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4th Biennial International Health Conference

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 04/17/2015 - 2:37pm
Friday, April 17, 2015 9:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Gender & Violence. The impact of sexual violence is present in every culture. Join us in unpacking how this pervasive issue affects all genders on our campus, in our local community, and around the globe. Through education and open dialogue on sexual violence, we seek to create awareness and promote strategies for change.

In collaboration with OSU’s Women in Policy Club, the OSU International Health Club will be hosting its 4th Biennial Conference: Gender & Violence on Friday, April 17th. This conference will shed light on how this pervasive issue affects all genders on our campus, in our local community, and around the globe. Free food is provided. Doors open at 9:30am in the Snell International Forum.

More Inappropriate Evaluations

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 04/17/2015 - 12:31pm

Last week, I started a discussion on inappropriate evaluations. I was using the Fitzpatrick , Sanders , and Worthen text for the discussion (Program Evaluation: Alternative approaches and practical guidelines, 2011. See here.) There were three other examples given in that text which were:

  1. Evaluation cannot yield useful, valid information;
  2. Type of evaluation is premature for the stage of the program; and
  3. Propriety of evaluation is doubtful.

I will cover them today.

First, if the evaluation doesn’t (or isn’t likely to) produce relevant information, don’t do it. If factors like inadequate resources–personnel, funding, time, lack of administrative support, impossible evaluation tasks, or inaccessible data (which are typically outside the evaluator’s control), give it a pass as all of these factors make the likelihood that the evaluation will yield useful, valid information slim. Fitzpatrick, Sanders, and Worthen say, “A bad evaluation is worse than none at all…”.

Then consider the type of evaluation that is requested. Should you do a formative, a summative, or a developmental evaluation? The tryout phase of a program typically demands a formative evaluation and not a summative evaluations despite the need to demonstrate impact. You may not demonstrate an effect at all because of timing. Consider running the program for a while (more than once or twice in a month). Decide if you are going to use the results for only programmatic improvement or for programmatic improvement AND impact.

Finally consider if the propriety of the evaluation is worthwhile. Propriety is the third standard in the Joint Committee Standards . Propriety helps establish evaluation quality by protecting the rights of those involved in the evaluation–the target audience, the evaluators, program staff, and other stakeholders. If you haven’t read the Standards, I recommend that you do.

 

New Topic (and timely): Comments.

It has been a while since I’ve commented on any feedback I get in the form of comments on blog posts. I read everyone. I get them both here as I write and as an email. Sometimes they are in a language I don’t read or understand and, unfortunately, the on-line translators don’t always make sense. Sometimes they are encouraging comments (keep writing; keep blogging; thank you; etc.). Sometimes there are substantive comments that lead me to think about things evaluation differently. Regardless of what the message is: THANK YOU! For commenting. Remember, I read each one.

my .

molly.

The post More Inappropriate Evaluations appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Thinning for fuels reduction & forest health

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/16/2015 - 2:37pm
Thursday, April 16, 2015 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Is your forest or small woodland overgrown or packed with small trees?  Thinning out some of the smaller trees can improve the health and vigor of the remaining trees – and make your forest more fire-resistant too! 

Join us for a hands-on field session where we discuss the nuts and bolts of non-commercial thinning, including short and long term objectives, tree selection, spacing and other considerations, and what to do with all the material you’ve just cut. 

Together we will mark a stand and decide what to leave and what to cut. We will then have a sawyer implement our design by cutting and removing material while we watch. Depending on the weather, they will burn or chip the cut material.   We’ll also look at other uses of the small logs, including for firewood and poles for farm building projects. 

If you’ve been wanting to perform fuels reduction or forest health thinning on your rural property but aren’t sure how to get started, this class is for you!  Please note that this is a field-based class – dress for the weather, and walking in the woods.  Short walks on uneven terrain will be involved. 

Please RSVP to (541) 776-7371 to ensure adequate handouts.  Cost is $5.  Space is limited.  You will receive directions upon registration.

Smoke Management Issues:

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/16/2015 - 2:37pm
Thursday, April 16, 2015 8:00 AM - 12:00 PM

This two day event includes a meeting regarding smoke management issues and a field tour to see the innovative restoration work being accomplished through the Ashland Forest Resiliency Project. There will be opportunities to hear guest speakers and ask and share questions regarding the challenges of conducting prescribed burning restoration work adjacent to communities.

Click HERE to register.

Wildlife and your woodland

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/16/2015 - 2:37pm
Thursday, April 16, 2015 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM
Check out the flyer!

Hood River - Oregon Season Trackers

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/16/2015 - 2:37pm
Thursday, April 16, 2015 10:00 AM - 2:30 PM

Become an Oregon Season Tracker “Citizen Scientist” and help monitor seasonal patterns of precipitation (rain and snow) and phenology (timing of natural processes such as bud break). You will be helping OSU Extension and HJ Andrews Experimental Forest scientists develop a better understanding of weather and how it affects plants. Your contribution may be especially valuable if you live, or have property in a remote rural area or at higher elevations.

For more information, click HERE

Innovative Applications of Douglas-fir in Building Design

Forestry Events - Thu, 04/16/2015 - 2:37pm
Thursday, April 16, 2015 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM
Speaker: Ethan Martin

Smoke Management Issues:

Forestry Events - Wed, 04/15/2015 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 2:00 PM - 7:30 PM

This two day event includes a meeting regarding smoke management issues and a field tour to see the innovative restoration work being accomplished through the Ashland Forest Resiliency Project. There will be opportunities to hear guest speakers and ask and share questions regarding the challenges of conducting prescribed burning restoration work adjacent to communities.

Click HERE to register.

Woodland Management - Dallas

Forestry Events - Wed, 04/15/2015 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Pre-registration required.  Register online for Dallas class, see flyer for additional details

Documentary Screening: The Mask You Live In

Health & Wellness Events - Wed, 04/15/2015 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM

The Mask You Live In follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America's narrow definition of masculinity. Discussion will follow the screening.

This film is presented by “Calling All Men In,” a monthly dialogue exploring ideas and beliefs about masculinity in our community. All male and masculine-identified individuals are invited to join the conversation.

Part of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. View the complete events calendar online.

 

Winds drive jellyfish-like creatures onto Oregon beaches

Breaking Waves - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 1:02pm

Velella velella blown ashore by prevailing winds, Fort Stevens State Park, April 2015 (photo by Tiffany Boothe, Seaside Aquarium)

Striking blue sea creatures, Velella velella, have washed up by the thousands on Oregon beaches including at Seaside, Manzanita, Astoria and Rockaway Beach in recent days, tourism officials report.

The small jellyfish-like animals normally live out at sea, floating on its surface. But every spring, thousands get blown by strong westerly winds onto the sands of Oregon, California and Washington and die, said Bill Hanshumaker, a senior instructor at the Hatfield Marine Science Center and chief scientist for Oregon Sea Grant.

When strong westerly winds blow over the Pacific coastline, Velella velella are swept by the thousands onto beaches including those at Seaside and Manzanita. They are often called By-the-wind Sailors, because they have their own small sails and move with the wind.

Velella velella (vuh-lell-uh vuh-lell-uh) can be beautiful to look at but start to give off a fishy smell as they decay. They don’t sting people who touch them, but experts at Oregon State University advise against walking barefoot through a pile of them because they contain a mild neurotoxin.

Learn more

The post Winds drive jellyfish-like creatures onto Oregon beaches appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Winds drive jellyfish-like creatures onto Oregon beaches

Sea Grant - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 1:02pm

Velella velella blown ashore by prevailing winds, Fort Stevens State Park, April 2015 (photo by Tiffany Boothe, Seaside Aquarium)

Striking blue sea creatures, Velella velella, have washed up by the thousands on Oregon beaches including at Seaside, Manzanita, Astoria and Rockaway Beach in recent days, tourism officials report.

The small jellyfish-like animals normally live out at sea, floating on its surface. But every spring, thousands get blown by strong westerly winds onto the sands of Oregon, California and Washington and die, said Bill Hanshumaker, a senior instructor at the Hatfield Marine Science Center and chief scientist for Oregon Sea Grant.

When strong westerly winds blow over the Pacific coastline, Velella velella are swept by the thousands onto beaches including those at Seaside and Manzanita. They are often called By-the-wind Sailors, because they have their own small sails and move with the wind.

Velella velella (vuh-lell-uh vuh-lell-uh) can be beautiful to look at but start to give off a fishy smell as they decay. They don’t sting people who touch them, but experts at Oregon State University advise against walking barefoot through a pile of them because they contain a mild neurotoxin.

Learn more

The post Winds drive jellyfish-like creatures onto Oregon beaches appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Field tour in the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge

Forestry Events - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 6:35am
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM

Mike Rule, Wildlife Biologist, will be our host and take us on an interesting tour through the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge. Management strategies developed for Turnbull NWR call for the integration of a variety of techniques to restore natural stand conditions, reduce hazard fuels and improve wildlife habitat.

Please bring your own lunch.

Register HERE. Space is limited!

Exploring Trees and Forests While Addressing Standards

Forestry Events - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 6:35am
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

K-2 teachers with resources to teach about forests and address CCSS and NGSS requirements. Emphasis will be on activities that are transferable to a variety of sites and utilize multiple learning modalities. Participants should bring a sack lunch, beverage, and dress for outdoor activities (rain or shine). If you have copies of standards, please bring them.

Register HERE

Woodland Management - Tangent

Forestry Events - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 6:35am
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
Pre-registration required.  Register online for Tangent class, see flyer for additional details

Conference - Forest Growth and Yield Models

Forestry Events - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 6:35am
Monday, April 13, 2015 8:00 AM - Tuesday, April 14, 2015 4:30 PM

How to be a competent user . . . Models of forest growth and yield are complex collections of mathematical functions and computer code designed to simulate the biological growth of forest trees and/or stands. While models may differ in the details, most such models rely on a very similar collection of tree, stand, and forest input data. These data may derive from field measurements, external models and equations, and imputation procedures.
An understanding of the model framework is useful to understand the interaction of input data and model components in making predictions. Through this understanding, model users can gain a greater appreciation of models, model results, and conclusions to be drawn from inventory systems. Attendees will also gain insights into approaches for evaluating and comparing the most commonly used models.

For more information, click HERE

Linn-Benton Livestock Association Annual Meeting and Dinner

Small Farms Events - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 6:34am
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Please RSVP so we can plan for you:
Kay Pynch – (541) 466-5344
Susan Ruckert – (541) 967-7171

For more information contact:

Shelby Filley (541)672-4461   shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Rural Living Basics: Living with you Well and Septic System

Small Farms Events - Tue, 04/14/2015 - 6:34am
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

This class is designed for rural residents to learn the basics (or have a refresher) of your drinking water well and septic systems to protect the health of your family, neighbors and animals, your property investment, and the safety of groundwater resources.

 The class is free and open to the public. However, pre-registration is appreciated to ensure adequate supplies. To register, call Chrissy at (541) 766-3556 or send an e-mail to well.water@oregonstate.edu

For a free nitrate screening of your drinking water, please bring approximately a cup of well water in a clean container.

The event is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service, Southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area, and Linn-Benton Community College.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Dr. Richard Besser, Chief Health and Medical Editor, ABC News.

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 04/13/2015 - 2:34pm
Monday, April 13, 2015 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM

"A View From Both Sides of the Camera: Using Television to Promote Public Health." Dr. Richard Besser, Chief Health and Medical Editor, ABC News.

Featured on “Good Morning America,” “World News Tonight with David Muir” and other major programming, ABC News’ Richard Besser provides medical analysis and reports for the public. A world traveler, Dr. Besser recently reported on the Ebola outbreak in West Africa from Liberia. With more than 20 years of medical and Public Health experience, Besser led the response to the 2009 influenza pandemic while serving as Acting Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. He is the recipient of multiple awards in public health and journalism. Dr. Besser will be speaking on A View from Both Sides of the Camera: Using Television to Promote Public Health.

The Provost's Lecture Series brings prominent scientists, acclaimed writers and key policymakers to Oregon State University to present on matters of national and international importance. The series is a project of the office of the Provost and other OSU partners.

The Provost's Lecture Series is brought to you by the Office of the Provost and the OSU Foundation. Dr. Besser’s visit is also supported by the Division of Health Sciences and the McCall Lecture Series.

Details on event webpage

Marine Science Day!

Food Events - Sat, 04/11/2015 - 2:34pm
Saturday, April 11, 2015 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

*Admission is Free* Get behind-the-scenes! HMSC will open its doors for a peek at the cutting-edge research, education and outreach in marine science that makes this marine laboratory unique. Meet researchers from Oregon State University and government agency partners. Explore with interactive science displays presented by marine scientists! Examine live specimens, interact with larval fish, listen to whales, volcanoes and deep sea vents!

 

Volunteers are always welcomed, and a shuttle bus from campus is available - contact Maryann Bozza at 541-867-0234