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Log Scaling Workshop

Forestry Events - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 2:37pm
Wednesday, August 10, 2016 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Audience: This program is for woodland owners, ranchers, loggers and contractors or anyone who is interested in how logs are measured and scaled.

What: Have you ever wanted to know more about how logs are measured/scaled at the mill and what the Scriber
log rule is all about? This is your chance to find out. Steve has put together a straight forward and informative
program that will cover the basic ways timber products are measured, including board foot and cubic foot
rules, history of log scaling, the Scribner log rule and how it is applied, third party scaling, how logs are measured,
log defect and how it is deducted, problems to avoid when processing logs, natural log defects, purchase
orders and scaling, and tracking logs from stump to mill.
This is a great opportunity to learn more about how our current and future log measurement system works and
how you can make the most out of it when selling your timber.

Registration is required.

Western Regional Extension Forestry

Forestry Events - Wed, 08/10/2016 - 2:37pm
Monday, August 8, 2016 12:00 PM - Wednesday, August 10, 2016 12:00 PM

This year’s Western Regional Extension Forestry (WCC 1003) meeting will take place August 8-10 in Park City, Utah. It will be hosted by Utah State University Extension Forestry. Please put these dates on your calendar’s and plan on joining us.

Time pressures and distance make collaboration and coordination between extension foresters from different states challenging. The objective of this meeting is to bring together extension professionals in forestry and related disciplines from the western region and offer a comfortable, low pressure venue for sharing program ideas and potential directions for future collaboration. We hope that our time together will lead to:

·           The formation of new programming ideas or ways to improve on existing programs.

·           Identification of ways to overcome barriers (real or potential) for getting ideas off the ground.

·           New partnerships between states where information and ideas are freely shared and used.

Much of this meeting will consist of short presentations (given by you!) of ideas you have for cooperative projects, followed by short, informal meetings to discuss the projects that generate the most interest. Our objective is to get some interstate projects going from this sharing. We expect that many of you have ‘back burner’ ideas that are slowly smoldering away…this will be your chance to share them. And even if you don’t have specific programming ideas in mind, you may be interested in colleagues’ ideas and this meeting could spark new collaborations. Below are two articles about the strategic planning techniques used by Oregon State University Extension Forestry. We are using their ideas as a rough guide for the sharing process we will use for this meeting.

Linking Strategic Thinking and Project Planning: The Oregon State University Extension Forestry Experience

https://www.crops.org/files/publications/jnrlse/pdfs/jnr021/021-01-0064.pdf

The tentative schedule is as follows:

Monday, August 8

Afternoon: WCC Board Meeting (WCC state representatives only)

Evening: Welcome reception (everyone)

Tuesday, August 9

AM: Presentations regarding potential project collaborations among participants. Back burner ideas become front burner ideas!

PM: Presentation from Joint Fire Science Network about recent programming successes and what’s working on the ground. Time will be set aside for strategizing ways to bring relevant, fire-related programming to your state.

Wednesday, August 10

AM: Collaboration and strategic planning (informal) session among peers

PM: Field tour: locations to be determined; will likely include stops at a local sawmill and/or a cross laminated timber manufacturer (see recent feature story from Utah Forest News) and stops in the nearby mountains to see ongoing and past forestry activities. 

Scribner Log Rule: What you can & can't do about it

Forestry Events - Tue, 08/09/2016 - 2:36pm
Tuesday, August 9, 2016 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Audience: This program is for woodland owners, ranchers, loggers and contractors or anyone who is interested in how logs are measured and scaled.

What: Ever wanted to know more about how logs are measured/scaled at the mill and what the Scriber log rule is all about?  This is your chance to find out.  Steve has put together a straight forward and informative program that will cover the basic ways timber products are measured, including board foot and cubic foot rules, history of log scaling, the Scribner log rule and how it is applied, third party scaling, how logs are measured, log defect and how it is deducted, problems to avoid when processing logs, natural log defects, purchase orders and scaling, and tracking logs from stump to mill.

This is a great opportunity to learn more about how our current and future log measurement system works and how you can make the most out of it when selling your timber.

Please register!

Canceled - Portland | Small Bites Happy Hour featuring Dr. Sam Logan

Health & Wellness Events - Mon, 08/08/2016 - 2:38pm
Monday, August 8, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
This event has been canceled.  Sorry for any inconvenience.

Summer Picnic and Tour, Benton Chapter Oregon Small Woodlands Assoc.

Forestry Events - Sat, 08/06/2016 - 2:36pm
Saturday, August 6, 2016 12:00 PM

Come and enjoy a potluck picnic with fellow small woodland owners and friends at Fort Hoskins Park, in the Kings Valley area. Drinks, plates and utensils will be provided.

Tour following the picnic is a short drive up the road to the Schmidt Family Forest, Hoskins property.

Directions: From Corvallis take Hwy 20 west to the Kings Valley Hwy 223. Turn right on Hwy 223 and go about 5 miles. Turn left on Hoskins road. The entrance to the park is on the right about a mile from Hwy 223

Compost Trouble Shooting

Small Farms Events - Sat, 08/06/2016 - 2:36pm
Saturday, August 6, 2016 12:30 PM - 3:30 PM

Instructor:  Chris Hjerrild, Master Gardener

Already have a compost system, but still have questions or need help?  Get your questions answered in this fun class

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Young Stand Thinning Strategies

Tree Topics - Fri, 08/05/2016 - 1:01pm

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

Continuing on the general theme of young stand management and especially the need for thinning, I’d like to look at strategies for thinning a young stand. Let’s start with some things to keep in mind about Young Stand Thinning or YST (also called precommercial thinning or PCT):

  • The idea of young stand thinning (YST) is to avoid harmful overcrowding later by removing excess trees early on.
  • The impact of thinning out a tree is very local. The overall stocking level (trees per acre) can be misleading. It is the spacing among immediate neighbors that counts.
  • The greatest benefit of YST is increased growing space rather than selection among trees. Creating more growing space to benefit as many leave trees as possible is the primary goal. Culling is secondary.
  • YST is key to achieving longer rotations and many non-timber objectives many family forest landowners desire.

As discussed previously , the common practice of planting Douglas-fir on a 10×10 grid gives about 440 trees per acre (tpa),  which is too many trees to carry to an initial thinning harvest.    We plant extra trees to allow for seedling losses in the establishment phase, but depending on survival, we will likely be well above our target for the initial thinning harvest (250-300tpa). So we need to remove  1/4 to 1/3 of the trees in a YST if trees are to reach a usable size  before they become overcrowded.  There are several approaches to that.

If we have a plantation with a regular and uniform planting pattern, a very simple and efficient approach to this is row removal. Removing every fourth row would reduce to 75% of original trees/planting spaces (reducing from 440 tpa  to 330 tpa) and removing every third row would reduce to 67% (from 440 tpa to  295 tpa).   Each is illustrated below.

 

This illustrates removing each fourth row. Each tree in the two rows adjacent to the row removed is given space on one side (a common thinning rule of thumb), but not on the third row, so not every tree benefits similarly. Still, this may be an adequate thinning if we saw moderate initial survival (75-85%) and do some additional thinning in the inner leave row.

 

In this illustration removing each third row, notice that every remaining tree is given space on one side, ensuring that every tree benefits similarly. This thinning ratio is well suited to stands with high planting survival, but might be overly aggressive in stands with more modest survival.

Besides the mechanical and intellectual ease of row thinning, it can have added benefits if you are a little late in doing the job, and having trouble getting the larger trees to fall to the ground. Felling a row gives room to fell trees into an open space.

Another systematic and only slightly less straight forward approach is to remove every third or fourth tree in a row.   That sound too easy?  By saying you will choose any one of every 3 or 4 trees in each row, you can do some limited selection and remove small or defective trees preferentially.  But don’t get carried away, stay focused on the main goal of removing one of each group of three or four trees, not culling.  That comes later.  When you come upon a gap with a missing tree (previously thinned by deer, voles or drought) you may count it as a removal and move on, or not, depending on you actual stocking, your target stocking, and how many trees you need to remove.  You can also take a couple rows at a time and consider the 3 or 4 spaces in each row as a group of 6 or 8 from which to choose your two trees to thin out.

In this illustration removing every third tree in a row, notice that it also creates a pretty uniform benefit to all trees. Each leave tree generally gets opened up on two sides (when removal is staggered row to row), benefiting every tree similarly.

 

 

This illustrates the two systematic thinning strategies (1/4 left, 1/3 right), the local effect of a thinning gap and how it allows a tree to retain more crown. The greatest benefit comes from releasing each tree on at least one side.

