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GridIron Chef and 5k Fun Run

Health & Wellness Events - Sat, 11/19/2016 - 2:34pm
Saturday, November 19, 2016 9:30 AM - 2:00 PM

What goes together like peas and carrots?

Football and food, of course!

Oregon State University's College of Public Health and Human Sciences and the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health invite you to the fourth annual GridIron Chef Contest and 5k Fun Run. 

Our football-themed obstacle course begins at the Women's Building on OSU's campus and ends with a touchdown back at the Women's Building for the College Tailgate. Enjoy food, drinks, adult beverages and samples of the GridIron Chef finalists' recipes, and then vote for your favorite!

Before the Oregon State vs. University of Arizona game, join us outside Reser Stadium to taste the winning recipe.

Kids' Challenge – 9:30 a.m.

5k Challenge – 9:45 a.m. 

College Tailgate – 10:15 a.m. 

Find more information and register here. 

Hoptopia: A World of Agriculture and Beer in Oregon's Willamette Valley.

Food Events - Fri, 11/18/2016 - 2:37pm
Friday, November 18, 2016 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Public talk by Dr. Peter Kopp, Assistant Professor of History at New Mexico State University and author of his new book Hoptopia: A World of Agriculture and Beer in Oregon's Willamette Valley.   The contents of your pint glass have a much richer history than you could have imagined. Through the story of the hop, Hoptopia connects twenty-first century beer drinkers to lands and histories that have been forgotten in an era of industrial food production. The craft beer revolution of the late twentieth century is a remarkable global history that converged in the agricultural landscapes of Oregon’s Willamette Valley. The common hop, a plant native to Eurasia, arrived to the Pacific Northwest only in the nineteenth century, but has thrived within the region’s environmental conditions so much that by the first half of the twentieth century, the Willamette Valley claimed the title “Hop Center of the World.” Hoptopia integrates an interdisciplinary history of environment, culture, economy, labor, and science through the story of the most indispensable ingredient in beer.   Friday, November 18th 1:00-3:00 at the OSU library in Corvallis. Dr. Kopp will be talking about his book, as well as the rich history of hops/beer research and the impact of the Oregon Hops and Brewing Archives at OSU.https://www.facebook.com/events/882746235160283/   Questions? Please contact Tiah Edmunson-Morton, Director of OSU’s Oregon Hops & Brewing Archives, edmunsot@oregonstate.edu.

CPHHS Research Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 11/18/2016 - 2:37pm
Friday, November 18, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
The Kaiser Permanente (KP) Research Bank is a nationwide research bank that facilitates studies related to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease. KP makes this resource—including samples and data—available to scientists who apply to use the information for genetic, epidemiological, and other scientific research. This long-term research program is designed to help scientists understand how people’s health is affected by their genes, behaviors, and the environment.

Dr. Sheila Weinmann is an epidemiologist whose research focuses on cancer etiology, screening, and progression, with particular emphasis on molecular epidemiology. Her interests also include pharmacoepidemiology and infectious disease epidemiology. She has over 20 years’ experience leading cohort and case-control epidemiologic studies and is presently the principal investigator of a grant to study molecular factors in relation to breast cancer recurrence in women on tamoxifen therapy. Dr. Weinmann has also been the principal investigator on epidemiologic studies of prostate cancer screening efficacy, molecular and other factors in relation to prostate cancer mortality after prostatectomy, statin use in relation to breast and prostate cancer recurrence, renal cell cancer risk factors, the molecular biology of renal cell cancer progression, and pregnancy outcomes after surgical treatment for cervical dysplasia.

Meredith Vandermeer is Research Associate in the Center for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente NW. She serves as Project Director for the CERTs Scientific Forum, a science forum supporting the Centers for Education and Research on Therapeutics, a national program funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) that conducts and disseminates research on drug and biologic effectiveness and safety.

This research seminar is Co-Sponsored by the College Research Office; the Hallie Ford Center; the Center for Healthy Aging; the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods Nutrition and Preventive Health; and the Center for Global Health. The seminar series provides a forum for faculty in the College of Public Health & Human Sciences and other researcher to present and discuss current research in public health and human sciences in an environment conducive to stimulating research collaboration and fostering student learning. Faculty and students from the Division of Health Sciences and other colleges, research centers and institutions are encouraged to participate

Ripples Upon Ripples

Terra - Fri, 11/18/2016 - 11:12am

By Rachel Robertson

Out on the ocean, a wave-energy converter heaves, rocks and pitches to the motion of the waves. How the converter interacts with the water to generate power is at the core of creating devices that can be commercially viable. And it has been a missing piece of information for wave-energy simulation tools — until now.

Researchers in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Oregon State University recently completed a year-long experimental testing project at the O.H. Hinsdale Wave Laboratory to do just that. The research was part of a $4.5 million effort initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy for Sandia National Laboratories and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to create a simulation software tool to advance wave energy research.

“Wave energy is a nascent technology — there’s a long way to go before we have utility-scale deployments of wave farms like you see with wind and solar,” said Kelley Ruehl, co-principal investigator from Sandia National Laboratories and an Oregon State alumnus in mechanical engineering. She was co-advised by Professor Bob Paasch (mechanical engineering) and Ted Brekken (electrical and computer engineering).

“Using simulations is an inexpensive way of evaluating the performance of different devices in comparison to one another or in testing out design changes. So having a good simulation tool is a critical step in design optimization,” she said.

Although other simulation tools exist, they are proprietary and not designed specifically for wave energy converters. The open-source code that the team developed is called WEC-Sim (for wave energy converter simulator).

“The intent of having an open-source code project was to have a tool that users can add features to themselves,” Ruehl said.

And so they have. The code was initially released in 2014, and in the first year there were only a handful of users. But Ruehl said over the last year there has been widespread adoption of the code. Programmers have been actively incorporating user modifications.

Last year the project moved to the experimental testing phase, which is when Oregon State entered the picture. “When we were looking at different test facilities, Oregon State, with its expertise in wave energy and the facilities at Hinsdale, was the obvious choice,” said Ruehl, who headed up the testing.

The Oregon State team involved with tank testing and data collection of the scale model (1/33 size of a full wave energy converter) included Asher Simmons and Ratanak So, graduate students in electrical and computer engineering. They were advised by Professor Ted Broken. Another collaborator, Bret Bosma, was a post-doc at the time and is now a faculty research associate.

Testing with an actual wave-energy converter was critical. Its structure is more complicated than that of other ocean vessels. Data from boats interacting with water are available, but the information is insufficient because wave-energy converters have two or more rigid bodies that interact in close proximity. In turn, that leads to more complicated interactions with the water.

“If you are standing in a lake, and you throw a rock as far out as you can, by the time the ripples get to your legs they’re hardly anything. But if you drop a rock right next to you, the ripples hit your leg and cause more ripples. It is the interaction causing more ripples that we don’t understand,” Simmons said.

Sensors on the body of the device and in the tank contributed to 62 total data signals, including measurements of force, position and the height of the waves. The system included a new use of a sensor — a pressure mat — located on the flaps of the device. It generates a field of pressure measurements that engineers could use to create a map of the wave impact on the flap.

Because the device was so highly instrumented, Simmons used the opportunity for a side project to determine the most efficient use of sensors. Some of the sensors have price tags that are out of reach for developers of wave-energy devices in the early stages of testing. So his research will help inform researchers about which sensors are critical to collecting good data, where the sensors would be best placed and how to correct the data if they are using non-optimal sensors.

“We really need this,” said Simmons, explaining that developers often don’t have the funds to properly test power take-off until far too late in the process, creating products that are not commercially viable. “My hope is that developers can use this information much earlier to get a better feel for how much power they will be able to extract,” he said.

The data from the testing phase will be publicly available through the WEC-Sim website and it will also be used to validate the WEC-Sim software.

For the researchers at Oregon State, the project was a great opportunity to be part of a collaborative effort to advance wave-energy technology. In addition to the two national labs and Oregon State, a local engineering firm (Andrews-Cooper) and a Spanish company (+D), collaborated on the project.

“I like physical modeling and working on real engineering problems, and wave energy is an extremely challenging one,” Bret Bosma said. “This was a very complicated system with a lot of sensors and a lot of data, and so it was a really nice platform to work on.”

The post Ripples Upon Ripples appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Center for Global Health Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Thu, 11/17/2016 - 2:39pm
Thursday, November 17, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

The College of Public Health and Human Sciences' Center for Global Health is pleased to have Dr. Stephanie Grutzmacher discuss her ongoing collaboration with Debre Berhan University in Ethiopia, working on projects related to food security and nutrition. Her talk will describe opportunities for field work and internships, while sharing insight into the development of long-term global partnerships for improved community wellbeing.

 

Please RSVP to cfgh@oregonstate.edu 

Master Woodland Manager Course

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/17/2016 - 2:39pm
Thursday, November 17, 2016 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Do you want to make sure your forest is resilient to fire, pests or diseases?  Are you interested in how your land can better suit wildlife, timber production, or recreation? Would you like to make sure your roads are well-built, and know that you filed your taxes correctly? The Master Woodland Manager (MWM) program shows you how to “read” your woodland by understanding local ecological factors as well as how to conduct assessments to determine where your woodland is heading as it grows and matures. You will learn how various management activities can help you meet your long term vision for the property.   This is the flagship course of the OSU Extension Forestry program.  MWM volunteers represent a 20 year legacy, and include a wide array of people and woodlands throughout Oregon. Whether you own 5 or 1,000 acres, the MWM program will help you gain skills for tending your woodland and provide opportunities to share your passion for stewardship.  View the Master Woodland Manager application/registration brochure.

Your Legacy, Your Land

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/17/2016 - 2:39pm
Thursday, November 17, 2016 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Join us for our monthly Your Legacy, Your Land Webinars.  We are partnering with OSU and their Ties to the Land program to connect you with experts as you work through your plans.  On the fourth Thursday of every month at 11 pm (PST), we will discuss a different topic associated with your legacy plan, from setting goals to communicating with your family to understanding the different estate planning tools.   Register for each webinar: http://mylandplan.org/content/your-legacy-your-land-monthly-webinar-series

Plant Propagation Class

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/17/2016 - 2:39pm
Thursday, November 17, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Would you like to learn how to propagate native plants for your forest or landscape? Native plants support the local wildlife habitat, and are low maintenance when planted in the proper place. If you have a natural area that needs to be restored, or are just interested in putting more natives into your home garden, farm or woodlot, then propagating your own can be very rewarding and save you money to boot!

Clackamas Community College’s fall term Plant Propagation class will emphasize native plants this year, and is designed to give you hands-on experience reproducing a variety of plants from seeds and cuttings. There is also an online component where you will get more of the background on how and why plants are propagated the way that they are.

The class is offered by the Horticulture Department at Clackamas Community College on the Oregon City campus Thursday evenings from 6:30-8:30 pm, September 29 - December 8, 2016, taught by Jen Gorski.

CANCELED | Cultivating OSU Connections

Health & Wellness Events - Thu, 11/17/2016 - 2:39pm
Thursday, November 17, 2016 12:00 AM

This event has been canceled and will be rescheduled for a later date.  Sorry for any inconvenience.

Make meaningful connections from the comfort of your computer, smart phone or tablet. Chat with fellow College of Public Health and Human Sciences alumni and current students using our innovative online networking platform. Never used a virtual platform to network before? Here's a demo to show you how it works.

Save the Date
Thursday, Nov. 17
Time TBD

Online

Free

Details and registration information will be available here in late October.

Center for Global Health Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Thu, 11/17/2016 - 6:10am
Thursday, November 17, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM
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The College of Public Health and Human Sciences' Center for Global Health is pleased to have Dr. Stephanie Grutzmacher discuss her ongoing collaboration with Debre Berhan University in Ethiopia, working on projects related to food security and nutrition. Her talk will describe opportunities for field work and internships, while sharing insight into the development of long-term global partnerships for improved community wellbeing.

 

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Please RSVP to cfgh@oregonstate.edu

2016 OSU Extension Land Steward Training

Forestry Events - Wed, 11/16/2016 - 2:35pm
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Visit our website for details and registration here.

·        -Have land but not sure how to take care of it? 

·        -Need a plan for your property? 

·        -New to the area?

·        -Thinking of purchasing land?

The award winning Land Stewards training helps local small-acreage landowners learn about ways to create a healthy environment on their property.  The program incorporates weekly field classes, presentations from natural resource professionals, and the creation of a personalized management plan. This program is great for land owners who want to learn or enhance or develop land management skills as a part of their rural lifestyles. 

The 11-week training covers topics such as wildfire risk reduction, woodland and forest management, natural vegetation and wildlife, rivers and stream ecosystems, pasture management, soils and organic waste, small acreage systems and infrastructure, economics and enterprise on your land, stewardship planning and much more!

Weekly classes will meet at OSU Extension at 569 Hanley Road, Central Point

Wednesday afternoons, September 7th – November 16; 12:00-5:00pm

Reading your Land's Capacity for Adaptation in a Changing Climate

Forestry Events - Mon, 11/14/2016 - 2:36pm
Monday, November 14, 2016 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

This is the first of three talks on the impacts of, and adaptive strategies for climate change on southern Oregon forests. We will explore the changes that are predicted to occur in this area, how local professionals are updating their forest management strategies in light of these changes, and potential future adaptive strategies.

Please RSVP

Hopkins Community Forest Day

Forestry Events - Sat, 11/12/2016 - 2:36pm
Saturday, November 12, 2016 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM

Hopkins invites you for a WORK DAY, Lunch, and sometime in the Great Outdoors on Saturday, November 12th, 8:30am-2:30pm.  Join us for the WORK DAY at Hopkins Demonstration Forest 16750 South Brockway Road, Oregon City. http://www.demonstrationforest.org.

Projects and Events

·         Prepare for the Wet and Cold

We are going to start on some basics to prep the facilities and buildings for the coming wet and cold weather.

·         Parking Lot Maintenance

Address some erosion concerns to avoid potential problems down the road is the plan.

·         Graveling Trail in Native Plant Garden

Before we get too far into the wet season we are going to clean up and trails in the Native Plant Garden.

LEARN BY DOING—IT’S THE HOPKINS WAY WE MANAGE OUR FOREST!

Lunch is provided @ 12:30pm

At 12:30, lunch will be provided in Hopkins Hall.

Let us know if you are coming

Please contact Jean at the Extension office to let us know you are coming at 503-655-8631 or jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu.  If you need more information contact: Peter Matzka, Hopkins Forest Educator at 503-884-6202 or peter.matzka@oregonstate.edu.

Pest Scene Investigator

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/10/2016 - 2:34pm
Thursday, November 10, 2016 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

For all woodland owners. Join us for a morning of learning from forest health experts about recent forest health issues in Clackamas County, such as western redcedar and Douglas-fir mortality, and how to manage these issues. Join us after the tour for lunch in Everett Hall to celebrate and share Master Woodland Manager activities and stories.
Dress for a day out in the woods. MWM’s can apply skills learned to their service.

Free but RSVP, space is limited.

Please see full details at http://extension.oregonstate.edu/clackamas/forestry

 

Portland | CPHHS Happy Hour

Health & Wellness Events - Thu, 11/10/2016 - 2:34pm
Thursday, November 10, 2016 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM
Get to know fellow alumni and friends of the College of Public Health and Human Sciences (CPHHS) at this casual happy hour. Find out the latest college news from Kathryn Stroppel, Director of Marketing and Communications, and Veronica Royce, College Alumni Relations Director. Need a new travel mug or tote bag? There will be drawings for cool swag to help you show off your college pride.

Appetizers are on us! No-host, cash bar is available.

Thursday, Nov. 10
4:30 - 6:30 p.m.

Portland Prime
121 SW 3rd Avenue
Portland, OR 97204

Free

Pre-registration via our Facebook event is appreciated, but walkups are accepted.

Logs to Lumber to Living: A Cabin in the Woods

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/10/2016 - 2:34pm
Thursday, November 10, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

What’s better than woodland ownership? How about living there? Or at least the opportunity for a secluded weekend. Whether it’s pride of ownership, a primary residence or second home, utilization of resources, or resale value, building on your respective woodlands consists of a number of things you need to consider. Among those are: permits, material costs (portable mills versus big box stores), design features, amenities (water, septic, electricity), optional accessories (ponds, docks, decks, firepits …. make it your own), and access/liability (roads, gates, fire, safety features). We’ll also show you a start-to-finish cabin project that was recently completed, including information on materials, costs and added amenities. This is a new program offering by Steve Bowers, OSU Forestry and Natural Resources Extension Forester, so we hope to see you there!

 

Plant Propagation Class

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/10/2016 - 2:34pm
Thursday, November 10, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Would you like to learn how to propagate native plants for your forest or landscape? Native plants support the local wildlife habitat, and are low maintenance when planted in the proper place. If you have a natural area that needs to be restored, or are just interested in putting more natives into your home garden, farm or woodlot, then propagating your own can be very rewarding and save you money to boot!

Clackamas Community College’s fall term Plant Propagation class will emphasize native plants this year, and is designed to give you hands-on experience reproducing a variety of plants from seeds and cuttings. There is also an online component where you will get more of the background on how and why plants are propagated the way that they are.

The class is offered by the Horticulture Department at Clackamas Community College on the Oregon City campus Thursday evenings from 6:30-8:30 pm, September 29 - December 8, 2016, taught by Jen Gorski.

Trustworthiness

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Thu, 11/10/2016 - 2:29pm

Trustworthiness. An interesting topic.

Today is November 9, 2016. An auspicious day, to be sure. (No, I’m not going to rant about November 8, 2016; just post this and move on with my living.) Keep in mind trustworthiness, I remind myself.

I had the interesting opportunity to review a paper recently that talked about trustworthiness. This caused me much thought as I was troubled by what was written. I decided to go to my source on “Naturalistic Inquiry” . Given that the paper used a qualitative design, employed a case study method, and talked about trustworthiness, I wanted to find out more. This book was written by two of my long time evaluation guides, Yvonna Lincoln and Egon Guba. (Lincoln’s name may be familiar to you from the Sage Handbook of Qualitative Research which she co-edited with Norman Denzin.)

Trustworthiness

On page 218, they talk about trustworthiness. About the conventional criteria for trustworthiness (internal validity, external validity, reliability, and objectivity). They talk about the questions underlying those criteria (see page 218).

They talk about how the criteria formulated by conventional inquirers are not appropriate for naturalistic inquiry. Guba (1981a) offers four new terms as they have “…a better fit with naturalistic epistemology.” These four terms and the terms they propose to replace are:

  1. credibility (rather than internal validity);
  2. transferability (rather than external validity);
  3. dependability (rather than reliability);
  4. confirmability (rather than objectivity).

They refer the reader to Chapter 11 (which begins on page 289 of the above mentioned book [also cited below]).

Guba (1981) proposed “…certain operational techniques that a naturalist can use to establish credibility, transferability, dependability, and confirmability.”

He (Guba, 1981) specifically talks about “…prolonged engagement and persistent observations, triangulation, peer debriefing, negative case analysis, and member checking…thick description…auditing…and confirmability.”

my .

molly.

 

Resources

Guba, E. G. (1981). Criteria for assessing trustworthiness of naturalistic inquiries. Educational Communication and Technology Journal, 29, 75-92.

Lincoln, Y. S. & Guba, E. G. (1985). Naturalistic Inquiry. Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications.

The post Trustworthiness appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Public Health Club mental health discussion

Health & Wellness Events - Wed, 11/09/2016 - 2:35pm
Wednesday, November 9, 2016 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Join Public Health Club in a discussion on mental health: anxiety, depression, suicidal thoughts, resources and coping strategies.

Will include: music, free dance and yoga lessons and dogs.

Bangalore info session and movie night

Health & Wellness Events - Wed, 11/09/2016 - 2:35pm
Wednesday, November 9, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:45 PM

Meet Jonathan Garcia, assistant professor of global health, and learn more about this faculty-led program in India.

Watch “Born into Brothels,” a riveting film about the children of sex workers in Calcutta, and connect via Skype for a conversation with Angela Chaudhuri, director of the SWASTI NGO. 

OSU students who participate in the program will work in collaboration with the SWASTI: Health Resource Centre. 

The College of Public Health and Human Sciences’ partnership with SWASTI will help facilitate student experiences including:

• Coursework on public health and research & scholarship

• Excursions to communities in and around Bangalore for experiential learning

• Integration of classroom learning with hands-on community-based activities

• Living at Green Path Guest House, a safe and modern building closely located to SWASTI