Trees & Woodlands

If you own or manage forest land or other natural resources in Oregon, learn the latest techniques in natural resource management. Participate in our classes and programs, such as Master Woodland Manager, Ties to the Land Successional Planning, Women Owning Woodlands, Tree School, and Oregon Master Naturalist.

Stories & Tips
Registration is open for the fourth annual Natural Resources Leadership Academy
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Genome could unlock eucalyptus potential for paper, fuel and fiber

In a collaboration spanning five continents, scientists have announced the complete sequencing of one of the world’s most widely planted trees, Eucalyptus grandis.

Oregon State ranks seventh worldwide in agriculture and forestry

Oregon State University has been recognized as a world-class center in agriculture and forestry, ranking seventh in a new international survey of more than 200 schools.

Popular Publications
 
Outlines the basic practices and benefits of using controlled fires for forest maintenance.
 
A full-color field guide. Learn to identify common conifer and broadleaf trees and ornamental, shade, and fruit trees as well.
 
Outlines the basic principles and safety issues of cutting down (felling) and cutting up (bucking ) trees.
 
Discusses the tree growing cycle, tasks and time requirements, laws and regulations, and costs, returns, and taxes.
 
A step-by-step guide to establish “basis,” the financial starting point to calculate tax liability on income from a timber sale.
 
As you learn more about forestry and your own objectives, keep improving your management plan to fit changing times, new situations, and expanding knowledge.
 
The Douglas-fir needle midge can be a very destructive pest of Douglas-fir. Infestation of new needles can be as high as 100 per-cent.

Featured Question

I have recently noticed many local Douglas firs turning brownish red (many needles dying), with some trees having entire limbs apparently dead or dying. I've seen this here in Corvallis, in the coast range, in the Portland area and in the Columbia Gorge; and I have seen it in young forest stands (20+ years) as well as individual 100 year old trees on urban city lots. (An arborist in Portland diagnosed one of these older trees as Swiss needle cast.) What is going on? Will the trees die? Is there treatment possible?

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