So there you have a few simple approaches that will allow you to expand the growing space and effectively redistribute resources among your leave trees through YST. Each can be done with a minimal amount of thought and debate.  There are other schemes that also work.  But the point is to choose an approach that makes sense to you, one that you can do consistently, effectively and efficiently.  The earlier you do it (maybe around age 10 in western Oregon) the more efficient and beneficial it will be.

Remember, the idea of YST is to make room for trees to grow without harmful competition until more can be removed in the first thinning harvest, which should then pay for itself. It is at that initial thinning harvest that you can make more complicated decisions about spacing and arrangement to reflect your long term goals for a stand, such as habitat diversity or timber quality.

Young stand thinning is not all that complicated, but it does seem hard for people to get done. If you have too many trees it is a very important step towards keeping you on track.  Without it, it is often harder to achieve many landowners’ goals, especially those relating to aesthetics or habitat diversity.

 

 

The post Young Stand Thinning Strategies appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Handle? Head or Heart?

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Fri, 08/05/2016 - 12:21pm

To handle yourself, use your head; to handle others, use your heart. ~~Eleanor Roosevelt

This quote is often attributed to Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962); there are some sites that attribute this quote to Donald Anderson Laird (1897-1969), a psychologist and author (no photo found). Probably, more accurate. I’m not sure that the origin of the saying is really important. It may be enough to keep in mind the saying itself. (I know–how does this relate to evaluation? Trust me, it does.)

Before I was an evaluator, I was a child therapist (I also treated young women). I learned many skills as a therapist that have served me well as an evaluator. Skills like listening, standing up for your self, looking at alternatives. Which leads me to this saying. I had to “handle” others all the time at the same time I had to “handle” my self. I could not “blow up” when reprimanded. I could not become discouraged when someone (the client, the funder) criticized me. I had to learn to laugh when the joke was on me. I had to keep my spirits up when things went wrong. I had to keep cool in emergencies. I had to learn to tune out gossip and negative comments from others. This was a hard time for me. I tend to be passionate when I have an opinion; I have/had opinions (often).

As an evaluator, I am still passionate. Once my evaluation “on” button is pushed, it is hard to turn it off. Yet I still have to handle people. This morning, for example, I met with a fellow faculty member. I had to listen. I had to look for (and at) alternatives. I “handled” with my head; remember, I am passionate about evaluation. I provided her with alternatives and followed through with those alternatives. I handled with my heart.

When others are involved (and in evaluation there are always others), they must be handled with care, with the heart. It goes back to the standards (propriety)  and the guiding principles   (integrity/honesty, direct respect for people, and responsibilities for general and public welfare).  In the current times, it is especially important to have direct respect for people. All people. (Regardless of race, ethnicity, religion, gender identity, sex, national origin, veteran status, and disability.) To be honest and have integrity. One way to make sure you have integrity is to handle with your heart.

 

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Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon residents: Take the Oregon Coastal Values survey

Breaking Waves - Fri, 08/05/2016 - 11:10am

A research team at Portland State University is conducting a survey of Oregonians to find out how Oregon residents use and value the coast and ocean. The survey asks for your opinions on marine management activities and your preferences for future management. It also includes an online mapping activity, allowing you to indicate places on the coast that are important to you and to recommend changes in the management of areas.

The goal of the survey is to reach a broad set of adult residents who have lived in Oregon for a year or more. The research team also wants to make sure they hear from people across the state, including eastern and southern Oregon. Please feel free to share this link with others via e-mail, social media, or any other way you feel comfortable.

This project is funded by Oregon Sea Grant, and findings will be shared in a final report to managers, researchers, and the public. All responses will be anonymous, and only summaries of findings will be shared.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Paul Manson, a Ph.D. student researcher at Portland State University: mansonp@pdx.edu. You may also contact the project’s principal investigator, Elise Granek, at graneke@pdx.edu. The research team is also on Twitter.

The post Oregon residents: Take the Oregon Coastal Values survey appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon residents: Take the Oregon Coastal Values survey

Sea Grant - Fri, 08/05/2016 - 11:10am

A research team at Portland State University is conducting a survey of Oregonians to find out how Oregon residents use and value the coast and ocean. The survey asks for your opinions on marine management activities and your preferences for future management. It also includes an online mapping activity, allowing you to indicate places on the coast that are important to you and to recommend changes in the management of areas.

The goal of the survey is to reach a broad set of adult residents who have lived in Oregon for a year or more. The research team also wants to make sure they hear from people across the state, including eastern and southern Oregon. Please feel free to share this link with others via e-mail, social media, or any other way you feel comfortable.

This project is funded by Oregon Sea Grant, and findings will be shared in a final report to managers, researchers, and the public. All responses will be anonymous, and only summaries of findings will be shared.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact Paul Manson, a Ph.D. student researcher at Portland State University: mansonp@pdx.edu. You may also contact the project’s principal investigator, Elise Granek, at graneke@pdx.edu. The research team is also on Twitter.

The post Oregon residents: Take the Oregon Coastal Values survey appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Barnacles for dinner? Could be!

Breaking Waves - Thu, 08/04/2016 - 9:25am

In Spain, a plate of gooseneck barnacles will set you back more than the cost of a lobster dinner. Known as percebes, goosenecks “set the palate in ecstasy,” a Barcelona chef recently told a reporter. Nevertheless, Julia Bingham winced a little last spring when asked if she had ever tried the tube-shaped delicacies while she was studying them as an undergraduate at Oregon State University.

“I get that question a lot, and it kills me to say ‘no,’” said Bingham, who had gingerly navigated the wave-tossed shore of Cape Perpetua to collect barnacle samples for her University Honors College thesis. “It’s supposed to be sweeter than crab or lobster and taste like the ocean.”

Read the whole story about Bingham’s Oregon Sea Grant-funded research in Terra.

The post Barnacles for dinner? Could be! appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Barnacles for dinner? Could be!

Sea Grant - Thu, 08/04/2016 - 9:25am

In Spain, a plate of gooseneck barnacles will set you back more than the cost of a lobster dinner. Known as percebes, goosenecks “set the palate in ecstasy,” a Barcelona chef recently told a reporter. Nevertheless, Julia Bingham winced a little last spring when asked if she had ever tried the tube-shaped delicacies while she was studying them as an undergraduate at Oregon State University.

“I get that question a lot, and it kills me to say ‘no,’” said Bingham, who had gingerly navigated the wave-tossed shore of Cape Perpetua to collect barnacle samples for her University Honors College thesis. “It’s supposed to be sweeter than crab or lobster and taste like the ocean.”

Read the whole story about Bingham’s Oregon Sea Grant-funded research in Terra.

The post Barnacles for dinner? Could be! appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

OSG’s Sam Chan off to Washington, D.C.

Breaking Waves - Tue, 07/12/2016 - 4:22pm

Sam Chan, Oregon Sea Grant’s Extension watersheds and aquatic invasive species specialist, is headed to Washington, D.C. for a one-year assignment as National Extension Program Lead with the NOAA Sea Grant office.

He starts there July 18, but is driving from Oregon to the East Coast with stops to visit several Great Lakes Sea Grant programs and to deliver the keynote address at the National Conference on Pharmaceuticals and Personal Care Products.

In Chan’s absence, Tania Siemens will handle invasive species outreach and education for Oregon Sea Grant.

The post OSG’s Sam Chan off to Washington, D.C. appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

“Shop at the Dock” for fresh seafood, fisheries education

Breaking Waves - Mon, 07/11/2016 - 9:59am

NEWPORT – What started as an experiment to help bring new customers to fishermen who sold seafood off their vessels has quickly become a favorite summer activity for a growing number of locals and visitors in Newport.

Sponsored and run by Oregon Sea Grant in partnership with the Port of Newport, “Shop on the Dock” is entering its third summer of offering free, guided educational tours of Newport’s commercial fishing docks. Shoppers learn a bit about the fisheries, meet the people who catch the fish, and have an opportunity to buy the freshest salmon, tuna, halibut and crab, usually at prices lower than they’d find at their local supermarkets.

This summer will see more walks spread over two months – July 15, 22 and 29, and Aug. 5, 12 and 19 – and having multiple walks (at 9:30 a.m., 10 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.) each date.

“It’s like going down to the docks with a friend who knows the seafood – and knows the fishermen,” said Kaety Jacobson, Sea Grant’s Newport-based Extension fisheries specialist, who runs the program. “We make it easy for people.”

Learn more:

The post “Shop at the Dock” for fresh seafood, fisheries education appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs