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Plant Propagation

Forestry Events - Thu, 10/29/2015 - 1:33pm
Thursday, October 29, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Native plants support the local wildlife habitat, and are low maintenance when planted in the proper place. If you have a natural area that needs to be restored, or are just interested in putting more natives into your home garden, farm or woodlot, then propagating your own can be very rewarding and save you money to boot!

Clackamas Community College’s fall term Plant Propagation class will emphasize native plants this year, and is designed to give you hands-on experience reproducing a variety of plants from seeds and cuttings. There is also an online component where you will get more of the background on how and why plants are propagated the way that they are. 

The class is offered by the Horticulture Department at Clackamas Community College on the Oregon City campus

Restoring the West Conference 2015: Fire Ecology & Restoration in the Interior West

Forestry Events - Thu, 10/29/2015 - 1:33pm
Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - Thursday, October 29, 2015 (all day event)

On numerous occasions, a riparian theme has been suggested for the Restoring the West Conference. We listened, and this years theme is Managing for Resilient Riparian Corridors. These areas where water and land meet are vital for water quantity and quality, biological heath and diversity, and social values. Historic riparian corridor management in the West has ranged from benign neglect to exploitation and purposeful destruction. This conference will highlight the functions and benefits of these complex systems and how they can be managed for resilience in the face of climatic variability and other pressures. There will be two days of plenary sessions and a poster session. Poster submissions are requested.

This conference is organized and sponsored by Utah State University (Cooperative Extension, Wildland Resources and Watershed Sciences Departments, College of Natural Resources, and Ecology Center), USDA Forest Service, State and Private Forestry, and the Western Aspen Alliance.

For more information, click http://www.restoringthewest.org/

Photographers sought for King Tides documentation project

Breaking Waves - Mon, 10/19/2015 - 8:28am

How might a changing climate and rising sea levels affect the Oregon coast? For the sixth straight year, Oregonians are invited to bring their cameras and smartphones to the coast and join in an international effort to document unusually high “King Tides” to help answer these questions.

This year the project focuses on three sets of extreme tides: Oct. 27-29, Nov. 24-27 and Dec. 23-25. Organized in Oregon by CoastWatch, the project invites anyone who can get to the coast during these tides to take shots at the highest reach of the tide on those days. Photos can focus on any feature, but the most useful show the tide near the built environment – roads, seawalls, bridges, buildings, etc.. Ideal photos would allow the photographer to return later, during an ordinary tide, to get comparison shots.

CoastWatch is making a special effort this year to document King Tides near Oregon’s four marine reserves (Cape Falcon, Cascade Head, Otter Rock, Cape Perpetua and Redfish Rocks.) Participants will be able to share their photos on Flickr and should be prepared to include the date, description and direction of the photo. The Oregon King Tides Photo Initiative website will include an interactive map to help photographers determine the latitude and longitude of their shots.

For information about the project, and about the special effort to document King Tides in the marine reserve areas, contact Fawn Custer, CoastWatch volunteer coordinator (and an Oregon Sea Grant marine educator) at (541) 270-0027, fawn@oregonshores.org


The post Photographers sought for King Tides documentation project appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 12:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!


endless pasta


Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 12:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.


Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden


Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 8:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs