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Annual Picnic of the Linn Chapter of OSWA

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/12/2017 - 2:36pm
Saturday, August 12, 2017 9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

The Linn Chapter of the Oregon Small Woodlands Association invites you (OSWA member and public alike) to join them for their annual picnic. Activities for all ages will begin at 9:00 and include a tour of the property, educational displays and plant identification. It is a great chance to see a well-managed woodland property and visit with friends. The Sallee and Tye family will grill burgers, so please bring a potluck item to share.

For more information contact Bill Bowling 541-791-1370 or email 

Hopkins Community Forest Day

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/12/2017 - 2:36pm
Saturday, August 12, 2017 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM
This is your chance to learn by doing a variety of projects in a sustainably managed woodland. Volunteers help with essential seasonal tasks of managing a working demonstration forest.
LEARN BY DOING—IT’S THE HOPKINS WAY WE MANAGE OUR FOREST!
The focus for the summer months is on trail and building maintenance, and trail and road brush removal.
Registration is requested and hot lunch will be provided. Please let us know you are coming to get a count for lunch. Contact Jean at 503-655-8631 or jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu.
For more information contact Peter Matzka at peter.matzka@oregonstate.edu.

Many Shapes and Sizes: A Tour of “Good Wood” Management and Products

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/12/2017 - 2:36pm
Saturday, August 12, 2017 9:30 AM - 3:00 PM

Join the Build Local Alliance, Forests Forever, Inc., and OSU Extension for an exploration of “Good Wood” Management and Products from local forests.


Background
The Build Local Alliance (BLA) seeks to improve the vitality of local forests and related human communities by connecting local, responsibly grown and processed wood with local projects. The BLA is comprised of forest owners and millwrights, retailers and distributers, designers and architects, craftsmen and builders, developers and homeowners, and other individuals who are interested in developing our local economy through sustainable forestry.
Forest Forever, Inc. (FFI) promotes science-based education to enhance understanding of, and appreciation for the complexities and benefits of woodland management. FFI operates Hopkins Demonstration Forest as an accessible example of sustainable forestry.


Mutual interests of BLA, FFI, and OSU Extension include:
•Sustainable management of local forests
•Forest-related enterprises that add value to the local economy
•Alternative markets for a wide range of wood products
•Improved returns for small scale harvest operations
•Connecting people and enterprises, from forest to finished product
•Improved connections between urban consumers and rural producers
•Improved awareness and understanding of sustainable forestry in Oregon

Registration: The cost is $15. Registration is required. To register BLA will provide eventbrite online registration - coming soon. Questions? Call 503-655-8631 or email jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu .

Dry Farming Collaborative Field Day

Small Farms Events - Tue, 08/08/2017 - 2:38pm
Tuesday, August 8, 2017 (all day event)

More than ten Dry Farming Collaboratize members will be hosting tours for our field days in August! Come learn about dry farming, see crops (tomatoes, potatoes, squash, melon, zucchini, dry beans, corn) grown without any supplemental irrigation in the field.

SAVE THESE DATES:

  • August 1st - Corvallis
  • August 8th - Springfield
  • August 15th - Southern Oregon
  • August 22nd - Elmira/Veneta
  • August 29th - Philomath/Corvallis

For more details about each day or to register visit http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/dry-farm/dry-farming-collaborative

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

DCWFN - Farm tour and work party (medicinal herb farm and garlic cleaning)

Small Farms Events - Thu, 08/03/2017 - 2:35pm
Thursday, August 3, 2017 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Viriditas Wild Garden & Foundhorn Gardens, Days Creek, OR
Farm tour and work party (medicinal herb farm and garlic cleaning)

 For more info click HERE

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Rock ‘n’ Roll

Terra - Thu, 08/03/2017 - 11:53am

By Lanesha Reagan

Loud beeps echo down the hall in the Women’s building, signaling the start of a machine the size of a small car that looks like a mechanical spider. I sit in a seat above its many legs, and my heart drops as it goes silent and lifts me higher. A moment later the machine — which scientists call the Six Degree-of-Freedom (6-DOF) motion platform — begins to vibrate and move up and down, from side to side and forward and back.

Luckily, I am strapped in with a seatbelt. The constant vibration doesn’t shake me right out of my seat. However, I do get a tingling in my back. That’s a clue to the purpose of this facility in Jay Kim’s lab. He’s busy trying to solve a major occupational health issue that has shaken the trucking, mining, construction and agriculture industries for decades.

Kiana Kia, a Ph.D. student in Industrial Engineering and Statistics, is studying whole body vibration and occupational safety in Jay Kim’s lab. (Photo: Theresa Hogue)

About 75 percent of workers who operate heavy machinery in these fields suffer from muscle and joint pain. In 2016, Kim and collaborators at the University of Washington and Northeastern University reported that low-back pain was the most prevalent of all the possible musculoskeletal ailments experienced by these drivers.

Kim is an assistant professor of Environmental and Occupational Health in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University. His study is funded by The Alpha Foundation and aims to evaluate the effects of whole-body vibration (WBV) exposure on low-back pain, biomechanical loading and physiological stresses in the musculoskeletal system.

“The study itself originated from a lot of field based epidemiological studies,” says Kim. “They have shown significant levels of exposure to whole-body vibration from moving vehicles, including semi trucks, heavy vehicles, vehicles in construction, mining and agriculture, as well as metro buses. Those exposures have been associated with various adverse health outcomes, including musculoskeletal disorders, especially in the low-back and neck regions.”

Back Injuries Are Prevalent

Studying the impacts of such exposure is only one aspect of Kim’s current study. Another is understanding why long-term exposure is creating these injuries. “We know that there are some links, but we don’t know the physiological evidence and exact underlying injury mechanisms that explain the association,” says Kim.

Legal regulations on exposure limits to whole-body vibration exist in the European Union, but the United States does not have such policies. With only recommendations and no consequences to employers, there is little push to limit workers’ exposure in the U.S. Injury compensation claims for musculoskeletal disorders account for the single largest component among all occupational injuries and illnesses in the country. According to Oregon’s Occupational Public Health Program, more than 1,700 cases of musculoskeletal disorders were reported in the transportation, construction, agriculture, and mining industries in 2015.

Near the University of Washington, where Kim received his Ph.D., one large transportation district is paying upwards of $3 million a year in compensation claims regarding lower back pain alone. With self-insured organizations footing the bill, the benefits of implementing new engineering technologies to reduce injuries could exceed the costs.

Jay Kim, left, is an assistant professor in Environmental and Occupational Health at Oregon State University. Kiana Kia, right, is studying whole body vibration and occupational health in Kim’s lab. (Photo: Theresa Hogue)

Bringing something new into the mix, Kim and his team simulate working conditions based on profiles, actual measurements made in mines, construction sites and other locations around the world. The more than 1,200 hours of profiles track the paths of vibrations that drivers experience during their shifts. Some are from as far away as mines in South America.

“The really unique thing is that most lab-based studies have been based upon random vibration or unrealistic sinusoidal (repetitive cycles) vibration,” says Kim. “But here, because we have the large-scale motion platform built with electromagnetic actuators, we can actually feed the vibrations measured from the field to the motion platform. So we can replicate exactly the same motion and vibration that you would feel if you were operating large-scale, heavy vehicles in the mining, construction and agriculture industries and all the way to a passenger car.”

All Shook Up

Kim can program the 6-DOF motion platform to simulate how operators move in all six directions during a work shift. Test subjects experience what it would be like if they were in control of heavy machinery at a mine or in a passenger car on a rough road.

While navigating through potholes or unpaved roads, drivers accept the risk of low-back pain throughout their eight-to-eleven-hour shifts. Prolonged exposure to those types of driving conditions may lead to musculoskeletal pain. The average age of truck drivers is going up, and the industry faces the difficulties of engaging workers to enter a field where their health may be at risk.

One of the main objectives of Kim’s study is to provide physiological evidence that can explain the association between whole-body-vibration exposure and musculoskeletal disorders, especially in the neck and low-back regions. His goal is to contribute to improved engineering interventions (such as seating and machinery design) and better occupational health and well-being for workers.

Volunteer Opportunities

While field studies typically generate data from drivers, Kim is recruiting test subjects for his laboratory-based studies from the university community and the city of Corvallis. Subjects cannot be pregnant, must be between the ages of 21 and 49 and have no current musculoskeletal issues or low-back disability. During the study, subjects will buckle into a truck seat mounted on the motion stimulator for two 2-hour sessions per day. In total, participants will be in the lab for eight hours a day over four days.

As I was being shaken by the 6-DOF firsthand, the feeling that I could tip off at any moment caused my stomach to drop, like it does on carnival rides. However, imagine that workers have to feel that intensity and pressure on their body for up to eleven hours. Going into work daily and knowing my body would be going through that strenuous experience would be difficult. It was exhilarating for five minutes, but five hours would be a whole other story.

People interested in being involved in this study can contact Kim, director of the Occupational Ergonomics and Biomechanics Lab, at oeb.lab@oregonstate.edu.

Editor’s note: Lanesha Reagan is a senior in English from Snohomish, Washington. She is also a member of the OSU Division 1 Women’s Volleyball team.

The post Rock ‘n’ Roll appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Dry Farming Collaborative Field Day

Small Farms Events - Tue, 08/01/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, August 1, 2017 (all day event)

More than ten Dry Farming Collaboratize members will be hosting tours for our field days in August! Come learn about dry farming, see crops (tomatoes, potatoes, squash, melon, zucchini, dry beans, corn) grown without any supplemental irrigation in the field.

SAVE THESE DATES:

  • August 1st - Corvallis
  • August 8th - Springfield
  • August 15th - Southern Oregon
  • August 22nd - Elmira/Veneta
  • August 29th - Philomath/Corvallis

For more details about each day or to register visit http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/dry-farm/dry-farming-collaborative

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

BCMGA Board Meeting

Gardening Events - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 6:13am
Monday, July 3, 2017 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Benton County Master Gardener board meeting

CC Master Gardener Board Meeting

Gardening Events - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 6:13am
Thursday, July 6, 2017 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

International Master Gardener Conference

Gardening Events - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 6:13am
Monday, July 10, 2017 - Friday, July 14, 2017 (all day event)

The International Master Gardener Conference (IMGC) has been held every two years since 1987.  The IMGC provides an opportunity for Master Gardeners, State and County coordinators to come together and learn through seminars and tours, celebrate successes through the International Search for Excellence Program, and meet and network with Master Gardener volunteers, faculty and staff from across the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and South Korea.

In 2017, the Oregon State University Extension Master Gardener Program and the Oregon Master Gardener Association will host the 2017 International Master Gardener Conference at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, Oregon, July 10-14, 2017, with support from many generous sponsors and friends.

National Children and Youth Garden Symposium

Gardening Events - Mon, 07/31/2017 - 6:13am
Thursday, July 13, 2017 - Saturday, July 15, 2017 (all day event)

Summer is almost here!  We hope your plans include joining us for the 25th National Children & Youth Garden Symposium (NCYGS)!  The deadline for online registration has been extended until Monday, June 26 (a nod to our educator friends - we know the end of the school year is busy)!  Registration onsite at the Hilton Vancouver, WA will also be available.

NCYGS is a one-of-a-kind professional development event for garden designers, public garden and school garden educators, parents, and anyone else who wants to learn more about getting kids excited about gardening and caring for the earth.

Learning doesn't stop during the summer, right?  Attend educational sessions that will answer the following questions and many more.

  • Where do the Maker and Local Food Movements intersect with youth gardening?
  • How can we make gardens inclusive, culturally-responsive, and allergen-free environments?
  • Who are Citizen Scientists and Plant Heros and how might they become the horticulture industry leaders of tomorrow?
  • What types of grants, corporate sponsorships, community partnerships, and micro-enterprise opportunities exist for funding youth gardening?

In addition to our educational sessions, excursions to local botanical, therapy, and school gardens, and fun keynote presentations, NCYGS has a lot more to offer:

  • a bookstore with a carefully-curated collection of brand new fiction and non-fiction titles and the ever-popular half-price table!
  • a farmers market just steps away on Saturday morning (and a break in the schedule to encourage a visit).
  • raffles and door prizes of great books and gardening swag from generous local companies Timber Press, Nature Play Sign, and Portland Nursery.
  • discounts at local shops, eateries, and transportation services, courtesy of Visit Vancouver.

 

Hyla Woods Gathering

Forestry Events - Sat, 07/29/2017 - 2:36pm
Saturday, July 29, 2017 9:00 AM - 7:00 PM

More Information: http://forestguild.org/node/443
REGISTER NOW: http://conta.cc/2smhBbI

Peter Hayes is a seventh-generation forest steward. He and his family have cared for Hyla Woods since 1986. Our tour will explore the forests of Hyla Woods, visit restoration forestry in practice, and see some of the many ways a thoughtful land steward leaves a mark on forests, and the ways they're marked by the forest in return. We will also create time for thoughtful discussion on how we'll build a stronger chapter of the Forest Stewards Guild in our region. Afterwards we'll come down from Mt. Richmond and continue the conversation at a nearby pub where we'll celebrate the publication of Jerry Franklin and Norm Johnson's long awaited new book, and discuss current forest issues and opportunities. If interested in car-pooling, contact Klaus.Puettmann@oregonstate.edu.

Stand Density Tour – Alsea Nelder plots

Forestry Events - Sat, 07/29/2017 - 2:36pm
Saturday, July 29, 2017 8:15 AM - 12:00 PM

Planting densities have a critical effect how individual trees and stands of trees grow. We will join Professor Mike Newton for a visit to a variable density research site (a Nelder plot) to hear some of what he learned there, and in other density-related work while at OSU. Join us for a lively discussion of planting densities and other management tools for supporting optimal stand health and productivity. Sponsored by the Benton Chapter of OSWA, Starker Forests and OSU Extension.

Location: We will meet at 8:15 at the office of Starker Forests, to car pool to the site in the Alsea area. We will depart promptly at 8:30.

Space is limited and registration is required by July 26. Register by calling Benton County Extension 541-766-6750, or email including your phone contact and number attending.

What to bring: Please come prepared for the weather of the day and being in the brush. Please wear long pants and closed toed shoes. Bring a water bottle, snacks or other personal items you need.

First-Year START orientation program Session 9

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 07/28/2017 - 2:41pm
Thursday, July 27, 2017 - Friday, July 28, 2017 (all day event)

START is a two-day program that occurs during the summer and is required for you to attend if you are entering Oregon State in the fall or summer term. You will need to attend both days and on-campus housing accommodations are offered, but it is not required for you to stay on campus during START.

At START you will:

  • Meet with advisors
  • Register for your fall term courses
  • Tour your residence hall and learn about what to expect
  • Meet other new students and hear from a current student’s experience
  • Learn about what it means to be part of the OSU Community
  • Take care of any business you still need to prepare for fall term

For all First Year START details, schedule and registration visit
First-Year Student | New Student Programs & Family Outreach | Oregon State University

For College of Public Health and Human Sciences' START details, contact the CPHHS Office of Student Success

 

CREATING FISH HABITAT ON PERKINS CREEK

Forestry Events - Wed, 07/26/2017 - 2:35pm
Wednesday, July 26, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Come to a Twilight Tour to see how private woodland owners implemented a stream habitat project near Clatskanie.  The Richen family worked with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife to plan and install five logjams in Perkins Creek in 2016.  See how the stream is changing to provide better conditions for salmon and trout. Hear from members of the Richen family and a biologist from ODFW about the project.

Date: Wednesday, July 26th

Time: 6:00—8:00 pm

All are welcome. Please RSVP: 503-397-3462

Directions from Clatskanie:

From Hwy 30 follow signs for Swedetown Rd. Take 0.2 miles to Olson Rd. Follow Olson Rd. for 2.2 miles and look for entrance to property on the left, immediately after Olson Rd. crosses Perkins Creek.

Co-sponsored by: OSU Extension Service, Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, and Columbia County Small Woodlands Association

Transfer START orientation program Session 3

Health & Wellness Events - Wed, 07/26/2017 - 2:35pm
Wednesday, July 26, 2017 (all day event)

Transfer START is a one-day program that occur during the summer and is required for you to attend if you are entering Oregon State in the fall or summer term. You will need to attend the full day in order to be eligible to register for classes.

At START you will:

  • Meet with advisors
  • Register for your fall term courses
  • Take care of any business you still to need to prepare for fall term
  • There are option components that allow you to learn about opportunities and resources that may be of interest to you.

For all Transfer START details, schedule and registration visit
Transfer START | New Student Programs & Family Outreach | Oregon State University

For College of Public Health and Human Sciences' START details, contact the CPHHS Office of Student Success

 

New video shows how underwater robotics contest prepares kids for technical jobs

Sea Grant - Tue, 07/25/2017 - 4:03pm

July 25, 2017

A new video shows how Oregon students are preparing for technical careers by building underwater robots for an annual competition in which they demonstrate their skills in front of engineers and scientists.

Contestants in MATE ROV competition learn engineering and problem solving skills. (photo by Daniel Cespedes)

The video, which was produced by Oregon State University with funding from Oregon Sea Grant, was filmed during the 2017 Oregon Regional MATE ROV Competition, which Oregon Sea Grant coordinates. It is one of about 30 regional contests around the world in which students qualify for an annual international competition.

Contestants operate their underwater devices remotely, and sometimes with a video monitor. (photo by Daniel Cespedes)

“Our goal is to really get students interested in science, technology, engineering and math — or STEM — and connect them with marine technicians and engineers and marine scientists that utilize remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs,” Tracy Crews, the manager of Oregon Sea Grant’s marine education program, said in the video.

Contestants often have to troubleshoot in real time. (photo by Daniel Cespedes)

Thirty-one teams from Oregon participated in this year’s competition, which was held in April at the pool at the Lincoln City Community Center. More than 200 students from elementary school through college demonstrated devices they built.

“For students who struggle with conventional school, it’s a chance for them to really shine,” Melissa Steinman, a teacher at Waldport High School, said in the video.

A new theme is chosen each year. This year’s theme highlighted the role of remotely operated vehicles in monitoring the environment and supporting industries in port cities. Like port managers and marine researchers, the students guided their robots through tasks that simulated identifying cargo containers that fell overboard, repairing equipment, and taking samples of hypothetically contaminated sediment and shellfish. Students also presented marketing materials they created and gave engineering presentations.

“A couple of teams, they just nailed it,” Ken Sexton, one of the judges and owner of The Sexton Corp., said in the video.

Students were also tasked with creating mock companies, thinking like entrepreneurs and working together to “manufacture, market, and sell” their robots. The students gained project management and communication skills as they managed a budget, worked as a team, brainstormed solutions and delivered presentations.

“Some of my team members are really, really good at programming, now,” Natalie DeWitt, a senior at Newport High School, said in the video. “And we have one kid who is really good at using CAD software design, now. And they actually had internships over the summer … those experiences we had in robotics gave us qualifications for jobs that we wouldn’t have had before.”

“It’s really good problem-solving, teamwork, just everything all together. It really helps … you have better skills for the future,” said Kyle Brown, a junior at Bandon High School.

Photos from the 2017 contest in Oregon are on Oregon Sea Grant’s Flickr page at c.kr/s/aHskYZdMiF

Volunteer scuba divers helped out at Oregon’s 6th annual Marine Advanced Technology Education Remotely Operated Vehicle competition at the pool at the Lincoln City Community Center. (photo by Daniel Cespedes)

The post New video shows how underwater robotics contest prepares kids for technical jobs appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

New video shows how underwater robotics contest prepares kids for technical jobs

Breaking Waves - Tue, 07/25/2017 - 4:03pm

July 25, 2017

A new video shows how Oregon students are preparing for technical careers by building underwater robots for an annual competition in which they demonstrate their skills in front of engineers and scientists.

Contestants in MATE ROV competition learn engineering and problem solving skills. (photo by Daniel Cespedes)

The video, which was produced by Oregon State University with funding from Oregon Sea Grant, was filmed during the 2017 Oregon Regional MATE ROV Competition, which Oregon Sea Grant coordinates. It is one of about 30 regional contests around the world in which students qualify for an annual international competition.

Contestants operate their underwater devices remotely, and sometimes with a video monitor. (photo by Daniel Cespedes)

“Our goal is to really get students interested in science, technology, engineering and math — or STEM — and connect them with marine technicians and engineers and marine scientists that utilize remotely operated vehicles, or ROVs,” Tracy Crews, the manager of Oregon Sea Grant’s marine education program, said in the video.

Contestants often have to troubleshoot in real time. (photo by Daniel Cespedes)

Thirty-one teams from Oregon participated in this year’s competition, which was held in April at the pool at the Lincoln City Community Center. More than 200 students from elementary school through college demonstrated devices they built.

“For students who struggle with conventional school, it’s a chance for them to really shine,” Melissa Steinman, a teacher at Waldport High School, said in the video.

A new theme is chosen each year. This year’s theme highlighted the role of remotely operated vehicles in monitoring the environment and supporting industries in port cities. Like port managers and marine researchers, the students guided their robots through tasks that simulated identifying cargo containers that fell overboard, repairing equipment, and taking samples of hypothetically contaminated sediment and shellfish. Students also presented marketing materials they created and gave engineering presentations.

“A couple of teams, they just nailed it,” Ken Sexton, one of the judges and owner of The Sexton Corp., said in the video.

Students were also tasked with creating mock companies, thinking like entrepreneurs and working together to “manufacture, market, and sell” their robots. The students gained project management and communication skills as they managed a budget, worked as a team, brainstormed solutions and delivered presentations.

“Some of my team members are really, really good at programming, now,” Natalie DeWitt, a senior at Newport High School, said in the video. “And we have one kid who is really good at using CAD software design, now. And they actually had internships over the summer … those experiences we had in robotics gave us qualifications for jobs that we wouldn’t have had before.”

“It’s really good problem-solving, teamwork, just everything all together. It really helps … you have better skills for the future,” said Kyle Brown, a junior at Bandon High School.

Photos from the 2017 contest in Oregon are on Oregon Sea Grant’s Flickr page at c.kr/s/aHskYZdMiF

Volunteer scuba divers helped out at Oregon’s 6th annual Marine Advanced Technology Education Remotely Operated Vehicle competition at the pool at the Lincoln City Community Center. (photo by Daniel Cespedes)

The post New video shows how underwater robotics contest prepares kids for technical jobs appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

First-Year START orientation program Session 8

Health & Wellness Events - Tue, 07/25/2017 - 2:48pm
Monday, July 24, 2017 - Tuesday, July 25, 2017 (all day event)

START is a two-day program that occurs during the summer and is required for you to attend if you are entering Oregon State in the fall or summer term. You will need to attend both days and on-campus housing accommodations are offered, but it is not required for you to stay on campus during START.

At START you will:

  • Meet with advisors
  • Register for your fall term courses
  • Tour your residence hall and learn about what to expect
  • Meet other new students and hear from a current student’s experience
  • Learn about what it means to be part of the OSU Community
  • Take care of any business you still need to prepare for fall term

For all First Year START details, schedule and registration visit
First-Year Student | New Student Programs & Family Outreach | Oregon State University

For College of Public Health and Human Sciences' START details, contact the CPHHS Office of Student Success

 

Summer 2017 “Shop at the Dock” tours in Newport and Warrenton show consumers how to buy in-season seafood

Breaking Waves - Mon, 07/17/2017 - 9:52am

Have you ever wanted to buy seafood right from the boat, but weren’t sure what questions to ask or what to look for? Have you ever stood at a seafood market staring at all the choices but not been sure what was local or in season?

If so, this summer is your chance to learn more about buying seafood. Experts with Oregon Sea Grant and the Oregon State University Extension Service will demystify the process during free, guided dockside tours in Newport and Warrenton that connect seafood lovers with commercial fishermen.

Oregon Sea Grant and Extension have been offering the tours – called Shop at the Dock – every summer in Newport since 2014, but this is the first year the event has expanded to Warrenton. During the tours, participants learn what seafood is in season, how it’s caught, whether it’s sustainable, and how to identify and buy high-quality fish and shellfish. Last year, the tours drew more than 350 people, said Kaety Jacobson, an Oregon Sea Grant marine fisheries specialist with Oregon State University’s Extension Service.

Dates for the remaining Newport tours are July 21 and 28, and Aug. 4, 11 and 18, 2017 with groups departing from dock 5 at 9:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. each day. The 90-minute tours are free and on a first-come, first-served basis. In Newport, registration is required only for groups of five or more by calling 541-574-6534 ext. 57427.

In Warrenton, the remaining tours will take place Sept. 15, 2017, at 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. and will include a tour of the Skipanon Brand Seafood cannery. Participants will also learn where they can find locally caught fish in local markets. Tours will start at the Warrenton Marina near the harbormaster’s office at 550 N.E. Harbor Place. For the Warrenton event, registration by phone is required for everyone and is on a first-come, first-served basis. To register, call 503-325-8573.

At both sites, participants are advised to wear comfortable walking shoes with traction, arrive 15 minutes early, and bring cash and a cooler with ice. For disability accommodations, please call the numbers above.

Joe Phillips, of fishing vessel Triggerfish, shows off an albacore tuna during the 2016 Shop at the Dock tours, which were organized by Oregon Sea Grant and Oregon State University’s Extension Service. (Photo by Lynn Ketchum, OSU)

The post Summer 2017 “Shop at the Dock” tours in Newport and Warrenton show consumers how to buy in-season seafood appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs