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New Reparian Rules Training

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/07/2017 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM

The Oregon Department of Forestry - North Cascade District and Oregon State University Extension will be hosting a training session on the new stream buffer rules for salmon, steelhead, and bull trout streams which go into effect on July 1, 2017. The training will be held at Hopkins Demonstration Forest, Everett Hall on June 7, 2017 from 10am – 2pm. See other dates and locations posted here. The classroom training is intended to cover the new stream buffer retention requirements for streams classified as SSBT. This session will also feature a field demonstration of the new rules. Please contact the Oregon Department of Forestry Molalla Office at 503-829-2216 for questions regarding the training or to find out if your property contains streams that will be effected by the new rules. For additional information see http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/AboutODF/Pages/ProposedLawsRules.aspx

There is no fee but you must register by Monday June 5 by calling or emailing Doah Ellis at 503-829-2216 or Shenandoah.L.Ellis@oregon.gov  Registration is limited to 50 participants.

 

Drought and Rangelands

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/07/2017 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

What will you learn?
Drought can affect the productivity and long-term species composition of rangelands in the western United States, as well as habitat quality for wildlife and forage for livestock. Drought is a periodic and sometimes chronic stressor in arid and semi-arid landscapes, creating challenges for public land managers to ensure that rangelands contain functional ecosystems and provide forage and other ecosystem services. Learn more...

Presenter(s):

  • Matt Reeves, Research Ecologist - Rocky Mountain Research Station in Missoula
  • Melinda Smith, Professor of Biology and Director of the Semi-arid Grassland Research Center (SGRC) - Colorado State University
  • Mike Pellant, retired range conservationist, ecologist, and coordinator for three Great Basin regional programs.

Session Details: Jun 7, 2017 2:00 pm US/Eastern     Duration: 01:30 (hh:mm)     Export Event to Calendar
*** Please join the session 15 minutes prior to the start of the webinar. ***

All live webinars are recorded. Within a week of the live event, a View button provides access to the on-demand replay. CEUs are available for on-demand webinars.

Who should participate?
Foresters, Land Managers, Climate Specialist, Loggers

Education Credits Units:

Society of American Foresters - 1 hour Category 1 Credit    [status: Applied For]

Strawberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/07/2017 - 2:36pm
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 1:00 PM - 4:00 PM
Mark your calendars for our field days at Oregon State University’s North Willamette Research and Extension Center in Aurora.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Know Your Woodland Plants Walk & Forest History Tour

Forestry Events - Tue, 06/06/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 4:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Join us for a fun evening learning about the local forests, historically and today. Start with a guided tour of the Canyon Life Museum sharing early settlement, logging and mining history of the North Santiam Canyon. Then travel a short distance for a casual plant identification walk with a forester to learn common trees, shrubs and other plants we find and talk about their place in the forest. Come prepared for the weather, and remember the possibility of encountering poison oak. Families welcome!  See flyer for details. 

Date: Tuesday June 6, 2017

Museum Tour: 4:30 pm - 5:45 pm

Location: Canyon Life Museum, 143 Wall St. Mill City

Native Plant Walk: 6:30 pm - 8:00 pm

Location: Fisherman's Bend Recreation Site, (1.5 miles west of Mill City)

Registration not required, but RSVP is appreciated. Call Benton County Extension 541-766-6750. Plant ID guides Trees to Know in Oregon and Shrubs to Know in Oregon available for purchase at the museum site.

Hands-On Food Preservation Series

Small Farms Events - Tue, 06/06/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, June 6, 2017 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Hands- on Food Preservation classes offered

OSU Extension Service Master Food Preservers are offering a series of hands-on food preservation classes this summer to help community members learn to preserve our fresh, local produce for year-round enjoyment.  Each class will focus on a different aspect of safe, healthy food preservation. These classes are appropriate for both novice food preservers and those with experience who hope to update their skills and knowledge. Classes can be taken individually or as a series and will be repeated each month (June, July, and August). All classes are held from 6-9 p.m. at the OSU Linn County Extension office, 33630 McFarland Rd, (corner of Old HWY 34 and McFarland Rd) Tangent.

Tuesday, June 6th; Wednesday, July 5th; Thursday, August 3rd

Preserving Fruit Products/Boiling Water Canning: This is where we begin. Review how and why different methods of preservation are used, basic techniques, necessary equipment, references and resources used for preserving fruits and fruit products.

Tuesday, June 13th; Wednesday, July 12th; Thursday, August 10th

Vegetables & Meat/ Pressure Canning and Drying: This class covers the safe and simple process of pressure canning vegetables and meats, including fish. Learn to use and care for your pressure canner then review tips for high-quality and nutritious dried foods.

Tuesday, June 20th; Wednesday, July 19th; Thursday, August 17th

Tomatoes, Sauces & Salsas: Tomatoes are the most preserved item of produce. This class covers options for preserving plain tomatoes, tomato sauces, juice and “The Laws of Salsa.” Make and compare a variety of salsas in class.

Tuesday, June 27th; Wednesday, July 26th; Thursday, August 24th

Pickle Making: Pickles are gaining popularity again. This class covers safe procedures for pickling vegetables, including fermented and fresh pack pickles, and selecting and preparing ingredients.

For more information and to register visit http://extension.oregonstate.edu/linn/food-preservation. Cost is $18 per class or $60 for the series
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Integrated Pest, Pollinator, and Native Hedgerow Management

Small Farms Events - Sun, 06/04/2017 - 2:36pm
Sunday, June 4, 2017 9:00 AM - 11:00 AM

WHAT:
- Organic caneberries and mixed vegetables systems overview.
- Native plant ID and tagging. Willows, pollinator gardens, herbs and cut flowers.
- Insect trapping and ID.
- Native bees and bee hotels. 
- Hot lunch from the earth oven!

WITH: 
James Cassidy, Javier Fernandez-Salvador, Linda Hardison, 
Andony Melathopoulos, Paul Jepson, 
& Jerry Paul

WHERE:
The OSU Student Farm, Corvallis
Head East on HWY 34, going out of town across the mighty Willamette. 

Turn Left on Electric Road. 

Go all the way to the end and turn right. 

Then go all the way to the end and turn right again - The Farm is on your left!

HOW MUCH: FREE! 
with a suggested donation for growers of $10. Limited to 12 growers. Come ready to work. Hands on workshop. 

https://secure.oregonstate.edu/smallfarms-events/register/148

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

National Get Outdoors Day

Environment Events - Sat, 06/03/2017 - 2:35pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017 (all day event)

The fifth annual National Get Outdoors Day event will be held on Saturday June 3rd, 2017 from 10am-3pm at Peavy Arboretum. This free event is hosted by OSU College of Forestry and OSU Benton County Extension, and will feature a variety of hands-on activities to connect youth and families with the great outdoors. Spanish speaking volunteers will provide bilingual assistance. 

Join us and discover the forest in your backyard. For more information visit the website at: http://cf.forestry.oregonstate.edu/get-outdoors-day

WOWNet Workshop

Forestry Events - Sat, 06/03/2017 - 2:35pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

This workshop will provide you with networking and some really great educational opportunities! This year we have two themes for the day; Non Timber Forest Products (NTFP) and Forest Measurements. Non Timber Forest Products will include a presentation from the Oregon Woodland Co-op president including potential income opportunities with their group as well as a more general overview of potential value added species you can find on your property. This is a great presentation, I have seen it and it is inspiring! There will also be FOUR NTFP make-and-takes! Forest measurements will include, how to measure trees in a plot, including tree diameter, and tree height, how to calculate the volume of those trees, and more! Space at the workshop is limited, so send in your registration information as soon as possible!

There is a registration fee of $20 that covers snacks, lunch, workshop supplies, and an exciting piece of WOWNet Swag. If you cannot pay the fee, scholarships are available in exchange for volunteer service during the workshop.


Return your registration with a check for $20 (or note that you will pay in person) written to OSU Extension Service, by May 25th to:
Tiffany Fegel
350 Richardson Hall
Corvallis, OR 97331
Questions? Contact Tiffany Fegel: Tiffany.Fegel@Oregonstate.edu, (971) 409-4030

Oak Habitat Stewardship Workshop

Forestry Events - Sat, 06/03/2017 - 2:35pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017 10:00 AM - 4:30 PM

National Get Outdoors Day

Forestry Events - Sat, 06/03/2017 - 2:35pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017 (all day event)

The fifth annual National Get Outdoors Day event will be held on Saturday June 3rd, 2017 from 10am-3pm at Peavy Arboretum. This free event is hosted by OSU College of Forestry and OSU Benton County Extension, and will feature a variety of hands-on activities to connect youth and families with the great outdoors. Spanish speaking volunteers will provide bilingual assistance. 

Join us and discover the forest in your backyard. For more information visit the website at: http://cf.forestry.oregonstate.edu/get-outdoors-day

National Get Outdoors Day

4-H Events - Sat, 06/03/2017 - 2:35pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017 (all day event)

The fifth annual National Get Outdoors Day event will be held on Saturday June 3rd, 2017 from 10am-3pm at Peavy Arboretum. This free event is hosted by OSU College of Forestry and OSU Benton County Extension, and will feature a variety of hands-on activities to connect youth and families with the great outdoors. Spanish speaking volunteers will provide bilingual assistance. 

Join us and discover the forest in your backyard. For more information visit the website at: http://cf.forestry.oregonstate.edu/get-outdoors-day

National Get Outdoors Day

Small Farms Events - Sat, 06/03/2017 - 2:35pm
Saturday, June 3, 2017 (all day event)

The fifth annual National Get Outdoors Day event will be held on Saturday June 3rd, 2017 from 10am-3pm at Peavy Arboretum. This free event is hosted by OSU College of Forestry and OSU Benton County Extension, and will feature a variety of hands-on activities to connect youth and families with the great outdoors. Spanish speaking volunteers will provide bilingual assistance. 

Join us and discover the forest in your backyard. For more information visit the website at: http://cf.forestry.oregonstate.edu/get-outdoors-day

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

CoastalWoodlands Roads Workshop

Forestry Events - Fri, 06/02/2017 - 2:40pm
Friday, June 2, 2017 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM

Use your road maintenance dollars effectively. Learn to assess your existing road for potential problems and prioritize repairs. Workshop covers maintenance and improvement techniques, water quality and aquatic habitat concerns, regulations, contracts, technical and financial assistance available to small woodland owners.

With:

Steve Bowers – Timber Harvesting Extension Specialist

Francisca Belart - Timber Harvesting Extension Specialist

Jon Souder- Forest Watershed Extension Specialist

Guillermo Giannico - Associate Professor, Fisheries Extension

Valerie Grant- North Coast Agent, OSU Forestry and Natural Resources

RSVP by May 30

Reservations Required: call 541-574-6534 or email Valerie.Grant@oregonstate.edu

Health Care System Improvements to Reduce Disparities in Colon Cancer Screening

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 06/02/2017 - 2:40pm
Friday, June 2, 2017 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

"Health Care System Improvements to Reduce Disparities in Colon Cancer Screening" Gloria Coronado, PhD, Epidemiologist and the Mitch Greenlick Endowed Senior Investigator in Health Disparities Research, Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research

Gloria Coronado, PhD, completed training at Stanford University and the University of Washington. Dr. Coronado's research has focused on understanding and addressing disparities in the occurrence and burden of disease in underserved populations, with a special emphasis on the Latino population in the Pacific Northwest. She has developed several innovative and cost-effective interventions to improve rates of participation in cancer screening among Latinos. Her innovative work has led to successful partnerships with large health plans, state institutions, and clinics serving migrants and the uninsured. She currently directs or co-directs three programs that use systems-based approaches to raise the rates of colorectal cancer screening in health plans and clinics in Washington, Oregon and California.
 
The college-wide research seminar is Co-Sponsored by the College Research Office; the Hallie Ford Center; the Center for Healthy Aging; the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health; and the Center for Global Health.

The seminar is Co-sponsored with the Health Policy Program.

The seminar series provides a forum for faculty in the College of Public Health & Human Sciences and other researchers to present and discuss current research topics in an environment conducive to stimulating research collaboration and fostering student learning. Faculty and students from the Division of Health Sciences and other colleges, research centers and institutions are encouraged to participate.

New video reveals how blood work can be used to identify sick sea stars

Sea Grant - Thu, 06/01/2017 - 3:16pm

A new video from Oregon Sea Grant (OSG), Sea Star Health: Using Blood Work to Identify Sick Sea Stars, reveals how OSG and Oregon State University created the first-ever blood panel for ochre sea stars to use as a baseline for detecting sick ones. The tool could help aquarists treat them before they succumb to Sea Star Wasting Syndrome, which causes their limbs to fall off.

The cause of the syndrome, which was first seen in the Pacific Northwest in 2013, is unknown. OSU veterinary student Heather Renee Srch-Thaden created the blood panel under the guidance of Dr. Tim Miller-Morgan, an aquatic veterinarian with OSG Extension, and Dr. Susan Tornquist, dean of OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

The video was filmed at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, where the public can touch and learn about sea stars in a tidepool exhibit at the HMSC Visitor Center. It was filmed and edited by OSG videographer Vanessa Cholewczynski, with photos by Tim Miller-Morgan and Heather Renee Srch-Thaden.

You can watch the four-minute video on OSG’s YouTube channel, here.

This new video from Oregon Sea Grant reveals how researchers are using blood samples from sea stars to detect signs of disease.

The post New video reveals how blood work can be used to identify sick sea stars appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New video reveals how blood work can be used to identify sick sea stars

Breaking Waves - Thu, 06/01/2017 - 3:16pm

A new video from Oregon Sea Grant (OSG), Sea Star Health: Using Blood Work to Identify Sick Sea Stars, reveals how OSG and Oregon State University created the first-ever blood panel for ochre sea stars to use as a baseline for detecting sick ones. The tool could help aquarists treat them before they succumb to Sea Star Wasting Syndrome, which causes their limbs to fall off.

The cause of the syndrome, which was first seen in the Pacific Northwest in 2013, is unknown. OSU veterinary student Heather Renee Srch-Thaden created the blood panel under the guidance of Dr. Tim Miller-Morgan, an aquatic veterinarian with OSG Extension, and Dr. Susan Tornquist, dean of OSU’s College of Veterinary Medicine.

The video was filmed at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center in Newport, where the public can touch and learn about sea stars in a tidepool exhibit at the HMSC Visitor Center. It was filmed and edited by OSG videographer Vanessa Cholewczynski, with photos by Tim Miller-Morgan and Heather Renee Srch-Thaden.

You can watch the four-minute video on OSG’s YouTube channel, here.

This new video from Oregon Sea Grant reveals how researchers are using blood samples from sea stars to detect signs of disease.

The post New video reveals how blood work can be used to identify sick sea stars appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

The Role of Predators, Parasitic Wasps, and Native Bees in Christmas Tree Farms

Forestry Events - Thu, 06/01/2017 - 2:45pm
Thursday, June 1, 2017 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM

Registration required.

We will be meeting at Green Valley Farm to learn about beneficial insects and native pollinators and the plants, landscapes and farming practices that support them in Oregon Christmas tree farms.  Your farm likely already has currently existing plants and locations that can be further exploited to provide resources beneficial insects need to remain on the farm.  Come learn about these beneficials that can aid in pest management.  The Farmscaping for Beneficials Project of the Integrated Plant Protection Center (IPPC) at Oregon State University (OSU), and the farmers at Green Valley Farm encourage all interested growers, extension personnel, consultants and conservationists to take a break with us for a period of discovery with native bees, predators and parasitic wasps Thursday June 1, 2017

You will learn:

what plants and practices support beneficial insects and native pollinators

what conservation practices Christmas tree growers are currently using and why

how these practices are integrated into Christmas tree production systems

field identification, and biology of beneficial insects and native bees

latest data on beneficial insects that occur on OR Christmas tree farms

Green Valley Farm is a second-generation family farm located in the western foothills of the Oregon Cascade Mountains.

They currently have approximately 300 acres,that include Christmas trees, hay, and timber.  Noble fir, Nordman fir, Grand fir, and Scotch pine in 3 different grades are wholesaled to retail lot operators.  Having operated a retail lot in Texas 20 years ago, they have a keen understanding of the value of customer service, the intrinsic value of fresh trees and sustainable practices.  The farm is surrounded by diverse habitat and they have established grass cover in the trees.

Using Green Valley Farm as our classroom we will discuss designing and enhancing on-farm habitat in and around the Christmas tree fields.  Don’t miss this unique opportunity to take in advice from innovative, veteran growers and OSU researchers as we begin to understand and observe how the complex web of on-farm biodiversity and crop production interact on Oregon Christmas tree farms. Lunch will be provided.

The Role of Predators, Parasitic Wasps, and Native Bees in Christmas Tree Farms

Forestry Events - Thu, 06/01/2017 - 2:45pm
Thursday, June 1, 2017 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM

We will be meeting at Green Valley Farm to learn about beneficial insects and native pollinators and the plants, landscapes and farming practices that support them in Oregon Christmas tree farms.  Your farm likely already has currently existing plants and locations that can be further exploited to provide resources beneficial insects need to remain on the farm.  Come learn about these beneficials that can aid in pest management.  The Farmscaping for Beneficials Project of the Integrated Plant Protection Center (IPPC) at Oregon State University (OSU), and the farmers at Green Valley Farm encourage all interested growers, extension personnel, consultants and conservationists to take a break with us for a period of discovery with native bees, predators and parasitic wasps Thursday June 1, 2017

 You will learn:

what plants and practices support beneficial insects and native pollinators

what conservation practices Christmas tree growers are currently using and why

how these practices are integrated into Christmas tree production systems

field identification, and biology of beneficial insects and native bees

latest data on beneficial insects that occur on OR Christmas tree farms

 Green Valley Farm is a second-generation family farm located in the western foothills of the Oregon Cascade Mountains.

They currently have approximately 300 acres,that include Christmas trees, hay, and timber.  Noble fir, Nordman fir, Grand fir, and Scotch pine in 3 different grades are wholesaled to retail lot operators.  Having operated a retail lot in Texas 20 years ago, they have a keen understanding of the value of customer service, the intrinsic value of fresh trees and sustainable practices.  The farm is surrounded by diverse habitat and they have established grass cover in the trees.

 Using Green Valley Farm as our classroom we will discuss designing and enhancing on-farm habitat in and around the Christmas tree fields.  Don’t miss this unique opportunity to take in advice from innovative, veteran growers and OSU researchers as we begin to understand and observe how the complex web of on-farm biodiversity and crop production interact on Oregon Christmas tree farms. Lunch will be provided.

 

The Role of Predators, Parasitic Wasps, and Native Bees in Christmas Tree Farms

Small Farms Events - Thu, 06/01/2017 - 2:45pm
Thursday, June 1, 2017 10:00 AM - 2:00 PM

We will be meeting at Green Valley Farm to learn about beneficial insects and native pollinators and the plants, landscapes and farming practices that support them in Oregon Christmas tree farms.  Your farm likely already has currently existing plants and locations that can be further exploited to provide resources beneficial insects need to remain on the farm.  Come learn about these beneficials that can aid in pest management.  The Farmscaping for Beneficials Project of the Integrated Plant Protection Center (IPPC) at Oregon State University (OSU), and the farmers at Green Valley Farm encourage all interested growers, extension personnel, consultants and conservationists to take a break with us for a period of discovery with native bees, predators and parasitic wasps Thursday June 1, 2017

 You will learn:

what plants and practices support beneficial insects and native pollinators

what conservation practices Christmas tree growers are currently using and why

how these practices are integrated into Christmas tree production systems

field identification, and biology of beneficial insects and native bees

latest data on beneficial insects that occur on OR Christmas tree farms

 Green Valley Farm is a second-generation family farm located in the western foothills of the Oregon Cascade Mountains.

They currently have approximately 300 acres,that include Christmas trees, hay, and timber.  Noble fir, Nordman fir, Grand fir, and Scotch pine in 3 different grades are wholesaled to retail lot operators.  Having operated a retail lot in Texas 20 years ago, they have a keen understanding of the value of customer service, the intrinsic value of fresh trees and sustainable practices.  The farm is surrounded by diverse habitat and they have established grass cover in the trees.

 Using Green Valley Farm as our classroom we will discuss designing and enhancing on-farm habitat in and around the Christmas tree fields.  Don’t miss this unique opportunity to take in advice from innovative, veteran growers and OSU researchers as we begin to understand and observe how the complex web of on-farm biodiversity and crop production interact on Oregon Christmas tree farms. Lunch will be provided.

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Seven Evaluations.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Wed, 05/31/2017 - 3:04pm
Evaluations.

Recently, I talked about how evaluations have changed.

They are still familiar yet they are different.

I have talked about formative and summative evaluation. (Thank you, Michael Scriven).

Those are two of the evaluation.

The other five are:

  1. Process Evaluation
  2. Outcome Evaluation
  3. Economic Evaluation
  4. Impact Evaluation
  5. Goals-based Evaluation

Yes, this discussion was from another blog.

So let’s discuss these other evaluations (which the author says you need to know to have an effective monitoring and evaluation system).

Choosing the evaluation for your program depends on where you are in the development of your program. If you are in the conceptualization phase there is one evaluation to use; the implementation phase uses others; and the end of the project will use yet a different evaluation or evaluations.

Going through them may help.

Conceptualization phase.

Formative evaluation typically is conducted during the development or improvements phase. By preventing waste and identify potential areas of concerns formative evaluation increases chances of success. It helps improve the program. Formative evaluation is often conducted more than once. It is usually contrasted with summative evaluation. For more information, see ; in fact, see it for all these evaluations, except as noted.

Implementation phase.

Process Evaluation usually refers to an evaluation of the treatment that focus entirely on variables between input and output data. It can also refer to the process component of the evaluation. Process evaluation occurs during the implementation phase.

Outcome Evaluation is often called “payoff evaluation.” Outcomes are often effects during the treatment. We would be wise to distinguish between immediate outcomes, middle (or end of treatment) outcomes, and long term outcomes. Outcome evaluation occurs during the implementation phase.

Economic Evaluation is also known as cost-benefit (or benefit-cost) analysis or cost-effectiveness analysis. For a detailed description of these types of evaluation see  OR . More and more, program designers are asked to do more with fewer resources and want to know what how efficient is the program.

Project closure (end) phase.

Impact Evaluation is an evaluation that focuses on outcomes. It occurs at the end of the project. Although it is desirable to do long term impact, there is often no funding available for that evaluation. The impact evaluation often back off the impact because there is no funding.

Summative Evaluation is conducted after the completion of the program, usually for the benefit of some external audience or funding agency. It should not be confused with outcome evaluation (an evaluation focused on outcomes rather than on process).

Goal-based Evaluation is any type of evaluation based on the goals and objectives of the program. It is done at the end of a program that is not on-going.  It often involves SMART objectives (Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relavant, and Timely).

So what are you going to use to evaluate your program? You have a choice.

my .

molly.

 

 

The post Seven Evaluations. appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs