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Basic Road Design Workshop

Forestry Events - Thu, 03/26/2015 - 2:38pm
Monday, March 23, 2015 - Thursday, March 26, 2015 (all day event)

This 4-day workshop identifies, through practical examples, the different design requirements necessary for a forest road that has multi-functional demands.  Design requirements to meet transportation needs, as well as landing demands, are stressed.  Basic design techniques are used.  Grade, alignment, drainage, and slope stability problems will be addressed.  ATTENDEES: engineering technicians, sale planners, foresters, road designers, contractors. 

For more information, click HERE

Coos County Herbicide Cost-Share

Forestry Events - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 2:50pm
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

The Coos County Weed Board is once again offering their herbicide cost share program to Coos County land-owners. This program provides low-cost herbicides to help combat invasive weeds.

A herbicide use meeting is being offered from 6-8pm on Wednesday, Mar. 25th at the Owens Building (CoosCounty Annex) in Co-quille and applicants are encouraged to attend. Applications are available at the meeting and attendees will receive assistance filling out the form and selecting appropriate herbicides to meet their needs. Applications are also available at:

· OSU extension, Myrtle Point

· Coos County Courthouse (in rack atCommissioners’ office entrance)

· Coos Soil and Water Conservation District Office, Coquille

· Oregon Department of Forestry, Coos Bay

· Hauser Store

The deadline to apply is March 25th

Analyzing and Forecasting Workshop

Forestry Events - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 2:50pm
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 (all day event)

This course reviews a process of systematically evaluating and tracking local wood raw material markets and regional forest product markets for investing in and managing timberlands and wood-using facilities.  It provides a process for prioritizing questions, aggregating data, conducting analysis and communicating results and recommendations.  The process has evolved through hundreds of Forisk engagements and dozens of research studies focused on breaking down local wood baskets and timber markets for a range of questions and clients.

More Information

Grades available on web

Health & Wellness Events - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 2:50pm
Wednesday, March 25, 2015 (all day event)

Spring Break

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Wed, 03/25/2015 - 11:16am

Today is the middle of Spring Break at Oregon State University.

What did you do today that involved thinking evaluatively?

Did you decide to go to work?

Did you decide to go to the beach?

Did you decide you were sick?

Did you decide you would work in the yard/garden?

Did you decide to stop and smell the roses?

Deciding is making a decision (of which you have only three choices–decide to do it, decide not to do it , or decide not to decide). Making those decisions is thinking evaluatively. Perhaps you did all of them (although going to the beach in the rain isn’t my idea of a good time–even to “get away”)? What criteria did you use? What decisions did you make?

The new term starts Monday, March 30, 2015 at OSU; it is already the second half of the second semester at schools who are using a semester calendar. When I was an undergraduate, I wanted to do anything besides go to classes; the weather was so fine. I was a diligent student, however, for a while at least.

How did you spend the week of spring break? Evaluatively?

my.

molly.

The post Spring Break appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Invasive Plant Best Management Practices

Forestry Events - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 2:36pm
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM

What will you learn?
BMPs help you identify effective and realistic practices that can be integrated into any behavior. Whether you’re a gardener, a landowner, a forester to a logger; the movement of invasive species is always a concern. A BMP can be as simple as cleaning your shoes or as complex as pressure washing your bulldozer. Regardless of your practice, the goal is always to minimize the spread of invasive species. Learn how to create best management practices (BMPs) that help identify and minimize the spread of invasive species.Learn more here...

 

Tractor Safety and Operation

Small Farms Events - Tue, 03/24/2015 - 2:36pm
Tuesday, March 24, 2015 (all day event)

The beginner class is intended for new farmers or those looking to buy a new tractor. Instructors Marc Anderson and Derek Wells are  Master Trainers in farm equipment and safety education and are experts on equipment operation. Light snacks and water will be provided, please bring a sack lunch.Click here for draft agendas of beginner class.

 For more information and to register visit:  http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/%20%20adult-tractor-safety-and-operation

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Well Water Screening and Edible Aquifers at the Daffodil Festival

Small Farms Events - Sun, 03/22/2015 - 6:34am
Saturday, March 21, 2015 10:00 AM - Sunday, March 22, 2015 4:00 PM

Come see us at the 2015 Daffodil Festival. Learn about the Southern Willamette Valley Groundwater Management Area, ask questions about local groundwater, kids can make an edible aquifer, and get you well water screened for nitrate - all for FREE.

Screening takes about 10 minutes, bring a sample of you well water in any clean container. 

Nitrate has been associated with a type of blue-baby syndrome, and there other emerging concerns about other potential health problems associated with nitrate in drinking water.   The areas at greatest risk for high nitrate in the Southern Willamette Valley are those with well-drained soils on the valley floor.  All homes with private wells should be actively monitored for nitrate levels, and it is recommended to test for nitrate and coliform bacteria every one to three years.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

OR Master Naturalist Program

Forestry Events - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 6:36am
Saturday, March 21, 2015 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM

The Oregon Coast Ecoregion course will present a diverse series of classes, covering the major ecosystems present on the Oregon Coast, from ocean and beaches to nearshore and intertidal to forests, rivers and estuaries. Once completed, this course will enable you to provide well-informed volunteer service to a variety of coastal groups and agencies.

For more information, click HERE

Tree School

Forestry Events - Sat, 03/21/2015 - 6:36am
Saturday, March 21, 2015 7:15 AM - 5:00 PM

Tree School is an important part of the comprehensive Extension Forestry & Natural Resources education program.  Tree School classes complement the year-long programs from OSU Extension and our collaborators in Natural Resources education.  Look for seasonal classes, workshops, and field days throughout the year on many of the core topics taught at Tree School.

Featuring 13 NEW classes including....

  • Fire, Fuels & Hazard Reduction
  • Fire Ecology
  • Free Online Forestry Planning
  • Plant Propagation, Handling & Planting
  • Bark Beetles & Defoliators
  • Federal Income Taxation of Forestland

Registration Deadline is February 27, 2015

 

Salmon Mashup: Rare Celilo Falls Film & Radio Chronicle

Breaking Waves - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 3:49pm

Celilo Falls fishery, early 1950s

Twenty-five years ago, in 1990, salmon populations from a variety of locations in the Pacific Northwest were being considered for listing under the federal Endangered Species Act. “Listing” of salmon was going to have serious implications for the region, and Joe Cone, then the science reporter for Oregon Sea Grant, developed a series of 14 radio feature stories to help listeners understand the issues and hear from the newsmakers and scientists involved.

The programs were broadcast on public radio stations in Oregon. Collected on an audio cassette at the time, these programs, recorded between November 1990 and August 1991, have been out of circulation for years. Since Northwest populations of salmon are still listed, receive protections, and have been the focus of attention for many people, Sea Grant Communications has been reviewing the recent history. In 2014 we published Salmon Abundance and Diversity in Oregon: Are We Making Progress? — a report and accompanying video, featuring OSU Prof. Court Smith. Now Cone’s 1990-91 broadcasts have been digitized, and some are online. Mashed up with this historic audio is rare color-film footage of the great Indian fishery at Celilo Falls on the Columbia River. That silent film footage is courtesy of the Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District. The combined audio and video is available on the Oregon Sea Grant Vimeo channel. The program is also available on YouTube. The four radio stories are 1) How the Salmon ESA decision was made, with Merritt Tuttle of NMFS; 2) An interview with Bill Bakke of Oregon Trout, an ESA petitioner; 3) Trying to help migrating salmon at Bonneville Dam, with OSU biologist Alec Maule; and 4) an Indian view of the salmon crisis, with Ted Strong of CRITFC. The announcer presenting the intros to each feature is Janine Kobel. Transcripts of the radio programs are available on request from Oregon Sea Grant Communications.

The post Salmon Mashup: Rare Celilo Falls Film & Radio Chronicle appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Salmon Mashup: Rare Celilo Falls Film & Radio Chronicle

Sea Grant - Fri, 03/20/2015 - 3:49pm

Celilo Falls fishery, early 1950s

Twenty-five years ago, in 1990, salmon populations from a variety of locations in the Pacific Northwest were being considered for listing under the federal Endangered Species Act. “Listing” of salmon was going to have serious implications for the region, and Joe Cone, then the science reporter for Oregon Sea Grant, developed a series of 14 radio feature stories to help listeners understand the issues and hear from the newsmakers and scientists involved.

The programs were broadcast on public radio stations in Oregon. Collected on an audio cassette at the time, these programs, recorded between November 1990 and August 1991, have been out of circulation for years. Since Northwest populations of salmon are still listed, receive protections, and have been the focus of attention for many people, Sea Grant Communications has been reviewing the recent history. In 2014 we published Salmon Abundance and Diversity in Oregon: Are We Making Progress? — a report and accompanying video, featuring OSU Prof. Court Smith. Now Cone’s 1990-91 broadcasts have been digitized, and some are online. Mashed up with this historic audio is rare color-film footage of the great Indian fishery at Celilo Falls on the Columbia River. That silent film footage is courtesy of the Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District. The combined audio and video is available on the Oregon Sea Grant Vimeo channel. The program is also available on YouTube. The four radio stories are 1) How the Salmon ESA decision was made, with Merritt Tuttle of NMFS; 2) An interview with Bill Bakke of Oregon Trout, an ESA petitioner; 3) Trying to help migrating salmon at Bonneville Dam, with OSU biologist Alec Maule; and 4) an Indian view of the salmon crisis, with Ted Strong of CRITFC. The announcer presenting the intros to each feature is Janine Kobel. Transcripts of the radio programs are available on request from Oregon Sea Grant Communications.

The post Salmon Mashup: Rare Celilo Falls Film & Radio Chronicle appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs