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Farm Walk: Farmscaping for Predators, Parasitic Wasps, and Native Bees on Christmas Tree Farms

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/17/2015 - 2:33pm
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM

For more information, click HERE

Registration is required!

Natural Resources Leadership Academy

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/17/2015 - 2:33pm
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Oregon State University's Natural Resources Leadership Academy (NRLA) is a unique opportunity for professionals and graduate students to enhance leadership skills, gain knowledge and connect with others in the natural resources field. In today's complicated world, each of us has a responsibility to share in leadership. As a part of the NRLA, you will learn about the dimensions of leadership that help to resolve issues. Together we'll evaluate the skills that each of us bring to the table and learn ways to relate to working teams. Leadership is both a science and an art that can be developed by learning and through practice.  In your NRLA course(s), you'll learn to identify leadership concepts and watch how they play out during the various aspects of your course and field trips. As a result, when you get back home, you'll have the value added benefit of knowing that both your knowledge about natural resource topics and your "toolbox" to manage those issues have been greatly enhanced.

For more information, or to register, see the NRLA Website.

Farmscaping for Predators, Parasitic Wasps, and Native Bees on Christmas Tree Farms

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/17/2015 - 2:33pm
Wednesday, June 17, 2015 10:00 AM - 1:00 PM

We will be meeting at Green Valley Farm to learn about beneficial insects and native pollinators and the plants, landscapes and farming practices that support them in Oregon Christmas Tree Farms.  Your farm likely already has currently existing plants and locations that can be further exploited to provide resources beneficial insects need to remain on the farm.  Come learn about these beneficials that can aid in pest management.  The Farmscaping for Beneficials Project of the Integrated Plant Protection Center (IPPC) at Oregon State University (OSU), and the farmers at Green Valley Farm encourage all interested growers, extension personnel, consultants and conservationists to take a break with us for a period of discovery with native bees, predators and parasitic wasps Wednesday, June 17th from 10:00 to 1:00

You will learn:

what plants and practices support beneficial insects and native pollinators

how these practices might be integrated into Christmas Tree production systems

field identification, and biology of beneficial insects and native bees

state-of-the-art integrated production practices used at Green Valley Farm

 Green Valley Farm is a second-generation family farm located in the western foothills of the Oregon Cascade Mountains.

They currently have approximately 300 acres, that include Christmas trees, hay, and timber.  Noble fir, Nordman fir, Grand fir, and Scotch pine in 3 different grades are wholesaled to retail lot operators.  Having operated a retail lot in Texas 20 years ago, they have a keen understanding of the value of customer service, the intrinsic value of fresh trees and sustainable practices.  The farm is surrounded by diverse habitat and they have established grass cover in the trees.

Using Green Valley Far as our classroom we will discuss designing and enhancing on-farm habitat in and around the Christmas tree fields.  Don’t miss this unique opportunity to work with an innovative, veteran grower and bugscapers as we begin to understand and observe how the complex web of on-farm biodiversity and crop production interact right before our eyes!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Trends in Tree Diagnostics

Forestry Events - Tue, 06/16/2015 - 2:34pm
Tuesday, June 16, 2015 8:30 AM - 3:30 PM

The theme of this year’s short course is “Trends in Tree Diagnostics.  Join us as we explore the latest trends, tools, and techniques in tree problem diagnostics. Registration begins at 8:00 am, and the course runs 8:30—3:30 with lunch provided.

Continuing Education Units: 5 CEUs for ISA Certified Arborists and Landscape Contractors have been requested.

Cost: Before May 15 ‐ $75 regular, $40 student; Add $10 each after May 15.  Lunch is included.

To register, click HERE

Natural Resources Leadership Academy

Forestry Events - Tue, 06/16/2015 - 2:34pm
Tuesday, June 16, 2015 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Oregon State University's Natural Resources Leadership Academy (NRLA) is a unique opportunity for professionals and graduate students to enhance leadership skills, gain knowledge and connect with others in the natural resources field. In today's complicated world, each of us has a responsibility to share in leadership. As a part of the NRLA, you will learn about the dimensions of leadership that help to resolve issues. Together we'll evaluate the skills that each of us bring to the table and learn ways to relate to working teams. Leadership is both a science and an art that can be developed by learning and through practice.  In your NRLA course(s), you'll learn to identify leadership concepts and watch how they play out during the various aspects of your course and field trips. As a result, when you get back home, you'll have the value added benefit of knowing that both your knowledge about natural resource topics and your "toolbox" to manage those issues have been greatly enhanced.

For more information, or to register, see the NRLA Website.

Natural Resources Leadership Academy

Forestry Events - Mon, 06/15/2015 - 2:34pm
Monday, June 15, 2015 8:30 AM - 5:00 PM

Oregon State University's Natural Resources Leadership Academy (NRLA) is a unique opportunity for professionals and graduate students to enhance leadership skills, gain knowledge and connect with others in the natural resources field. In today's complicated world, each of us has a responsibility to share in leadership. As a part of the NRLA, you will learn about the dimensions of leadership that help to resolve issues. Together we'll evaluate the skills that each of us bring to the table and learn ways to relate to working teams. Leadership is both a science and an art that can be developed by learning and through practice.  In your NRLA course(s), you'll learn to identify leadership concepts and watch how they play out during the various aspects of your course and field trips. As a result, when you get back home, you'll have the value added benefit of knowing that both your knowledge about natural resource topics and your "toolbox" to manage those issues have been greatly enhanced.

For more information, or to register, see the NRLA Website.

PURCHASING RURAL & SMALL FARM PROPERTY-3 class series; $45

Small Farms Events - Mon, 06/15/2015 - 2:34pm
Monday, June 15, 2015 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Many people in Jackson County dream of a small farm in the country. Buying and owning rural property comes with a host of special connsiderations. Get the facts about wells, septic systems, zoning requirements and limitations, special assessments, water and soil needs, farm product marketing restrictions, and water rights.  And learn about how to find the perfect piece of property, loan options and how the closing process works.  Each class may be attended individually, $20 each class. Instructors: Angela Boudro, Maud Powell, OSU Extension Small Farms and local experts. 
Spouse or farm partner attends for $.50 more when registering on line. Paid pre- registration is required.
All 3 classes, $45/ couples $46: REGISTER ON LINE

Class 1: REGISTER $20-Monday, June 15, 5:30 pm, Land & Legal Considerations.
Class 2: REGISTER $20-Monday, June 22, 5:30 pm, Water, Soils, Septic Systems.
Class 3: REGISTER $20-Monday, June 29, 5:30 p; Find & Finance Rural and Farm Property

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Jackson Josephine Small Woodlands Association Annual Tour & Picnic

Forestry Events - Sat, 06/13/2015 - 2:34pm
Saturday, June 13, 2015 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Join us for a tour of the Sardine Creek property of Clem Stockard and Bonnie Brown, the 2014 Jackson Josephine County Tree Farmers of the Year – Non-members welcome!

Details HERE

Please RSVP

Community Forestry Day

Forestry Events - Sat, 06/13/2015 - 2:34pm
Saturday, June 13, 2015 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM

Join us for the WORK DAYS at Hopkins Demonstration Forest Projects and events for May and June include:

  • Forest Inventory
  • Bus Parking Area
  • Poison Oak Patrol
  • Forest Interpretation Signage

Lunch is provided @ noon in Hopkins Hall. Might be time to start up the BBQ. Please RSVP!

Commencement

Health & Wellness Events - Sat, 06/13/2015 - 2:34pm
Saturday, June 13, 2015 (all day event)
See Commencement website: http://oregonstate.edu/events/commencement/

Summer Field Tour & BBQ

Forestry Events - Fri, 06/12/2015 - 2:33pm
Friday, June 12, 2015 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM

Tour the Springer Tree Farm in Lincoln County
The Marys Peak Chapter of SAF invites the local woodland owner community to join them on their summer field tour and BBQ.  Join them to tour Thad and Gary Springer's forest property in Lincoln County. The Springers have organized an excellent tour discussing current issues in forestry and small woodland ownership. Don't miss this opportunity to see an outstanding example of stewardship. Free BBQ hosted by Marys Peak SAF afterward. RSVP here by Wednesday, June 10 for logistics and food head count. 
Tour Topics:

  • Property and Family History - Property in Family since 1919.
  • Converting Pasture to Forest - Challenges & Techniques for Success
  • Commercial Thinning Operation - Thinning Strategies
  • Oregon Forest Practice Act Stream Protection Requirements- Determining a small Type F (fish) or N (non-fish) stream ODF rules for determining fish presence in streams
  • Management on adjacent USFS property - Before and After NW Forest Plan. Road Use Agreements

Fire Ecology Walk

Forestry Events - Fri, 06/12/2015 - 2:33pm
Friday, June 12, 2015 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Join the Deschutes Land Trust and Steve Fitzgerald for a fire ecology hike in Skyline Forest. We’ll hike along Bull Creek and see first-hand the impact the Two Bulls Fire left on Skyline Forest. Learn about the role fire plays in our eastside forests, how the land recovers with and without post-fire logging. Registration opens 1 month prior to the event.

Registration is required; please click HERE to register

Tractor Safety and Operation for Adults

Small Farms Events - Tue, 06/09/2015 - 2:38pm
Tuesday, June 9, 2015 (all day event)

The beginner class is intended for new farmers or those looking to buy a new tractor. Instructors Marc Anderson and Derek Wells are  Master Trainers in farm equipment and safety education and are experts on equipment operation. Light snacks and water will be provided, please bring a sack lunch.

Registration fee: $50 or $90 if registering for beginner and advanced class together

http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/adult-tractor-safety-and-operation

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Mapping your forest with Google Earth and a GPS phone app

Amy Grotta's Tree Topics - Tue, 06/09/2015 - 11:56am

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension – Columbia, Washington, & Yamhill Counties

This must be the end of the road…

One of the first orders of business on the Matteson Demonstration Forest is getting to know the lay of the land.  180 acres is a lot to get to know!  As is the case with any new woodland owner, we need a map to help orient ourselves while on the property, and to keep track of where different roads and trails lead.

Eventually, the OSU College Forests staff will create a GIS map of the Matteson Forest with various spatial layers – property boundaries, roads, forest types, culverts, and so forth.  In the meantime, I’ve been using Google Earth to create my own map, adding information as I continue to explore the tract.  While in the woods, I’ve been using a GPS app on my smartphone to keep track of where I am and to record points and paths. In this article I’ll describe how I’ve been using these two applications, which I think would be useful to most woodland owners who don’t have GIS at their fingertips.

Some woodland owners are already familiar with Google Earth. For those that are not, Tristan Huff (OSU Extension Forester on the south coast) has developed a useful tutorial for landowners.  I recommend the Pro version of Google Earth, which is now available for free (a recent change).  In addition to all the standard features of Google Earth, the Pro version shows tax lot boundaries and allows you to calculate the area of a polygon that you draw.  This enabled me to draw the Matteson property boundaries on my map with reasonable accuracy, by tracing the taxlot lines.

Yellow polygon approximates the property boundary. Google Earth Pro

On a recent visit to the Matteson Forest my goal was to map the roads and trails in the southern half of the property.  Major roads stand out on the aerial photo, but walking the tract we’ve come across numerous secondary roads, trails and a small pond that are obscured by the canopy when looking at  the aerial image.

Mature timber in the southwest section obscures roads and trails in this aerial view. My iPhone GPS proved to be at least as precise as this handheld GPS receiver.

A GPS receiver can be used to map them. GPS receivers vary widely in their accuracy, especially under tree canopy; the most accurate systems are quite costly.  Even a consumer-grade GPS receiver, which might be accurate to around 50 ft under tree canopy, can cost several hundred dollars.  But, if you are one of the two-thirds of American adults that has a smartphone, you already have a GPS receiver built in.  Why not use it?

Doing some research I came across Motion X-GPS, an iPhone app available for the bargain price of 99 cents.  Motion X-GPS uses your phone’s GPS receiver to track your location.  This works in places where you don’t get a phone signal.  You can record tracks and points as you move about. You can even take photos and associate them with a place or track.

Motion X-GPS has good tutorials on their website, so I won’t go into much detail here on how to the app in the field.  Below are two screenshots from my phone, showing a waypoint and a track that I recorded.

After I was done for the day, the next step was to get these features from my phone into Google Earth.  In Motion X-GPS you can share locations, tracks and waypoints to an email address.  I simply emailed the tracks to myself.

Opening up the .kmz attachment automatically opens the feature in Google Earth.  From there I could save it to my map of the property.  Here is my Google Earth map now, with all the features that I mapped in the field imported and saved.

In summary, I give Google Earth Pro and Motion X-GPS two thumbs up.  I’ve been using the latter for biking and running as well.  To conserve my phone’s battery charge while in the field, I turned off the cellular receiver (there’s little to no cell signal on the Matteson Forest anyhow).  Using the GPS app for 90 minutes consumed about 40% of my battery.  Unfortunately, Motion X-GPS is not available for Android devices, but there are other GPS tracking apps that function similarly and are Android compatible.

The post Mapping your forest with Google Earth and a GPS phone app appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Land Manager's Guide to Aspen Management in Oregon

Forestry Events - Mon, 06/08/2015 - 2:34pm
Monday, June 8, 2015 (all day event)

Aspen is considered an important tree species for habitat and wildlife, but it has been adversely affected by some prior land use practices including fire suppression.  The workshop will provide information and tools for assessing and restoring aspen stands.  Please RSVP by contacting Amy Stiner at 541-792-0435 or Shanna Northway at 541-575-1911.  Funding for the class comes from the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Oregon Wildlife heritage Foundation and OSU Extension Service.

Critical thinking and evaluation

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Mon, 06/08/2015 - 1:10pm

Thinking for yourself is a key competency for evaluators. Scriven says that critical thinking is “The name of an approach to or a subject within the curriculum that might equally well be called ‘evaluative thinking…’ “.

Certainly, one of the skills I taught my daughters from an early age is to evaluate experiences both qualitatively and quantitatively. They got so good at this exercise, they often preempted me with their reports. They learned early that critical thinking is evaluative, that critical doesn’t mean being negative, rather it means being thoughtful or analytical. Scriven goes on to say, “The result of critical thinking is in fact often to provide better support for a position under consideration or to create and support a new position.” I usually asked my girls to evaluate an experience to determine if we would do that experience (or want to do it) again.  Recently, I had the opportunity to do just that. My younger daughter had not been to the Ringling Museum in Sarasota FL; my older daughter had (she went to college in FL). She agreed, after she took me, that we needed to go as a family. We did. We all agreed that it was worth the price of admission. An example of critical thinking–where we provided support for a position under consideration.

Could we have done this without the ability to critically think? Maybe. Could we have come to an agreement that it was worth seeing more than once with out this ability? Probably not. Since the premise of this blog is that evaluation is something that everyone (whether they know it or not) does every day, then would it follow that critical thinking is done everyday? Probably. Yet, I wonder if you need this skill to get out of bed? To decide what to eat for breakfast? To develop the content of a blog? Do I need analysis and/or thoughtfulness to develop a content of a blog? It may help. Often, the content is what ever happens to catch my attention or stick in my caw the day I start my blog. Yet, I wonder…

Evaluation is an activity that requires thoughtfulness and analysis. Thoughtfulness in planning and implementing; analysis in implementing and data examination. Both in final report preparation and presentation. This is a skill that all evaluators need. It is not acquired as a function of birth; yet it is taught through application. But people may not have all the information they need. Can people (evaluators) be critical thinkers if they are not informed? Can people (evaluators)be thoughtful and analytical if they are not informed? Or just impassioned?  Does information just cloud the thoughtfulness and analysis? Something to ponder…

 

my.

molly.

The post Critical thinking and evaluation appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Forest Pest and Disease Management

Forestry Events - Sat, 06/06/2015 - 2:34pm
Saturday, June 6, 2015 8:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Field workshop. Registration required. Call the OSU Extension Service office at 503-655-8631 for more information or to register.

OR Master Naturalist Program

Forestry Events - Sat, 06/06/2015 - 2:34pm
Saturday, June 6, 2015 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM

The Oregon Coast Ecoregion course will present a diverse series of classes, covering the major ecosystems present on the Oregon Coast, from ocean and beaches to nearshore and intertidal to forests, rivers and estuaries. Once completed, this course will enable you to provide well-informed volunteer service to a variety of coastal groups and agencies.

For more information, click HERE

Mingus Park Weed Walk

Forestry Events - Fri, 06/05/2015 - 2:34pm
Friday, June 5, 2015 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM

Walk with us as we explore Mingus Park's varied landscapes.

 · Get to know native trees, shrubs and flowers

· Learn to identify potentially harmful invaders

· Get ideas on how to make your landscaping friendlier to native plants and

 wildlife

Oregon Sea Grant video wins APEX Award

Breaking Waves - Fri, 06/05/2015 - 10:12am
Oregon Sea Grant has won an APEX Award of Excellence in the Electronic Media-Video category for its online video, Responding to the Risks of Marine Debris: Derelict Fishing Gear. According to APEX, there were 165 entries in the Electronic Media category, and awards were based on “excellence in graphic design, editorial content and the success of the entry…in achieving overall communication effectiveness and excellence.” Responding to the Risks of Marine Debris is a production of Oregon Sea Grant in cooperation with NOAA West and the west coast Sea Grant programs. You can view the six-minute video at https://vimeo.com/92878422

The post Oregon Sea Grant video wins APEX Award appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs