.  

Members of the Leadership Academy are encouraged to participate.  Those who participate, complete one requirement of the ETHICAL pillar.  

Members who are interested need to:

  1. Sign up via the Center for Civic Engagement registration page: http://sli.oregonstate.edu/mlk (NOT the Academy Portal)
  2. Email Dr. Scott Paja at: scott.paja@oregonstate.edu indicating: the project you are registered for
  3. Upon verification of your participation following the project, you will receive access to complete a brief survey reflection via the Academy Portal as required for all Academy events
  4. You will receive a credit towards completion of the Academy visible on your account in the Academy Portal! 

The annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service is about joining forces to honor the life of Dr. King; we do this through furthering his dream for peace by working with our neighbors and communities to mutually benefit all involved. MLK Day is an opportunity to honor Dr. King’s legacy through service. Individuals are inspired, strengthened, and moved to make positive change. The MLK Day of Service projects give people a chance to address societal problems and unite communities.

Dr. King once said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

2016 projects available include the following. Please register here if you are an Oregon State student, staff, or faculty OR here if you have no Oregon State University email.

Stone Soup: Volunteers will be preparing and serving a free meal to those in need of a hot meal in our community. 12 volunteers are needed from 7:45am-12pm. This project is for ages 14 and older.  Guardian must be present for any youth participant.

Oregon Lebanon Veterans' Home: Volunteers will be participating supporting veterans in building basic wood models, chatting and socializing with the veterans, assisting with some landscaping/facility maintenance, and touring around the facility. 12 volunteers are needed from 8am to 12pm. This project is for ages 18 and older.

Produce for the People: Volunteers will be moving fallen leaves, digging garden paths, weeding, and other garden maintenance. 50 volunteers are needed from 8:15am-12pm.
This project is for all ages. Guardian must be present for any youth participant.

Corvallis Parks & Recreation: Volunteer activities include trail surfacing, invasive species removal, tree pruning, and clean-up projects. 50 volunteers are needed from 8:15am-12pm. This project is for ages 18 and older.

Habitat for Humanity Site Build: Volunteer activities include interior construction, may include painting, caulking, and installing cabinets. 10 volunteers are needed from 8:15am-3pm. This project is for ages 18 and older.

Heartland Humane Society: Volunteers will be participating in animal care including, but not limited to feeding, cleaning, and walking cats and dogs. 12 volunteers are needed from 8:45am-11:30am. This project is for ages 8 and older.  Guardian must be present for any youth participant.

Campus Clean-UpVolunteers will be picking up litter from the Oregon State campus including plastic, cans, cigarette butts, etc. with Student Health Services and Smoke-Free Campus. 15 volunteers are needed from 9:30am to 12pm. This project is for ages 18 and older.

Craft 'N Care for Meals on Wheels: Volunteers will be making up to 120 paper flowers collectively to create bouquets to decorate the tables where seniors served by Meals on Wheels eat. Volunteers are encouraged to bring glass jars or bottles that could be re-purposed as a vase with them to the project. 50 volunteers are needed from 9:15am-11:30am. This project is for all Ages.  Guardian must be present for any youth participant.

Lincoln Elementary School Garden/Linus Pauling Institute Healthy Youth Program: Volunteers will provide winter garden maintenance for the Lincoln Garden at Lincoln Elementary School. The Lincoln Garden is an outdoor learning space for students during the school day, in addition to a production garden, growing food for youth and family programs and to be donated to local organizations that serve families in our community. Volunteers will be part of the larger effort to increase the access and availability of fresh, healthy food for all. 12 volunteers are needed from 9:15am-12pm. This project is for ages 10 and older.  Guardian must be present for any youth participant.

SAGE Garden: Volunteers will help with winter garden maintenance. Tasks will depend upon the weather, but will include cardboard-wood chip mulching, leave-mulching, weeding, weaving of the willow fence, infrastructure repair projects, painting, plant relocation, etc. 40 volunteers are needed from 9:15am-12pm. This project is for ages 10 and older.  Guardian must be present for any youth participant.

Linn Benton Food Share: Volunteers will repackage bulk food for distribution to some of the 74 member agencies (shelters, care centers, food banks, etc.) to bring food to those who need it most in Linn and Benton Counties. 36 volunteers are needed from 9:15am-12pm. This project is for all ages.  Guardian must be present for any youth participant.

Habitat for Humanity ReStore: Volunteers will be organizing and processing donated materials for sale at the Habitat ReStore. 10 volunteers are needed from 9:15am to 2pm. This project is for ages 16 and older.  Guardian must be present for any youth participant.

Accessibility accommodations contact: Center for Civic Engagement, CCE@oregonstate.edu or 541-737-3041.

THANK YOU 2015 MLK VOLUNTEERS!

Linn Chapter OSWA Annual Meeting and Potluck

Forestry Events - Sat, 01/16/2016 - 2:37pm
Saturday, January 16, 2016 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service

Health & Wellness Events - Sat, 01/16/2016 - 2:37pm
Saturday, January 16, 2016 8:00 AM - 2:00 PM

This Year, the MLK Day of Service will take place on Saturday, January 16, 2016.

The annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service is about joining forces to honor the life of Dr. King; we do this through furthering his dream for peace by working with our neighbors and communities to mutually benefit all involved. MLK Day is an opportunity to honor Dr. King’s legacy through service. Individuals are inspired, strengthened, and moved to make positive change. The MLK Day of Service projects give people a chance to address societal problems and unite communities.

Dr. King once said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

 Learn more: http://sli.oregonstate.edu/mlk.

Last day to apply for graduation (Fall term)

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 01/15/2016 - 2:41pm
Friday, January 15, 2016 (all day event)

Understanding vegetation in young plantations: It’s what they do

Tree Topics - Wed, 01/13/2016 - 12:02pm

By Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties

 

photo: VMRC

Last month I spent a morning at OSU attending the annual science meeting of the Vegetation Management Research Cooperative (VMRC). It was well worth the time.

The VMRC’s mission includes conducting applied reforestation research of young plantations from seedling establishment through crown closure and, to promote reforestation success. The VMRC’s research has an emphasis on practical, operational vegetation control, and their research is broadly relevant and readily applied to the needs of family forest landowners, so I do try to keep up on their work.

Since many of the member groups do use herbicides in their forest management, their research frequently does involve herbicides. But the work is not generally about herbicides per se, but rather about understanding the nature of weed competition and how different degrees of competition and disturbance affect seedling growth and vegetation community dynamics. They are interested in knowing the influence of the timing of competition control efforts on survival and growth, how the length and timing control each affects growth and survival (“critical period threshold”), or the interaction of different seedling stock types and vegetation control methods affects seedling growth and vegetation community dynamics. Good stuff to know.

The meeting was also a chance to meet the VMRC’s new Director and Associate Director, Dr Carlos Gonzalez-Benecke and Max Wightman. They kicked things off with an excellent summary of the past decade’s research conducted around western Oregon and southwest Washington. They also did some broader synthesis of results to help lead the coop forward in another decade of work.

The VMRC currently has 14 members including forestry companies, state and federal agencies. It is one of 11 research coops at OSU’s College of Forestry (http://www.forestry.oregonstate.edu/research/research-cooperatives). Each conducts research and applies the results to solve problems, develop new products, support long-term field studies, and develop decision support tools. A CoF faculty member leads each cooperative and members work together to develop a mutually agreeable research program, pool dues payments to support the cooperative’s operating budget, and provide significant in-kind support to leverage dues payments.

You may have seen my earlier posting on the Swiss Needle Cast Cooperative , and can expect to hear more about the work of the VMRC, SNCC and some of our other research coops in the future.

The post Understanding vegetation in young plantations: It’s what they do appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 12:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs