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Portland Trip to Daimler

Environment Events - Thu, 05/03/2018 - 2:35pm
Thursday, May 3, 2018 7:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Members of the Academy will visit Daimler, interact with industry leaders from business and engineering, learning about internship and full-time opportunities with the companies, and enjoying behind the scenes tours of facilities.  Transportation, a light breakfast, and lunch will be provided, and professional attire is expected.
Members attending need to arrange in advance to be away from Corvallis for the entire day.  Do not sign up if you will not be able to arrange your schedule to be away from campus the entire day.  Spaces are very limited, so if you sign up it is imperative that you make appropriate arrangements and attend.  
Registered participants will be contacted by Dr. Paja the week of the trip to coordinate details on a meeting place for departure (7am) and drop off upon return (4pm).
This is open to interested Academy members of all majors.  It will be of particular interest to: ME, IE, MfgE, ECE, Mat Science, CS, and ChemE

Not a member? Submit your application today!

(All OSU engineering students in good academic standing are eligible to apply) 

Engineering for Global Development

Environment Events - Thu, 05/03/2018 - 2:35pm
Friday, May 4, 2018 11:00 AM - 11:50 AM

Mariela Machado is Program Manager at Engineering for Change, a nonprofit based in NYC, where she works actively in the ICT and Technology for development fields all over the world. Mariela has a Telecommunication Engineering degree from UCAB in Caracas, Venezuela, a Master’s degree in ICTs from Barcelona, Spain and a Master's in Public Administration (MPA) in Development Practice from Columbia University. She worked as Project Manager for Telefonica, an international telecoms company present in over 15 countries in 3 continents for over 5 years. Mariela then went to do research for academia where she co-authored a report with Jeffrey Sachs that was presented at the World Economic Forum of Africa in 2016 on how ICT could enable the achievement of the SDG's by 2020, and an article on ICTs in Cuba for Foreign Affairs, among others. Mariela is still supporting research at Columbia University in projects devoted to connecting the unconnected.

Ovation

Health & Wellness Events - Thu, 05/03/2018 - 2:35pm
Thursday, May 3, 2018 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

Ovation is the college's signature event to recognize outstanding alumni and friends who are dedicated to serving the college and our students and/or who have significantly impacted their community in a positive way.

During this free event, including a reception and dinner, the college will recognize:

Claire Hughes, ’58, the first Native Hawaiian registered dietitian and former chief of the Hawaii State Department of Health’s Nutrition Branch.

We’ll also recognize Jessi Broberg, ’15, supervisor of administrative volunteers and a CPHHS preceptor at OHSU.

And Charlie Fautin, deputy director/public health administrator with the Benton County Public Health Department.

All alumni, faculty, staff and students of the college are invited to attend and bring one guest. We encourage you to R.S.V.P. and support the college and those who support us!

 

Beaverton students qualify for international underwater robotics contest in Washington

Sea Grant - Wed, 05/02/2018 - 4:51pm

5-2-18

by Tracy Crews and Tiffany Woods

BEAVERTON, Ore. – Students from Valor Christian School International in Beaverton have qualified for an international underwater robotics competition in Washington after placing first at a similar regional contest in Lincoln City that tested their engineering and problem-solving skills.

A team of students demonstrates their entry in the Oregon Regional MATE ROV competition on April 28 at the Lincoln City Community Center. (Photo by Cait Goodwin)

The team, called Valor Maritime International, was one of 40 teams from Oregon and southern Washington that participated in the 7th annual Oregon Regional Marine Advanced Technology Education Remotely Operated Vehicle competition on April 28 at the Lincoln City Community Center. In the pool, students from elementary school through high school demonstrated devices they built for the competition, which aims to prepare students for careers involving science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Oregon teams hailed from Port Orford, Brookings, Gold Beach, Coos Bay, Toledo, Newport, Lincoln City, Tigard, Warrenton, Beaverton, The Dalles, Florence, Tillamook and Aloha. Four Washington teams came from White Salmon and Ridgefield.

The competition, which was coordinated by Oregon Sea Grant and sponsored by the Oregon Coast STEM Hub, was divided into several categories based on skill and grade level. Students placing first in the Ranger category advanced to the 17th annual international competition, which will be held June 21-23 at the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way.

Students watch their entry’s progress in the MATE ROV competition. (Photo by Tracy Crews)

The competition in Lincoln City was one of 31 regional contests held around the world that are supported by the California-based Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center.

Each year a new theme is chosen. This year’s theme highlights the role remotely operated vehicles – or ROVs – play in the Pacific Northwest, with a focus on archaeology, seismology and renewable energy. Teams were tasked with building an underwater robot that could locate and retrieve the hypothetical wreckage of a downed airplane, deploy hypothetical equipment to monitor earthquakes, and install simulated renewable energy devices. Students also formed mock companies, gave presentations and created plans to manufacture, market and sell their devices.

Additional support for the regional event came from: Oregon State University, the MATE Center, the Marine Technology Society, and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. More than 50 volunteers served as divers and scorekeepers as well as judges, who evaluated the robots, posters and engineering presentations.

The First Place Ranger team, “Valor Maritime International,” from Valor Christian School International in Beaverton, Oregon, is headed for the international MATE ROV competition in Washington on June 21-23. (Photo by R. McDonald)

Winners of the competition in Oregon are:

RANGER CLASS (advanced level, 1st place finisher advances to international competition)
1st Place — Valor Maritime International from Valor Christian School International
2nd Place — Laveer Enterprise from Life Christian School in Aloha
3rd Place — Knight Marine from Valor Christian School International

NAVIGATOR CLASS (intermediate level, participates only in regional competition)
1st Place — ROV Sharks from Wasco County 4-H in The Dalles
2nd Place — JJICE from Siuslaw High School in Florence
3rd Place — Waterlogged from Tillamook High School

SCOUT CLASS (novice level, participates only in regional competition)
1st Place — Water Warriors from Warrenton Grade School
2nd Place — Water Whisperers from Warrenton Middle School
3rd Place — Valient Technologies from Valor Christian School International

The STEMinists from Wallace and Priscilla Stevenson Intermediate School in White Salmon won an award for team spirit.

A video of the 2017 competition in Oregon is on Oregon Sea Grant’s YouTube channel.

You can view photos of the 2018 competition in Oregon online.

The post Beaverton students qualify for international underwater robotics contest in Washington appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Beaverton students qualify for international underwater robotics contest in Washington

Breaking Waves - Wed, 05/02/2018 - 4:51pm

5-2-18

by Tracy Crews and Tiffany Woods

BEAVERTON, Ore. – Students from Valor Christian School International in Beaverton have qualified for an international underwater robotics competition in Washington after placing first at a similar regional contest in Lincoln City that tested their engineering and problem-solving skills.

A team of students demonstrates their entry in the Oregon Regional MATE ROV competition on April 28 at the Lincoln City Community Center. (Photo by Cait Goodwin)

The team, called Valor Maritime International, was one of 40 teams from Oregon and southern Washington that participated in the 7th annual Oregon Regional Marine Advanced Technology Education Remotely Operated Vehicle competition on April 28 at the Lincoln City Community Center. In the pool, students from elementary school through high school demonstrated devices they built for the competition, which aims to prepare students for careers involving science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).

Oregon teams hailed from Port Orford, Brookings, Gold Beach, Coos Bay, Toledo, Newport, Lincoln City, Tigard, Warrenton, Beaverton, The Dalles, Florence, Tillamook and Aloha. Four Washington teams came from White Salmon and Ridgefield.

The competition, which was coordinated by Oregon Sea Grant and sponsored by the Oregon Coast STEM Hub, was divided into several categories based on skill and grade level. Students placing first in the Ranger category advanced to the 17th annual international competition, which will be held June 21-23 at the Weyerhaeuser King County Aquatic Center in Federal Way.

Students watch their entry’s progress in the MATE ROV competition. (Photo by Tracy Crews)

The competition in Lincoln City was one of 31 regional contests held around the world that are supported by the California-based Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Center.

Each year a new theme is chosen. This year’s theme highlights the role remotely operated vehicles – or ROVs – play in the Pacific Northwest, with a focus on archaeology, seismology and renewable energy. Teams were tasked with building an underwater robot that could locate and retrieve the hypothetical wreckage of a downed airplane, deploy hypothetical equipment to monitor earthquakes, and install simulated renewable energy devices. Students also formed mock companies, gave presentations and created plans to manufacture, market and sell their devices.

Additional support for the regional event came from: Oregon State University, the MATE Center, the Marine Technology Society, and the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International. More than 50 volunteers served as divers and scorekeepers as well as judges, who evaluated the robots, posters and engineering presentations.

The First Place Ranger team, “Valor Maritime International,” from Valor Christian School International in Beaverton, Oregon, is headed for the international MATE ROV competition in Washington on June 21-23. (Photo by R. McDonald)

Winners of the competition in Oregon are:

RANGER CLASS (advanced level, 1st place finisher advances to international competition)
1st Place — Valor Maritime International from Valor Christian School International
2nd Place — Laveer Enterprise from Life Christian School in Aloha
3rd Place — Knight Marine from Valor Christian School International

NAVIGATOR CLASS (intermediate level, participates only in regional competition)
1st Place — ROV Sharks from Wasco County 4-H in The Dalles
2nd Place — JJICE from Siuslaw High School in Florence
3rd Place — Waterlogged from Tillamook High School

SCOUT CLASS (novice level, participates only in regional competition)
1st Place — Water Warriors from Warrenton Grade School
2nd Place — Water Whisperers from Warrenton Middle School
3rd Place — Valient Technologies from Valor Christian School International

The STEMinists from Wallace and Priscilla Stevenson Intermediate School in White Salmon won an award for team spirit.

A video of the 2017 competition in Oregon is on Oregon Sea Grant’s YouTube channel.

You can view photos of the 2018 competition in Oregon online.

The post Beaverton students qualify for international underwater robotics contest in Washington appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

What do the Nobels mean?

Environment Events - Mon, 04/30/2018 - 2:35pm
Monday, April 30, 2018 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM

While the Nobel Prizes in science attract public attention in a way that no other scientific award does, what do they mean and what role do the Nobel-winning discoveries play in shaping our world?

The College of Science invites you to a special evening of inspiration as three science professors present short talks on the 2017 Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry and Physiology/Medicine and the exciting scientific advances they represent.

Join us in partnership with the Corvallis Library for a public discussion on these extraordinary discoveries and their benefits for mankind.

The event is free and open to all.

For more information, visit http://impact.oregonstate.edu/2018/04/understanding-sciences-highest-awards/ 

In Praise of Squash

Terra - Mon, 04/30/2018 - 2:30pm
Green soldiers harvest the remaining squash from the fields after research is finished. (Photo: James Cassidy)

By Hana Maaiah

WITH RAIN JACKETS ZIPPED UP and hori horis (weed knifes) in hand, “green soldiers” flood the Organic Growers Club on a rainy Sunday morning. This army of volunteers gathers once again to cultivate the land with all sorts of nutritious foods. Squash is a favorite, but we’ll come back to that.

After 18 years, you’d think the volunteers would surrender to the rain or heat, but just as it claims in every email, “rain or shine!!!” they report for duty. The momentum originated with pop star, soil professor and social entrepreneur James Cassidy at Oregon State University. Some weeks, “I’d be the only one who showed up!” he says. The farm has been sustained by student volunteers who are, as the club’s bumper sticker proudly exclaims, ready to “START SEEING SOIL!!!”

A lot happens in one week while I am indoors staring at a computer screen, immersed in my school work. Every time I visit the farm, I am impressed by how much the landscape changes. One day we plant seeds, and two weeks later, the plants quickly mature with thick stems and wide, flat leaves. Soon after they begin flowering, and in three months, I am eating different kinds of squash for every meal: butternut squash and fig bread, spaghetti squash noodles with veggies, butternut squash and chickpea soup, acorn squash as a side dish. At one point during this fall season, I am anticipating the morning when I would wake up and realize I had turned into a squash.

These different squash varieties were monitored for storage rot. At the end of the project, they were processed and shared with the food pantry at OSU. (Photo: Shiana Briette)

An Abundance of Squash

So, there was squash. A lot of squash. Staring out onto the fog-covered fields, I wonder: Where did all the seeds come from?

I search for the man in the fedora, the omnipotent green soldier. He is always able to feed my curiosity. “Cassidy! This is amazing, look at all this squash!” I yell, almost spinning around in circles trying to point it all out. “Where did all the seeds come from?” In this particular endeavor of this particular scale (that is, sustainably small organic farming), it can sometimes be a challenge to have the resources you need when you need them.

“They were donated to us. Alex Stone, look her up! She is a rad researcher at OSU,” he says. “She is all about squash storability. Never thought about it, right?!”

He is definitely right. I had never thought about the shelf life of a squash, and I didn’t think I cared. “When she was done doing all her cool science stuff, she offered us the seeds, and now we have all of this,” he adds, also almost spinning around in a circle too. “That’s how it is here. Everyone keeps everyone in mind, and we keep it going full circle!”

It goes full circle indeed. As I ask questions about these beautifully blooming, history-filled, delicious miracle vegetables, my curiosity intensifies. When Stone donated these seeds to the Organic Grower’s Club, I was to learn, her impact didn’t stop there.

Food from the farm either gets shared among the volunteers, donated to local food pantries or sold in a CSA (community-supported agriculture) box, where the profits help fund summer interns.

Boxes of squash, harvested from the field, are ready to be cut and frozen before they are shared with the community. (Photo: Shiana Briette)

As I walk around the food pantry on the Oregon State campus one evening, I notice those beautiful orange squash I had seen earlier that week. The only difference is that they aren’t connected to a vine and laying on the earth. The squash were harvested, prepared and transported, now sitting in plastic bags cubed, or pureed, in a freezer of food that is shared with those in need.

Put the Winter Back in Winter Squash

Stone is a professor and vegetable crop researcher in the Department of Horticulture at Oregon State. She works to identify squash capable of high yields and long-term storage. With 16 different squash varieties, she aims to popularize winter squash and help famers generate income during the slow winter months, while providing people with local produce options for cold days.

Stone says her goal is to “put the winter back in winter squash.” She has two objectives. First, she works with farmers to figure out why their squash are rotting in storage bins. The problem can consume a significant portion of the stored crop. Farmers go from growing the squash, putting it in a barn for storage and then throwing it away. They try different storage environments and consider applying foliar calcium. Nothing seemed to keep the squash from going bad.

“Farmers were embarrassed about their squash rotting. It made them feel like they didn’t know how to do their job and that they were bad farmers,” says Stone. But is isn’t the fault of the farmers. Here in the Willamette Valley, there seem to be some very virulent storage rots not found elsewhere. So what farmers need are squash varieties that don’t rot.

An answer may come from across the Pacific. Tetsukabuto (fondly called Tetsu) meaning “steel helmet” in Japanese, is what Stone describes as “some kind of miracle squash.” Tetsu is very high yielding, resistant to soil borne diseases and storage rot and stores all winter. The name seems fitting. It did sound like a miracle, so I questioned how it came to be, bracing myself for stories describing lots of data collection and eventually a squash birthed in a lab. This was not the case at all.

Stone’s colleague, Shinji Kawai, who works in the vegetable breeding program, has always eaten Tetsu. He told her that back in Japan where he grew up, Tetsu is commonly grown. Some Japanese people don’t like it because it is difficult to cut, but when Tetsu is grown in the Willamette Valley, the fruits don’t have the hard skin. Oregon-grown Tetsu is easier to cut.

I giggled at the thought of a dangerous squash, but Stone quickly confirms that it is a serious concern. “My mother had to be taken to the hospital when I was younger,” she says, “because she seriously cut her finger cutting squash.” After the accident, she starting opening up winter squash by throwing it out a second story window onto the driveway – a very effective method.

A Sustainable Vegetable

With issues in variety selection, hardness and storage problems, squash is a complex vegetable. However, once you figure out how to cure it of squash rot and soften its skin, the only tricky part is from the consumer’s perspective. Alex hopes that squash can change the farming game by introducing a winter crop that provides farmers with an income during the winter season as well as giving consumers a local product to purchase.

With the help of eatwintersquash.com, Hanna Maaiah cooked a unique and tasty meal of Tetsu Squash Gyoza! (Photo: Hana Maaiah)

If you try surviving on locally raised produce in Oregon during the winter, you would surely starve. Stone and her group are getting the message out there: “Put the winter back in winter squash,” she says, which means that we should not eat it when it is harvested in September but, instead, later in the fall and even into the winter. “Starbucks has a pumpkin latte in August, when most squash isn’t ready until October, and then people are sick of it by October, which is when we should start eating it,” she adds.

Most squash can be harvested in mid September. If it stores well and is rot resistant (like Tetsu), it can last until April. Stone jokes about storing squash in the back of her truck and then eating it six months later. I soon found out this wasn’t a joke at all.

On her website, eatwintersquash.com, Stone introduces people to novel ways to eat squash — cut into a salad, wrapped in a quesadilla, or cut and roasted like french fries.

Or if you are lucky, she might leave three Tetsukabuto squash on your work tractor and encourage you to try one of her delicious recipes. I try the Gyoza wraps and tweak the recipe so that I could use up some vegetables in my fridge. The result is a deliciously sweet and healthy lunch that has me hooked on winter squash.

The size is perfect, the taste is unique and sweet and the main problem, like Stone says, is that I didn’t know that Tetsukabuto existed before this day. Surely, there is a need to develop a market for winter squash eaten in the winter.

Beyond Squash

There are a couple of take aways from this journey with squash. One is to be in constant dialogue with the environment and always ask questions. We must remember to put together the connections in the everyday patterns that reveal themselves to us, which helps us be conscious about our impact on our community. This also means becoming part of our surroundings by supporting the things we’d like to see more of in society, by either volunteering or other forms of support. Recognize the mighty purchasing power we all contain, and remember to vote with our dollars for things we would like to see more of in our communities.

Lastly, let’s give our food a few more moments of our day. Feeding ourselves can feel more like a burden than a celebration, but shortening the distance between farm and table will make each meal a bit more appetizing.

_______________________________

Note: Hana Maaiah is a senior in Environmental Sciences at Oregon State University.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

CC Master Gardener Board Meeting

Gardening Events - Mon, 04/30/2018 - 6:09am
Thursday, April 5, 2018 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM

Woodland Management...a basic forestry shortcourse

Forestry Events - Sat, 04/28/2018 - 2:34pm
Saturday, April 28, 2018 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Registration deadline March 27

extension.oregonstate.edu/benton/forestry/events

Woodland Management...a basic forestry shortcourse

Forestry Events - Sat, 04/28/2018 - 2:34pm
Saturday, April 28, 2018 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

Registration deadline March 27

extension.oregonstate.edu/benton/forestry/events

Protect Your Home from Wildfire

Forestry Events - Sat, 04/28/2018 - 2:34pm
Saturday, April 28, 2018 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM

A Workshop for Homeowners!

Learn how to look at your property with an eye to wildfire preparedness - Learn what you can do to reduce risk!

Wildfires take up the headlines in the summer, but now is the time to prepare for them. Join us for this educational program to learn about what you can do to prepare for wildfire. Learn what a firewisehome looks like and the simple actions you can take to get your property ready. By taking action now, you can reduce the chance that your home will burn during a wildfire.

Register by April 23. HTTP://EXTENSION.OREGONSTATE.EDU/COOS/OR BY PHONE AT 541-572-5263

Light lunch is provided!

The Corvallis Maker Fair

4-H Events - Sat, 04/28/2018 - 2:34pm
Saturday, April 28, 2018 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM

Oregon State University and The CO will host the Corvallis Maker Fair, a celebration of science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics, or STEAM, education and innovation, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. April 28th on the Corvallis campus. The family-friendly fair, now in its fifth year, will be held in the Memorial Union Ballroom and the Student Experience Center Plaza. The event is free and open to the public.

 

For more information: http://www.corvallismakerfair.org/ 

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs