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Produce Safety Alliance Grower Training Course - MEDFORD

Small Farms Events - 3 hours 25 min ago
Tuesday, November 7, 2017 (all day event)

Registration cost: $25, includes PSA Grower Training manual; Certificate of Completion, morning coffee and refreshments, and lunch

Registration is required. Register by Oct. 31, 2017on-line at:  PSA Grower Training

Location:
RCC/SOU Higher Education Center
Presentation Hall
101 South Bartlett Street
Medford, OR 97501

Questions? Contact Sara Runkel: 541-672-4461 , sara.runkel@oregonstate.edu or Sue Davis: 503-807-5864, sdavis@oda.state.or.us

Who Should Attend

Fruit and vegetable growers and others interested in learning about produce safety, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) Produce Safety Rule, Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs), and co-management of natural resources and food safety. The PSA Grower Training Course is one way to satisfy the FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirement outlined in § 112.22(c) that requires ‘At least one supervisor or responsible party for your farm must have successfully completed food safety training at least equivalent to that received under standardized curriculum recognized as adequate by the Food and Drug Administration.’


What to Expect at the PSA Grower Training Course

The trainers will spend approximately seven hours of instruction time covering content contained in these seven modules:

  • Introduction to Produce Safety

  • Worker Health, Hygiene, and Training

  • Soil Amendments

  • Wildlife, Domesticated Animals, and Land Use

  • Agricultural Water (Part I: Production Water; Part II: Postharvest Water)

  • Postharvest Handling and Sanitation

  • How to Develop a Farm Food Safety Plan

In addition to learning about produce safety best practices, key parts of the FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirements are outlined within each module. There will be time for questions and discussion, so participants should come prepared to share their experiences and produce safety questions.


Benefits of Attending the Course

The course will provide a foundation of Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) and co-management information, FSMA Produce Safety Rule requirements, and details on how to develop a farm food safety plan. Individuals who participate in this course are expected to gain a basic understanding of:

  • Microorganisms relevant to produce safety and where they may be found on the farm

  • How to identify microbial risks, practices that reduce risks, and how to begin implementing produce safety practices on the farm

  • Parts of a farm food safety plan and how to begin writing one

  • Requirements in the FSMA Produce Safety Rule and how to meet them.

After attending the entire course, participants will be eligible to receive a certificate from the Association of Food and Drug Officials (AFDO) that verifies they have completed the training course. To receive an AFDO certificate, a participant must be present for the entire training and submit the appropriate paperwork to their trainer at the end of the course.

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - 3 hours 25 min ago
Thursday, November 2, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Weed Management

Learn about management strategies for common weeds on your land.  Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - 3 hours 25 min ago
Thursday, October 26, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Pasture & Grazing Management

Make the most of your pasture by learning how grass plants grow, rotational grazing, nutrient and winter-time management. Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - 3 hours 25 min ago
Thursday, October 19, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Woodlands and Wildlife

Look at the woodlands and natural areas on your property and consider options to enhance and manage for healthy trees and wildlife habitat.  Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

BCMGA Board Meeting

Gardening Events - 11 hours 58 min ago
Monday, October 2, 2017 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Benton County Master Gardener board meeting

CC Master Gardener Board Meeting

Gardening Events - 11 hours 58 min ago
Thursday, October 5, 2017 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Mason Bee Cocoon Cleaning Workshops with OSU Linn County Extension

Gardening Events - 11 hours 58 min ago
Thursday, October 19, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Learn how to harvest, clean and store your Mason Bee cocoons. Bring your mason bee boxes, tubes and cocoons. Didn't get any Mason Bees this year? Feel free to come anyways and you can help process cocoons from some of the "super sites". These classes are taught by pollinator extraordinaires within our Linn County Master Gardener group.

 Sign-up here

Mason Bee Cocoon Cleaning Workshops with OSU Linn County Extension

Gardening Events - 11 hours 58 min ago
Saturday, October 21, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Learn how to harvest, clean and store your Mason Bee cocoons. Bring your mason bee boxes, tubes and cocoons. Didn't get any Mason Bees this year? Feel free to come anyways and you can help process cocoons from some of the "super sites". These classes are taught by pollinator extraordinaires within our Linn County Master Gardener group.

Sign-up here

Mason Bee Cocoon Cleaning Workshops with OSU Linn County Extension

Gardening Events - 11 hours 58 min ago
Saturday, October 28, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Learn how to harvest, clean and store your Mason Bee cocoons. Bring your mason bee boxes, tubes and cocoons. Didn't get any Mason Bees this year? Feel free to come anyways and you can help process cocoons from some of the "super sites". These classes are taught by pollinator extraordinaires within our Linn County Master Gardener group.

Sign-up here

CBEE Fall 2017 Career Reception

Environment Events - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Come to the CBEE Fall Career Reception, held on the evening before the OSU Engineering Career Fair, to learn more about engineering careers, plus current entry-level and internship opportunities! This event is free and open to all CBEE students. The evening's schedule of events includes:

  • Career Insights Program – information about current opportunities and career paths at the participating companies
  • Networking Reception – an opportunity to meet with companies that interest you 
More info: http://cbee.oregonstate.edu/reception-student-info

2017 OSU Land Steward Training

Forestry Events - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, October 17, 2017 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Early Bird Registration before Aug. 1 save $50:   Register online here
Registration Deadline Aug. 15; Cost Full Registration price: $200 individual, $275 Couple.

For more information visit The Land Steward Web Page or call 541-776-7371

Apply today to participate in this fun and informative, field-based educational program that helps landowners learn what they have, decide how to manage it, and make a plan to get there. The program is based out of the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, 569 Hanley Road, Central Point.

 
The Land Steward Program, is an 11-week field-based course.  It is designed to help landowners, from small plots to large acreage, develop a management plan to accomplish their goals.
 
The program covers a full spectrum of land management considerations, from forests to farms, soils, water, pasture management, fire awareness, wildlife, economics and connection to resources that help landowners implement their plans.  Participants receive handouts, references, resources, professional presentations and site visits to bring the learning alive!

Oregon Season Tracker: An OSU Extension Citizen Science Program

Forestry Events - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, October 17, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

As a citizen scientist volunteer you will gather scientific data on precipitation and seasonal plant changes (phenology) at your home, woodland, farm, ranch or school to share with other observers and research partners statewide. Do you like the outdoors and like the idea of contributing to science research? If so, join us and become an OST citizen scientist volunteer!

Information and Registration

Advanced Poultry Feeding

Small Farms Events - Tue, 10/17/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, October 17, 2017 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
Advanced poultry feeding for small-scale commercial flocks.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Practical, Low-Cost Grazing Management

Small Farms Events - Mon, 10/16/2017 - 2:38pm
Monday, October 16, 2017 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Learn the basics of managing your pastures, not through costly inputs but by controlling your livestock to maximize plant health and growth. Learn about the factors that determine paddock size and fence location, temporary water systems and more.  If you have one, bring a large laminated map of your property and dry-erase markers to begin planning your fence locations.  Instructors: Gordon Jones, OSU Extension General Ag Faculty and Angela Boudro, Boudro Enterprises

Register on line: http://bit.ly/JacksonSmallFarms  or call 541-776-7371

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Tree ID and Nature Journaling Workshop

Forestry Events - Sat, 10/14/2017 - 2:34pm
Saturday, October 14, 2017 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

This day-long course is ideal for anyone who is interested in learning to identify native tree species and exploring ways to record information in the world around us. It’s a great course for anyone who is looking for new ways to gain a more detailed, comprehensive, and systematic perspective on the ecosystems they interact with, whether they be farms, forests, ranches, gardens, or wildlands … Really, the sky is the limit. We will use the tree identification portion of the class to begin developing observational and recording skills. Different methods and techniques of collecting and recording information will be discussed and demonstrated. Instruction on basic natural history illustration techniques will also be presented. There will be a practical field portion to the class where students can implement techniques and ideas.

Pencils, paper and resource materials will be provided. Students are encouraged to bring any additional art supplies they may want to use.


Lunch will be provided.
Course is $35 per person
Pre-Registration required: online at http://extension.oregonstate.edu/coos/tree-id-nature-journaling or by calling our office at 541-572-5263

Ties to the Land - Lane County

Forestry Events - Sat, 10/14/2017 - 2:34pm
Saturday, October 14, 2017 9:00 AM - 12:30 PM

Secure the future of your woods at the upcoming Ties to the Land workshop hosted by OSU Extension, EWEB, and McKenzie River Trust. Participants will learn skills to preserve their family lands and with each generation involve more family members in the ownership and operation of their small woodland or farm-based businesses. The workshop's mix of presentations and practical exercises will focus on developing a shared vision and passion for the land, keeping the land in the family, and identifying and addressing the challenges facing family business.

Topics Included:

·Developing a shared vision and passion for the land

·Keeping the land in the family -maintaining generational ties

·Identifying and addressing challenges facing family business

Information and Registration

Uncovering burden of dementia in Lebanon: What next?

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 2:36pm
Friday, October 13, 2017 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM

"Uncovering burden of dementia in Lebanon: What next?" Monique Chaaya, DrPH, is a Professor of Epidemiology in the Faculty of Health Sciences, American University of Beirut, Lebanon.

Dr. Chaaya’s research interests focus on mental health and tobacco control. She has conducted cross-sectional and longitudinal studies on the mental health of vulnerable populations including pregnant women, prisoners of war, and displaced and older adults in underprivileged communities. She has also validated in Arabic five mental health scales such as the Arabic Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS), the Arabic Perceived Stress Scale, and A-RUDAS (Rowland Universal Dementia Assessment Scale).

Her interest in mental health of older adults began in 2000 when she joined a multidisciplinary Urban Health Research Group and served as a co-investigator on a comprehensive survey examining the health of disadvantaged older persons. In 2011 she received an NIH R21 grant to study the prevalence of dementia in Lebanon, in collaboration with international researchers from Denmark and the UK. Building on the NIH grant, she developed a cohort study on dementia (COLDS) funded by the Lebanese National Council for Scientific Research.

The focus of this study is to determine the incidence of dementia and other health outcome including mortality, hospitalization and institutionalization

She received her DrPH from the Department of Mental Health at John Hopkins School of Public Health. She served for 6 years as the chair of the Epidemiology and Population Health Department and played a major role in developing the proposal for a PhD in Epidemiology program, and revising the MPH and MS programs in Epidemiology and Population Health.  For the last 6 years, she has been involved in coordinating a training program at King Abdullah International Medical Research Center (KAIMRC) and other academic units at the King Saud Abdul-Aziz University for Health Sciences (KSAU-HS) to build research capacity of junior medical’/clinical researchers at KAIMRC.

The college-wide research seminar is Co-Sponsored by the College Research Office; the Hallie Ford Center; the Center for Healthy Aging; the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health; and the Center for Global Health. The seminar series provides a forum for faculty in the College of Public Health & Human Sciences and other researchers to present and discuss current research topics in an environment conducive to stimulating research collaboration and fostering student learning. Faculty and students from the Division of Health Sciences and other colleges, research centers and institutions are encouraged to participate.

We also encourage you to attend this Friday’s Music A La Carte: “OSU Music Faculty Showcase” to enjoy a Friday with both Art & Science! This free, lunch-hour concert series has been a tradition at Oregon State University since 1969 and features a variety of OSU music ensembles, faculty and student musicians, as well as regional, national and international guest artists. The concerts take place in the beautiful Memorial Union Lounge, beginning at 12 pm and lasting for approximately 45 minutes.

Information Session: Human Research Protection Program

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 2:36pm
Friday, October 13, 2017 3:00 PM - 4:00 PM

Information Session with CPHHS Graduate Students about the Human Research Protection Program at OSU on Friday, October 13 from 3-4pm in HFC115.

Lisa Leventhal will present (Human Research Protection Program (HRPP) Administrator, Office of Research Integrity) and a Q&A session will follow.

Any questions can be directed to Deanne.Hudson@oregonstate.edu

UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles

Breaking Waves - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 10:21am

10/13/17

By Tiffany Woods

A study led by a University of Oregon marine biologist has moved the seafood industry one step closer to farming gooseneck barnacles, which are a pricey delicacy in Spain and a common sight on the West Coast.

Gooseneck barnacles grow on top of adult thatched barnacles. (Photo by Julia Bingham)

Funded by Oregon Sea Grant, researchers found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab grew at rates comparable to those of their counterparts in the wild.

Led by Alan Shanks, a professor with the UO’s Charleston-based Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB), the researchers glued juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside 12 plastic tubes that were about twice the height and diameter of a can of tennis balls. Unfiltered seawater was pumped in, vigorously aerated and allowed to overflow. After a week, the barnacles began secreting their own cement.

Twice a day for eight weeks, the researchers fed the barnacles either micro-algal paste or brine shrimp eggs; a third group of barnacles was not fed anything but was left to filter food out of the seawater. Once a week the researchers measured the barnacles’ growth. Those that were fed the brine shrimp eggs outgrew the other barnacles.

Seawater is pumped into plastic tubes containing juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab at the University of Oregon as part of a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers glued the juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside the tubes. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

“The experiment has demonstrated that feeding is not dependent on high water velocities, and barnacles can be stimulated to feed using aeration and will survive and grow readily in mariculture,” Shanks said.

He added that unlike high-flow systems, his low-flow “barnacle nursery” doesn’t use as much energy or have expensive pumps to maintain, so it has the potential to decrease operating costs.

Despite the findings, the researchers are cautiously optimistic.

“While our experiment showed promise, there is still a great deal of research which needs to be done to solve some of the barriers to successful and profitable mariculture,” said research assistant Mike Thomas. “For example, inducing settlement of gooseneck barnacle larvae onto artificial surfaces has historically proven difficult and this makes the implantation of barnacles a laborious task. There are other methods of mariculture which need to be explored further for their efficacy before deciding on the best method.”

Another part of Shanks’ project involved conducting field research to see if there are enough gooseneck barnacles in southern Oregon to sustain commercial harvesting. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife allows commercial harvesting of gooseneck barnacles on jetties but not on natural rock formations. Shanks hopes the agency will be able use the results of his work when regulating their harvesting.

A juvenile gooseneck barnacle grows on an acrylic plate in a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers at the University of Oregon found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in their lab grew at rates comparable to or greater than those for species in the wild. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

Researchers used photographs and transects to estimate the barnacle populations on eight jetties in Winchester Bay, Coos Bay, Bandon, Port Orford, Gold Beach and Brookings. They estimated that there are roughly 1 billion adult and juvenile gooseneck barnacles attached to these eight jetties but only about 2 percent are of commercially harvestable size.

“Our surveys suggest that wild populations are unlikely to sustain long-term commercial harvest should the market significantly expand beyond its current size,” researcher Julia Bingham wrote in a report about the project.

She added that with the exception of jetties in Coos Bay and Winchester Bay, the other six jetties had such limited numbers of barnacles that even a “very small-scale harvest” – about 500 pounds per year per jetty – could wipe out harvestable-sized goosenecks on them in five years.

With a second round of funding from Oregon Sea Grant that was awarded in 2017, Shanks and Aaron Galloway, an aquatic ecologist at the OIMB, are continuing the research. Their new work includes:

  • studying how long it takes for a population to return to pre-harvest densities
  • testing different glues and surfaces to see if harvested barnacles that are too small for market can be reattached to plates and returned to the ocean
  • testing out bigger tubes for rearing barnacles in the lab to make them feasible for larger-scale aquaculture
  • testing other diets, including finely minced fish waste from a seafood processing plant

Additional reporting by Rick Cooper.

The post UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles

Sea Grant - Fri, 10/13/2017 - 10:21am

10/13/17

By Tiffany Woods

A study led by a University of Oregon marine biologist has moved the seafood industry one step closer to farming gooseneck barnacles, which are a pricey delicacy in Spain and a common sight on the West Coast.

Gooseneck barnacles grow on top of adult thatched barnacles. (Photo by Julia Bingham)

Funded by Oregon Sea Grant, researchers found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab grew at rates comparable to those of their counterparts in the wild.

Led by Alan Shanks, a professor with the UO’s Charleston-based Oregon Institute of Marine Biology (OIMB), the researchers glued juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside 12 plastic tubes that were about twice the height and diameter of a can of tennis balls. Unfiltered seawater was pumped in, vigorously aerated and allowed to overflow. After a week, the barnacles began secreting their own cement.

Twice a day for eight weeks, the researchers fed the barnacles either micro-algal paste or brine shrimp eggs; a third group of barnacles was not fed anything but was left to filter food out of the seawater. Once a week the researchers measured the barnacles’ growth. Those that were fed the brine shrimp eggs outgrew the other barnacles.

Seawater is pumped into plastic tubes containing juvenile gooseneck barnacles in a lab at the University of Oregon as part of a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers glued the juveniles to textured, acrylic plates hung vertically inside the tubes. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

“The experiment has demonstrated that feeding is not dependent on high water velocities, and barnacles can be stimulated to feed using aeration and will survive and grow readily in mariculture,” Shanks said.

He added that unlike high-flow systems, his low-flow “barnacle nursery” doesn’t use as much energy or have expensive pumps to maintain, so it has the potential to decrease operating costs.

Despite the findings, the researchers are cautiously optimistic.

“While our experiment showed promise, there is still a great deal of research which needs to be done to solve some of the barriers to successful and profitable mariculture,” said research assistant Mike Thomas. “For example, inducing settlement of gooseneck barnacle larvae onto artificial surfaces has historically proven difficult and this makes the implantation of barnacles a laborious task. There are other methods of mariculture which need to be explored further for their efficacy before deciding on the best method.”

Another part of Shanks’ project involved conducting field research to see if there are enough gooseneck barnacles in southern Oregon to sustain commercial harvesting. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife allows commercial harvesting of gooseneck barnacles on jetties but not on natural rock formations. Shanks hopes the agency will be able use the results of his work when regulating their harvesting.

A juvenile gooseneck barnacle grows on an acrylic plate in a research project funded by Oregon Sea Grant. Researchers at the University of Oregon found that juvenile gooseneck barnacles in their lab grew at rates comparable to or greater than those for species in the wild. (Photo by Mike Thomas)

Researchers used photographs and transects to estimate the barnacle populations on eight jetties in Winchester Bay, Coos Bay, Bandon, Port Orford, Gold Beach and Brookings. They estimated that there are roughly 1 billion adult and juvenile gooseneck barnacles attached to these eight jetties but only about 2 percent are of commercially harvestable size.

“Our surveys suggest that wild populations are unlikely to sustain long-term commercial harvest should the market significantly expand beyond its current size,” researcher Julia Bingham wrote in a report about the project.

She added that with the exception of jetties in Coos Bay and Winchester Bay, the other six jetties had such limited numbers of barnacles that even a “very small-scale harvest” – about 500 pounds per year per jetty – could wipe out harvestable-sized goosenecks on them in five years.

With a second round of funding from Oregon Sea Grant that was awarded in 2017, Shanks and Aaron Galloway, an aquatic ecologist at the OIMB, are continuing the research. Their new work includes:

  • studying how long it takes for a population to return to pre-harvest densities
  • testing different glues and surfaces to see if harvested barnacles that are too small for market can be reattached to plates and returned to the ocean
  • testing out bigger tubes for rearing barnacles in the lab to make them feasible for larger-scale aquaculture
  • testing other diets, including finely minced fish waste from a seafood processing plant

Additional reporting by Rick Cooper.

The post UO study moves seafood industry closer to farming gooseneck barnacles appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs