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Educating for Systems Thinking - Level B

Forestry Events - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 2:33pm
Tuesday, August 4, 2015 (all day event)

Note: The Level A workshop on August 3 is a prerequisite for this workshop!

Purpose: To make systems thinking tools relevant to educators

Attendees will learn:

  • How to utilize systems thinking tools and concepts to deepen student understanding within their particular subject area.
  • How to address the systems thinking content strand of the Oregon Environmental Literacy Plan, and how it supports STEM

Details:

  • Free for formal and non-formal K-12 educators / administrators
  • Register early, space is limited.
  • more information

Participants will become more deeply acquainted with the tools and concepts introduced in Level A, and how these connect to the Oregon Environmental Literacy learning strands. They will expand their systems thinking toolbox with additional archetypes, feedback loops and an intro to dynamic computer modeling. They will report out about their progress using the tools introduced in Level A, and will have opportunity for collaborative planning.

Into the Forest: A workshop for teachers to extend outdoor school learning

Forestry Events - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 2:33pm
Wednesday, August 12, 2015 9:00 AM - Friday, August 14, 2015 1:00 PM

Three-day free workshop for Oregon fifth- and sixth-grade teachers whose students will attend outdoor school during the 2015-16 school year.

  • practice "hands-on" experiential activities that can be used in the classroom and in the field
  • apply field techniques in the forest and hear from content experts
  • see how forest-related content can be infused into the curriculum, especially with regard to science and math
  • engage in experiential activities used in forest research and science inquiry
  • receive forest education resources, including a new OFRI publication for sixth-graders and an accompanying teacher guide
  • work with colleagues to create lessons that are aligned with outdoor school curriculum, NGSS and Common Core State Standards
  • develop strategies and activities that will help you integrate forestry content and science inquiry skills into your practice

Twilight Tour to Linn County Seed Orchard

Forestry Events - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 2:33pm
Thursday, August 6, 2015 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM

Come learn about the production of improved seed at the Roseburg Forest Products’ seed orchard. Geneticist Sara Lipow will give a layman’s overview of how tree improvement programs work and talk about the availability of genetically improved seed/seedlings to small landowners. Orchard manager Mike Albrecht and Sara will then walk us through orchard blocks of various ages where we will view and discuss the various treatments used to encourage trees to produce cones, view some cross pollinations being carried out and give a general overview of how seed orchards are managed.

Livestock First Aid & Parasite Management

Small Farms Events - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 2:33pm
Tuesday, September 15, 2015 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Sept. 15 - Livestock First Aid and Parasite Management
Oct. 6 - Dealing With Drought

5:30 PM TO 8:00 PM
$15 per session or $100 to attend all Sessions
Contact OSU KBREC for More Information

(541) 883-7131
http://oregonstate.edu/dept/kbrec/
http://oregonstate.edu/dept/kbrec/sites/default/files/klamath_small_farms_series.pdf
6923 Washburn Way
Klamath Falls, OR
97603
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Introductory Basic HACCP

Small Farms Events - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 2:33pm
Tuesday, August 11, 2015 8:30 AM - Wednesday, August 12, 2015 4:00 PM

Workshop Objectives
To provide an overview of the prerequisite programs (GMPs, SSOPs) as a foundation for developing HACCP based food safety plans. Participants will work in teams and go through the process of establishing a HACCP based food safety plan for a specific food product.This program will provide information for participants to begin to prepare to come into compliance with the FDA’s mandate to require comprehensive, prevention based controls across the food supply.
 
Event Flyer

Registration Information

Registration Fee: $365 per person Register Early! Space is limited to 24
Registration fee includes coffee breaks and the HACCP textbook. Lunch is on your own.
 
Need more information?
Dr. Mark Daeschel, ph: 541.737.6519
Dr. Yanyun Zhao, ph: 541.737.9151
Registration Information
Debby Yacas, ph: 541.737.6483, or toll-free: 800.823.2357

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

DOWN AND DIRTY, Soil Building

Small Farms Events - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 2:33pm
Monday, August 3, 2015 3:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Do you want more productive, healthier gardens and farms which take less time and money? To achieve this, the secret is SOIL, healthy, living soil.
Learn how to recognize healthy soil, feed and nourish the soil food web, and build fertiflity using natural strategies and techniques that come from getting down to the ground, a soil-eyed  view that will change the way you grow.  Cost is $20 for one or $30 couples or farm partners.   On-line registration link available at http://extension.oregonstate.edu/sorec/farms
Ms. Murphy is author of Building Soil: A Down-to-Earth Approach.  Copies of her book will be available at the workshop.

To read more and register, go to:
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/sorec/farms

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

TOO MANY TOMATOES???

Small Farms Events - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 2:33pm
Tuesday, August 18, 2015 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Do you have an abundance of tomatoes?  Learn a little history of the tomato and how to safely preserve both paste and slicing tomatoes with confidence using research-based methods. We will discuss the basics of water bath canning, freezing and  dehydrating. We have recipes for sauces, salsas, chutneys, relishes, juices, and more. Have too many green tomatoes too? We have ideas for these as well. See a demonstration on how to make and safely     preserve salsa. There will be samples to taste and time for questions and answers.                                           

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Dry Farming Field Day

Small Farms Events - Sun, 08/02/2015 - 2:33pm
Monday, August 3, 2015 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM

Come visit the dry farming plots at Oak Creek and taste dry-farmed vs. irrigated tomatoes.

We look forward to seeing you at the Dry Farming Field Day on August 3, 2015! 
This event will be held at the Oak Creek Center for Urban Horticulture. You are welcome to come anytime that day between 4 and 7pm.

If you have any questions contact Amy Garrett at 541-766-3551 or amy.garrett@oregonstate.edu.
For more information, visit http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/dry-farming-demonstration
RSVP Here
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Speaking of the weather…

Tree Topics - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 3:00pm

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension – Columbia, Washington & Yamhill Counties

I don’t need to tell you it’s hot out there today. (Oops! I just did. Sorry.)

Between the extreme heat and the very real fire danger, it’s not a good afternoon to be working in the woods.  Rarely do I say I’d rather be in the office than in the field, but today is one of those days that I’m appreciating the air conditioning.

Since everyone is talking about the weather anyhow, it seems appropriate to share some reading material that relates to it, which you can enjoy in the comfort of whatever cool spot you’ve found today.  Oregon Forests and Climate Change is the subject of a little writing project which a number of my Extension colleagues have taken on as a group.

Why this project?  OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension strives to provide objective, science-based education to help forest owners succeed in forest stewardship. The growing body of climate science means that a basic understanding of climate and climate variability are needed to guide key aspects of stewardship of managed forests, such as:

  • selecting appropriate tree species and types of forest,
  • determining the timing of management actions such as planting and thinning,
  • estimating rates of growth and productivity, and
  • anticipating climatic stress and threats to forest health.

We realize there are still a lot of unknowns that go along with all this, so our intention is not to be prescriptive but rather to explore what some of the key issues might be. We’re learning as we go and sharing what we learn through a series of short articles.  The first set of these stories are available to read now over on the Oregon Forests & Climate Change blog. To set the stage, we get some perspectives on the subject of climate change from a woodland owner who also happens to be a forest geneticist working in the timber industry.

Crater Lake snowpack in July circa 1915. Photo credit: TheOldMotor.com

The next three articles address some of the basic principles of climate science. One looks at Oregon’s weather and climate as we’ve experienced it in our lifetimes vs. what is projected for the future. The next uses snowfall at Crater Lake as an example, in analyzing long term trends vs. year-to-year fluctuations in our weather. Finally, we look at some of the underlying factors that create these fluctuations, such as the El Niño cycle we are in right now.

These articles lay the foundation for the next phase of our project, in which we’ll be exploring how our forests respond to climate variability, extremes, and long-term change, and how we as managers can respond in turn. Stay tuned over the next year or so as we continue.

Of course, climate change can be a loaded subject and discussions about the topic can quickly grow rather heated. (I could not resist that pun…) We will be staying above the fray and look objectively at what anticipated changes may – or may not – mean on the ground, here in Oregon. So grab another icy drink and click here for more.

The post Speaking of the weather… appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Last Fridays Farm Tours

Small Farms Events - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 2:36pm
Friday, July 31, 2015 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM
North Willamtte Research and Extension Center Farm Tours

 

Bring a friend and come see what's going on at the farm! Learn about current research projects and other activities at NWREC.

Tours begin at 2:00 pm every final Friday of the month, beginning in May. They are usually about 1.5 hours in length and are free.

Please pre-register with Jan by calling 503-678-1264. Tours are free and limited to the first 24 attendees.

If you have a large group, such as a garden club or other organization, that would like to tour NWREC, please schedule a separate date with Jan.

Tour dates are on the following Fridays

  • July 31st
  • Aug 28th
  • Sept 25th

 Driving directions to NWREC

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Pop-up Dinner

Gardening Events - Fri, 07/31/2015 - 6:13am
Friday, July 24, 2015 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
The Food Innovation Center invites you to join us for the first ever Pop-Up dinner. Come celebrate Oregon’s summer bounty and enjoy a delicious meal developed by the chefs in our world class kitchen.

Imagine yourself eating a multi-course meal with 100 of your fellow food lovers on the plaza outside of the Food Innovation Center.  Experience sustainable agriculture fresh from the field!

Mix and mingle with people who know and love food and give us feedback on what you think by participating in the Pop-Up Dinner data collection. Leave with a full stomach and some new ideas to use at home.

Providing a majority of the vegetables you’ll find at our Pop-Up are local farmers Marieta and Brandon Easley of Slice of Heaven Farm in Sandy, Oregon.  Providing fresh, responsibly farmed vegetables to their community has always been their goal as well as using sustainable practices that respect nature, reigniting our interconnectedness with nature, and setting good lifestyle examples for our next generation.

The meal features some of Oregon’s finest Specialty Crops in addition to other amazing foods for you to feast on. Don’t hesitate because seats are limited and you’ll want to be the first to signup.                                                                        Sign-up @ Eventbrite link by July 22

Choice. Again.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 2:55pm

Ignorance is a choice.

Not knowing may be “easier”; you know, less confusing, less intimidating, less fearful, less embarrassing.

I remember when I first asked the question, “Is it easier not knowing?” What I was asking was “By choosing to not know, did I really make a choice, or was it a default position?” Because if you consciously avoid knowing, do you really not know or are you just ignoring the obvious. Perhaps it goes back to the saying common on social media today: “Great people talk about ideas; average people talk about things; small people talk about other people” (which is a variation of what Elanor Roosevelt said).

Critical thinking (no, not negative thinking; reflective, thoughtful thinking) enables knowing. Talking about ideas allows people to think reflectively, to think thoughtfully; to know. Talking about people cuts off thinking about ideas; allows individuals to “not know”. And in that case, not knowing is seems easier; less effort. Perhaps, you say, that the people don’t know that they don’t know. That, too, is a choice. I am reminded of a thought that was stated with regard to “white privilege”: “…it is (emphasis original) your fault if you don’t maintain awareness of that fact” (referring to the fact that white people do benefit from white skin and therefore privilege). I’m not saying that not knowing (ignorance) is a form of white privilege; I am saying that there are similarities, that it is your fault to maintain ignorance, that there are choices.

And yes, this does relate to evaluation. What choices have you made recently that have kept you ignorant. Is it just too much trouble to…(fill in the blank)? I know there are days where I default to the not knowing (ignorance) position. (My philosophy teacher once told me that there are only three choices: to agree to do (know), to agree to not do (not knowing), and agree to not decide (default).) It takes too much work; I’ve too many other things that need to be done yesterday. OR, I am afraid of knowing. That is a choice.

I realized recently that I will encourage people to look at self-confidence/self-efficacy and to measure an individual’s intention to change as a way to identify outcomes. Yet there are other approaches to get to outcomes. I happen to believe that  Mazmanian (1998*) did identify something important (intention to change) when evaluating programs (even though he was talking about continuing medical education). That is almost 20 years ago. Is it still relevant? (Don’t know.) It is still useful? (Yes.)  Does it still help the evaluator get closer to condition change? (Yes.)

Not knowing (ignorance) may be easier; I don’t think it is really an option in today’s world. It is, after all, the information age.

*Mazmanian, P. E., Daffron, S. R., Johnson, R. E., Davis, D. A., & Kantrowitz, M. P.  (1998).  Information about the barriers to planned change: A randomized controlled trial involving continuing medical education lectures and commitment to change. Academic Medicine 73(8), 882-886.

my .

molly

 

The post Choice. Again. appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Tracking Progress through Collaborative Monitoring

Forestry Events - Thu, 07/30/2015 - 2:36pm
Thursday, July 30, 2015 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Monitoring plays a prominent role in collaborative projects and can be used to strengthen communication and consensus among diverse groups. Monitoring allows collaborative projects to define their landscape management process and serves as a neutral approach to determining effectiveness. Learn key concepts of a monitoring framework and guiding principles for practical, efficient monitoring.

Join the webinar!

Hatfield Center celebrates 50th anniversary next week

Sea Grant - Mon, 07/27/2015 - 3:16pm

NEWPORT, Ore. – Fifty years ago this summer, Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center opened its doors as a fledgling research and education facility envisioned to help the depressed central Oregon coast economy revive.

Today it stands as one of the most important and unique marine science facilities in the country, bringing together a plethora of scientists from different agencies to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing the world’s oceans, educating a new generation of students about these issues, and reaching out to inform the public about their impacts.

Oregon Sea Grant has been part of the HMSC since the beginning. The program’s first marine Extension agent, Bob Jacobson, was stationed there, providing service and consultation to the commercial fishing fleet. Sea Grant marine educators Don Giles and Vicki Osis laid the groundwork for what would become an exemplary k-12 and public education program which now leads STEM education efforts on the Oregon coast. And we manage the HMSC Visitor Center, popular with tourists – and now serving as a living laboratory for studying how people learn in informal settings such as aquariums and museums.

OSU and the HMSC will commemorate their half century of success with a celebration and reception on Friday, Aug. 7, at the center. The public is invited.

“This is an opportunity to look at the past and honor the people and events that have made the Hatfield Marine Science Center such a special place,” said Bob Cowen, director of the center. “It’s also a time to celebrate the future, as OSU is launching its Marine Studies Initiative and working on plans to expand the center and its capacity.”

The 50th anniversary celebration will begin at 4:30 p.m. just outside the Hatfield Marine Science Center, located south of the Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport. The celebration will feature speakers, displays, a historical slide show, and a video featuring faculty, student and community perspectives on the center’s future plans. A reception will follow from 5:30 to 7 p.m.; the events are free and open to the public.

Earlier in the day, a special presentation by Rick Spinrad, chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and former OSU Vice President for Research, will be held in the Visitor Center Auditorium. His talk, “How Oceanography Saved the World,” which begins at 3 p.m., is part of the 50th Anniversary Alumni Speaker Series.

Other speakers include former Oregon State President John Byrne, a former NOAA administrator.

Event information and links to HMSC archives, historic photos, video and a timeline of landmarks for the Hatfield Marine Science Center can be found at: http://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/50th.

 

The post Hatfield Center celebrates 50th anniversary next week appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Hatfield Center celebrates 50th anniversary next week

Breaking Waves - Mon, 07/27/2015 - 3:16pm

NEWPORT, Ore. – Fifty years ago this summer, Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center opened its doors as a fledgling research and education facility envisioned to help the depressed central Oregon coast economy revive.

Today it stands as one of the most important and unique marine science facilities in the country, bringing together a plethora of scientists from different agencies to tackle some of the most pressing issues facing the world’s oceans, educating a new generation of students about these issues, and reaching out to inform the public about their impacts.

Oregon Sea Grant has been part of the HMSC since the beginning. The program’s first marine Extension agent, Bob Jacobson, was stationed there, providing service and consultation to the commercial fishing fleet. Sea Grant marine educators Don Giles and Vicki Osis laid the groundwork for what would become an exemplary k-12 and public education program which now leads STEM education efforts on the Oregon coast. And we manage the HMSC Visitor Center, popular with tourists – and now serving as a living laboratory for studying how people learn in informal settings such as aquariums and museums.

OSU and the HMSC will commemorate their half century of success with a celebration and reception on Friday, Aug. 7, at the center. The public is invited.

“This is an opportunity to look at the past and honor the people and events that have made the Hatfield Marine Science Center such a special place,” said Bob Cowen, director of the center. “It’s also a time to celebrate the future, as OSU is launching its Marine Studies Initiative and working on plans to expand the center and its capacity.”

The 50th anniversary celebration will begin at 4:30 p.m. just outside the Hatfield Marine Science Center, located south of the Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport. The celebration will feature speakers, displays, a historical slide show, and a video featuring faculty, student and community perspectives on the center’s future plans. A reception will follow from 5:30 to 7 p.m.; the events are free and open to the public.

Earlier in the day, a special presentation by Rick Spinrad, chief scientist for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and former OSU Vice President for Research, will be held in the Visitor Center Auditorium. His talk, “How Oceanography Saved the World,” which begins at 3 p.m., is part of the 50th Anniversary Alumni Speaker Series.

Other speakers include former Oregon State President John Byrne, a former NOAA administrator.

Event information and links to HMSC archives, historic photos, video and a timeline of landmarks for the Hatfield Marine Science Center can be found at: http://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/50th.

 

The post Hatfield Center celebrates 50th anniversary next week appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Columbia County Small Woodlands Assoc./ OSU Extension Summer Woodland Tour

Forestry Events - Sat, 07/25/2015 - 2:37pm
Saturday, July 25, 2015 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM

 Our hosts for this year’s tour are the Skeans family (Randy, Lisa and son Jarrod), three-time Columbia County Tree Farmers of the Year, and owners of Just-A-Mere Farm, a combination timber, Christmas tree and contract logging business.

Come at 8:30 for hot coffee and pastries.  At 9:00 we will begin the program with an introduction and history of the Tree Farm. Then we will load into carpools for a loop tour stopping at various points of interest illustrating the management of this farm for long-term, sustained timber yield. Please wear comfortable, sturdy shoes as there will be some stops that involve a short walk.

Just-A-Mere has been in the Skeans family over five generations dating back to Jess Skeans, Randy’s great-grandfather. Over that time the farm has transitioned from timber to hay and back to timber again, with some land remaining in Christmas trees.  The size of the farm, and the family logging business with access to a variety of machines and equipment affords a level of flexibility in terms of harvest and other practices that few family woodland owners can match.  Come enjoy a day in the woods and see what makes the Skeanses’ farm unique.

A BBQ picnic lunch catered by Sunshine Pizza will follow the tour. Lunch is provided to all attendees courtesy of CCSWA. Non-CCSWA members, please consider a cash donation to cover your lunch cost.

After lunch, stick around for a presentation by Oregon Department of Forestry’s fire division about fire season safety and preparedness.

Remember, family is invited. Please include the number in your party when you RSVP to Vicki Krenz at the OSU Extension office vicki.krenz@oregonstate.edu by July 17th RSVP is needed for accurate food preparation, please!  

Directions (look for yellow “Tree Tour” signs en route):

From Rainier: From Hwy 30, turn south onto 6th St. (south side of the highway; across from Fibre Federal Bank at Veterans Way). Merge onto C St. and left onto Fern Hill Rd. Follow Fern Hill for 4 miles and go right onto Skeans Rd. Turn right into the first driveway. From Vernonia: Hwy 47 north to Apiary Rd. Go 13 miles and turn right on Fern Hill Rd. Go 3.8 miles and turn left on Skeans Rd. and then right into the first driveway.

Surveys. Again. Still.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 07/24/2015 - 10:14am

The use of a survey is a valuable evaluation tool, especially in the world of electronic media. The survey allows individuals to gather data (both qualitative and quantitative) easily and relatively inexpensively. When I want information about surveys, I turn to the 4th edition of the Dillman book (Dillman, Smyth, & Christian, 2014*). Dillman has advocated the “Tailored Design Method” for a long time. (I first became aware of his method, which he called “Total Design Method,” in his 1978 first edition, a thin, 320 page volume [as opposed to the 509 page fourth edition].)

Today I want to talk about the “Tailored Design” method (originally known as total design method).

In the 4th edition, Dillman et al. say that “…in order to minimize total survey error, surveyors have to customize or tailor their survey designs to their particular situations.” They are quick to point out (through various examples) that the same procedures won’t work  for all surveys.  The “Tailored Design Method” refers to the customizing survey procedures for each separate survey.  It is based upon the topic of the survey and the audience being surveyed as well as the resources available and the time-line in use.  In his first edition, Dillman indicated that the TDM (Tailored Design Method) would produce a response rate of 75% for mail surveys and an 80%-90% response rate is possible for telephone surveys. Although I cannot easily find the same numbers in the 4th edition, I can provide an example (from the 4th edition on page 21-22) where the response rate is 77% after a combined contact of mail and email over one month time. They used five contacts of both hard and electronic copy.

This is impressive. (Most surveys I and others I work with conduct have a response rate less than 50%.) Dillman et al. indicate that there are three fundamental considerations in using the TDM. They are:

  1. Reducing four sources of survey error–coverage, sampling, nonresponse, and measurement;
  2. Developing a set of survey procedures that interact and work together to encourage all sample members to respond; and
  3. Taking into consideration elements such as survey sponsorship, nature of survey population, and the content of the survey questions.

The use of a social exchange perspective suggests that respondent behavior is motivated by the return that behavior is expected, and usually does, bring. This perspective affects the decisions made regarding coverage and sampling, the way questions are written and questionnaires are constructed, and determines how contacts will produce the intended sample.

If you don’t have a copy of this book (yes, there are other survey books out there) on your desk, get one! It is well worth the cost ($95.00, Wiley; $79.42, Amazon).

* Dillman, D. A., Smyth, J. D. & Christian, L. M. (2014)  Internet, phone, mail, and mixed-mode surveys: The tailored design method (4th ed.). Hoboken, N. J.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

my .

molly.

The post Surveys. Again. Still. appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Twilight Tour near Wren

Forestry Events - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 2:39pm
Thursday, July 23, 2015 5:45 PM - 8:00 PM

Join us for a twilight tour at Karen Fleck Harding’s family property near Wren. Wildlife habitat management is the focus on the family’s 230 acre woodland property on the Marys River. Karen (the 2010 Benton Tree Farmer of the Year) will be joined by Jennifer Weikel, ODF Wildlife Biologist, Master Woodland Manager and Small Woodland owner to talk about managing for wildlife. Be prepared for a walk, long pants are recommended, and bring field glasses if desired.

Directions: From Corvallis take Highway 20 to Kings Valley Highway OR 223. Turn right onto 223 and take the first right onto Ritner then right on Wren Rd. Left on Echo Hills Rd. Go approximately 2 miles to the end of the gravel road. Drive slow and watch for oncoming cars.

For those who prefer to carpool from Corvallis, plan on meeting at the Benton Extension office. Be prepared to leave at 5:20

Cascadia earthquake: Finding the sweet spot between fear and action

Breaking Waves - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 11:04am

A recent national news article suggesting that everything in Oregon west of Interstate-5 “would be toast” in a major Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake certainly drew attention to the seismic reality facing the Pacific Northwest.

The concern, though, is that people are focusing on the most draconian or extreme scenarios, experts say, which can lead to a sense of fatalism. The reaction illustrates the state of earthquake and tsunami preparedness – or lack thereof – in the United States, said Patrick Corcoran, Oregon Sea Grant’s Astoria-based coastal hazards specialist, who works with coastal communities on disaster preparedness.

It’s a matter of feast or famine.

“The Cascadia Subduction Zone has shifted from a science project to a social studies project,” Corcoran said. “We need to find a sweet spot between fear and action. What I try to do is temper the tendency of people to toggle between the poles of ‘it won’t happen here’ and ‘it will be so bad that there’s no use worrying about it.’”

(Read the entire story from OSU News & Research Communication to learn how Corcoran and other OSU faculty are working with the state and coastal communities to prepare people, communities and infrastructure for a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake and tsunami).

Learn more

Earthquake and tsunami preparedness material from Oregon Sea Grant:

The post Cascadia earthquake: Finding the sweet spot between fear and action appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Cascadia earthquake: Finding the sweet spot between fear and action

Sea Grant - Thu, 07/23/2015 - 11:04am

A recent national news article suggesting that everything in Oregon west of Interstate-5 “would be toast” in a major Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake certainly drew attention to the seismic reality facing the Pacific Northwest.

The concern, though, is that people are focusing on the most draconian or extreme scenarios, experts say, which can lead to a sense of fatalism. The reaction illustrates the state of earthquake and tsunami preparedness – or lack thereof – in the United States, said Patrick Corcoran, Oregon Sea Grant’s Astoria-based coastal hazards specialist, who works with coastal communities on disaster preparedness.

It’s a matter of feast or famine.

“The Cascadia Subduction Zone has shifted from a science project to a social studies project,” Corcoran said. “We need to find a sweet spot between fear and action. What I try to do is temper the tendency of people to toggle between the poles of ‘it won’t happen here’ and ‘it will be so bad that there’s no use worrying about it.’”

(Read the entire story from OSU News & Research Communication to learn how Corcoran and other OSU faculty are working with the state and coastal communities to prepare people, communities and infrastructure for a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake and tsunami).

Learn more

Earthquake and tsunami preparedness material from Oregon Sea Grant:

The post Cascadia earthquake: Finding the sweet spot between fear and action appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs