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End of Fall Term 2014

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 12/12/2014 - 6:36am
Friday, December 12, 2014 (all day event)

Calving School

Small Farms Events - Fri, 12/12/2014 - 6:36am
Friday, December 12, 2014 12:30 PM - 4:00 PM

This program will consist of presentations, educational videos, and simulated calving assistance.  A handbook will be provided.

Please RSVP to let us know you are coming

For more information or to register please contact Shelby Filley (541)672-4461

shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

Registration fee $25.00 payable at the door in cash or check

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

A Reply to Jeff Gillman's 'Some Thoughts on Extension'

Master Gardener Blog - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 4:25pm
Recently, Jeff Gillman penned a blog post entitled 'Some Thoughts on Extension', where he worked his way through three points.  These were:

  1. Extension is important.
  2. Extension is dying.
  3. Extension cannot be saved unless administrators make fundamental changes in the way things are done.
I have immense respect for Dr. Gillman.  He's a respected scholar, teacher, author and blogger.  He is, in many ways, the type of professional I aspire to be.  That being said, I do disagree with some parts of his post ~ something that he welcomed and invited in the original post.
To provide a context for my perspective, I wanted to briefly go over my professional experience and background.  I came to Extension as an outsider.  I accepted the position as the Statewide Coordinator of the Oregon State University Extension Master Gardener Program in 2007, without truly understanding what Extension was or what the Master Gardener Program was about.  From 2002-2007, I was an Assistant Professor of Biology at Fordham University in New York City, where I studied the ecology of insects in urban and suburban gardens. 
To this day, it amazes me that I was able to land the position at OSU.  I was not a gardener.  I thought that the term 'Master Gardener' was a term used to describe a journeyman union worker ~ like 'Master Electrician' or 'Master Plumber'.  I didn't know what I was walking into.
Perhaps that is why, as a relative outsider with only 8 years of experience in Extension, I view Extension as vital, thriving and innovative.  A cynic by nature, I don't believe that my view is tainted by rose colored glasses.
That being said, I wanted to take on points #2 and #3 from Jeff's post, and provide an alternative view.
Jeff's Point #2:  Extension is dying.  
  • Extension has failed to keep up with current communication trends.  You won't easily find us with internet searches.  Top 'hits' are reserved for retail big box stores and magazines.
  • Extension faculty aren't given credit for gathering and distributing research-based information.  Credit is primarily given for research papers and grant dollars.
My reply:  My position is in urban and community horticulture.  I am under constant pressure to reach as many people as possible and to utilize innovative methods to deliver educational content.   I work hard to make sure that our work in urban and community horticulture, and that our work via the Master Gardener Program, is accessible and apparent online.  I manage 4 websites and 2 social media accounts for the Program.
I don't have a marketing budget.  I don't have experience in marketing.  Heck ~ I don't even have help.  At the Statewide level, I'm a one-woman show.  And, I'm losing the marketing and media game.  The Facebook page I maintain for OSU Extension's Master Gardener Program has 2,932 'likes'.  The Facebook page for Scott's Lawn Care has 319,567 'likes'.
But, what I lack in quantity of interactions, I try my best to make up for with high quality educational exchanges.
On an annual basis, I teach about 30 classes to about 1,000 people.  Small numbers, in the large scheme of things.  But the outcomes of those classes are anything but trivial.  Those who take Master Gardener classes report that they have taken steps to attract beneficial insects into their garden (64%), are more tolerant of spiders in the garden (58%), planted a pest-resistant cultivar (71%), decreased or eliminated pesticide use (68%), disposed of a pesticide at a community hazardous waste removal event (54%), and are more tolerant of insect pests (58%) as a direct result of what they have learned in our classes.  Take that, search engine optimization winners!
Extension changes attitudes and behavior, while stores and companies make sales.  In this way, I don't think that I am competing with commercial retail operations for customers.  So I'm not the most popular kid on the internet (thank goodness!).  The internet will not kill Extension (despite repeated warnings to the contrary), in the same way that the internet has not killed the public library.
That being said, I do want to note that we have worked to reinvent ourselves.  In Oregon, we offer an online Master Gardener training option, as well as many other gardening courses, online.  We work directly with local and regional news outlets to reach the masses with research-based gardening tips. OSU Extension faculty experts have monthly gardening spots on local morning shows.  We blog.  We tweet.  We try to cover as much ground as possible, with the limited resources that we have.  And, I'm pretty proud say that we directly reach over 200,000 people each year, and conservatively estimate that we reach another 550,000 through our online and media outreach efforts.  Small potatoes ~ I'm sure ~ compared to some commercial firms . . . . but our numbers are focused on making a difference, rather than a sale.
Jeff's Point #3:  Extension cannot be saved unless administrators make fundamental changes in the way things are done.
Here, Jeff makes an argument that I hear all too often ~ administrators need to give credit, make promotions, and grant raises based upon the comprehensive portfolio of work done by Extension professionals.  Incentives need to place less weight on research and more weight on outreach.
At Oregon State, I feel that the work I do in the field (public outreach and education) is recognized and valued.  But, there is also the expectation that I will do more than teach the same three general topics, year after year.  I'm expected to innovate, grow and learn ~ and to pass on the information that I acquire to the general public.


And I've really tried to do this.  This word cloud was generated from my public talk titles.  Even though I'm an entomologist who has expertise in IPM, I've aggressively sought out information on pesticides, GMOs, invasive pests and weed control ~ because folks kept asking for more information on these topics.  I've acquired expertise in these areas by reading the scientific literature, participating in research projects, and talking to experts in the field.  
If you're still with me at this point, I know you're dying to know more about my expertise in insect sex.  I give a public lecture on just this very topic, in Portland, in March of 2015.  Catch it if you can.
My experience has been that efforts in public outreach and education are recognized by administrators ~ if you don't rest on your laurels, and continually work to learn and improve.
And, where research is sometimes characterized as a distraction in Extension ~ my experience has been that staying engaged in the research community (by writing grant proposals and research papers, attending and presenting at professional society conferences, taking the time to read the latest research in the scientific journals) makes me better as an Extension professional.  I LOVE it when I learn something new ~ through research or through the literature ~ that I can pass onto Master Gardeners and the general public.  
I 'live tweeted' my way through the Entomological Society of America Meetings  (#EntSoc14), where I also took pages worth of notes.  These latest research findings make their way into my public outreach and education events.
I spent the last two months working on two separate NSF grant proposals (that have a slim chance of getting funded).  But, the time I spent putting the proposals together have been fantastic.  I've had engaging conversations with potential collaborators ~ some of the top experts in urban land use, biodiversity, waste management, life cycle analysis ~ and I've been immersed in the literature on urban ecology and agriculture.  Once again, what I've gained through this time ~ even if the proposals are not funded ~ will make its way into my public outreach and education events.
So yes, my administrators will probably be a lot happier if I land big grants and write heavily cited research papers.  But they also understand what it is that I do, and they do their best to support my efforts.  And for that, I feel very blessed.
Just my two cents.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Sea Grant’s Ruby Moon featured on new OSU coast video

Breaking Waves - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 7:00am

Oregon: The Coast is a new interactive, multimedia application that’s part of Oregon State University’s Beaver Nation campaign, aiming to document how OSU people and programs connect with the state, the nation – and the world beyond. And it features Sea Grant Extension agent Ruby Moon in a feature about buying fresh seafood off the docks from the people who catch it.

“I was nervous,” says Moon, who worked with David Baker of OSU’s Interactive Communications unit this summer to produce her segment. “But they made me look smart.”

Moon works out of the Lincoln County Extension office in Newport on issues related to fisheries, seafood and marine renewable energy.

Check out Oregon: The Coast and the rest of the growing collection of Beaver Nation Is Everywhere multimedia programs at OSU’s Interactive Communications site.

The post Sea Grant’s Ruby Moon featured on new OSU coast video appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Sea Grant’s Ruby Moon featured on new OSU coast video

Sea Grant - Thu, 12/11/2014 - 7:00am

Oregon: The Coast is a new interactive, multimedia application that’s part of Oregon State University’s Beaver Nation campaign, aiming to document how OSU people and programs connect with the state, the nation – and the world beyond. And it features Sea Grant Extension agent Ruby Moon in a feature about buying fresh seafood off the docks from the people who catch it.

“I was nervous,” says Moon, who worked with David Baker of OSU’s Interactive Communications unit this summer to produce her segment. “But they made me look smart.”

Moon works out of the Lincoln County Extension office in Newport on issues related to fisheries, seafood and marine renewable energy.

Check out Oregon: The Coast and the rest of the growing collection of Beaver Nation Is Everywhere multimedia programs at OSU’s Interactive Communications site.

The post Sea Grant’s Ruby Moon featured on new OSU coast video appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

50 years of Oregon Sea Grant film and video

Breaking Waves - Wed, 12/10/2014 - 10:57am

Marine science, resource conservation, community resilience – and a whole lot of gorgeous Oregon coastal scenery: Check out this new compilation by Communications Director Joe Cone of excerpts from some of the many films and videos produced by Oregon Sea Grant since our program’s start in 1971:

http://vimeo.com/112763821

The post 50 years of Oregon Sea Grant film and video appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

50 years of Oregon Sea Grant film and video

Sea Grant - Wed, 12/10/2014 - 10:57am

Marine science, resource conservation, community resilience – and a whole lot of gorgeous Oregon coastal scenery: Check out this new compilation by Communications Director Joe Cone of excerpts from some of the many films and videos produced by Oregon Sea Grant since our program’s start in 1971:

http://vimeo.com/112763821

The post 50 years of Oregon Sea Grant film and video appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Lane County Livestock Association Breakfast Educational Program

Small Farms Events - Wed, 12/10/2014 - 6:35am
Wednesday, December 10, 2014 6:30 AM - 8:00 AM

 

For more information contact Shelby Filley (541) 672-4461  shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Evaluation theory tree

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 4:32pm

Recently, I got a copy of Marvin Alkin’s book, Evaluation Roots (his first edition; eventually, I will get the second edition).

In Chapter Two, he and Tina Christie talk about an evaluation theory tree and presents this idea graphically (all be it in draft form).

Think of your typical tree with three strong branches (no leaves) and two roots. Using this metaphor, the authors explain the development of evaluation theory as it appears in western (read global north) societies.

As you can see, the roots are “accountability and control” (positivist paradigm?) and social inquiry (post-positivist paradigm?).

The branches are labeled “use”, “methods”, and “valuing”. Scattered along those branches are various theorists who were/are significant in evaluation and its development. Some of these theorists have models that I have talked about in previous blogs (Lincoln/Guba, Stake, House, Eisner). Some are known to me and need to be shared here (Cousins, Stufflebeam, Greene, Rossi). Some are unknown to me (MacDonald, Wolf/Owens, Suchman, who have not been invited to contribute). In the first edition, Alkin has invited chapters by most of the folks listed in the tree.

The second edition lists more folks than the first. The metaphor of the tree has also been revised  (see http://www.amazon.com/Evaluation-Roots-Perspective-Theorists-Influences/dp/1412995744#reader_1412995744). It now has leaves, some of which list the theorists,and a third root has been added: epistemology. Alkin says that the valuing branch stems from that root and is divided into objectivist and subjectivist views.

Although I don’t own the 2nd edition (yet), it takes a more global coverage but “…no chapter emerged on development theory in low and middle income countries (LMICs)”. This quote is taken from an article written by Alkin and Fred Carden in the January 2012 issue of Journal of MultiDisciplinary Evaluation (8, 17, 102-118). They suggest “…evaluation analysts…build a more comprehensive knowledge and documentation on development evaluation and more broadly on building the field of evaluation in LMICs.” It would be valuable for the global south to be represented.

The metaphor makes it easy to categorize the various views of evaluation; provides the reader with names to follow; and provides a history of sorts of evaluation. It would be interesting to see what is being done in the world they don’t address. Perhaps there is a novel approach that will be a newly leafed bud by someone who has yet to be named. Then it wouldn’t be a history…it would be contemporary.

 

my.

molly.

(Pee Ess: I’ve been blogging for five years…)

The post Evaluation theory tree appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Linn-Benton Livestock & Forages Breakfast Educational Program

Small Farms Events - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 6:35am
Tuesday, December 9, 2014 6:30 AM - 8:00 AM

 

For more information contact:

Shelby Filley (541)672-4461   shelby.filley@oregonstate.edu

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

WHOLESALE PROFITABILITY FARM TRIP

Small Farms Events - Tue, 12/09/2014 - 6:35am
Monday, December 8, 2014 9:00 AM - Tuesday, December 9, 2014 6:00 PM

10/21 Update: ONLY 5 SPOTS LEFT
This trip is being organized by OSU Extension Small Farms and Thrive. The $25 fee is being used to offset the costs of the presentations, farm tours and van transportation arranged by OSU Extension and Thrive.  Participants are responsible for costs of their own food and lodging. Exception, lunch Tuesday at Persephone Farm is included in the $25 fee.  READ MORE...
Ever wonder if selling wholesale might be a profitable alternative or addition to your farmers market sales? Are you selling some wholesale currently but don't know you're really making money from it? Are you interested in being a solution to the food security issue in our valley? Are you interested in getting contract to grow your crops?

Monday, Dec. 8
9 am  Meet to carpool at the OSU Extension Office, 569 Hanley Rd Central Point. Travel by van to Corvallis
12 pm  lunch (bring a packed lunch)
2-4 pm  Tour Denison Farm, Corvallis
5-7 pm  Wholesale Profitability talk with Tanya Murray, OSU

Tuesday, Dec. 9
10-noon  Tour Persephone Farm
12:30-1:30 pm Lunch at Persephone Farm (provided) and discussion "Bringing It Back Home"

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

2014 State of the Sheep Symposium

Small Farms Events - Sat, 12/06/2014 - 6:35am
Saturday, December 6, 2014 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

 Register at:

http://sheeporegon.com/2014-convention/

 

For more information contact: OSGA (503)364-5462 or Gene Pirelli Professor and Extension Animal Scientist OSU Extension/Department of Animal and Rangeland Sciences Regional Livestock/Forage Specialist

Voice Mail – 503-623-8395  Email – gene.pirelli@oregonstate.edu

 

 

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Personal and Situational Bias-Cognitive Bias by another name?

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 12/05/2014 - 4:35pm

Personal and situational bias are forms of cognitive bias and we all have cognitive bias.

When I did my dissertation on personal and situational biases, I was talking about cognitive bias (only I didn’t know it, then).

According to Wikipedia, the term cognitive bias was introduced in 1972 (I defended my dissertation in 1983) by two psychologists Daniel Kahneman  and Amos Tversky .

Then, I hypothesized that previous research experience (naive or sophisticated)  and the effects of exposure to expected project outcomes (positive, mixed, negative) would affect the participant and make a difference in how the participant would code data. (It did.)  The Sadler article which talked about intuitive data processing was the basis for this inquiry. Now many years later, I am encountering cognitive bias again. Sadler says that “…some biases can be traced to a particular background knowledge…”(or possibly–I think–lack of knowledge), “…prior experience, emotional makeup or world view”. (This, I think, falls under the category of, according to Tversky and Kahneman, human judgements and it will differ from rational choice theory (often given that label).

This is important for evaluators to remember…what you bring to the table does affect you; any assumptions you make because of your experience, world view, and/or perceptions affects you AND the evaluation. One way to help mitigate those assumptions is to make them explicitly clear–put them on the table.

Today, I was in a meeting about diversity. Although the term had been defined previously, there were many new players at the table for whom this term had not been clearly defined. Diversity is more than just the intersection of race and gender. Daryl Smith presents a model addressing this (she presented this model at a presentation at OSU in 2012). The discussion until that point had focused only on race; all the other forms of diversity including gender were not being addressed. Yet to talk about this topic all forms of diversity needed to be considered. Smith’s model included climate, access, success, education, scholarship, outreach, and capacity and they were all listed as “…overarching institutional goals for equity, inclusion, and diversity.” We had not clarified assumptions in this discussion. We were being influenced by personal and situational biases. If this had been an evaluation, there would have been a lot of cognitive dissonance; even not being an evaluation, there was a lot of cognitive dissonance.  We will resolve this dissonance, even if it takes a while.

What I ask of evaluators is to remember that what you have experienced and what you know does affect the evaluation–any evaluation. Evaluations are not free of bias; evaluations can never be bias free. All we can do is try to mitigate the biases.

Citation:

Sadler, D. R. (1981). Intuitive data processing as a potential source of bias in naturalistic evaluations. Educational Evaluation and Policy Analysis 3(4), 25-31.

The post Personal and Situational Bias-Cognitive Bias by another name? appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Mentored Management Planning Shortcourse

Forestry Events - Thu, 12/04/2014 - 2:36pm
Thursday, December 4, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

A written Forest Management Plan serves many purposes.  It helps you organize and plan for activites on your land.  It is a valuable communication tool for your family.  A plan is required for forest certification programs and it forms the foundation for sustainable forest management.  By writing part, or all of your own forest management plan, you gain a better understanding of your land and can potentially save on professional costs.

Writing a plan takes time and an understanding of your property, but the Mentored Management Planning shortcourse will guide you through the process.  In addition to the four class sessions, you will be paired with an experienced "mentor" who will provide one-on-one assistance.

To attend you must pre-rregister no later than October 24.

https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/792

 

 

2014 Land Stewards Program

Forestry Events - Thu, 12/04/2014 - 2:36pm
Thursday, December 4, 2014 1:00 PM - 5:30 PM

The Jackson County OSU Extesnion Service and Jackson Soil and Water Conservation District is please to offer the 2014 Land Steward Program.

This is an 11-week training course - weekly classes will meet at the OSU Extension auditorium, on Thursday afternoon, September 11 - December 4 from 1:00 - 5:30 p.m.. (With a break for the Thanksgiving holiday).

Land Steward training will help local small-acreage landowners learn about ways to create a healthy environment on their property through classroom sessions, field trips and the creation of a personalized management plan for their property, the course is targeting owners who want to learn how to balance sustainability with their rural lifestyle.

Land Stewards will be equipped to design and implement programs to help people:

  • Live safely in wildfire-prone areas
  • Identify and eradicate noxious weeds
  • Promote and develop wildlife habitat
  • Conserve water and reduce runoff
  • Reduce yard waste and wood biomass
  • Make their own mulch and compost
  • Maintain healthy trees and forest

Applications received before August 28th save $25 ($150 per person, or $20 for couples).

Applications received on/after August 29th, subject to standard fee ($175 per person, or $225 for couples).

For application please go to:  http://extension.oregonstate.edu/sorec/sites/default/files/ls_application_course_info_2014.pdf

Webinar - #FactsOverFear: Ebola Preparedness for the Americas

Health & Wellness Events - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 2:37pm
Tuesday, December 2, 2014 7:30 AM - 9:00 AM

Registration required. The Ebola outbreak in West Africa, currently the largest in history, has sparked an international public health response.  We invite you to join the American Public Health Association and the Pan American Health Organization for a webinar panel discussion on this topic featuring opening remarks by Dr. Georges C. Benjamin, executive director of APHA, and Dr. Francisco Becerra, assistant director of PAHO/WHO. Other invited speakers will be announced.

Register

Webinar Objectives:

  •     Describe the history of Ebola and the current outbreak in West Africa.
  •     Evaluate the experiences in disease response from Africa.
  •     Evaluate the experience in handling a suspected case in Brazil.
  •     Discuss the U.S. experience in preparedness and response to imported Ebola.
  •     Describe PAHO/WHO’s strategic approach to preparedness and response for LAC countries.

Twitter Chat
PAHO and APHA will also co-host a Twitter chat during the webinar. Join us as we engage the public in a live conversation and Q&A.  Make sure you are following us on Twitter, @publichealth and @pahowho and using the hashtags #FactsOverFear and #Ebola to participate.

Earn CE Credits
APHA is providing free continuing education credits in conjunction with the webinar.  To obtain continuing education credits, participants must attend the webinar and complete an evaluation online.

President's Winter Coffee

Health & Wellness Events - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 2:37pm
Tuesday, December 2, 2014 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

OSU faculty, staff and students are invited to take a break before finals for holiday treats and gourmet coffee. Join President Ray in celebration and conversation at the Memorial Union Lounge.

We will be taking non-perishable food items or monetary donations to benefit OSU’s Food Pantry. Your donation is appreciated.

Small-Scale & Urban Farming Series

Small Farms Events - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 2:37pm
Tuesday, December 2, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

 For more information, contact the OSU Lane County Extension office at (541)344-5859, or stop by the office at 996 Jefferson Street in Eugene, to pick up an application.

Office hours are Monday-Thursday, 10am-1pm and 2-5pm.

Cost of session is $25.00.  Pre-registration is required.

For payment with a credit card see the website: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/lane/gardens

 

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

November Ice Storm hits Coast Range

Amy Grotta's Tree Topics - Tue, 12/02/2014 - 11:39am
West of Philomath. Image: Liz Cole

By Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties

While most residents of the Willamette Valley and Cascades foothills experienced unseasonably cold temperature in mid November, residents and landowners in the central Coast Range endured a serious ice storm. This was not a region-wide storm, but sure packed a punch in certain areas, with some people saying the damage caused may be as bad as or worse than that caused by the infamous Columbus Day Storm. I have not heard of any additional damage from a freezing rain event on December 1.

The main area affected is centered around Blodgett and Burnt Woods, stretching north through Kings Valley into Polk County and south to the flanks of Marys Peak. The McDonald Forest was shut down for nearly a week due to falling ice, limbs and whole trees, closing roads throughout the research forest and creating hazards to workers and recreationists. Crews and equipment are working to reopen forest roads throughout the area.

Ouch.
Image: Liz Cole

Ice ½ to ¾ inch thick brought down branches, broke out tops and uprooted whole trees in rural residential as well as forested areas. Although damage was irregular and uneven, stands of all types and age classes were affected. An aerial survey by the Oregon Department of Forestry indicated that roughly 6,600 acres of significant damage (less the 10% of trees damaged to over 30% of trees damaged), although I have seen some stands where over half the trees were damaged.   Damage seemed worse in draws dominated by hardwoods. Here is a map of the storm damage distribution.

Of course, we have been here before, at least to some degree. Wind and snow storms come through from time to time knocking things down and making a mess. This creates hazards for people and ruins or reduces the value of damaged trees and stands, and may cause forest health issues such as rot or beetle outbreaks down the road. Downed wood can serve as a nursery for beetles if abundant and large enough which may then lead to damage to healthy trees, and broken tops and other wounds may lead to heart rots. The ODF has just released a good discussion of possible effects on forest health following the November 2014 storm, including some guidelines on actions.

Near Burnt Woods

But right now, many people will focus their efforts on cleanup. The Oregon Department of Forestry also developed a webpage a couple years back about dealing with storm damage  that is aimed mostly at residential situations, but it may be worth a look. It includes links to other articles such as “tree first aid after a storm”

Be sure to be extra vigilant whenever you are doing anything in the woods after a storm since it can create an abundance of hazards including loose tops or branches hung up overhead, kick back-inducing tangles of branches, or spring-loaded limbs and trunks on the ground. If cleaning up, please review saw safety, wear all recommended safety gear and use all caution. Caution should include prudent assessment of the situation and of your own skills and ability. And as we say in the advice business, “be sure to seek professional help” when needed. Although I doubt Ann Landers was ever referring to loggers, it is nonetheless sound advice.

Image: Liz Cole

The post November Ice Storm hits Coast Range appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Nano-cellulose Based InnofreshTM Coatings for Preserving Pre- and Post-harvest Fruit Quality

Food Events - Mon, 12/01/2014 - 2:38pm
Monday, December 1, 2014 3:30 PM - 4:30 PM
Fall 2014 Faculty Seminar Schedule, Dept. of Food Science & Technology

Presenter: Yanyun Zhao, Professor