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4-H Critter Campus

4-H Events - 11 hours 8 min ago
Saturday, January 24, 2015 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM

4-H Critter Campus

Saturday, January 24th, 2015   10am - 2pm

Polk County Fairgrounds, Rickreall, OR

See details and registration here!

Deadline to apply for Winter Term graduation

Health & Wellness Events - 11 hours 8 min ago
Friday, January 16, 2015 (all day event)

Applications for graduation must be submitted to the Office of the Registrar. They may be filed up to three terms before the expected graduation term so progress can be monitored each term. However, applications must be submitted no later than the end of the second week of the term in which the student plans to complete degree requirements.

See Apply for graduation and application deadlines

Last day to drop a class

Health & Wellness Events - 11 hours 8 min ago
Friday, January 16, 2015 (all day event)
Schedule Changes After Classes Begin. All Web transactions are done on the "Register/Add/Drop Classes" page of the OSU Web registration system. Login to MyOSU at https://myosu.oregonstate.edu, select Student, then under Registration Tools, click on Add/Drop Classes. Web registration generally is available 24 hours a day, except from 11:55 p.m. Friday evening to 7 a.m. Saturday morning.

All paper transactions are done at the Registrar’s Office between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Last day to add a class by web

Health & Wellness Events - 11 hours 8 min ago
Sunday, January 11, 2015 (all day event)

Winter Term 2014 begins

Health & Wellness Events - 11 hours 8 min ago
Monday, January 5, 2015 (all day event)
Welcome back!

Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series

Small Farms Events - 11 hours 9 min ago
Thursday, January 29, 2015 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM

 For more information, contact the OSU Lane County Extension office at (541)344-5859, or stop by the office at 996 Jefferson Street in Eugene, to pick up an application.

Office hours are Monday-Thursday, 10am-1pm and 2-5pm.

Cost of session is $25.00.  Pre-registration is required.

For payment with a credit card see the website: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series

Small Farms Events - 11 hours 9 min ago
Thursday, January 29, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

 For more information, contact the OSU Lane County Extension office at (541)344-5859, or stop by the office at 996 Jefferson Street in Eugene, to pick up an application.

Office hours are Monday-Thursday, 10am-1pm and 2-5pm.

Cost of session is $25.00.  Pre-registration is required.

For payment with a credit card see the website: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Farms - Southern Oregon

Small Farms Events - 11 hours 9 min ago
Monday, January 26, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Growing Farms: Successful Whole Farm Management

A hybrid course for beginning farmers that teaches those new to farming how to plan and manage a farm, while giving them tools to produce and market farmed and raised goods. The course also encourages interaction and community building among participants, helping build a professional network among small farmers and ranchers.

While developing a whole-farm plan, participants will learn about sustainable practices and land stewardship. The course encourages farmers to see how small farms and ranches fit into our community’s economic and environmental success.

Class meets:
6 - 8:30pm, Monday, January 26th
6 - 8:30pm, Monday, February 9th
Full Day, Saturday, February 21st
6 - 8:30pm, Monday, March 9th

REGISTER HERE:  https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/growing-farms-hybrid-course-beginning-farmers#introduction-section  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Farms - South Willamette Valley

Small Farms Events - 11 hours 9 min ago
Thursday, January 22, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Growing Farms: Successful Whole Farm Management

A hybrid course for beginning farmers that teaches those new to farming how to plan and manage a farm, while giving them tools to produce and market farmed and raised goods. The course also encourages interaction and community building among participants, helping build a professional network among small farmers and ranchers.

While developing a whole-farm plan, participants will learn about sustainable practices and land stewardship. The course encourages farmers to see how small farms and ranches fit into our community’s economic and environmental success.

Class meets:
6 - 8:30pm, Thursday, January 22
6 - 8:30pm, Thursday, February 5th
Full Day, Saturday, February 21st
6 - 8:30pm, Thursday, March 5th

REGISTER HERE:  https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/growing-farms-hybrid-course-beginning-farmers#introduction-section  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

2015 EcoFarm Conference

Small Farms Events - 11 hours 9 min ago
Wednesday, January 21, 2015 - Saturday, January 24, 2015 (all day event)

The Ecological Farming Association presents the 35th annual EcoFarm Conference at the Asilomar Conference Grounds in Pacific Grove, California, January 21-24, 2015

As the largest and oldest ecological agricultural gathering in the West, the EcoFarm Conference offers more than 70 workshops featuring an array of educational and technical workshops for farmers, ranchers, distributors, retailers, activists, consumers, students, and educators, along with notable keynote speakers, an exhibitor marketplace, live entertainment, discussion groups, mixers, delicious organic meals and libations.

Visit www.eco-farm.org for more info and to register.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Farms - North Willamette Valley

Small Farms Events - 11 hours 9 min ago
Wednesday, January 21, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Growing Farms: Successful Whole Farm Management

A hybrid course for beginning farmers that teaches those new to farming how to plan and manage a farm, while giving them tools to produce and market farmed and raised goods. The course also encourages interaction and community building among participants, helping build a professional network among small farmers and ranchers.

While developing a whole-farm plan, participants will learn about sustainable practices and land stewardship. The course encourages farmers to see how small farms and ranches fit into our community’s economic and environmental success.

Class meets:
6 - 8pm, Wednesday, January 21st
6 - 8:30pm, Wednesday, February 4th
Full Day, Saturday, February 21st
6 - 8:30pm, Wednesday, March 4th

REGISTER HERE:  https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/growing-farms-hybrid-course-beginning-farmers#introduction-section  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing Farms - North Coast

Small Farms Events - 11 hours 9 min ago
Thursday, January 8, 2015 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Growing Farms: Successful Whole Farm Management

A hybrid course for beginning farmers that teaches those new to farming how to plan and manage a farm, while giving them tools to produce and market farmed and raised goods. The course also encourages interaction and community building among participants, helping build a professional network among small farmers and ranchers.

While developing a whole-farm plan, participants will learn about sustainable practices and land stewardship. The course encourages farmers to see how small farms and ranches fit into our community’s economic and environmental success.

Class meets:
5 - 8pm, Thursday, January 8
5 - 8pm, Thursday, January 22
9am - 4pm, Saturday, January 31
5 - 8pm, Thursday, February 12 

REGISTER HERE:  https://pace.oregonstate.edu/catalog/growing-farms-hybrid-course-beginning-farmers#introduction-section  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Lane County Livestock Association Breakfast Educational Program

Small Farms Events - 11 hours 9 min ago
Wednesday, January 14, 2015 6:30 AM - 8:00 AM

 

For more information contact Shelby Filley (541) 672-4461  shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Linn-Benton Livestock & Forages Breakfast Educational Program

Small Farms Events - 11 hours 9 min ago
Tuesday, January 13, 2015 6:30 AM - 8:00 AM

 

For more information contact:

Shelby Filley (541)672-4461   shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Sustainable Landscape Training - Lane County

Gardening Events - 11 hours 10 min ago
Wednesday, December 10, 2014 9:00 AM - Thursday, December 11, 2014 5:00 PM

Learn practical information to create sustainable/green/ecological landscapes. Participants will learn to utilize landscape practices that can be applied to their own yards and will benefit by improving their soil biology and reducing erosion.

Class will meet both days, December 10-11, 2014 from 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Registration form and credit card payment option is available on the website: extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

Understanding GMOs and forestry

Amy Grotta's Tree Topics - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 12:40pm

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension – Columbia, Washington & Yamhill Counties

A sculpture of DNA among the trees. Photo credit: Aras Bilgen, Flickr Creative Commons

This week, the closest contest of last November’s election – the GMO labeling initiative – was finally put to rest after a recount.  The measure ultimately failed by a tiny margin, but it did a lot to put GMO’s into the public spotlight. Of course, the ballot measure had to do with food labeling, not trees, but it got me thinking that it might be worth looking at how GMOs relate to forestry.

What is a GMO?

In case you were not following along during election season, let’s start with a definition. A GMO is an organism whose genes have been directly altered by humans, in a laboratory, through genetic engineering within individual cells. GMO methods can be used to modify an organism’s own DNA or to insert DNA from another organism. The modified cells then are regenerated into whole organisms. Reasons for doing this might be to improve crop productivity, disease resistance, the nutritional yield of food plants, or resistance to herbicides to facilitate weed control. From the technology itself to the ways that GMO might be used in society, it quickly becomes obvious why GMOs can be very controversial.

What is not a GMO?

So, on to forestry and trees. Planting season is upon us, and if your seedlings are coming from one of the small woodlands seedling sales, or from a large commercial forest nursery, and you are planting Douglas-fir, then chances are your seedlings are advertised as “genetically improved”. Some people mistakenly think that this means that they are GMO trees, but this is not the case. For decades, we have employed traditional breeding techniques in forestry to produce seedlings that perform well. On the most basic level, this means that parent trees with desirable traits, such as drought tolerance, height growth, frost resistance, etc. are identified. Seeds or cuttings from these trees are collected and grown in a controlled area such as a seed orchard. More seed is collected from these trees, so that the desired traits can be passed on to the next generation. The “genetically improved” seedlings you plant are a product of this process, not of genetic engineering.

 

How might genetic engineering apply to forestry?

Chestnuts accumulated on a Portland sidewalk. Photo credit: Mike Kuniavsky, flickr.com Creative Commons

The story of the American chestnut tree is a good example. The American chestnut once was a major component of forests in the eastern United States. It was a valuable timber tree and an important food source for both people and animals. But, a fungal disease, the chestnut blight, introduced in the late 19th century virtually wiped it out. Only a few hundred trees survived. (American chestnut, while not native to Oregon, was brought over and planted by pioneers. The blight is not prevalent in Oregon, so chestnuts do well here.) Many people are working to try to restore the chestnut to its native range. Besides traditional breeding for blight resistance, some researchers are experimenting with genetic engineering. They have inserted a gene from wheat that conveys resistance to blight into American chestnut trees. The researchers are also testing many other genes, mostly derived from the blight resistant Chinese chestnut.

 

GMO research at Oregon State

At OSU, forestry professor Steve Strauss is recognized as a leader in genetic engineering research. He does a lot of his work on poplars and eucalypts, which have potential for bioenergy feedstocks, pulp and solid wood. But, before GMO plants like these could be utilized commercially, regulatory agencies and the public will subject them to a lot of scrutiny. For example, we need to be sure that there are no unintended consequences, such as unplanned spread of the modified genes to other non-GMO plants in the environment, or on a farm. So Dr. Strauss and his cooperators do a lot of laboratory and contained field studies on the safety and risks associated with genetically engineered trees, with the focus on methods for preventing their spread until they are more fully understood.

 

Despite the failure of the GMO labeling initiative this year, we certainly have not seen the end of the debate around this issue. So, it’s worth understanding what genetic engineering is and is not, and what the potential benefits and risks of this technology might be. For those who want to read further, I’ll refer you to this website: http://agbiotech.oregonstate.edu/

I think the bottom line (and here I probably ought to invoke a disclaimer*) is that genetic modification may eventually be a management tool, like herbicides, chainsaws, and other tools in your forestry “toolbox”. GMOs are inherently neither good nor bad. The more important questions for forest managers and for society are how, when, and for what purposes they are employed.

Of course, there was another big initiative on the ballot last November. And like GMO’s, the production of marijuana certainly has its intersections with forest ecology and management, as anyone in southern Oregon might tell you. But that’s a topic for another day…

*Disclaimer: the opinions expressed on this blog are of the authors, and do not necessarily represent the position of Oregon State University as an institution.

The post Understanding GMOs and forestry appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Biennial grant competition – call for preliminary proposals

Breaking Waves - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 11:42am

Oregon Sea Grant invites preliminary proposals (pre-proposals) from researchers affiliated with any Oregon institution of higher education for research projects that address cutting-edge socioeconomic and biophysical science related to important marine and coastal issues.

Pre-proposals will be entered into a highly competitive review and selection process. Proposed work may begin on either February 1, 2016, or February 1, 2017. Individual requests for funding are not to exceed $115,000 per year. Available funding is set by the NOAA Sea Grant Program based on congressional appropriations, and is subject to change and rescission.

Pre-proposals are due to the Oregon Sea Grant office by 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 13, 2105.

For full details, visit our Biennial Grant Competition page.

The post Biennial grant competition – call for preliminary proposals appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Biennial grant competition – call for preliminary proposals

Sea Grant - Fri, 12/19/2014 - 11:42am

Oregon Sea Grant invites preliminary proposals (pre-proposals) from researchers affiliated with any Oregon institution of higher education for research projects that address cutting-edge socioeconomic and biophysical science related to important marine and coastal issues.

Pre-proposals will be entered into a highly competitive review and selection process. Proposed work may begin on either February 1, 2016, or February 1, 2017. Individual requests for funding are not to exceed $115,000 per year. Available funding is set by the NOAA Sea Grant Program based on congressional appropriations, and is subject to change and rescission.

Pre-proposals are due to the Oregon Sea Grant office by 5 p.m. Friday, Feb. 13, 2105.

For full details, visit our Biennial Grant Competition page.

The post Biennial grant competition – call for preliminary proposals appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

More about the Alkin’s Evaluation Theory Tree

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 10:49am

This will be short.

I showed a revised version of Alkin’s Evaluation Theory Tree in last week’s post. It had leaves. It looked like this:

It was taken from the second edition of Alkin’s book.

I have had two comments about this tree.

  1. There are few women represented in the tree. (True, especially in the draft version; in version above there are more.)
  2. I was reminded about the  Fred  Carden and Marvin C. Alkin’s article in the Journal of Multidisciplinary Evaluation, 8(17), January 2012. (There are still more leaves and the global south is represented.)

The person who reminded me about the Carden and Alkin (Thank you, Pablo Rodriguez-Bilella)  article also gave me a reference that I am sharing (and since I cannot add a link I’ll just put the URL–hopefully, it will work in the post as it did in the comment–you may have to copy and paste):

http://evi.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/1356389013516055.

This article is mentioned in the revised (yet again) version of the Evaluation Theory Tree in the article in number 2 above (see Table 1 and Figure 2).

So read the article in #2 above. and read the other article. The global south has a role here. It is important for evaluation.

 

Also, …today is third night of Hanukkah…candles help with the darkness (the light returns Sunday…)

Happy Hanukkah.

my .

molly.

 

 

The post More about the Alkin’s Evaluation Theory Tree appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Quality Control in Wood Products Manufacturing

Forestry Events - Thu, 12/18/2014 - 6:37am
Tuesday, December 16, 2014 8:00 AM - Thursday, December 18, 2014 5:00 PM

Course Description

This workshop will introduce participants to many of the key tools of quality control – brainstorming, Pareto charts, checksheets, flowcharts, cause-and-effect diagrams, design of experiments and statistical process control (SPC). Particular emphasis will be given to SPC. Participants will work 'hands on' to gain first-hand experience using the tools introduced in the course.

 Program Highlights

  1. Participants will use numerous tools of quality to solve a specific wood products industry case example
  2. Participants will work 'hands-on' in a computer lab to use the tools introduced in the course
See the course website for more details and to register