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CC Master Gardener Board Meeting

Gardening Events - Fri, 06/30/2017 - 6:12am
Thursday, June 1, 2017 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

National Get Outdoors Day

Gardening Events - Fri, 06/30/2017 - 6:12am
Saturday, June 3, 2017 (all day event)

The fifth annual National Get Outdoors Day event will be held on Saturday June 3rd, 2017 from 10am-3pm at Peavy Arboretum. This free event is hosted by OSU College of Forestry and OSU Benton County Extension, and will feature a variety of hands-on activities to connect youth and families with the great outdoors. Spanish speaking volunteers will provide bilingual assistance. 

Join us and discover the forest in your backyard. For more information visit the website at: http://cf.forestry.oregonstate.edu/get-outdoors-day

BCMGA Board Meeting

Gardening Events - Fri, 06/30/2017 - 6:12am
Monday, June 5, 2017 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Benton County Master Gardener board meeting

Scientific Illustration Exhibition

Gardening Events - Fri, 06/30/2017 - 6:12am
Wednesday, June 7, 2017 5:00 PM - Friday, June 9, 2017 5:00 PM

RECEPTION JUNE 7, 5-6 PM

OPEN VIEWING JUNE 8-9, 3-5 PM 

Tethered Harvester Tour

Forestry Events - Thu, 06/29/2017 - 2:53pm
Thursday, June 29, 2017 2:45 PM - 6:00 PM
Mechanized harvesting with cut-to-length processors has revolutionized forest management in recent decades. This equipment allows earlier selective harvest in young stands, which helps landowners manage for a wider range of objectives. Tethering is the newest technological advancement, which allows this equipment to operate on slopes otherwise too steep for ground-based harvesting. On this tour, we will see a tethered harvester in operation and look at the results of recent thinnings. Sponsored by the Benton Chapter of OSWA, Miller Timber Services, Starker Forests and OSU Extension.

Date: Thursday June 29, 2017

Time: 2:45 to 6:30 pm

Location: We will meet at 2:45 at the office of Miller Timber Services, 24745 Alsea Hwy, Philomath to load vans before heading to sites in the Alsea area. We will depart promptly at 3:00. 

Space is limited and registration is required and will close by June 26. Register by calling Benton County Extension 541-766-6750, or by email including your phone contact and number attending.

Cost: $5 fee to help cover van costs 

What to bring: Please come prepared for the weather of the day and a visit to an active harvest site. Closed-toed shoes, long pants and hardhat are recommended. Bring a water bottle, snacks or other personal items you need.

Irrigation Management in Pastures

Small Farms Events - Thu, 06/29/2017 - 2:53pm
Thursday, June 29, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

OSU Forage Management Series

Small Farms Events - Thu, 06/29/2017 - 2:53pm
Thursday, June 29, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM
Each part consists of an evening classroom presentation at the Oldfield Animal Teaching Facility on the OSU campus, followed by a morning field practical at a local outdoor location.

Class meets Wednesdays (6 – 8:30 pm) and Thursdays (10 – noon). Topics for each month are:
April 19 & 20 – Farm and Forage Assessment
May 24 & 25 – Harvest Management
June 28 & 29 – Irrigation
August 16 and 17 – Fertility
September 20 and 21 – Renovation Techniques

Speakers will be Shelby Filley, David Hannaway, Serkan Ates, Gene Pirelli, and Troy Downing, plus other OSU faculty and local experts.

This series will focus on a “project ranch” that we work on together, including site visits and on-line document sharing and blog. The project ranch will be the Wilson Farm, the OSU sheep facility with sheep and cattle grazing the pastures. You can also work on your own ranch as a side project if desired. The objective of the series is to improve knowledge about managing forage on properties in the Willamette Valley.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (Drones): How they operate and their potential for improving your forest and range land management.

Forestry Events - Wed, 06/28/2017 - 3:16pm
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 9:00 AM - Wednesday, June 28, 2017 12:00 PM

-Tuesday, June 27, Oberteuffer Research and Education Forest, Elgin
-Wednesday, June 28, Defrees Ranch, Sumpter
-Time: 9:00 am to 12 noon both days.


Directions:
Oberteuffer Research and Education Forest:
To get there…1) Drive 7.3 miles from Elgin NE on Highway 82 to the Stubblefield Mountain/Pine Grove Loop
road; 2) Turn right; and 3) Travel 2.5 miles on the main gravel road to the northeast corner property access gate.
There is a sign at the entrance. Go through the gate and drive about 1/2 mile to the building.


Defrees Ranch:
From Baker City drive west on Highway 7 towards Sumpter for 24 miles. Turn Left onto Huckleberry Loop (you
will drive past the Sumpter Valley Railroad station). Drive for approximately 1 mile then turn left onto the Defrees
driveway which will be marked for the event.
Content: A question we frequently get from landowner’s is how can UAV’s be utilized to help manage woodland
and range properties in eastern Oregon? To help answer your questions we are going to demonstrate and discuss
how these machines can be used as a tool for management and provide some guidelines for their
purchase.


Come and join us for a great opportunity to learn more about this new technology from experts who have been
using them.

Our special instructors for this program are:
Mark Ducey, Ethan Blair, Frankie Sullivan, University of New Hampshire Angela Boag, University of Colorado

We will have extra water. Bring appropriate clothes for the weather and wear boots, there will be some
walking.


We need to know how many copies of handouts to make so please RSVP for the demonstration at the Oberteuffer
Research and Education by contacting the OSU Union County Extension Office in La Grande at 541-963-
1010. For the Defrees Ranch demonstration, please RSVP with the OSU Baker County Extension Office in Baker
City at 541-523-6418.


This is a unique opportunity to see how this technology works and its application to managing your woodlands
and rangelands.

Irrigation Management in Pastures

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/28/2017 - 3:16pm
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

NWREC Caneberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/28/2017 - 3:16pm
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Mark your calendars for our field days at Oregon State University’s North Willamette Research and Extension Center in Aurora.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

OSU Forage Management Series

Small Farms Events - Wed, 06/28/2017 - 3:16pm
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

Each part consists of an evening classroom presentation at the Oldfield Animal Teaching Facility on the OSU campus, followed by a morning field practical at a local outdoor location.

Class meets Wednesdays (6 – 8:30 pm) and Thursdays (10 – noon). Topics for each month are:
April 19 & 20 – Farm and Forage Assessment
May 24 & 25 – Harvest Management
June 28 & 29 – Irrigation
August 16 and 17 – Fertility
September 20 and 21 – Renovation Techniques

Pre-registration and a $30 fee per part per ranch is required. There is a discounted price of $120 for signing up for all five parts. Click here for on-line registration. If you do not have Internet access, stop by or call the OSU Extension Linn County office, 541-248-1088 for assistance.



Speakers will be Shelby Filley, David Hannaway, Serkan Ates, Gene Pirelli, and Troy Downing, plus other OSU faculty and local experts.

This series will focus on a “project ranch” that we work on together, including site visits and on-line document sharing and blog. The project ranch will be the Wilson Farm, the OSU sheep facility with sheep and cattle grazing the pastures. You can also work on your own ranch as a side project if desired. The objective of the series is to improve knowledge about managing forage on properties in the Willamette Valley.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Growing a Diverse Forest and Making Money: How Some Small Woodland Owners Do It

Tree Topics - Wed, 06/28/2017 - 8:20am

By Amy Grotta, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension – Columbia, Washington & Yamhill Counties

Lately on this blog we’ve been discussing ways to grow a diverse forest.  Many small woodland owners are interested in maintaining diversity on their land, yet strive to do it in a way that also brings in income from timber or other means. For these reasons, I was intrigued by the work of Julian Geisel, who recently wrapped up his master’s degree in the College of Forestry at OSU. His research topic, “Management Strategies for Small, Income Generating and Structurally Diverse Forests” is particularly relevant to small woodland owners. Julian’s research focused on private woodlands in western Oregon, representative of the vast majority of the owners that we work with in Extension. I interviewed Julian about his work.

 

Julian Geisel, former OSU graduate student

What question did you set out to explore through your research?

I wanted to know what strategies help make it possible to generate income while maintaining or improving structural diversity on a small-scale forest. Most small woodland owners want or need to produce income from their property. Society values forest diversity, and so do many woodland owners, but many believe it’s not possible to maintain without sacrificing income. However, some woodland owners have been successful at it, and so I wanted to know if there were specific strategies or things they had in common, that other woodland owners could apply.

 

What methods did you use to accomplish this?

I conducted extensive interviews with six owners with between 25 – 150 acres in the Willamette Valley. These owners all had stated income generation and maintaining diversity as goals in their management plans. In the interviews, we discussed their management philosophy, successes and challenges they had in achieving their management goals, and resources or people that they relied upon. I used these interviews to look for patterns and evidence, and to validate my interpretation, I had another student independently review all the interview transcripts.

In addition, I did field assessments to try to quantify the extent to which these owners’ forests were structurally diverse. I looked at features of the overstory, understory, ground cover, and dead wood, for example. Then, I reviewed each landowner’s records to evaluate how much income they were producing. Finally, after doing all of this work and coming up with my own theories and ideas, I went back to each landowner for a second interview to confirm that my interpretations of what they said were correct.

 

How did the woodland owners that you interviewed describe structural diversity on their property, and why was this type of management important to them?

Structurally diverse forest in Linn County

Well, structural diversity is sort of a technical term. Some talked about it in terms of having habitat, or areas for wildlife. Some described their property as being more “natural”, and others simply recognized diversity across the landscape; i.e. their property is different from their neighbors’ and that in itself created diversity. Their motivations varied, but included the desire to maintain a functioning ecosystem, reducing pest risk, having more options for selling timber, or simply wanting to do what they felt was best for the land.

Among the landowners, I found a continuum between those that were more income-driven, and those that were very passionate about the concept of diversity, but all of them incorporated some of both into the management of their forest. Some did not think there had to be a tradeoff between the two, some created diversity or income without necessarily intending to in the process of reaching another goal.

 

How did these owners make money from their forestland?

Some of the income generation strategies included: selling timber, selling specialty wood, renting out a residence on the property, leasing other parts of the property for grazing, selling firewood or boughs, and providing timber management services or equipment for other landowners.  Sometimes owners would reinvest the profit from a one-time timber sale into a different type of asset that would provide a more regular cash flow.

Also important were strategies to save money, such as using firewood, construction materials and residential water from one’s own land; sharing resources with other woodland owners; keeping forest operations small and manageable so that the owners could do it themselves instead of hiring out; and learning how best to navigate the tax system.

Finally, owners emphasized the secondary benefits their forests provided, that had indirect value to them, such as mental health, stress reduction, physical fitness, and recreation.

 

What are the challenges to achieving structural diversity and income generation on a small acreage?

Scale is a problem. Landowners said that setting aside areas as ecological “preserves” is difficult when there are fewer acres to work with. All acres need to contribute to both income and diversity goals on very small properties Additionally, landowners recognized that there are many external factors influencing their forest that are both complex to understand, and hard to control – such as markets, tax systems, and regulations. These things, if not taken into proper consideration, can impinge on their goals.

 

If one were interested in balancing income generation and structural diversity, what seem to be the most important strategies to be successful?

Everyone mentioned that learning is a lifelong and continuous process. They combined learning by doing, and observing nature with listening to other people’s accounts during classes or by reading up on topics. Having mentors such as family members or neighbors and conducting little documented experiments characterized even more sophisticated managers.

Integrating their actions to achieve multiple goals is another important strategy. The landowners said that without much additional effort, by making small tweaks to their management they could produce income while maintaining or improving forest diversity, or vice versa. One memorable example was thinning plantations and leaving head-high snags. This action increased future income, created snags and made falling trees a little easier and faster.

Cultivating trusting relationships with others seem to be crucial. Forest management yielded successes quicker as a joint effort. So in the end, it’s not about the trees, it’s about people.

 

Congratulations to Julian on successful completion of his degree.  He plans to post more information about his project at his website, http://smallforests.com/ 

The post Growing a Diverse Forest and Making Money: How Some Small Woodland Owners Do It appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

First-Year START orientation program Session 1

Health & Wellness Events - Tue, 06/27/2017 - 2:37pm
Monday, June 26, 2017 - Tuesday, June 27, 2017 (all day event)

START is a two-day program that occurs during the summer and is required for you to attend if you are entering Oregon State in the fall or summer term. You will need to attend both days and on-campus housing accommodations are offered, but it is not required for you to stay on campus during START.

At START you will:

  • Meet with advisors
  • Register for your fall term courses
  • Tour your residence hall and learn about what to expect
  • Meet other new students and hear from a current student’s experience
  • Learn about what it means to be part of the OSU Community
  • Take care of any business you still need to prepare for fall term

For all First Year START details, schedule and registration visit
First-Year Student | New Student Programs & Family Outreach | Oregon State University

For College of Public Health and Human Sciences' START details, contact the CPHHS Office of Student Success

 

Christmas Tree Training Day

Forestry Events - Mon, 06/26/2017 - 2:35pm
Monday, June 26, 2017 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Audience: FNR and other OSU staff wanting to learn about Christmas tree production and management to help with client questions. Will discuss- “How to find answers to those Christmas tree questions that may come your way”.

Chal Landgren, OSU Extension Christmas Tree Specialist, will be the instructor.

Where: Holiday Tree Farm Nursery, 30132 Beaver Creek Rd. Corvallis, Oregon. Look for the “Christmas Tree Class” sign near the front office. Class will be a mix of field and indoor discussions, assuming it stops raining.

When: Monday, June 26; 8:30-4:00 pm

Topics:

·         The Basics- costs/returns, where Oregon fits? statistics, rules, associations and the National Check- Off Program.

·         Getting started-soils and nutrient management (EM 8856-E-Christmas Tree Nutrient Management Guide). Just the high points- what growers need to do to assess their site and be successful before planting a tree.

·         All about seedlings- Tour of nursery and Christmas tree seed orchard (Scott Godwin- Holiday Nursery Manager)

·         Growing trees- tree culturing and genetics- field and class (PNW 6 and 684)

·         Keeping trees healthy-diseases/insects/weed control- field and class (PNW 659+ PNW Disease, Weed and Insect Handbooks)

·         A Growers Perspective- Issues and concerns in the industry- Mark Arkills, Holiday Tree Farm Area Manager.

·         Where to get help for growers and yourself? - Associations, WSU, ODA, OSU connections.

Bring your lunch. Snacks and refreshments provided.

 

To Register for the class: E-mail Chal Landgren (chal.landgren@oregonstate.edu) or call 971.801.0381. Preregister by 6/22/17.

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs