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Woodland Management Shortcourse - Linn County

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:41pm
Thursday, November 2, 2017 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM

The Basic Woodland Management Shortcourse is an Extension program ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property. It gives a broad introduction to woodland ownership activities. It is offered in four evening sessions with a Saturday fieldtrip. Course themes include:
     • Getting Started - Assessing your property and your site
     • What’s Going on in Your Woods? - Understanding tree biology and forest ecology
     • Taking Care of Your Woods - Tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control
     • Getting it Done - Safety, timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations.

 

Registration by October 20th. Register online or call the Benton County Extension 541-766-6750  

Space is limited and registration is required.

Living on the Land - Lane County

Forestry Events - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:41pm
Thursday, November 2, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are 5 two hour classes in the series, 6-8pm. You can take just one class for $10, or all of the classes for $30. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water and Electric Board. 

Topics covered include: land stewardship planning, soils, and water resources; well and septic systems; woodlands and wildlife; pasture and grazing management; weed management

Information and Registration

High Tunnel Production & Marketing for the Diversified Vegetable Farm

Small Farms Events - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:41pm
Thursday, November 2, 2017 9:30 AM - 12:30 PM

BIG LICK FARM –942 Winston Section Rd, Winston

Big Lick Farm has been in operation for 10 years and they recently moved to a new, larger farm   location. Suzie will give a tour of her farm and discuss their diversified marketing channels and how they use high tunnels to extend their season.  Participants will have an opportunity to network over lunch.

www.biglickfarm.com

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/douglas/douglas-county-womens-farmer-network

Questions and to RSVP:

Contact Sara Runkel, Small Farms & Food Systems Coordinator

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Living on the Land (Lane)

Small Farms Events - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:41pm
Thursday, November 2, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Weed Management

Learn about management strategies for common weeds on your land.  Living on the Land is a workshop series tailored for small acreage landowners and those new to managing land. There are five classes in the series. This program is sponsored by the OSU Extension Service in Lane County and Eugene Water & Electric Board. This this the first in the series of five.  For additional information, go to the website: http://bit.ly/LaneSmallFarms  Preregistration required.

    $10/CLASS,  $30 FOR SERIES or $35 FOR 2 Farm Partners

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

At the Edge of the Forest

Terra - Thu, 11/02/2017 - 1:25pm
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Forest-dwelling animals don’t have to live right by a road, pasture or human settlement to be affected by what scientists call forest edges. Indeed, animals up to a kilometer (0.6 miles) from an edge show a measurable impact from their proximity to areas where trees have been removed to make way for other land uses.

In the largest-ever analysis of arboreal vertebrate species — 1,673 species on five continents — an international team of researchers has found that 85 percent are either attracted to or avoid the edges of forests. For 46 percent, the response is positive; edges provide these species with the resources they need to survive.

Tapirs are among the species that are threatened by the break up of forests into smaller patches. (Photo: Adam Hadley, Oregon State University)

However, scientists are more concerned with the 39 percent that show negative effects. That’s because as intact forested landscapes diminish and become broken into smaller areas, species that prefer the deep woods face shrinking habitats and an increased threat of extinction. The findings emphasize the need for conservation programs to preserve large areas of forestland and prevent them from being divided into smaller fragments.

Adam Hadley and Urs Kormann, research associate and post-doctoral scientist respectively in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University, are co-authors of a paper announcing the team’s findings in the journal Nature. Marion Pfeifer at Newcastle University in the United Kingdom is the lead author of a team of 32 researchers from the U.K, North and South America, Europe, Australia, Africa and Australia.

The study is the latest showing how the rapid fragmentation of the world’s forests is affecting animal extinctions and biodiversity. About half of the world’s forested acres are now thought to be within 500 meters — the length of five and a half football fields — of the edge of a road, pasture or other non-forest land use.

Examples of species that depend on unbroken swaths of forested landscapes include the Sunda pangolin (Manis javanica), the Bahia tapaculo (Eleoscytalopus psychopompus), the long-billed black cockatoo (Zanda baudinii) and Baird’s tapir (Tapirus bairdii).

For this study, researchers assembled data for animal abundance across a range of mostly tropical landscapes, from open non-forested habitats to forest edges and deep within remote jungles. For each of the species included in the paper, the researchers calculated two measurements, which they call “edge influence” and “edge sensitivity,” in order to capture the complexity of relationships between species and habitats.

“I was shocked that we could find this effect for so many species going so deep into the forest,” said Hadley, who studies pollinators in forested areas of Costa Rica and Oregon. Studies of deep forest habitats are especially rare, he said, since such areas are difficult to reach. Nevertheless, the data show that edges really matter, he added. “There are few remaining areas where you don’t have intrusions into the forests, such as roads and other activities. Maybe we should consider not putting roads into them. It may be valuable just to keep them as remote as possible. There aren’t that many left.”

The study is the first to document universal patterns across many groups of animals, said Kormann. “This adds stark evidence to the idea that, if we are to conserve species diversity on this planet, there is no alternative to doing more to safeguard the last expansive tracts of rainforest.”

The study was funded by the European Research Council.

The post At the Edge of the Forest appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Spalting Tour - OSU

Forestry Events - Wed, 11/01/2017 - 1:44pm
Wednesday, November 1, 2017 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Come visit Dr. Seri Robinson at the Applied Mycology Lab at Oregon State University and learn about some of the wonderful things fungus can do by “spalting” wood. See firsthand, how she and her team are learning how to manage the spalting process in pursuit of beautiful and valuable wood and other applications. This is a follow-up to the great teaser presentation Seri gave at last year’s Benton Chapter OSWA Annual meeting.
spalting:
1. (noun) Any coloration of wood, either living or dead, by fungi, which is considered visually or texturally appealing.
2. (verb) Process producing spalted wood

Location: OSU campus, meet at the south entrance to Richardson Hall before heading to the lab. Parking on campus free after 5:00 pm.

Registration required, space is limited. Register by October 30th. Call Benton County Extension office 541-766-6750, or email include a contact phone and the number attending. 

Hitting the Genetic Jackpot

Terra - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 4:11pm

By Dani Douglas

Your environment — including food choices, exercise habits and sun exposure — contributes the most when it comes to living to an average age. But it is your genes that determine how likely you are to live to an exceptional age.

Harold Bae, assistant professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences

“We define exceptional age as the top 1 percent survival rate in a particular birth year cohort,” says Assistant Professor Harold Bae, who investigated the role of genes on longevity in a recent study published in the Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences.

“For example, in the New England Centenarian Study, the birth year cohort is 1900. That means that males age 96 and older and females age 100 and older have reached exceptional age.”

One example of our genes’ influence on exceptional aging shows up among siblings. Male siblings of centenarians are 17 times more likely than other men born around the same time to reach 100, and female siblings are 8.5 times more likely to reach 100.

A gene debunked

Bae and his team looked closely at genetic data in the blood samples of 2,072 subjects from four centenarian studies. One of the most interesting findings was that a gene called FOX03, which the scientific community has been studying for a decade, has less of an impact on exceptional aging than previously thought.

“The definition of longevity wasn’t consistent in prior studies,” says Bae. “The data shows that as subjects got older, the effect of FOX03 went down, and there was no survival benefit over the age of 95.”

“We don’t think that it’s a single gene,” he adds. “It looks like it’s a combination of genes and that, when they work together, they’re able to push your health span closer to life span, which is related to a hypothesis introduced over 35 years ago called compression of morbidity.”

The term ”compression of morbidity” was coined by James Fries of Stanford University in 1980. He theorized that most illness is chronic and occurs later in life — and that the lifetime burden of illness could be reduced if the onset of chronic illness could be postponed.

People living to exceptional age typically have an elongated health span close to life span, meaning they live in a healthful state until just a few years before they die. Those who live an average lifespan typically have a shorter health span and suffer longer in their later years.

Control the average

The average lifespan for Americans is currently 78.8 years. The good news for the majority of the population who won’t reach exceptional longevity is that 70 percent to 80 percent of normal aging is within our control in the choices we make daily for our health and well-being.

Bae cites the Seventh Day Adventists as an example. “This is a population that doesn’t engage in a lot of risky behaviors,” he says. “They don’t smoke or drink, and they eat well, and their lifespan is eight to 10 years longer than average.”

Because the healthy aging and longevity gene combination remains unknown, Bae and his team are focusing their efforts on using more advanced statistical techniques to tease meaningful results from small samples. The more they can study these prodigious individuals, the more we can learn about living the longest — and healthiest — life possible.

Calling all supercentenarians 

Living to 100 has its benefits, such as a longer health span and special words to designate the milestone.

  • A centenarian has reached 100 years old. About one in 5,000 people are centenarians.
  • Semi-supercentenarians are between the ages of 105 and 109. About one in 250,000 people reach this stage.
  • A supercentenarian is 110 years or older. About one in 5 million live this long.

According to a 2010 report published by the United States Census Bureau, the number of centenarians nationally is on the rise. In 1980, there were 32,194 centenarians, or 1.42 for every 100,000 people. In 2010, the number grew to 53,364 or 1.73 in every 100,000.

In 2010, centenarians were overwhelmingly female – 82.8 percent versus 17.2 percent male.

The post Hitting the Genetic Jackpot appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Inspiring Student Innovation

Terra - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 3:31pm

By Keith Hautala

Few things are more rewarding for graduate engineering students at Oregon State than a research partnership with a national laboratory. The highly motivated students who come to these facilities combine ambition and hard work with unique mentoring opportunities and access to the world’s most advanced scientific equipment, including supercomputers and particle accelerators.

The U.S. Department of Energy has 17 national labs scattered across the United States. These facilities are dedicated to finding innovative solutions to the world’s most urgent scientific challenges.

“Working at one of the national laboratories is a great opportunity for graduate students,” said Zdenek Dohnalek, deputy director of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washington. “The unique collaborative environment, state-of-the-art instrumentation and broad range of scientific expertise make for a winning combination. Students gain experience that is hard to get anywhere else.”

Ryan Frederick, a Ph.D. student in chemical engineering, used this scanning tunneling microscope system at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to study titanium dioxide clusters on graphene.

Ryan Frederick, a Ph.D. candidate in chemical engineering, spent last summer working at the national lab under Dohnalek’s supervision. His research aims at developing next-generation materials for the electronics industry — specifically, better photoresists based on inorganic metal oxide clusters.

Frederick’s project involved studying the growth of titanium dioxide clusters on graphene, which required him to become proficient in a technique called scanning tunneling microscopy. The timing couldn’t have been better; Oregon State is about to acquire a new scanning tunneling microscopy system, and Frederick has been tapped to help bring the instrument online.

“I now have a lot of experience with the technique, so I can help bring the new system to the university and train people to use it,” said Frederick.

A Better Battery

Lynza Sprowl, a Ph.D. student in chemical engineering, uses a supercomputer at the Argonne National Lab to perform computational molecular studies on battery anode chemistries.

Lynza Sprowl, who is also pursuing a Ph.D. in chemical engineering, is spending an entire year working in the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory near Chicago. Sprowl focuses on the future of energy, particularly battery and fuel cell technologies. Her doctoral research delves into surface interactions that drive the chemical processes of catalysis and corrosion.

Sprowl’s work at Argonne, supported by the Department of Energy’s Office of Science Graduate Student Research program, involves modeling these interactions on a giant supercomputer. The national lab’s supercomputing resources enable Sprowl to accumulate data in a fraction of the time it would take back home. She’ll also have access to some of the best minds in her field.

“They have a great battery community at Argonne, so I’ll be drawing on their expertise,” said Sprowl. “Knowing that I’m doing something I really care about — that can also make a difference — is very exciting to me.”

Argonne is also home to the Advanced Photon Source, a facility that generates a massive beam of high-energy synchrotron X-rays used in various types of research. The beamline is divided among dozens of workstations. Each is occupied continuously, as investigators from around the country apply for “beam time” months in advance.

See the Flow

Environmental engineering master’s students Doug Meisenheimer and Rebecca Paustian have each made trips out to the synchrotron, where they use a technique called X-ray microtomography (micro-CT) to construct high-resolution 3-D images of multi-phase fluid flow through porous media. The technique enables them to, for example, track the movement of water, oil, and air through a sandstone aquifer. This type of research is instrumental in improving technologies for oil recovery and decontamination of drinking water reservoirs.

Doug Meiseheimer in environmental engineering used X-ray microtomography at the Argonne National Lab to construct high-resolution 3-D images of fluid flow through porous media. The technique applies to fluids such as water and oil in sand, gravel and rock.

The micro-CT workstations at Argonne are set up only three times a year, and the demand for beam time is so great that it is doled out in 48-hour increments. The tight scheduling leaves little margin for error, and there is intense pressure to make every moment count.

“We try to take shifts, but if experiments aren’t going well — or if it’s really exciting, if things are happening — we stay up most of the time,” said Meisenheimer. “I usually get maybe five hours of sleep during those 48 hours.”

In one 48-hour stint, the team can generate upwards of 2.5 terabytes of data, the equivalent of 100 Blu-Ray discs, full of high-resolution 3-D images.

The intensive, immersive environment at the synchrotron instills students with increased focus and clarity. “Condensing the project into such a short time period helped me learn quickly,” said Paustian.

Meisenheimer said that the national lab experience was truly inspirational. “It’s a huge facility. The synchrotron is 1.1 kilometers (more than a half mile) in circumference. Posters are displayed everywhere outlining current research. It’s amazing to see all the different types of work generating new ideas about what I want to do.”

_______________________________________________

See this and other stories about research partnerships in the fall 2017 issue of Momentum from the College of Engineering.

The post Inspiring Student Innovation appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

2017 OSU Land Steward Training

Forestry Events - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 1:36pm
Tuesday, October 31, 2017 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Early Bird Registration before Aug. 1 save $50:   Register online here
Registration Deadline Aug. 15; Cost Full Registration price: $200 individual, $275 Couple.

For more information visit The Land Steward Web Page or call 541-776-7371

Apply today to participate in this fun and informative, field-based educational program that helps landowners learn what they have, decide how to manage it, and make a plan to get there. The program is based out of the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, 569 Hanley Road, Central Point.

 
The Land Steward Program, is an 11-week field-based course.  It is designed to help landowners, from small plots to large acreage, develop a management plan to accomplish their goals.
 
The program covers a full spectrum of land management considerations, from forests to farms, soils, water, pasture management, fire awareness, wildlife, economics and connection to resources that help landowners implement their plans.  Participants receive handouts, references, resources, professional presentations and site visits to bring the learning alive!

BCMGA Board Meeting

Gardening Events - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 5:06am
Monday, October 2, 2017 1:00 PM - 3:00 PM
Benton County Master Gardener board meeting

CC Master Gardener Board Meeting

Gardening Events - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 5:06am
Thursday, October 5, 2017 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Mason Bee Cocoon Cleaning Workshops with OSU Linn County Extension

Gardening Events - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 5:06am
Thursday, October 19, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Learn how to harvest, clean and store your Mason Bee cocoons. Bring your mason bee boxes, tubes and cocoons. Didn't get any Mason Bees this year? Feel free to come anyways and you can help process cocoons from some of the "super sites". These classes are taught by pollinator extraordinaires within our Linn County Master Gardener group.

 Sign-up here

Mason Bee Cocoon Cleaning Workshops with OSU Linn County Extension

Gardening Events - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 5:06am
Saturday, October 21, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Learn how to harvest, clean and store your Mason Bee cocoons. Bring your mason bee boxes, tubes and cocoons. Didn't get any Mason Bees this year? Feel free to come anyways and you can help process cocoons from some of the "super sites". These classes are taught by pollinator extraordinaires within our Linn County Master Gardener group.

Sign-up here

Mason Bee Cocoon Cleaning Workshops with OSU Linn County Extension

Gardening Events - Tue, 10/31/2017 - 5:06am
Saturday, October 28, 2017 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Learn how to harvest, clean and store your Mason Bee cocoons. Bring your mason bee boxes, tubes and cocoons. Didn't get any Mason Bees this year? Feel free to come anyways and you can help process cocoons from some of the "super sites". These classes are taught by pollinator extraordinaires within our Linn County Master Gardener group.

Sign-up here

Citizen Fire Academy - Douglas County

Forestry Events - Mon, 10/30/2017 - 1:36pm
Monday, October 30, 2017 12:00 AM - 11:55 PM
Online modules from the comfort of your own home. Each online module includes reading and video tutorials, review exercises, discussion board. Throughout the course, you will work on your own fire preparedness plan and present your final plan at the graduation session.

Firewise techniques - Jacksonville

Forestry Events - Sat, 10/28/2017 - 1:35pm
Saturday, October 28, 2017 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Know what you want to do on your property but not quite sure how best to do it? Sometimes the best way to get answers and learn something new is to go out and do it. Join forest and fire professionals from Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), and Oregon State University Extension (SOREC) to get real-time guidance as you are building your own burn pile, selecting trees that will be thinned, and other activities during this field day. By the end of the day you will have the chance to see the results of your work.

Training Includes:
•Selective Thinning for Fuels
•Effective Pile Burning and Tree Friendly Pruning
•Chainsaw Maintenance
•Chipper Use

RSVP by 10/23 @ 541-776-7371
Or online at http://bit.ly/LandStewardClasses

CARPOOL LEAVES OSU EXTENSION 569 HANLEY ROAD, CENTRAL POINT AT 8:30 A.M.

 

Selling Logs from your Property- (Lane)

Forestry Events - Sat, 10/28/2017 - 1:35pm
Saturday, October 28, 2017 9:00 AM - 5:30 PM

This two day symposium runs Friday October 27 from 5:00 - 8:30 PM and Saturday, October 28 fro 9 AM to 5:30 PM. Landowners log their property for a number of reasons. For some, it’s the culmination of decades of planning and hard work to produce a valuable crop. For others, it might be a liquidation of an asset to meet a sudden financial need. Still, others might be undertaking a thinning operation to improve forest health and habitat. Whatever your reason or goal, selling logs is a high-stakes endeavor, and mistakes can be costly – this is not a time to cut corners! Make sure your property looks how you want it to when the job is done and don’t risk unnecessary damage to your property that could take decades to restore.

At the symposium, participants will hear from consulting foresters, loggers, log buyers, small woodland landowners, and representatives from OSU Extension Service and the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Topics include:

  • ·         Timber sale fundamentals
  • ·         Fair value for your logs
  • ·         Rights and responsibilities
  • ·         Benefits of a forestry consultant
  • ·         Protecting yourself from liability
  • ·         Inventory and marketing
  • ·         How to select a logger
  • ·         Notifications and harvest regulations
  • ·         Harvest taxes
  • ·         Cost share programs
  • ·         Logging roads and operational logistics
  • ·         Portable sawmilling
  • ·         Log scaling 
Registration Required

Selling Logs from your Property - (Lane)

Forestry Events - Fri, 10/27/2017 - 1:35pm
Friday, October 27, 2017 5:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This two day symposium runs Friday October 27 from 5:00 - 8:30 PM and Saturday, October 28 fro 9 AM to 5:30 PM. Landowners log their property for a number of reasons. For some, it’s the culmination of decades of planning and hard work to produce a valuable crop. For others, it might be a liquidation of an asset to meet a sudden financial need. Still, others might be undertaking a thinning operation to improve forest health and habitat. Whatever your reason or goal, selling logs is a high-stakes endeavor, and mistakes can be costly – this is not a time to cut corners! Make sure your property looks how you want it to when the job is done and don’t risk unnecessary damage to your property that could take decades to restore.

At the symposium, participants will hear from consulting foresters, loggers, log buyers, small woodland landowners, and representatives from OSU Extension Service and the Oregon Department of Forestry.

Topics include:

  • ·         Timber sale fundamentals
  • ·         Fair value for your logs
  • ·         Rights and responsibilities
  • ·         Benefits of a forestry consultant
  • ·         Protecting yourself from liability
  • ·         Inventory and marketing
  • ·         How to select a logger
  • ·         Notifications and harvest regulations
  • ·         Harvest taxes
  • ·         Cost share programs
  • ·         Logging roads and operational logistics
  • ·         Portable sawmilling
  • ·         Log scaling 

Leading Indicators – 2017

Terra - Wed, 10/18/2017 - 4:46pm

The post Leading Indicators – 2017 appeared first on Terra Magazine.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs