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CPHHS Research Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 03/06/2015 - 3:34pm
Friday, March 6, 2015 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM

"Advantages and Pitfalls of Wearable Monitors for Objective Physical Activity Assessments: Future Applications for Health-Related Research" John Schuna, Jr, PhD, Assistant Professor, Exercise and Sport Science, College of Public Health and Human Sciences.

Dr. Schuna's research areas encompass objective physical activity assessment, sedentary behavior assessment, and physical activity and sedentary behavior epidemiology. Recent work has focused on automated technology interfaces for physical activity assessment, and the value of total volume of physical activity (i.e., energy expenditure) irrespective of intensity.

See Dr. Schuna's faculty profile

This college-wide research seminar, is Co-Sponsored by the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs; the Center for Healthy Aging; the Hallie Ford Center; the Moore Family Center for Whole Grain Foods, Nutrition and Preventive Health and the Center for Global Health. The seminar series provides a forum for faculty in the College of Public Health & Human Sciences and other researcher to present their current research in public health and human sciences in an environment conducive to stimulating research collaboration and fostering student learning. Faculty and students from the Division of Health Sciences and other colleges, research centers and institutions are encouraged to participate.

Center for Global Health Thematic Group Seminar

Health & Wellness Events - Fri, 03/06/2015 - 3:34pm
Friday, March 6, 2015 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Professor Anthony Veltri will present his current international research on building Environmental Safety and Health capabilities in Asian factories, specifically China. His talk will also discuss opportunities for involvement for OSU students in Public Health, Engineering and Business.

Faculty research, teaching and outreach activities in this thematic group respond to the growing call to build new and unique occupational safety and health management and technical capabilities in organizations in the United States and abroad. Faculty have considerable experience working closely with Chinese manufacturing organizations to build occupational safety and technical capabilities that are relevant and applicable to Chinese work culture and values. Faculty have expertise in practices in exposure assessment, risk characterization, toxicology and management.

Please RSVP specifying the 'Thematic Group event' to cfgh@oregonstate.edu.

 http://health.oregonstate.edu/global-health

Oregon Forests Student Summit

Forestry Events - Thu, 03/05/2015 - 3:37pm
Thursday, March 5, 2015 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

The goal of the Oregon Forests High School Student Summit is for high school students who are considering college to: 1) increase their understanding about forests, 2) explore careers in forestry and natural resources, and 3) consider OSU’s College of Forestry for their undergraduate career.

For more information, click HERE

PROMISE Internship Info and Application Support Session

4-H Events - Wed, 03/04/2015 - 7:36am
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM

OSU undergraduate students will learn about the PROMISE paid summer  
internship program and participate in a cover letter/resume building  
workshop.

Benefits of being a PROMISE intern:

  • Increase your professional toolkit
  • Build confidence in the workplace
  • Develop your networking skills
  • Gain from a  meaningful experience

Oregon Season Trackers

Forestry Events - Wed, 03/04/2015 - 7:36am
Wednesday, March 4, 2015 10:00 AM - 2:30 PM

Do you want to learn more about the microclimate of where you live?

Do you want to contribute to our understanding of weather and its effect on plants and animals?

Become an Oregon Season Tracker  "Citizen Scientist" and help monitor seasonal patterns of precipitation (rain and snow) and phenology (timing of natural processes such as bud break). You will be helping OSU Extension and HJ Andrews Experimental Forest scientists develop a better understanding of weather and how it affects plants.

In this workshop volunteers will learn how to participate in two national citizen science networks:

CoCoRaHS participants collect rain and snowfall data used by the National Weather Service, climate modelers, emergency managers, and others.

Nature's Notebook observers report on season plant changes in key native species identified across the state.

It is easy to participate and suitable to involve your entire family.  All you need is a computer or smart phone to log in and record your data; a CoCoRaHS rain gauge, one or more plants to observe, and a willingness to make regular rainfall and/or plant observations (depending on if you choose to participate in one or both programs).

To register online:  https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/830

 

Inferential statistics

Evaluation is an Everyday Activity - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 4:24pm

This is a link to an editorial in Basic and Applied Social Psychology. It says that inferential statistics are no longer allowed by authors in the journal.

“What?”, you ask. Does that have anything to do with evaluation? Yes and no. Most of my readers will not publish here. They will publish in evaluation journals (of which there are many) or if they are Extension professionals, they will publish in the Journal of Extension. And as far as I know, BASP is the only journal which has established an outright ban on inferential statistics. So evaluation journals and JoE still accept inferential statistics.

Still–if one journal can ban the use, can others?

What exactly does that mean–no inferential statistics? The journal editors define this ban as as “…the null hypothesis significance testing procedure is invalid and thus authors would be not required to perform it.” That means that authors will remove all references to  p-values, t-values, F-values, or any reference to statements about significant difference (or lack thereof) prior to publication. The editors go on to discuss the use of confidence intervals (No) and Bayesian methods (case-by case) and what inferential statistical procedures are required by the journal.

This ban reminds me of a valuable lesson presented to me in my original statistics course (maybe not the original one, maybe several). That lesson being the difference between practically significant and statistically significant. Something can be statistically significant (all it has to do is meet the p<.05 bar) and not be practically significant. To demonstrate this point, I offer the example of a three point gain per semester. It was statistically significant at p<.05 but did it actually show that the students learned something over the semester? Does three points make that much difference? Three points is three questions on a 100-question test or 1.5 questions on a 50-question test.  How much would they have to learn to make a difference in their lives? You do the math.

The journal is requiring strong descriptive statistics INCLUDING EFFECT SIZE (go read Cohen) because effect size is independent of sample size unlike significance tests. Cohen lists effect sizes as small (0.2), medium (0.5) or large (0.8).  Descriptive statistics are those numbers which describe the SAMPLE (not the population from which the sample was drawn) and typically include measures of central tendency (mean, median, mode)  and variability (range , standard deviation, kurtosis , and skewness), as well as frequency and percentage (i.e., distributional data).

By using a larger sample size, the “descriptive statistics become increasingly stable and sampling error is less of a problem.” The journal stops “…short of requiring particular sample sizes…”, however, stating that “…it is possible to imagine circumstances where more typical sample sizes might be justifiable.” I do remember a voice advocating for stating effect size; no one ever went so far as to talk down inferential statistics.

What does that say for the small sample sizes Extension professionals typically achieve? I would suggest Extension professionals look at effect size.

my .

molly.

1. Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Earlbaum Associates.

The post Inferential statistics appeared first on Evaluation is an Everyday Activity.

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Oregon Forests Student Summit

Forestry Events - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:35pm
Tuesday, March 3, 2015 9:00 AM - 2:00 PM

The goal of the Oregon Forests High School Student Summit is for high school students who are considering college to: 1) increase their understanding about forests, 2) explore careers in forestry and natural resources, and 3) consider OSU’s College of Forestry for their undergraduate career.

For more information, click HERE

Inland Empire Reforestation Council

Forestry Events - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:35pm
Tuesday, March 3, 2015 (all day event)
Site Prep and Beyond: Managing Young Conifer Stands
Hear from State and Private Industry professional foresters on the latest in management, site prep, mitigation, pests and legislative updates. For more information, or to register see the event brochure.

Woodland Management

Forestry Events - Tue, 03/03/2015 - 3:35pm
Tuesday, March 3, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM

This five-session course is ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property.  It serves as preparation for the OSU Master Woodland Manager Training.  Topics covered include:

  • Getting Started: Assessing your property and your site
  • What's Going on in Your Woods? Understanding tree biology and forest ecology
  • Take Care of Your Woods: Tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control
  • Getting it Done: Safety, tools and techniques, timber sale logistics, and laws and regulations.
Instructors are Glenn Ahrens, OSU Forestry & Natural Resources Extension Agent, and Julie Woodward, Forest Education Program Manager, Oregon Forest Resources Institute.

Please pre-register no later than February 3.

https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/832

Climate Trends in the Pacific Northwest

Forestry Events - Mon, 03/02/2015 - 3:35pm
Monday, March 2, 2015 1:00 PM - 5:00 PM
Ag and forest owners and producers are invited to this informal session on what is being observed in the field of climate research by scientists associated with Oregon State. This will address recent/current conditions and how changing trends may affect the long term production in Northeast Oregon and the Pacific Northwest. Geologic mapping and using this to estimate ground and surface water trends and recharge will be covered.

Woodland Management

Forestry Events - Mon, 03/02/2015 - 3:35pm
Monday, March 2, 2015 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
This five-session course is ideal for anyone who is just starting out taking care of a woodland property.  Topics covered include:
  • Getting Started:  Assessing your property and your site
  • What's Going on in Your Woods?  Understanding tree biology and forest ecology
  • Taking Care of Your Woods: tree planting, care for an established forest, weed control
  • Getting it Done: Safety, timber sale logisitics, and laws and regulations

Instructor is Amy Grotta, OSU Forest & Natural Resources Extension Agent - Columbia, Washington & Yamhill Counties

To attend you must pre-register no later than January 26th.  The form can me accessed at:

https://secure.oregonstate.edu/osuext/register/823.

 

Food Science Camp 2013 and Erik Fooladi

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Fri, 07/19/2013 - 1:44pm

We participate in the Oregon State U Food Science Camp for middle school students.

Part of the STEM [science technology engineering math] Academies@OSU Camps.

We teach about bread fermentations, yeast converting sugars to CO2 and ethanol, lactobacillus converting sugar to lactic and acetic acids, how the gluten in wheat can form films to trap the gas and  allow the dough to rise. On the way we teach about flour composition, bread ingredients and their chemical functionalities, hydration, the relationships between enzymes and substrates [amylases on starch to produce maltose for the fermentation organisms]; gluten development, the gas laws and CO2′s declining solubility in the aqueous phase during baking which expands the gas bubbles and leads to the oven spring at the beginning of baking; and the effect of pH on Maillard browning using soft pretzels that they get to shape themselves..

All this is illustrated by hands on [in] activities: they experience the hydration and the increasing cohesiveness of the dough as they mix it with their own hands, they see their own hand mixed dough taken through to well-risen bread. They get to experience dough/gluten development in a different context with the pasta extruder, and more and more.

A great way to introduce kids to the relevance of science to their day to day lives: in our case chemistry physics biochemistry and biology in cereal food processing.

We were also fortunate to have Erik Fooladi from Volda University College in Norway to observe the fun: http://www.fooducation.org/

If you have not read his blog and you like what we do here: you should!

 

endless pasta

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

Good Cheese, Bad Cheese

Bringing Food Chemistry to Life - Wed, 07/10/2013 - 1:25pm

pH, colloidal calcium phosphate, aging, proteolysis, emulsification or its loss and their interactions lead to optimum melting qualities for cheeses. A module in this year’s food systems chemistry class.

This module was informed by this beautiful article “The beauty of milk at high magnification“ by Miloslav Kalab, which is available on the Royal Microscopical Society website.

http://www.rms.org.uk/Resources/Royal%20Microscopical%20Society/infocus/Images/TheBeautyOfMilk.pdf

Of course accompanied by real sourdough wholegrain bread baked in out own research bakery.

Inspired by…

“The Science of a Grilled Cheese Sandwich.”

by: Jennifer Kimmel

in: The Kitchen as Laboratory: Reflections on the Science of Food and Cooking

Edited by Cesar Vega, Job Ubbink, and Erik van der Linden

 

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs

February 2011- Nutrition Education Volunteers taking “vacation”

Family Food Educators of Central Oregon - Tue, 02/01/2011 - 9:24am

I’m back from maternity leave and getting resettled into some new responsibilities.  We had a staff member leave us, so Glenda and I are having to pick up the work load until we find someone new, or our responsibilites change.  Being a new mom is lots of work too, so I’ve gone part time (24 hours aweek) but am still trying to get everything done… that being said, we’ve decided to put our nutrition education volunteering on hold, until I have a managable workload.

We look forward to being able to start things back up in the summer or fall of 2011.  Thanks so much and since a few of you have been asking, here’s a photo of our boy.  He is 5 months old today!

Bundled out in the cold!

Categories: OSU Extension Blogs