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Homeschool Outdoor School

4-H Events - Wed, 09/13/2017 - 2:34pm
Monday, September 11, 2017 - Wednesday, September 13, 2017 (all day event)

This Homeschool Outdoor School is a program sponsored by Polk Christian Home Educators and Polk County 4-H and is open to all youth in grades 5-8.  We will be having homeschooled high school and college age youth to serve as counselors.  If you are interested in counceling, contact us.

The progrma is designed to give youth hands-on outdoor learning experiences with natural science, pond study, forestry, outdoor cooking, compass/GPS, archery, digital photography, animal habitat, survival skills and more. 

Click here for more info!

Video: Searching for microplastics in razor clams and oysters

Breaking Waves - Wed, 09/13/2017 - 9:41am

Britta Baechler (right) looks at harvested razor clams.

Sept. 13, 2017

A new video from Oregon Sea Grant shows how researchers at Portland State University are inspecting the guts and tissues of razor clams and oysters along the Oregon coast for microplastics, which can come from foams, tiny beads in facial creams, synthetic fibers from clothing, and disintegrating plastic bags.

An oyster is shucked at a lab at Portland State University.

“Our goal is to figure out if we have them in our oysters and clams, and if so, are they at problematic levels?” said Britta Baechler, a PSU master’s student who is working on the Oregon Sea Grant-funded project under the guidance of PSU marine ecologist Elise Granek.

Oysters and clams, Baechler explained in the four-minute video, are indiscriminate filter feeders and so they may ingest a piece of plastic and not be able to get rid of it. Microplastics, which are defined as less than 5 mm, are of concern because they can attract chemicals, which might harm animals if eaten.

Britta Baechler shows a dissolved razor clam in a Petri dish.

With help from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Baechler dug up razor clams at nine sites along the Oregon coast and bought oysters at five locations to see if there are areas where microplastics are more prevalent. She collected the shellfish in the spring of 2017 and again this summer to see if microplastics are more common during certain times of the year.

Once the oysters and clams were gathered, they were taken to Granek’s lab at PSU where they were measured, weighed, shucked and frozen so they could later be dissolved in potassium hydroxide. This process leaves a clear liquid that contains only sand and any plastics that may be present. The researchers hope to have dissolved all of the bivalves by the end of September. For the ones that have already been dissolved, they’ve been analyzing the liquefied remains under a microscope to see if they find microplastics, but results are not in yet.

“Ultimately, we’re hoping that this study brings awareness to Oregonians and even visitors to the state of Oregon that plastics that we use in our daily lives make their way into the environment,” Baechler said in the video. “We’re also hoping that our partners, like Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and other state agencies, might take this information to learn about hot spots for microplastics to address the problem.”

Photos of Baechler and her work can be downloaded from this album on Oregon Sea Grant’s Flickr page.

The video was produced by Tiffany Woods and filmed and edited by Gustavo Garcia.

The post Video: Searching for microplastics in razor clams and oysters appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Video: Searching for microplastics in razor clams and oysters

Sea Grant - Wed, 09/13/2017 - 9:41am

Britta Baechler (right) looks at harvested razor clams.

Sept. 13, 2017

A new video from Oregon Sea Grant shows how researchers at Portland State University are inspecting the guts and tissues of razor clams and oysters along the Oregon coast for microplastics, which can come from foams, tiny beads in facial creams, synthetic fibers from clothing, and disintegrating plastic bags.

An oyster is shucked at a lab at Portland State University.

“Our goal is to figure out if we have them in our oysters and clams, and if so, are they at problematic levels?” said Britta Baechler, a PSU master’s student who is working on the Oregon Sea Grant-funded project under the guidance of PSU marine ecologist Elise Granek.

Oysters and clams, Baechler explained in the four-minute video, are indiscriminate filter feeders and so they may ingest a piece of plastic and not be able to get rid of it. Microplastics, which are defined as less than 5 mm, are of concern because they can attract chemicals, which might harm animals if eaten.

Britta Baechler shows a dissolved razor clam in a Petri dish.

With help from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Baechler dug up razor clams at nine sites along the Oregon coast and bought oysters at five locations to see if there are areas where microplastics are more prevalent. She collected the shellfish in the spring of 2017 and again this summer to see if microplastics are more common during certain times of the year.

Once the oysters and clams were gathered, they were taken to Granek’s lab at PSU where they were measured, weighed, shucked and frozen so they could later be dissolved in potassium hydroxide. This process leaves a clear liquid that contains only sand and any plastics that may be present. The researchers hope to have dissolved all of the bivalves by the end of September. For the ones that have already been dissolved, they’ve been analyzing the liquefied remains under a microscope to see if they find microplastics, but results are not in yet.

“Ultimately, we’re hoping that this study brings awareness to Oregonians and even visitors to the state of Oregon that plastics that we use in our daily lives make their way into the environment,” Baechler said in the video. “We’re also hoping that our partners, like Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and other state agencies, might take this information to learn about hot spots for microplastics to address the problem.”

Photos of Baechler and her work can be downloaded from this album on Oregon Sea Grant’s Flickr page.

The video was produced by Tiffany Woods and filmed and edited by Gustavo Garcia.

The post Video: Searching for microplastics in razor clams and oysters appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

The 27th Annual Forestry Tour for Community Leaders

Forestry Events - Tue, 09/12/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 7:45 AM - 2:00 PM

FEATURED TOPICS: FOREST MANAGEMENT, STREAM RESTORATION, AND STREAM PROTECTION

• Forest site visits include Lewis & Clark Timberlands/Greenwood Resources,

and Weyerhaeuser in the Highway 26 area.

• Join us for a discussion of forest management operations, stream buffers and

stream enhancement projects.

Accommodation requests related to a disability should be made by September 7th by calling Clatsop County Extension (503) 325-8573.

RSVP by September 7th. Call OSU Extension at (503) 325-8573

Morning refreshments, lunch, and transportation provided by the committee.

Please wear boots or sturdy shoes (no open toes) and appropriate clothing for the outdoors.

2017 OSU Land Steward Training

Forestry Events - Tue, 09/12/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Early Bird Registration before Aug. 1 save $50:   Register online here
Registration Deadline Aug. 15; Cost Full Registration price: $200 individual, $275 Couple.

For more information visit The Land Steward Web Page or call 541-776-7371

Apply today to participate in this fun and informative, field-based educational program that helps landowners learn what they have, decide how to manage it, and make a plan to get there. The program is based out of the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, 569 Hanley Road, Central Point.

 
The Land Steward Program, is an 11-week field-based course.  It is designed to help landowners, from small plots to large acreage, develop a management plan to accomplish their goals.
 
The program covers a full spectrum of land management considerations, from forests to farms, soils, water, pasture management, fire awareness, wildlife, economics and connection to resources that help landowners implement their plans.  Participants receive handouts, references, resources, professional presentations and site visits to bring the learning alive!

Woodland Management, A Basic Forestry Short Course

Forestry Events - Tue, 09/12/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Instructor: Norma Kline, OSU Ext. Forester for Coos & Curry Counties

This five-session course is ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property. Topics covered include: Getting started: Assessing your property and your site. What’s going on in your woods? Understanding tree biology and forest ecology.  Taking care of your woods:  Tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control.  Getting it done: Safety, timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations. FIELD TRIP: See real examples of things learned in class.

Pre-Registration Required: Class size is limited. No walk –ins

Online (credit/debit) at: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/coos/ *Registration closes 09/01/2017 at  5:00 PM. Questions: Call Shawna at 541-572-5263 ext. 

NOVIC Field Day

Small Farms Events - Tue, 09/12/2017 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, September 12, 2017 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
More details coming soon!
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Protect Your Home From Wildfire - Douglas County

Forestry Events - Sat, 09/09/2017 - 2:38pm
Saturday, September 9, 2017 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

The area within 200 feet of your home, called “defensible space,” is what usually determines whether or not your home will survive a wildfire. Even after fast moving, scorching fires, homeowners who have prepared by keeping their property “Lean, Clean and Green” have returned to find their houses fully intact. Other homeowners who do nothing may return to nothing but char, even though the surrounding woods are still green. 

This one-day workshop will teach you why defensible space is the most crucial area to maintain. You will get the best and latest techniques recommended by ODF and DFPA to improve your defensible space. Learn how to identify what parts of your property need work and the components of a well maintained defensible space with an in-class discussion and on the ground field tour. You will see how the professionals assess a home for wildfire preparedness and learn to bring that same discerning eye back to your own property by the end of the workshop.

Instructors include representatives from OSU Extension, DFPA, & Firewise.

Register on-line at: Protect Your Home From Wildfire

 

Meet at the DFPA office in the morning, then everyone will carpool in the afternoon to the field tour sites near Roseburg (we will not travel more than 20 min. away from the DFPA office). Please bring a lunch. 

Hopkins Community Forest Day

Forestry Events - Sat, 09/09/2017 - 2:38pm
Saturday, September 9, 2017 8:30 AM - 2:30 PM
This is your chance to learn by doing a variety of projects in a sustainably managed woodland. Volunteers help with essential seasonal tasks of managing a working demonstration forest.
LEARN BY DOING—IT’S THE HOPKINS WAY WE MANAGE OUR FOREST!
The focus for the summer months is on trail and building maintenance, and trail and road brush removal.
Registration is requested and hot lunch will be provided. Please let us know you are coming to get a count for lunch. Contact Jean at 503-655-8631 or jean.bremer@oregonstate.edu.
For more information contact Peter Matzka at peter.matzka@oregonstate.edu.

This Forest’s Diversity is for the Birds

Tree Topics - Fri, 09/08/2017 - 12:40pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties

Earlier in this series (click here), we talked about some of the reasons people are interested in growing a diverse forest, some of the key components of diversity, and also some of the many ways to enhance your woods’ diversity.  The idea was to show that a landowner often has a very wide range of future options, but often needs to make choices and take actions to achieve their goals.  I know this may have seemed academic to some readers, so we will share some examples of how this looks in practice.

A meadow creates open areas where sun loving plants such as oak thrive and also forest edges that are attractive to certain wildlife.

A good example of managing for diversity to meet some specific wildlife and timber objectives is Cedar Spring tree farm near Airlie, owned by Dave Hibbs, Sarah Karr and their family.

Sarah is an avid birder, determined that any property they own provide benefits for wildlife as well as for her family. Dave is a retired OSU forestry professor interested in producing future high quality timber along with other benefits from their woods.  So, Dave and Sarah are typical of many families, with co-owners having some different objectives and priorities.  But they  have a willingness and ability to manage for multiple objectives that can be met by growing a diverse forest. So let’s take a look at some of the ways they do this.

It began by thinking about and writing down what they are trying to accomplish. They have a management plan that lists their goals. Developing this plan together forced them to be clear about their individual priorities and then to decide how to combine them in a way that works for both of them.

They then considered places on their property that are most critical to, or perhaps best suited to meeting each of those objectives. Different parts of a property naturally lend themselves to some objectives better than others.  An important step towards limiting conflicts between sometimes-competing objectives is not expecting to accomplish everything on every acre.

Together these two steps help them refine and focus their efforts. For example, among the species Sarah is particularly keen on is the band tailed pigeon, a migratory bird that is abundant on their property each summer.  The main attraction for the band tailed pigeon is the natural mineral spring in a small meadow. With this as the habitat cornerstone,  Sarah is interested in providing other important habitat needs. Besides maintaining the open meadows around the springs, this includes providing tall roosting/perching sites and also many berry producing trees and shrubs.  That is, they have identified specific parts of species diversity (berry producing trees and shrubs) and structural diversity (open meadow near the springs and tall perch trees) that are important to manage for.

This takes us to some of the specific management practices discussed in earlier posts.

In an area salvaged and planted after blow down, some small snags and down wood are left along with a blue elderberry.

They spent their first decade of ownership controlling invasive weeds, mostly blackberry and scotch broom that were taking over. These weeds were closing in the meadow, making the springs less accessible for the pigeons and, elsewhere on the property, out-competing many other plants, including the young conifer trees. They replanted large areas where trees had been lost to weed competition, mixing in clumps of some different species such as cedar and pine where suited.  Aggressive weed control served both of their key objectives.  But the execution was different for Dave and Sarah than it might be for other landowners focused only on timber production, where any non-conifer tree or shrub may be considered a weed.  Native fruiting trees and shrubs such as madrone, blue elderberry and dogwood were favored, tolerated or treated as a weed, depending on their size, location, and competitiveness.  That is, they controlled competition while keeping a lot of natural diversity.

They have spent the following decades tending the woods with a similar approach, depending primarily on thinning and perpetual weed control by mowing or spraying, as appropriate to enhance or maintain diversity.

Selective thinning has help maintain a mixed canopy of hardwoods and softwoods.

Not long after finishing replanting some areas, Dave began thinning the young stands. The objective there was to adjust densities to meet key timber growing objectives and also, to maintain the species diversity of the stand.  Without thinning, and particularly without including “maintaining diversity” as one of the thinning objectives, much of the diversity in some stands would likely have been lost, with little but the fastest growing species surviving the first intense crush of competition.

Dave decided in some cases and locations to remove competing hardwoods, and in others to promote them by removing a competing conifer. This choice clearly benefited the wildlife objective at the expense of future timber production.  But it was a calculated tradeoff, applied in some places, and not in others.  Some of those trees killed or left to die are turned into snags, providing another important part of structural diversity.

Dave and Sarah now have a property with a diverse mix of stands and a robust population of band tailed pigeons visiting each summer. Many other birds and animals live there seasonally or year-round too.

So there you have a short example of how someone is growing a diverse forest to meet multiple objectives. It has taken some thought, purpose, and understanding of how trees grow and compete, along with a significant amount of work.  It sometimes has an opportunity cost in less efficient timber production.  But then, efficient timber production often has an opportunity cost of less diversity or less effective habitat production.  That is something each landowner can and should decide for themselves.  In this case, these two objectives are met largely by managing different parcels for different primary objectives.  The meadow and springs are for the pigeons, as are some very diverse stands nearby.  Other stands are clearly dedicated to long term timber production.

 

Sara and Dave share stories and strategies with fellow landowners. Cull trees are sometimes girdled to leave standing dead trees. Wrens and other birds love small brush piles made from pruning slash

 

 

The post This Forest’s Diversity is for the Birds appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Mud and Manure Management - Part 1

Small Farms Events - Thu, 09/07/2017 - 6:08am
Thursday, September 7, 2017 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

The rainy season will be here soon and livestock in small pastures, paddocks, or other confined spaces benefit from proper management of mud and manure. Now is the time to identify those areas that need treatment, such as high traffic areas and roof drip lines. If you want to reduce mud around your cattle, sheep, horse, or other livestock pastures this year, you don’t want to miss this class. Composting and fertilizer values of manure will also be discussed. The second session is a hands-on workshop where participants will see how to improve drainage around a barn.

A two-session class:

Part 1 - Evening educational program on Thursday, September 7, 6:00 – 9:00 pm, Lookingglass Grange Hall, 7426 Lookingglass Rd, Roseburg, OR 97471
Refreshments will be provided.

Part 2 - Morning practical program (work session) on Friday, September 8, 9:00 am – noon, Local Ranch in Lookingglass

Cost: $20 for the first person / $10 per family member/business partner (up to 3).  Partners will be sharing class materials.

Register on-line at: Mud and Manure Management

 

 Instructors:

Sara Runkel, Small Farms & Food Systems, OSU Extension Service

Shelby Filley, Livestock & Forages, OSU Extension Service

Walt Barton, Hydrologist, Douglas Soil & Water Conservation District

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Mud and Manure Management - Part 2

Small Farms Events - Thu, 09/07/2017 - 6:08am
Friday, September 8, 2017 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

A two-session class:

Part 1 - Evening educational program on Thursday, September 7, 6:00 – 9:00 pm, Lookingglass Grange Hall, 7426 Lookingglass Rd, Roseburg, OR 97471

Part 2 - Morning practical program (work session) on Friday, September 8, 9:00 am – noon, Local Ranch in Lookingglass

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Libraries.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Wed, 09/06/2017 - 3:58pm
LIBRARIES 

With them, we are amazing!

Without them, we humons are limited.

I can only speak for myself–I do not want to be limited. I am a library champion. (A library champion is someone who fosters public awareness on the extensive range of resources and services available at public, school, academic and special libraries nationwide.)

If you were to see my professional library, perhaps you would understand. (It looks like the photo above, only the shelves are white; I have four bookcases with extensions. The shelves are full.)

If you were to see my personal library, you would understand. Most of it is still in boxes.

Because I believe that literacy is important, When they were young and beginning to read, I gave four of my bookshelves to my daughters (who are now grown, although their bookshelves are still full, mostly, of books). One each is in their room; two are now in the quest room. Hence, my library is mostly still in boxes.

I’ve stopped buying books for personal use (I still get professional ones). I use the library to get hard copy. I have 13 books at home plus two book club books. I have 11 books on hold.

I have an iPad on which I have at least four books and an equal number on hold. (I read a lot.)

But libraries do so much more than provide us with books (still their most important function). They move information in new directions! And they have magic fingers on the keyboard. I would be lost without libraries.

The information to which they have access is astounding.

Libraries and evaluation.

I want to discuss my professional library. I have one whole bookcase (of seven plus shelves) which is filled with books relating to evaluation. Some books are in many editions. And that doesn’t include statistics books or measurement books or the hard-copy journals that have come over the years.

“Why?” you ask, do I have multiple versions of the same (well, almost) book, different editions? Ah. Perhaps one edition will provide the answer (to the puzzle) and the others do not. Does that mean that the answer is not relevant? No. Does that mean that the information is passe? Maybe. Maybe not. The book may be the seminal reference and needs to be sited. It may give a history that isn’t found any place else. It is important to see how the volume changes with each edition. Having multiple volumes adds value. (And the root of evaluation is value.)

Do I need all this? Probably not, especially in the age of the internet and access to all that it provides. Yet, there is something about hard copy; you know a book  (whether a paperback or not), with its binding, its smell, its feel, that cannot be duplicated on-line. Something that cannot be diminished. Something that definitely adds value, merit and worth.

 

“To live in the world without becoming aware of the meaning of the world is like wandering in a great library without touching the books.” ~~Manly P. Hall

My feeling exactly.

 

 

 

The post Libraries. appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Woodland Management, A Basic Forestry Short Course

Forestry Events - Wed, 09/06/2017 - 2:39pm
Wednesday, September 6, 2017 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM

Instructor: Norma Kline, OSU Ext. Forester for Coos & Curry Counties

This five-session course is ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property. Topics covered include: Getting started: Assessing your property and your site. What’s going on in your woods? Understanding tree biology and forest ecology.  Taking care of your woods:  Tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control.  Getting it done: Safety, timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations. FIELD TRIP: See real examples of things learned in class.

Pre-Registration Required: Class size is limited. No walk –ins

Online (credit/debit) at: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/coos/ *Registration closes 09/01/2017 at  5:00 PM. Questions: Call Shawna at 541-572-5263 ext. 

2017 OSU Land Steward Training

Forestry Events - Tue, 09/05/2017 - 2:41pm
Tuesday, September 5, 2017 12:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Early Bird Registration before Aug. 1 save $50:   Register online here
Registration Deadline Aug. 15; Cost Full Registration price: $200 individual, $275 Couple.

For more information visit The Land Steward Web Page or call 541-776-7371

Apply today to participate in this fun and informative, field-based educational program that helps landowners learn what they have, decide how to manage it, and make a plan to get there. The program is based out of the Southern Oregon Research and Extension Center, 569 Hanley Road, Central Point.

 
The Land Steward Program, is an 11-week field-based course.  It is designed to help landowners, from small plots to large acreage, develop a management plan to accomplish their goals.
 
The program covers a full spectrum of land management considerations, from forests to farms, soils, water, pasture management, fire awareness, wildlife, economics and connection to resources that help landowners implement their plans.  Participants receive handouts, references, resources, professional presentations and site visits to bring the learning alive!

Benton & Polk County 2017 Outstanding Tree Farmer of the Year Tour and Picnic

Forestry Events - Sat, 09/02/2017 - 2:34pm
Saturday, September 2, 2017 8:30 AM - 1:00 PM

Please join us to recognize this year’s honorees, Dave Hibbs and Sarah Karr and visit their Cedar Springs Tree farm property near Airlie. Dave and Sarah have been managing this property for twenty years to balance sound conifer management and production with unique wildlife considerations. The couple have lots of insights and stories to share about managing for diverse objectives.

Tour sponsors include: Dave and Sarah, OSWA Benton and Polk County Chapters, Oregon Tree Farm System and OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension.

Details on lunch to follow

Location: Since space is limited, we are encouraging carpooling. Please arrive at the Adair County Park group picnic area by 8:30 a.m. for a car pool to the property. We will return to the park for lunch. Watch for signs within the park.

Registration Required by August 29. Call Benton County Extension 541-766-6750, or email including your phone contact and number attending. 

Please come prepared for the weather of the day and being in the brush, and possible poison oak. Bring a water bottle, snacks or other personal items you need.

Making things (life) better.

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 09/01/2017 - 2:11pm
Get better.

Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It’s not.

~~Theodor Seuss Geisel

 

Dr. Seuss is a life-time favorite of mine. If he were still alive (unfortunately, he died in 1991), he would still be speaking out (however subtly) and making a difference (he was born in 1904). He opposed discrimination and isolationism and cartooned those issues between 1941-1943.

 

His comment above reminded me about why I’m an evaluator. I do care. A lot.

Yes, I like to solve puzzles.  I like to figure things out. Yes, I really like to make life better.

I use science. And scientific principles. And data. To get answers.

So I have to wonder, how can anyone go through this life without that support? (You know, the support of science and answers provided by data.)

Statistics

Yes, I know…statistics lie (this saying “statistics lie” is often attributed to Mark Twain) and liars use statistics, depending on what the statistic is representing and who is using it. Or figures don’t lie; liars do figure may be more accurate (used by Carroll D. Wright ). (Oh and while I’m talking about statistics, Hans Rosling  died in February [2017]; a major loss.)

There is a lot of press about “big data” these days. And artificial intelligence. Is this the future?  Given that I hear what sound like competing stories about the future I can only wonder.

Even though I care. A lot. Perhaps as one source said, “…is it just a bit of social theatre we perform to make ourselves feel virtuous, useful, and in the right?” Maybe I’m just feeling virtuous and useful.

Maybe I only think I can change the world.

Gloria Anzaldua , an American scholar of  Chicana cultural theory who died in 2004, is quoted as saying, “I change myself; I change the world.”

So because I care (Seuss) and I am changing myself (Anzaldua), perhaps life will get better. Perhaps.

I will stick around and find out. And remember.

The post Making things (life) better. appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Master Gardener Coastal Garden Tour

Gardening Events - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 6:09am
Tuesday, August 29, 2017 8:30 AM - 3:00 PM
10am—11am: Tour OCCC South Beach Campus Garden  11am—Noon: Tour Yaquina Bay Lighthouse Garden  Noon—1:30: Lunch at the Newport Bayfront “Shop the dock” opportunity  2pm—3pm: Tour Oceanview Adaptive Garden   Lincoln County Master Gardeners will be at each garden to answer questions. Tours count towards Continuing Education hours. Carpool will leave from the Benton County Extension Office at 8:30 am or you can drive on your own.    RSVP to pamela.monnette@oregonstat.edu 

CC Master Gardener Board Meeting

Gardening Events - Thu, 08/31/2017 - 6:09am
Thursday, August 3, 2017 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Transfer START orientation program Session 4

Health & Wellness Events - Wed, 08/30/2017 - 2:35pm
Wednesday, August 30, 2017 (all day event)

Transfer START is a one-day program that occur during the summer and is required for you to attend if you are entering Oregon State in the fall or summer term. You will need to attend the full day in order to be eligible to register for classes.

At START you will:

  • Meet with advisors
  • Register for your fall term courses
  • Take care of any business you still to need to prepare for fall term
  • There are option components that allow you to learn about opportunities and resources that may be of interest to you.

For all Transfer START details, schedule and registration visit
Transfer START | New Student Programs & Family Outreach | Oregon State University

For College of Public Health and Human Sciences' START details, contact the CPHHS Office of Student Success