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Reflections from the Trail

Tree Topics - Fri, 07/10/2015 - 10:36am

Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties.

I recently did a backpacking trip with my daughter, about a 12 year long summer tradition. This year we did a section of the Pacific Crest Trail starting at the California border, travelling “north” to Howard Prairie Reservoir. We actually travelled much farther east than north, ending up only about 10 miles north of California after 55 miles on the trail.
This was really the first time I spent much time in the Siskiyous. I have always heard great things about that landscape from friends and colleagues who have worked or played down there.
The landscape, geology and soils of that region are quite diverse and often quite different from other parts of the state. We spent time hiking through very interesting and diverse mixed conifer forests and meadows with many familiar as well as unfamiliar shrubs and flowers. We really enjoyed the chance to experience the Siskiyous for ourselves. On this dry year, we saw no snow and had pretty long stretches between water. But mosquitos were scarce.
Another rather unusual characteristic of this section of the PCT is the relatively large amount of private lands traversed. Much of the Oregon PCT travels through National Forest lands. In Southern Oregon we were in part of the checkerboard of BLM and private lands. It turns out that I know a few of those private family landowners who have long been encouraging us hike that section.
Jud Parsons met us at his gate at the end of our second day on the trail with a smile and jug of fresh water. He then gave us a tour of the family’s property near Mount Ashland. Jud has a great knowledge and deep connection to this land, most of which was purchased by his grandfather over a hundred years ago. We rumbled around in the old Chevy looking at a recent selective harvest, visiting some favorite trees, talking about history and a century of family ties to the land in southern Oregon. That history included the establishment of the ski road and also the PCT, of which the family hosts about two or three miles as it passes back and forth between their property and the BLM. Just a couple of weeks earlier, he had hiked his section of the trail with a chainsaw to clear the trail of a tangle of snags that came down in a winter storm. The trail is now part of that land and its stewardship.
I imagine some of you are beginning to feel sorry for me, or certainly my daughter, for interrupting a perfectly good wilderness experience for a busman’s holiday to a family forestland. Don’t be. Visiting a place, woodland or other, with somebody so familiar with and having such deep roots to a place has always been a cherished experience for me, and for my daughter too. We loved the visit with Jud on his property, and already look back at it as one of the highlights of the trip due to all the new dimensions it added.
The visit gave us a perspective that is inaccessible to most hikers on the PCT who often dash along the trail unaware of the ecological, social or historical context of the land they pass through. This is understandable since they have to rely on a sparse, landscape-impoverished guidebook, much to their loss. I am once again grateful for the chance to work with the landowner community, which affords me so many pleasures and benefits – including a jug of water and patch of cherished ground to camp on.

 

 

The post Reflections from the Trail appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Free overnight STEM camp for 7th-8th grade girls

Breaking Waves - Fri, 07/10/2015 - 8:49am

NEWPORT – Seventh and eighth grade girls on the Oregon Coast can get a taste of what it’s like to be an engineer or marine scientist at a free overnight camp Aug. 17-18 at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center and the neighboring Oregon Coast Aquarium.

Sponsored by the Oregon Coast STEM Hub, the camp will give girls a chance to work with researchers at Hatfield Marine Science Center in the labs and in the field, and enjoy behind-the-scenes tours with women in aquarium careers. They’ll also get to spend the night in the Shark Tunnel at the Oregon Coast Aquarium! Meals are provided.

Registration is limited; learn more and sign up at  http://ow.ly/PrC5W.

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Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Free overnight STEM camp for 7th-8th grade girls

Sea Grant - Fri, 07/10/2015 - 8:49am

NEWPORT – Seventh and eighth grade girls on the Oregon Coast can get a taste of what it’s like to be an engineer or marine scientist at a free overnight camp Aug. 17-18 at OSU’s Hatfield Marine Science Center and the neighboring Oregon Coast Aquarium.

Sponsored by the Oregon Coast STEM Hub, the camp will give girls a chance to work with researchers at Hatfield Marine Science Center in the labs and in the field, and enjoy behind-the-scenes tours with women in aquarium careers. They’ll also get to spend the night in the Shark Tunnel at the Oregon Coast Aquarium! Meals are provided.

Registration is limited; learn more and sign up at  http://ow.ly/PrC5W.

The post Free overnight STEM camp for 7th-8th grade girls appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Blueberry Field Day

Small Farms Events - Fri, 07/10/2015 - 6:10am
Wednesday, July 8, 2015 1:00 PM - Thursday, July 16, 2015 5:30 PM
For complete information, please view Blueberry Field Day agenda.
Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

First-year START orientation

Health & Wellness Events - Thu, 07/09/2015 - 2:36pm
Thursday, July 9, 2015 (all day event)

First-year START is an extensive two-day orientation, advising, and registration program with sessions offered June through September, attendance on both days is required. New Student Programs also offers a program for parents and family members of first-year students on the same day for an additional fee.

For more information, registration and other START session dates see First-Year START Information

Advanced insect and disease field session

Forestry Events - Thu, 07/09/2015 - 2:36pm
Monday, July 6, 2015 - Thursday, July 9, 2015 (all day event)

This field session offers the most advanced and in-depth insect and disease training available in the Pacific Northwest. The attendees will spend one-on-one field time with top-level entomologists and pathologists from the Pacific Northwest region and gain real-life experience in developing management regimes and silvicultural measures. Each day will consist of site visits to infected stands for a first-hand look and discussion of particular insect and disease problems. Attendees will learn identification, biology, response to stand conditions and management options. Small group sessions will be used to develop management strategies and mock stand prescriptions. The region’s leading entomologists and pathologists will be on hand to provide assistance and advice as the prescriptions are developed.

For more information, click HERE

An Introduction to PNW Agroforestry Practices

Forestry Events - Wed, 07/08/2015 - 2:34pm
Wednesday, July 8, 2015 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM

Please join us for this multi-media informational forum! The day will be filled introducing you to Pacific Northwest Agroforestry and Woodland Practices. It is not just about growing trees. It is so much more!!!! We have prepared a day of short presentations, videos, and photo tours related to agroforestry, woodland management, riparian buffers and ecological conservation. We will also share with you several resources to inspire and improve your knowledge on agroforestry and woodland management. Organized by Marion and Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation Districts. FREE, but registration is required.

Put down those pruning shears

Tree Topics - Wed, 07/08/2015 - 11:56am

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, Benton, Linn and Polk Counties

I recently got a call from a fellow whose Douglas-fir trees were covered with globs of pinkish pitch. It looked kind of like candle wax drippings on a Chianti bottle in some Italian restaurant, except it was on the trunks of his trees. As we talked I discovered that it was not an old stand, and the landowner had been out during the nice weather last summer and pruned his trees up six or eight feet to make it easier to get around and to reduce the risk of fire down near the County road. The pitch blobs were at the pruning scars.

Pitch moth evidence on off-site ponderosa pine

The culprit here is the Sequoia pitch moth (Synanthedon sequoia), a common clear-winged moth that attacks many conifer species.

Although commonly seen in town in people’s shore pine and other ornamental pine species, it is not generally a problem on Douglas-fir, or native Valley ponderosa pine except when the tree is wounded. A common and very attractive wound is easily created by pruning live branches during the summer months (April thru September) when the bark is soft and the adult moth is active. Although unlikely to kill your trees it is unsightly and generally avoidable.

Prevention is the best cure.

So this summer, put down those pruning shears. Save that job for the winter months.

 

Have an image of pitch moth on Douglas-fir you would like to share? email brad.w-r@oregonstate.edu

Fresh pitch moth evidence on an ornamental pine

The post Put down those pruning shears appeared first on TreeTopics.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Now available: The 2015-16 Oregon Coast Quests Book

Breaking Waves - Tue, 07/07/2015 - 8:00am

The 2015-16 edition of Oregon Sea Grant’s popular Oregon Coasts Quests Book is now available for sale. This 216-page, spiral-bound book features:

Directions for 24 Quests
Updates to existing Quests
Two brand-new Quests
Ten Quests created by youth
Quests in four Oregon counties (Lincoln, Coos, Curry, and Benton)
One Quest with directions in both English and Spanish

The book retails for $10 and is being sold by booksellers around the state. To find out where you can buy a copy, visit the booksellers page on the Quests website: http://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/quests. If you happen to be or know of a bookseller interested in selling Quest books, please contact OregonCoastQuests@oregonstate.edu for ordering information.

Find us on Facebook
Oregon Coast Quests now has a Facebook page, where you can get updates, “like” the page, and share your Questing adventures with friends and neighbors: https://www.facebook.com/OregonCoastQuests

Happy Questing!

The post Now available: The 2015-16 Oregon Coast Quests Book appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Upcoming “Dock Shop” walks take the mystery out of buying fresh seafood

Breaking Waves - Mon, 07/06/2015 - 8:00am

NEWPORT – Want to learn more about the seafood caught off the Oregon coast – and have a chance to buy some while you’re at it? Join Oregon Sea Grant for a series of “Dock Shop” guided tours on July 10, 16, 22 and 28 at Newport’s commercial fishing port.

Led by Ruby Moon,  Oregon Sea Grant Extension fisheries specialist, the walks start at the entrance of Port Dock 5, across SE Bay Boulevard from Local Ocean restaurant at noon each date. They last from 1-2 hours, depending on what vessels are in port and who’s selling what.

Moon will lead the walks while talking about what seafood is in season, what local boats fish for and how, vessel types, fishing practices and sustainability.

Those interested in buying seafood should bring cash and a cooler with ice. Comfortable shoes with good traction are a must! There is no charge for taking part in the walk.

Learn more:

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Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans

Breaking Waves - Wed, 07/01/2015 - 1:15pm

(This post was co-written by Kelsey Adkisson, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Fellow and Ivan Kuletz, Oregon Sea Grant Marine Policy Intern. )
Oregon doesn’t stop at the beach. In fact, the shoreline is just the beginning of an incredibly complex and thriving marine environment full of colorful rockfish, towering kelp forests, expansive sandy flats, jagged rocky reefs, and a diversity of unique invertebrates.

To ensure this environment remains healthy and vibrant, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) and Oregon Sea Grant (OSG) teamed up and developed a successful partnership that focuses on enhancing the intersection of science and management. This partnership has fostered fellowships and scholarships that support science-based resource management issues. As part of this collaboration, two OSG Fellows, Kelsey Adkisson and Ivan Kuletz, worked with ODFW on a great example of Oregon’s support for science-based ocean resource management- the Oregon Nearshore Strategy.

The Oregon Nearshore Strategy is a set of prioritized recommendations for conservation, management, and research of species and habitats that occur within state waters. Oregon’s nearshore environment is home to a vast array of species and habitats. All of which are integral components of a complex nearshore ecosystem. This ecosystem is interconnected through food webs, ocean currents, and a multitude of other biological, physical, chemical, geological and human use factors.

Originally developed in 2005, and currently undergoing a ten year revision, the Nearshore Strategy was created via a collaborative process led by ODFW. Members of the public, ocean-related businesses, recreational interests, conservation groups, government agencies, tribes, universities, and many other sectors helped contribute to the Strategy.

“At its core, the Nearshore Strategy is intended to contribute to the larger domain of marine resources management and focus actions towards priority issues and areas that have not already received the attention they deserve,” explained Caren Braby, the ODFW Marine Resources Program Manager. “Ultimately, the Strategy’s effectiveness hinges on public input, which helps shape the document, and also ensures that diverse perspectives, values, visions and concerns for the nearshore environment are represented.”

As part of the 2015 revision process, Kelsey and Ivan worked with ODFW Project Leader, Greg Krutzikowsky, to review and update the enormous body of scientific knowledge that underpins the document. This information was used to develop recommendations that support Oregon’s diversity of marine life. As Sea Grant Scholars, it was a unique experience to be part of something that is used by such a broad variety of interest groups, including federal agencies, policy makers, citizen groups, fishermen, conservation organizations, and researchers.
The Nearshore Strategy is currently undergoing public review and the update is due to be completed by October 1, 2015. Public input is essential to shaping and prioritizing resource needs for the next ten years and ODFW is seeking input on the Strategy. To review the Oregon Nearshore Strategy, provide input, or find out more about the revision process please visit the ODFW Oregon Nearshore Strategy website: (http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/nearshore/index.asp).

Learn more:

(Photo credits: Janna Nichols)

The post Beyond the Shore: Oregon’s Plan for Thriving Oceans appeared first on Breaking Waves.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs