4-H 6830L • Revised September 2007 (**). Revised February 2008 (*2/08)

This curriculum was designed to help children discover the importance of breakfast through reading and discussion of various children's literature books. The four modules each offer a no-cook food activity and other activities to reinforce the message about smart eating. "Breakfast Bites," a parent newsletter, takes the message from the classroom into the home.

Each module's lesson plan, worksheets, and parent newsletter are available for online viewing, downloading, and printing in Adobe Acrobat PDF (download the free Adobe Acrobat Reader; for best results, use Acrobat Reader 4.0 or higher). The curriculum also includes some activities used in all modules.

The curriculum was prepared jointly by the 4-H Youth Development and Family and Community Development programs of the Oregon State University Extension Service and by the Oregon Department of Education.

Module 1, Breakfast Builds Better Brains
The first module focuses on the importance of starting the day with breakfast. Children learn that eating in the morning helps their brain work better. The module includes participation activities that reinforce the importance of eating a balanced breakfast. The activities also introduce a calendar for children to record and track their daily breakfast consumption.

Module 2, Many Foods Make a Morning Meal
In this module, children are introduced to the idea that breakfast is when you eat, not what you eat. They discover that breakfast can include many different kinds of nutritious foods and participate in activities that reinforce the importance of making choices for a balanced and varied breakfast. Children will continue to track daily breakfast consumption in this lesson.

Module 3, Fruits and Veggies --- A Colorful Way to Start the Day!
By exploring a variety of colorful and tasty vegetables, children learn they need five servings of fruits and vegetables each day. The module's activities reinforce the importance of including fruits and/or vegetables at breakfast. Children continue to track their daily breakfast consumption.

Module 4, Grains Get You Going
This module explains how grains provide energy to the brain and body to support thinking and moving. The activities in this lesson help children discover and identify grains and grain-based foods. Children track their daily breakfast consumption.

Module 5, Milk & Movement for Mighty Bones
This module helps children discover that milk and foods made from milk provide calcium for building bones and teeth. Children will participate in activities that reinforce the importance of both calcium and physical activity in building strong bones. Children continue to track their daily breakfast consumption.


Design Team
(in alphabetical order) Dana Baxter, OSU Extension nutrition education coordinator, Lane County; Evelyn Brookhyser, OSU Extension 4-H youth development/family and community development faculty emeritus, Lincoln County; Nancy Kershaw, OSU Extension 4-H youth development/family and community development faculty, Tillamook County; Terri Lloyd-Jones, nutrition specialist, Oregon Department of Education; Elaine Schrumpf, OSU Extension specialist, 4-H youth development; Ellen Schuster, former OSU Extension specialist, family and community development, nutrition and foods; and Janice Smiley, OSU Extension 4-H youth development/family and community development faculty, Washington County.

Writer
Connie Evers

Graphic Design
Carol Buckle, Anderson Buckle Creative, Portland Oregon.

 

© 2007 Oregon State University. This publication may be photocopied or reprinted in its entirety for noncommercial purposes. This material was partially funded by USDA's Food Stamp program, Oregon State University Extension Service cooperating.

This publication was produced and distributed in furtherance of the Acts of Congress of May 8 and June 30, 1914. Extension work is a cooperative program of Oregon State University, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and Oregon counties. Oregon State University Extension Service offers educational programs, activities, and materials--without discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, age, marital status, disability, or disabled veteran or Vietnam-era veteran status. Oregon State University Extension Service is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Published October 2004. Revised September 2007.