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Strawberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/08/2016 - 2:41pm
Wednesday, June 8, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Annual Strawberry Field Day! Check back often for agenda, exact times and other important information! Details will be posted as soon as available!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Rural Living Basics: Living with Your Well & Septic System

Small Farms Events - Tue, 06/07/2016 - 2:38pm
Tuesday, June 7, 2016 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM
FREE Class & Screening
Bring 1/2 cup of untreated well water for nitrate screen. All results are confidential.

This class is designed for rural residents to learn the basics of groundwater, water wells, and septic systems. Learn steps to protect the health of your family, neighbors, animals, your property investment, and the safety of groundwater resources. 

When: June 7th, 2016 6:30pm to 8:30pm
Where: Aurora Presbyterian Church, 21553 Liberty Street, NE Aurora, Oregon 97002

RSVP’s Appreciated as this space only holds 35.
Chrissy.Lucas@oregonstate.edu
See all of our events at http://wellwater.oregonstate.edu

Questions? Chrissy at 541-766-3556

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Open house for Child Development Center

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 2:41pm
Monday, June 6, 2016 11:00 AM - 1:00 PM

Open house for Child Development Center. The Child Development Center is dedicated to discovering and communicating knowledge that contributes to the optimal development and well-being of young children and their families.

As part of Human Development and Family Sciences, the Child Development Center prepares professionals in early childhood development and family services; generates and transmits knowledge on family-focused early childhood programs through research, program development, and evaluation; and provides a developmental program of the highest quality for young children and their families that serves as a resource for the community-at-large.

Child Development Center Website

OSG specialist to serve up Pacific albacore in Washington, D.C.

Breaking Waves - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 10:14am

NEWPORT – Kaety Jacobson, Oregon Sea Grant fisheries specialist, is packing her bags – and then some – for a trip to the nation’s capital to take part in the 41st annual NOAA Fish Fry.

Thanks to a donation from the Oregon Albacore Commission, Jacobson will travel with 250 lbs of fresh-frozen albacore tuna loin portions – and a recipe for tuna poke, a Hawaiian-style marinated tuna salad, courtesy of Newport’s Local Ocean Seafoods restaurant.

The Fish Fry, a popular summer event sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association runs Wednesday, June 8th from 6pm – 9pm at the Herbert C. Hoover Main Commerce Building on 14th St. and Constitution Avenue.  The event promotes public understanding of aquaculture and sustainable marine fisheries.

Sea Grant programs from around the country were invited to take part during our 50th anniversary year to showcase the variety of sustainable seafood from in the nation’s ocean and Great Lakes states.

The post OSG specialist to serve up Pacific albacore in Washington, D.C. appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

OSG specialist to serve up Pacific albacore in Washington, D.C.

Sea Grant - Mon, 06/06/2016 - 10:14am

NEWPORT – Kaety Jacobson, Oregon Sea Grant fisheries specialist, is packing her bags – and then some – for a trip to the nation’s capital to take part in the 41st annual NOAA Fish Fry.

Thanks to a donation from the Oregon Albacore Commission, Jacobson will travel with 250 lbs of fresh-frozen albacore tuna loin portions – and a recipe for tuna poke, a Hawaiian-style marinated tuna salad, courtesy of Newport’s Local Ocean Seafoods restaurant.

The Fish Fry, a popular summer event sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association runs Wednesday, June 8th from 6pm – 9pm at the Herbert C. Hoover Main Commerce Building on 14th St. and Constitution Avenue.  The event promotes public understanding of aquaculture and sustainable marine fisheries.

Sea Grant programs from around the country were invited to take part during our 50th anniversary year to showcase the variety of sustainable seafood from in the nation’s ocean and Great Lakes states.

The post OSG specialist to serve up Pacific albacore in Washington, D.C. appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Master Naturalist Program

Forestry Events - Sun, 06/05/2016 - 2:34pm
Friday, June 3, 2016 12:00 PM - Sunday, June 5, 2016 12:00 PM
For information on 2016 course schedule in Central Oregon, http://oregonmasternaturalist.org/eastcascades

Ecological Forestry 101: Intro to Silviculture and Wildlife

Forestry Events - Sat, 06/04/2016 - 2:34pm
Saturday, June 4, 2016 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

With careful stewardship, forests can be perpetually managed on a regenerative cycle that allows for multiple entries and a sustained yield of a broad range of high-value forest products. The timing and design of thinning practices can result in a wide variety of forest conditions depending on the landowners’ objectives—including those that benefit wildlife habitat, forest health, and long-term income generation.

This workshop will introduce you to the principles of ecological forestry as well as tools to implement it successfully on smaller parcels. Learn about harvest management strategies and how they relate to wildlife habitat.

For information about this program, go to: www.nnrg.org/beginning-forestry

All woodland owners are encouraged to attend!

POISONOUS PLANTS-Risks to Grazing Livestock

Small Farms Events - Sat, 06/04/2016 - 2:34pm
Saturday, June 4, 2016 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
  This class is designed to help livestock owners identify poisonous plants and manage the risk of animals consuming toxins.
A) Economic impacts of plant poisoning;
B) Keys to identifying local toxic plants;

C) Assessing potential harm to your animals;
D) How, why and when plant poisoning occurs;
E) Common sense pasture/farm management
Instructor: Author, Shirley Weathers. Field Guide to Plants Poisonous to Livestock, Western U.S., will be available at the class

REGISTER ON LINE:  https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/1022

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Postcard from Dalarna County, no. 2

Tree Topics - Sat, 06/04/2016 - 1:39pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry and Natural Resources Extension agent for Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

Dalarna County was the seat of a very old and important copper and iron mining industry, an early source of wealth and power for Sweden.  We visted the Falun copper mine, active since the 10th century and a UNESCO world heritage site.

Preparing to head down into the Falun Copper mine.

Why is that part of our forestry tour?

Forest products were a critical part of early mining industry, which needed massive amounts of charcoal and round wood to extract and process the metals. Forestlands near the mine were hard pressed to provide these products.  The mine is also the birthplace of world’s oldest stock company, which eventually became large forest and paper corporation Stora Enso.

Over-exploitation of forest resources by the mid-16th century led to a series of perhaps the world’s oldest forest protection rules.  In 1607 King Charles IX issued a ban on logging and charcoal production within a one-mile radius of the Falun mine (using the old Swedish mile, about 7 English miles). It was named the “Peace Mile” in hopes it would reduce disputes over unregulated charcoal production.

However it was not until 1754 that the surveyor Johan Brandberg finished measuring 112 points around the circumference of a the circle, marking each with stones.

from: http://www.fredsmilen.se/RosenGammalKarta.aspx Marker stone number 112 in the Peace mile ring, marked with an arrow.

See old and new maps of the circle drawn by Brandberg at:

http://www.fredsmilen.se/RosenGammalKarta.aspx

and

http://www.fredsmilen.se/Default.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

The post Postcard from Dalarna County, no. 2 appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Grasses for landowners

Forestry Events - Fri, 06/03/2016 - 2:36pm
Friday, June 3, 2016 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Given in Two Parts on the Same Day

Join Rachel Werling as we learn to recognize commonly encountered and recognizable native and non-native grass species. The goal is to be able identify grass species on your property. This is not a forage class, though some forage species will be covered. Bring grass samples with roots for ID, and a hand lens, if you have one:

·         Part 1:  Focus on grass anatomy and vocabulary and will be held at OSU Extension Auditorium.

·         Part 2:  Visit a Land Steward home site in the Applegate where we can see many species in the field.

For details, click on the calendar link:  

http://calendar.oregonstate.edu/advanced/month/extension/

Citizen Fire Academy

Forestry Events - Fri, 06/03/2016 - 2:36pm
Friday, June 3, 2016 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Citizen Fire Academy (CFA) is a program designed to provide participants with a working knowledge of fire behavior, strategies to improve fire resilience on their properties and in the community, and an opportunity to get to know the agencies and people involved in preparing for and fighting fire.  The CFA program is delivered through a combination of in-class instruction, online learning, and field tours.  Participants finish the class with a self-prepared Wildfire Preparedness Plan for themselves or their neighborhood. Whether you are a property owner, landscape professional, community leader or simply an interested member of the public, if you recognize how wildfire can pose a threat to you or your community, but want to know more about what to do, the CFA program is for you.  Take a look at the brochure and register by mail or online by May 20th to reserve your spot!  Online registration at https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/1014.

How to determine the most appropriate treatments before and after wildfire in sagebrush and pinon-juniper ecosystems

Forestry Events - Fri, 06/03/2016 - 2:36pm
Friday, June 3, 2016 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM

Details can be found here, http://ow.ly/4ng2Qf

Please register by May 27th.

Grass Anatomy/ Field ID

Small Farms Events - Fri, 06/03/2016 - 2:36pm
Friday, June 3, 2016 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

ISTRUCTOR: Rachel Werling; OSU Extension

Part 1: (9:00-11:00am) will cover anatomy and Part 2: (12:00-3:00pm) will cover native grasses for landowners in the field  

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

2016 OSU Alumni Association Senior Send-Off

Environment Events - Thu, 06/02/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, June 2, 2016 7:30 PM - 10:00 PM

Register online at http://www.osualum.com/sendoff.

A show fit for a graduate. Join your classmates for an evening of entertainment and celebration on us.

Register by May 31 to get VIP access at 7 p.m. Wristbands will be required. Specific details on how to pick up your wristband will be emailed to you closer to the event.

Music | Casino games | Refreshments | Prizes
Formal attire and preregistration are encouraged.
See photos from the 2015 send-off.

Graduating students: FREE* Must show valid student ID
Guests: $5 limit one guest per graduating student. 
(Guests must be with a graduating student to enter the event)

Registration closes May 31.

Food and drinks
Sweet prizes
Music by live DJ
First 500 graduating attendees* receive a free pint glass!

*Graduation status will be verified.

 

Water, Soil and Carbon for Every Farm with Keyline Design: Learning from the world's driest inhabited continent and it’s drought solutions

Small Farms Events - Thu, 06/02/2016 - 2:35pm
Thursday, June 2, 2016 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM
FREE  - RSVP please include the number of people coming.
  • Water, Soil and Carbon for Every Farm with Keyline Design: Learning from the world's driest inhabited continent and it’s drought solutions – Australian Permaculture Consultant, Darren Doherty (Regrarians Ltd.)
    • Holistic management, planned grazing and financial planning as a primary drought strategy
    • Keyline farm planning for the structural reconfiguration of the farmscape considering cost-effective drought mitigation
    • Keyline and other regenerative agriculture strategies for soil and production improvements
    • ‘How much water do we actually need?' and 'what are all of the sources of water available to me?'
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Postcard from Sweden – Dalarna County

Tree Topics - Thu, 06/02/2016 - 1:56pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties

 

A New Approach

Dalagård farm & forest retreat is a large working forest owned by Cecilia and Leif Öster. These first -generation landowners are developing an active silvo-trouism enterprise to diversify the farm’s income and promote its sustainability. Forest products and hunting leases are other significant income streams.

We enjoyed a wonderful Swedish Mid-Summer style lunch while enjoying the beautiful setting.

 

Leif explains alternative forest management practices used near the guest complex. This is aimed at balancing the guests aesthetic expectations of forests with broader forest production objectives.

Local trees on display in a small educational arboretum are described for visitors.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Very Long Tradition

Just down the road from Dalagård, we were welcomed into the home of Karen Perers, an eleventh generation landowner of a small forest & farm property in Dalarna County.

 

Karin shared insights into how her family and farm has contributed to the community over the centuries delivering first charcoal and firewood and later pulpwood and sawlogs “The family and farm have been producing those wooden things  that the times ask for” across several centuries, she said. A recognized leader, Karin is director of the Board for Melanskog, the large regional landowner cooperative hosting many of our visits in the area.

 

Karin shows and discusses the first map of the property, along with a modern one, each containing very similar information.

 

Note year on map heading: 1749.

 

 

 

 

The post Postcard from Sweden – Dalarna County appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Citizen Fire Academy

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/01/2016 - 2:38pm
Wednesday, June 1, 2016 2:30 PM - 5:30 PM

Citizen Fire Academy (CFA) is a program designed to provide participants with a working knowledge of fire behavior, strategies to improve fire resilience on their properties and in the community, and an opportunity to get to know the agencies and people involved in preparing for and fighting fire.  The CFA program is delivered through a combination of in-class instruction, online learning, and field tours.  Participants finish the class with a self-prepared Wildfire Preparedness Plan for themselves or their neighborhood. Whether you are a property owner, landscape professional, community leader or simply an interested member of the public, if you recognize how wildfire can pose a threat to you or your community, but want to know more about what to do, the CFA program is for you.  Take a look at the brochure and register by mail or online by May 20th to reserve your spot!  Online registration at https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/1014.

Postcard from Scandinavia – Stockholm

Tree Topics - Sun, 05/29/2016 - 9:23pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources agent

Our group of 26 family woodland owners arrived in Sweden this week at the start of the Scandinavia Forestry Tour.

The tour is organized by the Oregon Woodlands Coop along with Washington County Woodlands Association and OSU Forestry &

Woodland owners visiting the Skansen historic museum in Stockholm Sweden

Natural Resources Extension.

The purpose of the tour is to look at forestry practices in this part of the world, meet fellow family forest landowners and focus particularly on the strong role of landowner cooperatives in both Sweden and Norway.

Most of our group is from Oregon, but we have people from four other US states, as well as South Africa rounding out the group.

This is my first electronic post card from the tour, where I will try to share some of the things we are seeing and learning here.

 

Old traditional buildings at Skansen Museum

 

View of Stockholm

 

 

 

The post Postcard from Scandinavia – Stockholm appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Summer hours start at HMSC Visitor Center

Breaking Waves - Tue, 05/24/2016 - 10:58am

NEWPORT – Summer hours start Tuesday, May 31 at our Visitor Center at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center.

From then until Labor Day, the Visitor Center will be open from 10 am to 5 pm seven days a week, with new exhibits, trained interpreters, animal feedings and programs designed to engage people of all ages in exploring and learning about Oregon’s dynamic coast and ocean.

To find out about upcoming activities, events and special programs, bookmark the Visitor Center’s home page.

The Center is operated by Oregon Sea Grant, and also houses our Marine Education program, which sponsors many summer day camps, classes and special activities for K-12 learners and families.

The post Summer hours start at HMSC Visitor Center appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

The Blue Economy

Terra - Thu, 05/19/2016 - 4:46pm

IN THE FALL OF 2002, as the Klamath River dwindled in the wake of a dry summer, dead fish began piling up in eddies and small tributaries. Over a two-month period, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biologists counted more than 34,000, mostly adult chinook salmon that had died on their way upstream to spawn. The actual number was undoubtedly higher. In most sections of the river, crews were unable to tally all the floating carcasses from day to day.

Commercial salmon landings had been declining in prior years, and on top of a continuing drop in Pacific groundfish (species such as rockfish, cod, whiting and sole), the news from the Klamath seemed like another swipe at a once thriving West Coast industry. Contentious debates erupted among fishermen, farmers, tribal leaders and politicians about water management, fishery stock assessments and emergency relief for coastal communities.

By 2006, as salmon runs in the Klamath continued to plummet, groundfish cutbacks had already hit those communities hard. And when the commercial salmon season was closed in California and most of Oregon in 2008, fishermen in the two states took another $30 million hit.

By then, Oregon State University researchers were working on a long-term approach to a solution. “We had been asked if there was something we could do to address the salmon problem on the Klamath,” says Gil Sylvia, an Oregon State University economist and director of the Coastal Oregon Marine Experiment Station in Newport. “This is a fast-growing animal with a lot of uncertainties about it — so many stocks, so much complexity. Why aren’t we using more advanced methods to manage it?

“So one afternoon, a group of us developed a plan that became the basis for a program we call ‘Fish Trax.’ The idea is to enable fishermen to target healthy stocks — fish from rivers with strong runs — and to avoid weak ones, so fishermen can change the way they harvest rather than getting kicked off the water with total area closures. That’s the goal,” he adds.

The traditional maritime economy was clearly struggling, but programs like Fish Trax — which depends on genetics, digital data and collaboration among people who did not always see eye-to-eye — point the way to a new relationship with the ocean. Its proponents in community development and environmental policy are calling it the “blue economy.”

In an Ocean Week speech on Capitol Hill in 2009, Jane Lubchenco laid out the goals: “Americans want clean beaches, healthy seafood, good jobs, abundant wildlife, stable fisheries and vibrant coastal communities … . This collection of services depends on healthy, productive and resilient ocean and coastal ecosystems.”

As the newly appointed administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Oregon State marine biologist went on to define the characteristics of a “blue economy.” In short, fisheries, seafood production, recreation and other uses of the oceans would be joined at the hip with social sciences and ecology. Ecosystem services, climate change and ocean acidification would be factored into decisions about catching fish, allocating water and dedicating the ocean for specific activities. Renewable energy companies and scientists would share the waves with trawlers and crabbers.

Fishing — a legendary mix of grit, skill and luck — would remain a critical component of the “blue economy” but would become more reliable and predictable. A disaster with a salmon run would be mitigated by science-based restoration efforts. And it would all depend on innovative technologies, such as acoustics, digital mapping, ocean-observing systems and data management.

Despite its struggles, the traditional marine economy is a powerhouse. In Lincoln County alone in 2012 (the most recent year for which data are available), fishing and marine science jobs contributed $230 million to personal income, according to the county’s Economic Development office. Tourism added another $135 million.

Education and research are adding jobs in Newport, the county seat and home to Oregon State’s Hatfield Marine Science Center, the Oregon Coast Aquarium, NOAA’s Pacific fleet headquarters and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry’s new Coastal Discovery Center. “When it comes to marine science and education,” says Gil Sylvia, “when you look at what’s been invested along the Oregon coast, there’s been over a $2 billion investment in the last decade. It’s much bigger than people understand.

“And when you talk about the ‘blue economy,’ you have to define what you mean by ‘blue,’” he adds. “A lot of it is traditional maritime, the fishing and seafood industry. For example, Seattle is the largest seafood city in the United States when you’re talking about large fishing vessels and processors, but most of the fish are landed in Alaska.”

The Right to Fish

Migratory fish like salmon, which are subject to a thousand threats in rivers and at sea, pose a daunting challenge to those who aim to align fishing with ecology. But things don’t get much simpler with more sedentary species, such as rockfish. Studies of their reproduction are ongoing.  And then there’s uncertainty about the future of the ocean. How will warmer temperatures and acidic waters affect the coastal food web?

“Over time, we know rockfish recruitment (successful reproduction) can vary widely from year to year,” says Kirsten Grorud-Colvert, assistant professor in integrative biology at Oregon State. She studies rockfish under an annual permit from the National Marine Fisheries Service and must estimate the number of young fish she will catch. In her research along the Oregon coast, she uses devices that look like bags of garden fencing and are known as SMURFs — Standard Monitoring Units for Recruitment of Fish.

“From year to year, it’s tough to predict. Rockfish are so episodic in their recruitment,” she says. “This year we saw a species that we haven’t seen recruit much over the last five years — they have just been trickling in — go off the roof.”

Some species of rockfish can live more than 100 years, and as they grow, so does their reproductive potential. A 15-inch vermilion can produce about 150,000 eggs when it spawns. That might seem like a lot, but the real champions are the big old females. A 25-inch fish can produce more than 1.7 million eggs.

“Incorporating that into management is tricky,” says Grorud-Colvert. “Having areas like marine reserves where these older larger females can live is a powerful complement to other management approaches.”

She and other scientists are documenting the impacts of marine protected areas (MPAs), widespread globally but a relatively recent development along the Oregon coast (see “The Bounty,” Page 28). In Science magazine last fall, Grorud-Colvert and Lubchenco reported that MPAs now cover 3.5 percent of the surface area of the world’s oceans. More than five decades of research, the researchers reported, shows that fully protected MPAs, aka marine reserves, effectively increase the diversity and size of fish populations and enhance some commercial fisheries outside the boundaries.

However, just producing more fish may not be enough. In a paper in the journal Oceanography, Oregon State graduate student Allison Barner joined Lubchenco and other scientists in raising another possibility: Combine marine reserves with rights-based fisheries management, processes for giving individuals or communities exclusive rights to harvest fish in waters adjacent to a reserve. This arrangement even has a name: Territorial User Rights for Fisheries (TURF)-Reserve. The result would be that, in exchange for protecting the reserve, fishing communities would reap the benefits by being able to catch the bounty spilling over into their fishing grounds.

TURFs have not been proposed for the Oregon coast, but the idea is likely to raise hackles in fisheries management circles. Gil Sylvia calls it “politically combustible.” Paul Klarin of the Oregon Department of Land Conservation and Development says the seas have long been treated as a public commons with open access. He leads planning for Oregon’s coastal waters, efforts captured in a map showing areas dedicated to specific uses: fishing, marine reserves, energy production, navigation and underwater cables (more trans-Pacific cables land in Oregon than in Washington or California).

The rules are different in federal waters, which extend 200 miles off the coast. Starting in 2011, a type of rights-based fisheries management known as individual transferable quotas — rights given to individual fishermen and capped at a total maximum harvest — were allowed under U.S. law.

Since then, the scientists say, the Pacific groundfish industry has shown signs of improvement. Revenues have risen more than 12 percent (not including whiting, Oregon’s largest single fishery). And 21 species have moved from “avoid” to “good alternative” or “best choice” under the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch Program, which advises eco-conscious consumers on fish to buy.

Data in DNA

Data are the currency of the “blue economy.” Satellites scan the sea surface daily, and sensor arrays on buoys and underwater gliders send information continuously to labs on land. The result is an ever-changing picture of temperatures, waves, winds, currents and water chemistry (see “Enduring Vigil”).

“Fishermen need to make decisions every day,” adds Sylvia. “Are we going to fish? Where are we going to fish? How are we going to fish? Data can be invaluable.”

Some of the most powerful clues come from marine organisms themselves. In their DNA are patterns that reveal how whales are related to each other, whether or not corals can adapt to a changing environment and where salmon were born. If you’re a salmon fisherman, being able to distinguish one stock from another — those from the Klamath River, the Sacramento or the Rogue — could make the difference between holds that are empty or full when you return to the dock.

“Fishermen need to make decisions every day,” adds Sylvia. “Are we going to fish? Where are we going to fish? How are we going to fish? Data can be invaluable.”

Through a research program known as CROOS (Collaborative Research on Oregon Ocean Salmon), Sylvia and his colleagues at the Oregon State marine experiment station are developing Fish Trax to provide that information. They aim to enable salmon fishermen to know where and when to target specific runs of fish, in effect to trace fish from rivers of origin to the sea. Salmon from each river tend to follow similar patterns as they move, and by analyzing the genetic fingerprints of captured fish, scientists can see where the animals tend to go.

“Fish Trax created (Internet) portals for fishermen to access their own data. They can ask things like ‘which stocks of fish did I catch at this depth in this location over a two-year period?’ And they can query the database and find out,” he says. However, that is just the beginning.

Fish Trax provides information to others as well: seafood processors, salmon hatchery managers, businesses and the public. “I see traceablity as a way to share information with the marketplace and to improve and standardize quality,” says Sylvia. “And to use that information in selling and marketing the product. It’s a powerful tool for doing that. We can do it today because we have digital information systems, which are part of the ‘blue economy.’ These systems open up immense possibilities.”

When the idea was first proposed, the reception was mixed. “The fishing industry loved it, but they were torn,” says Sylvia. “They worried about how the information would be used by managers. Could new knowledge be used to regulate the industry in unanticipated ways?”

Things came to a head during a meeting at the Hatfield Marine Science Center in 2006. Scott Boley, an Oregon State graduate and respected industry leader who died in 2007 (the Fish Trax website is dedicated to him), let people know that, while he had his doubts, the industry could benefit from it. “‘I’ve lost sleep over this. But things are so bad, I don’t see how it couldn’t but help us in the long term, to change this fishery around,’” Sylvia recalls Boley saying. “That was it. That profound statement got the agencies on board too, even though they had their doubts.” Sylvia and his team are continuing to develop Fish Trax with support from NOAA.

In its land-and-sea-grant mission, Oregon State brings together fishermen, agency managers, elected officials, scientists and engineers to create a “blue economy” for the future. “We get the luxury of looking five or 10 years down the road,” says Sylvia. “Industry doesn’t always have that luxury, but we do. It’s our job to plant and test ideas.”

The post The Blue Economy appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs