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Basic Woodland Management Short Course 2016

Forestry Events - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 2:37pm
Tuesday, February 16, 2016 (all day event)
More details to come. Mark your calendar now if you would like to take our annual offering of this course.

Basic Woodland Management Short Course 2016

Forestry Events - Tue, 02/02/2016 - 2:37pm
Tuesday, February 9, 2016 (all day event)
More details to come. Mark your calendar now if you would like to take our annual offering of this course.

Local Food Connection

Small Farms Events - Mon, 02/01/2016 - 2:36pm
Monday, February 1, 2016 8:30 AM - 4:00 PM
 

 

 www.localfoodconnection.org

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Willamette Valley Bird Symposium

Forestry Events - Sat, 01/30/2016 - 2:35pm
Saturday, January 30, 2016 9:00 AM - 5:00 PM

A day-long symposium bringing together professionals, students of all ages, and amateurs to celebrate birds. This student-focused event includes scientific presentations, research techniques demonstrations, and live raptors from Chintimini Wildlife Center.

Registration: $15 (students, AOU members, & K-12 educators), $20 (general public) late registration increases after Jan. 8, 2016 

The Web of Life in Aquatic & Terrestrial Habitats

Forestry Events - Fri, 01/29/2016 - 2:39pm
Friday, January 29, 2016 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Audience: K-8 Educators
Curricula: Project Learning Tree and Project Aquatic WILD
Description: : Explore activities from Project Learning Tree and Project Aquatic WILD that investigate adaptations and relationships between organisms in local streams, lakes, riparian, and upland habitats. Incorporate Next Generation Science Standards into motivating classroom and outdoor experiences. Develop your knowledge about energy flow through ecosystems while learning about local aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Online Directions

Register for this Workshop

CPHHS Research Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 01/29/2016 - 2:39pm
Friday, January 29, 2016 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

"Exercise and Glucose Metabolism in Older People: the Roles of Volume, Intensity, and Timing" Loretta DiPietro, PhD, Chair, Department of Exercise Science, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University

Dr. DiPietro’s research emphasizes the importance of exercise in older women, and the associations between physical activity and breast cancer, unhealthy weight gain and glucose regulation. She has examined how the functional changes traditionally associated with aging are in fact similar to those that occur with bedrest and low-gravity conditions (such as space flight). Dr. DiPietro is a permanent member of the National Institute on Aging’s Aging Systems and Geriatrics Study Section.

Recognizing that many of today’s critical public health problems can be addressed, at least partly, through improved nutrition and physical activity, Professor Loretta DiPietro has built bridges between population-based public health and the clinical and physiological domains of exercise science. An accomplished and widely published researcher with particular interest in the role of physical activity in the health of older adults, she has been awarded grants from the National Institute on Aging and the American Cancer Society, and has lectured at medical schools, public health schools, and other organizations around the world.

Dr. DiPietro joined Milken Institute SPH in 2008 from Yale University School of Medicine, where she was associate professor of epidemiology and public health and a fellow at the John B. Pierce Laboratory, which studies how biological systems interact with the built environment and their influence on health. As chair of the Department of Exercise Science, Dr. DiPietro emphasizes the many collaborative research and educational opportunities that students can pursue across the GW Medical Center and the entire University.

Faculty profile

View upcoming and past CPHHS Seminars

Spacing young conifer stands

Tree Topics - Fri, 01/29/2016 - 10:26am

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

In a previous article , I wrote that many folks in NW Oregon are growing too many trees in young stands given some common family forest landowners’ objectives, including doing a commercial thinning when the trees are in their mid 20s.  Since most people are hoping to do a commercial thinning on their way towards a variety of longer-term objectives and stand conditions, we need to focus on reaching that first commercial thinning in a timely manner and leaving the stand in a good condition to meet future objectives. Let’s begin by looking at what it takes to have a commercial thinning.

My contacts in the business around the mid-Valley tell me that while the first thinning should provide a mix of saw logs and chip logs, most of the surplus trees removed in the thinning need to produce a sawlog or two if you hope to break even or make a little money (a mix of around 2/3 saw logs and the remaining 1/3 chip logs is a rule of thumb used by some). Too many small logs and you are losing money. That sawlog will vary according to the mill it is headed to, but is generally 20 feet to 32 feet long with a 6 or 7 inch top. Smaller wood goes to chip and saw or pulp.

Roughly speaking, you need a stand with an average size of about 10 inches dbh (or bigger) to get this desired mix of products to have a profitable operation in recent market conditions ($475 to $500 per MBF).

So why are people having trouble achieving that? It has to do with how trees grow in stands.  Let’s review nature’s rules:

  • Bigger trees need to use more site resources (mainly light, water and nutrients) than little trees.
  • The resources available on any given site are limited.
  • As a group of trees grows, it reaches a point where there are not enough resources to go around and trees begin to compete, leading to winners and losers.
  • Eventually some trees have to die (the losers) for others (the winners) to have room to grow.

What’s neat is that there is a regular and reliable pattern to this process which applies generally to all species (when growing in groups of similar age). There is a predictable maximum number of trees of a given size that can grow together in a group.

So it follows that there is a predictable maximum average size for any given number of trees growing together in a group, according to its species.  As a group of trees grows towards its maximum size for that number (its spacing or density), it will pass through certain stages along the way.  These stages (e.g. crown closure) or zones (e.g. self-thinning) all correspond to different and increasing levels of competition among the trees, each occurring a  predictable point. See illustration below.

 

 

 

As covered before, the idea in spacing a young stand is to have the “right” number of well-distributed trees to allow them to grow until they are big enough to support a commercial thinning, and to be able to do it “on time”, before future opportunities are affected by overly-intense competition. This generally means aiming to thin the stand when it is in the Goldilocks zone (yellow or gold), and avoiding slipping into the self- thinning zone (red).  Bad things happen in the red zone. Trees start dying, starved to death for want of resources by excessive competition among their neighbors.  This is euphemistically called “self-thinning”.  Self-thinning is an entirely natural process that gradually allows room for surviving trees to grow larger.  But in the process live crowns get smaller, individual tree growth slows down and all the trees suffer.  If allowed to proceed too far (approaching the brown zone), the stand becomes  too weak and unstable to be thinned effectively.  That leaves few options besides letting the stand grow (and self-thin) for another decade or so until it can be clear cut, then start over.  This is not necessarily a bad decision, but not the outcome many family landowners are aiming for.

This relationship of predictable stages (commonly expressed as a ratio of the maximum) also gives us predictable average tree sizes at which different stages are reached. This lets us know if trees growing at any particular spacing will reach a given target, like the 10 inch average size needed for a commercial thinning, before becoming too crowded and stressed.

 

Let’s consider some young Douglas-fir stands.

Growing at the commonly planted spacing of 10×10 (about 440 tpa, the column on the right), trees will just be 6” (on average) when they enter the Goldilocks zone, and barely 8” when they are pushing up against the red zone. We saw why it is hard to have a profitable operation at that size.  But delaying the thinning operation is unlikely to fix the situation, since we won’t have reached even a  10” average before approaching the brown zone.  Generally many the trees we’d like to remove in an early thinning will be smaller than average.  A delay for any reason at this spacing is likely a big step towards a short rotation.

 

 

Trees planted and growing at an 11×11 spacing (360 tpa) may do a little better, growing into the Goldilocks zone at an average size of about 6½”, and reaching the red zone at about 8½”. Still shy of the thinning target while avoiding intense stress, but it might work for some people.

 

So what about a still wider spacing? Trees growing at a 12×12 (300 tpa) spacing have a lot more room to grow before crowding and competition begins to undermine other management objectives. At a 12×12 spacing trees will be about 7½”, when they fully occupy the site and 10″ on average when they approach the self-thinning red zone. It is much easier to see a profitable thinning operation in this type of stand, and less temptation to delay and push beyond the upper end of the desired thinning window. But should life or market conditions mandate a delay, this spacing gives a bit more breathing room. Other advantages of this stocking level include an earlier (if small) cash flow to offset some establishment costs, fewer, larger trees to handle in the thinning harvest, and a residual stand of deep-crowned, wind firm, rapidly growing trees which provides the landowner a wider range of silvicultural options.

 

Oh oh, so what if you planted at 10×10? Watch for an article soon on the nearly-forgotten practice of pre-commercial thinning (PCT).

The post Spacing young conifer stands appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Mapping the Course

Forestry Events - Thu, 01/28/2016 - 2:34pm
Thursday, January 28, 2016 (all day event)

Timberlands, Forest Products Processing, Biomass, and Bioenergy Issues for 2016: Attend this conference for in-depth discussions and analysis on forest products market challenges, opportunities, threats, and issues for 2016 and beyond in the North American West Coast timberland region.

For more information, http://westernforestry.org/upcoming-conferences/mapping-the-course-2016

Starker Lecture Series - Burning Questions: Forest, Fires & People

Forestry Events - Thu, 01/28/2016 - 2:34pm
Thursday, January 28, 2016 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Over the past several years, there has been an increase in the number and severity of wildfires in Oregon.  This trend is expected to continue as the Pacific Northwest become increasingly vulnerable to the effects of a changing climate including, decreased snowpack, higher temperatures and drought, and declining forest health.  These environmental changes increase the risk of catastrophic wildfire impacting communities living in the wildland-urban interface. Wildfire was once considered to be a risk only for people living in rural areas; however it is quickly becoming a reality for urban neighborhoods.  Recent fires in Corvallis and Portland illustrate the need for rural and urban communities alike to adapt to the changing conditions of their environment in which they live. The 2016 Starker Lecture will address the “new normal” of living with fire, and will offer individuals, neighborhoods, and communities useful information and strategies for living in a changing environment.

Jan 28, 2016, 7:00 pm, Whiteside Theatre, Downtown Corvallis, Film Screening of Legacy of Fire: The Story of the Tillamook Burn and special speaker Doug Decker, State Forester

Yamhill County Small Woodlands Association

Forestry Events - Wed, 01/27/2016 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, January 27, 2016 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM
There will be a presentation on current forest issues by Seth Barnes (Oregon Forest Industries Council).

Washington County Small Woolands Association

Forestry Events - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, January 26, 2016 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM

Tamara Cushing, Oregon State University Assistant Professor, Starker Chair for Private and Family Forestry, and Extension Specialist in economics and forest policy for the College of Forestry, will be the featured speaker. Tammy’s presentation will compare and contrast the life cycle of growing trees for harvest in the southeast U.S. versus the Pacific NW (specifically Douglas-fir). She will describe wood quality and certification (including non-wood products), methods of production and genetics, and other factors for the two regions.

Landtype Association Mapping in the PNW National Forests

Forestry Events - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, January 26, 2016 2:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Please join me in the following Adobe Connect Meeting.

Meeting Name: Landtype Association Mapping

Invited By: Cheryl Friesen

To join the meeting:
https://usfs.adobeconnect.com/landtypemapping/

 If you have never attended an Adobe Connect meeting before:

Test your connection: https://usfs.adobeconnect.com/common/help/en/support/meeting_test.htm

Get a quick overview: http://www.adobe.com/go/connectpro_overview

Nutrient Management Workshop: Keeping Nitrogen in the Crop and Dollars in the Pocket

Small Farms Events - Tue, 01/26/2016 - 2:35pm
Tuesday, January 26, 2016 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Join us for an interactive, one-day nitrogen workshop for Oregon Growers on nutrient management solutions. Local experts from Oregon State University Extension and local fertilizer companies will share information and tools to increase nitrogen use efficiency. Grower participation is the backbone of this workshop as grower knowledge and needs are the drivers for applicable solutions to nitrogen management. This workshop is free and open to the public. Lunch will be provided. Certified Crop Advisor CEUs will be available.

http://www.signupgenius.com/go/5080d4cadad22a57-oregon

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Story

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 3:25pm

Alan Rickman  died this month. He was an actor of my generation; one that provided me with much entertainment. I am sad. Then I saw this quote on the power of stories. How stories explain. How stories can educate. How stories can help reduce bias.  And I am reminded how stories are evaluative.

Dick Krueger did a professional development session (then called a “pre-session”) many years ago. It seems relevant now. Of course, I couldn’t find my notes (which were significant) so I did an online search, using “Dick Krueger and stories” as my search terms. I was successful! (See link.) When I went to the link, he had a whole section on story and story telling. What I remember most about that session is what he has listed under “How to Analyze the Story”. Specifically the four points he lists under problems with credibility:

  • Authenticity – Truth
  • Accuracy – Memory Problems
  • Representativeness and Sampling
  • Generalizability / Transferability

The next time you tell a story think of it in evaluative terms. And check out what Dick Krueger has to say.

I’ve started aggregating my blog posts (no easy task, to be sure) in preparation for developing the “modules” for a WECT-like approach to evaluation. The first section is Program Planning and Logic Modeling. The following posts are relevant (and presented in no particular order):

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/11/09/relevant-resources/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2010/01/05/101/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/04/19/timely-topic-planning-your-evaluation/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2012/05/30/perpetual-beta/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/10/12/stories-as-evaluation/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/04/01/how-do-you-find-the-answer/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/03/25/language-what-does-it-really-mean-and-how-do-you-know/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/03/02/all-of-the-people-all-of-the-time/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2011/01/27/standard-evaluation-tools/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2015/02/04/logic-models-good-tool/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2012/03/09/causal-relationships-evaluation-and-logic-models/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2012/01/23/logic-models-again/

http://blogs.oregonstate.edu/programevaluation/2010/12/21/logic-model-revisited/

There may be more that are remotely related to Program Planning and Logic Modeling. This was my first pass. The URLs work and will take you to a longer post. You may have to cut and paste.

my .

molly.

 

 

 

The post Story appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

On-Campus Employment Fair

Environment Events - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 2:38pm
Monday, January 25, 2016 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Interested in a student job on-campus? Join us at the On-Campus Employment Fair to network with departments and secure on-campus employment for next academic year! See who's attending here.

Attend the following break-out sessions for a more in depth look at various job search techniques as well as how to handle group interviewing:
  • 11:00-12:00 Job Search Strategies hosted by the Career Development Center and Human Resources
  • 12:00-1:00 Group Interviewing hosted by UHDS 
  • 1:00-2:00 Job Search Strategies hosted by the Career Development Center and Human Resources
  • 2:00-3:00 Group Interviewing hosted by UHDS

Strengths Based Leadership

Environment Events - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 2:38pm
Monday, January 25, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

This session requires advanced completion of a 30-minute online assessment, the Clifton StrengthsFinder, by all attendees. Thus, registration is due by January 6th. Those who have signed up will receive an exclusive access code to allow them to take the Strengths assessment between Jan 7th and Jan 14th. The actual session on Jan 18th will then utilize the data from your assessment in helping you understand your strengths as a leader!

This assessment has helped more than 8 million people around the world discover their talents and become better leaders. After you take the Clifton StrengthsFinder, you'll receive a customized report that lists your top five talent themes, along with action items for development and suggestions about how you can use your talents to achieve academic, career, and personal success. In a highly interactive workshop, Melissa Yamamoto (Gallup Certified Strengths Coach) will help you understand your strengths and how to utilize this knowledge to maximize your practices as a leader. Attendees can expect to:

Increase your self-awareness. Effective leaders know what they do well, and they find ways to apply their talents authentically and productively. Understanding your talents is an important step in cultivating self-awareness as a leader.

Deepen your knowledge and appreciation of others' talents. As you learn more about your own talents, you will begin to see the unique talents in others. You'll also appreciate others for the different perspectives they offer because of their talents. The best leaders understand that teams with a diversity of talents achieve the best outcomes.

Form and maximize your teams. Although leaders need not be well-rounded, teams should be. Understanding each team members' talents is crucial to getting the most out of a team -- and in a way that honors the contributions each person can make. Understanding each team members' talents will give you new insights into how the team can perform to its full potential.

Help others to affirm, develop, and apply their talents. As a leader who understands your own talents and how to apply them productively, you can lead others to develop and apply their talents.

 

Details are available in the Academy Portal for members.

Not a member?  Submit your application today!

(All OSU engineering students in good academic standing with a minimum of 45 total earned credits are eligible to apply)

Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28

Breaking Waves - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 7:00am

NEWPORT – The OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center and the Union of Concerned Scientists will host a reception and panel discussion on the environmental and economic impacts of ocean acidification on our coastal communities. The event is from 5-7 pm this Thursday, January 28  in the HMSC Visitor Center’s Hennings Auditorium.

Expert panelists will discuss the science of ocean acidification, local impacts and potential solutions with community members and elected officials.

Panelists are:

  • Dr. George Waldbusser, Assistant Professor, OSU College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Alan Barton, Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery
  • Dr. Francis Chan, Associate Professor and Senior Researcher, OSU College of Science
  • Emily Heffling, Western States Outreach Coordinator, Union of Concerned Scientists

Join us for a light reception and meet our panelists before the presentation.

The event, hosted by HMSC Director Bob Cowen and State Representative David Gomberg, is family-friendly, free and open to the public. RSVP requested – eheffling@ucsusa.org or 510-809-1584.

Learn more: Current and recent Oregon Sea Grant-funded research on ocean acidification

The post Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28

Sea Grant - Mon, 01/25/2016 - 7:00am

NEWPORT – The OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center and the Union of Concerned Scientists will host a reception and panel discussion on the environmental and economic impacts of ocean acidification on our coastal communities. The event is from 5-7 pm this Thursday, January 28  in the HMSC Visitor Center’s Hennings Auditorium.

Expert panelists will discuss the science of ocean acidification, local impacts and potential solutions with community members and elected officials.

Panelists are:

  • Dr. George Waldbusser, Assistant Professor, OSU College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Alan Barton, Whiskey Creek Shellfish Hatchery
  • Dr. Francis Chan, Associate Professor and Senior Researcher, OSU College of Science
  • Emily Heffling, Western States Outreach Coordinator, Union of Concerned Scientists

Join us for a light reception and meet our panelists before the presentation.

The event, hosted by HMSC Director Bob Cowen and State Representative David Gomberg, is family-friendly, free and open to the public. RSVP requested – eheffling@ucsusa.org or 510-809-1584.

Learn more: Current and recent Oregon Sea Grant-funded research on ocean acidification

The post Ocean acidification panel at HMSC Jan. 28 appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

CCFFA Winter Potluck and Program Fireline Stories

Forestry Events - Sat, 01/23/2016 - 2:37pm
Saturday, January 23, 2016 11:30 AM - 2:30 PM

Get the inside story on major fires in our area from 2013-2015. How did they start, why did they spread, and what problems did the firefighters have? You will see photos and learn details that weren’t in the news. Mike Haasken is the presenter and is a Certified Fire Behavior Analyst as well as an ODF Stewardship Forester. He will also share financial valuations and estimates for recovery.
Bring your favorite potluck food to share. Registration required.

Benton Chapter OSWA Annual Meeting

Forestry Events - Sat, 01/23/2016 - 2:37pm
Saturday, January 23, 2016 11:30 AM - 3:00 PM
Please RSVP