Monthly Garden Calendars

The monthly gardening calendars are produced by OSU Extension. Each calendar provides reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance. For more info, contact: your local OSU Extension office.

Select desired month:

January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December 


 

January

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Planning

  • Keep a garden journal. Consult your journal in the winter, so that you can better plan for the growing season.
  • Check with local retail garden or nursery stores for seeds and seed catalogs, and begin planning this year's vegetable garden.
  • Have soil test performed on garden plot to determine nutrient needs. Contact your local Extension office for a list of laboratories or view EM 8677 online.
  • Take hardwood cuttings of deciduous ornamental shrubs and trees for propagation.
  • Plan to replace varieties of ornamental plants that are susceptible to disease with resistant cultivars in February.

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Clean pruners and other small garden tools with rubbing alcohol.
  • Reapply or redistribute mulches that have blown or washed away during winter.
  • Place windbreaks to protect sensitive landscape evergreens against cold, drying winds.
  • Central/Eastern Oregon: To prevent winter damage from drying, water plants deeply every 6 to 8 weeks, when the temperatures are above freezing.
  • Western Oregon: Do not walk on lawns until frost has melted.
  • Western Oregon: Water landscape plants underneath wide eaves and in other sites shielded from rain.

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Monitor landscape plants for problems. Don't treat unless a problem is identified.
  • Scout cherry trees for signs and symptoms of bacterial canker. Remove infected branches with a clean pruner or saw. Sterilize tools before each new cut. Burn or send to landfill before bloom. See EC 631, Controlling Diseases and Insects in Home Orchards.
  • Watch for field mice damage on lower trunks of trees and shrubs. Eliminate hiding places by removing weeds. Use traps and approved baits as necessary.
  • Use dormant sprays of lime sulfur or copper fungicide on roses for general disease control, or, plan to replace susceptible varieties with resistant cultivars in February.
  • Western Oregon: Moss in lawn may mean too much shade or poor drainage. Modify site conditions if moss is bothersome.
  • Mid-January: Spray peach trees with approved fungicides to combat peach leaf curl and shothole. Or plant curl-resistant cultivars such as Frost, Q1-8 or Creswell. 
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Houseplants and Indoor Gardening

  • Monitor houseplants for correct water and fertilizer; guard against insect infestations; clean dust from leaves.
  • Protect sensitive plants such as weeping figs from cold drafts in the house.
  • Propagate split-leaf philodendrons and other leggy indoor plants by air-layering or vegetative cuttings.
  • Plant dwarf annual flowers inside for houseplants: coleus, impatiens, and seedling geraniums.
  • Western Oregon: Gather branches of quince, forsythia, and flowering cherries; bring indoors to force early bloom.

Download: the January calendar (PDF - 32 K)
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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February

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Planning

  • Tune up lawn mower and garden equipment before the busy season begins.
  • Have soil test performed on garden plot to determine nutrient needs. Contact your local Extension office for a list of testing laboratories or view EM 8677 online.
  • Select and store healthy scion wood for grafting fruit and nut trees. Wrap in damp cloth or peat moss and place in plastic bag. Store in cool place.
  • Plan an herb bed, for cooking and for interest in the landscape. Among the choices are parsley, sage, chives, and lavender. Choose a sunny spot for the herb bed, and plant seeds or transplants after danger of frost has passed (late April-early May in the Willamette Valley and Central Coast; June-July in Eastern and Central Oregon).
  • Plan to add herbaceous perennial flowers to your flowering landscape this spring. Examples include candytuft, peony, penstemon, coneflower. 

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Repair winter damage to trees and shrubs.
  • Make a cold frame or hotbed to start early vegetables or flowers.
  • Fertilize rhubarb with manure or a complete fertilizer.
  • Incorporate cover crops or other organic matter into soil.
  • Prune and train grapes; make cuttings.
  • Prune fruit trees and blueberries.
  • Eastern Oregon: Prune and train summer-bearing and fall-bearing raspberries.
  • Western Oregon: Prune deciduous summer-blooming shrubs and trees; wait until April in high elevations of eastern and central Oregon.
  • Western Oregon: Prune and train trailing blackberries (if not done prior late August); prune black raspberries.
  • Western Oregon: Prune fall-bearing raspberries (late in Feb or early March).
  • Western Oregon: Prune clematis, Virginia creeper, and other vining ornamentals. 

Planting/Propagation

  • Plant windowsill container gardens of carrots, lettuce, or parsley.
  • Plan to add herbaceous perennial flowers to your flowering landscape this spring: astilbe, candytuft, peony, and anemone.
  • Good time to plant fruit trees and deciduous shrubs. Replace varieties of ornamental plants that are susceptible to disease with resistant cultivars.
  • Plant asparagus if the ground is warm enough.
  • Plant seed flats of cole crops (cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts), indoors or in greenhouse.
  • Western Oregon: Where soil is dry enough and workable, plant garden peas and sweet peas. Suggested varieties of garden peas include: Corvallis, Dark Green Perfection, Green Arrow, Oregon Sugar Pod, Snappy, Knight, Sugar Snap, Oregon Trail, and Oregon Sugar Pod II.
  • Western Oregon: Good time to plant new roses. 

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Monitor landscape plants for problems. Don't treat unless a problem is identified.
  • Use delayed-dormant sprays of lime sulfur for fruit and deciduous trees and shrubs.
  • Remove cankered limbs from fruit and nut trees for control of diseases such as apple anthracnose, bacterial canker of stone fruit and eastern filbert blight. Sterilize tools before each new cut.
  • Control moles and gophers with traps.
  • Western Oregon: Elm leaf beetles and box-elder bugs are emerging from hibernation and may be seen indoors. They are not harmful, but can be a nuisance. Remove them with a vacuum or broom and dustpan.
  • Western Oregon: Monitor for European crane fly and treat lawns if damage has been verified. 
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Houseplants and Indoor Gardening

  • Pasteurize soil for starting seedlings in pots or flats, or use clean, sterile commercial mixes.
  • Central Oregon: Gather branches of quince, forsythia, and flowering cherries; bring indoors to force early bloom.

Download: the February Calendar (PDF - 32 K)
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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March

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Planning

  • Plan the vegetable garden carefully for spring, summer, and fall vegetables that can be eaten fresh or preserved. If you lack in-ground gardening space, plan an outdoor container garden.
  • Use a soil thermometer to help you know when to plant vegetables. Some cool season crops (onions, kale, lettuce, and spinach) can be planted when the soil is consistently at or above 40°F. 

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Lawn mowing: Set blade at 0.75 to 1 inch for bentgrass lawns; 1.5 to 2.5 inches for bluegrasses, fine fescues, and ryegrasses.
  • Compost grass clippings and yard waste, except for clippings from lawns where weed-and-feed products or herbicides (weed killers) have been used.
  • Spread compost over garden and landscape areas.
  • Prune gooseberries and currants; fertilize with manure or a complete fertilizer.
  • Fertilize evergreen shrubs and trees, only if needed. If established and healthy, their nutrient needs should be minimal.
  • If needed, fertilize rhododendrons, camellias, azaleas with acid-type fertilizer. If established and healthy, their nutrient needs should be minimal.
  • Western Oregon: Prune spring-flowering shrubs after blossoms fade.
  • Western Oregon: Fertilize caneberries (broadcast or band a complete fertilizer or manure). 

Planting/Propagation

  • Divide hosta, daylilies, and mums.
  • Use stored scion wood to graft fruit and ornamental trees.
  • Plant insectary plants (e.g. Alyssum, Phacelia, coriander, candytuft, sunflower, yarrow, and dill) to attract beneficial insects to the garden. See PNW550 (Encouraging Beneficial Insects in Your Garden) for more information.
  • Central Oregon: Sow chard seeds outdoors. Plant seed flats of cole crops (cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts) indoors or in a greenhouse.
  • Western Oregon: If soil is dry enough, prepare vegetable garden and plant early cool-season crops (carrots, beets, broccoli, leeks, parsley, chives, rhubarb, peas, radish). Plant onions outdoors as soon as the soil is dry enough to work.
  • Western Oregon: Plant berry crops (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries, currants, gooseberries, and other berry-producing crop plants). See OSU Extension publications for varieties. 

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Monitor landscape plants for problems. Don't treat unless a problem is identified.
  • Spray trees and shrubs for webworms and leafrollers, if present.
  • Protect new plant growth from slugs. Least toxic management options include barriers and traps. Baits are also available for slug control; iron phosphate baits are safe to use around pets. Read and follow all label directions prior to using baits or any other chemical control.
  • Learn to identify the predatory insects that can help keep aphids and other pests under control.
  • Spray to control leaf and twig fungus diseases in dogwood, sycamore, hawthorn, and willow trees.
  • Prune ornamentals for air circulation and to help prevent fungus diseases.
  • Western Oregon: Monitor for European crane fly and treat lawns if damage has been verified.
  • Western Oregon: Start rose blackspot control tactics at budbreak. Control rose diseases such as black spot. Remove infected leaves. Spray as necessary with registered fungicide. 
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Houseplants and Indoor Gardening

  • Trim or shear heather when bloom period is finished.
  • Start tuberous begonias indoors.
  • Western Oregon: Take geraniums, begonias, and fuchsias from storage. Water and fertilize. Cut back if necessary. Move outdoors next month.

Download: the March Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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April

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Planning

  • Write in your garden journal throughout the growing season.
  • Prepare garden soil for spring planting. Incorporate generous amounts of organic materials and other amendments, using the results of a soil analysis as a guide.
  • Prepare raised beds in areas where cold soils and poor drainage are a continuing problem. Incorporate generous amounts (at least 2"”) of organic materials.
  • Use a soil thermometer to help you know when to plant vegetables. When the soil is consistently above 60°F, some warm season vegetables (beans, sweet corn) can be planted. 

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Allow foliage of spring-flowering bulbs to brown and die down before removing.
  • Apply commercial fertilizers, manure, or compost to cane, bush (gooseberries, currants, and blueberries), and trailing berries.
  • Place compost or well decomposed manure around perennial vegetables, such as asparagus and rhubarb.
  • Cut back ornamental grasses to a few inches above the ground, in early spring.
  • Cover transplants to protect against late spring frosts.
  • Optimum time to fertilize lawns. Apply 1 lb. nitrogen per 1,000 sq.ft. of lawn. Reduce risks of run-off into local waterways by not fertilizing just prior to rain, and not over-irrigating so that water runs off of lawn and onto sidewalk or street.
  • Western Oregon: Optimum time of year to dethatch and renovate lawns. If moss was a problem, scratch surface prior to seeding with perennial ryegrass.
  • Western Oregon: Prune and shape or thin spring-blooming shrubs and trees after blossoms fade.
  • Central/Eastern Oregon: If snow mold was a problem, scratch surface. If turf damage is severe, seed with Kentucky bluegrass.
  • Central Oregon and higher elevations of Eastern Oregon: Prune your deciduous trees and shrubs, using proper pruning techniques. 

Planting/Propagation

  • Plant gladioli, hardy transplants of alyssum, phlox, and marigolds, if weather and soil conditions permit.

It's a great time to start a vegetable garden. Among the vegetables you can plant, consider:

  • Oregon coast: beets, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, chard, slicing cucumbers, endive, leeks, lettuce, onion sets, peas, and potatoes.
  • Western valleys, Portland, Roseburg, Medford: broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, chard, chives, endive, leeks, lettuce, peas, radishes, rhubarb, rutabagas, spinach, and turnips.
  • Central Oregon and higher elevations of eastern Oregon (late April): peas, radishes, lettuce, spinach, and turnips.
  • Columbia and Snake River valleys, Ontario: snap and lima beans, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, chard, chives, sweet corn, slicing and pickling cucumbers, kohlrabi, leeks, lettuce, onion sets, parsnips, peas, potatoes, pumpkins, radishes, rhubarb, rutabagas, summer and winter squash, and turnips.

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Clean up hiding places for slugs, sowbugs and millipedes. Least toxic management options for slugs include barriers and traps. Baits are also available for slug control; iron phosphate baits are safe to use around pets. Read and follow all label directions prior to using baits or any other chemical control.
  • Monitor strawberries for spittlebugs and aphids; if present; wash off with water or use insecticidal soap as a contact spray. Follow label directions.
  • If necessary, spray apples and pears when buds appear for scab. See EC 631, Controlling Diseases and Insects in Home Orchards.
  • Cut and remove weeds near the garden to remove potential sources of plant disease.
  • Use floating row covers to keep insects such as beet leaf miners, cabbage maggot adult flies, and carrot rust flies away from susceptible crops.
  • Help prevent damping off of seedlings by providing adequate ventilation.
  • Southwest Oregon: Place pheromone traps in apple or pear trees in late April to monitor codling moth activity.
  • Western Oregon: Manage weeds while they are small and actively growing with light cultivation or herbicides. Once the weed has gone to bud, herbicides are less effective.
  • Western Oregon: Spray stone fruits, such as cherries, plums, peaches, and apricots for brown rot blossom blight, if necessary.
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Download: the April Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded  if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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May

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Planning

  • Prepare and prime irrigation system for summer.
  • Use a soil thermometer to help you know when to plant vegetables. Wait until the soil is consistently above 70°F to plant tomatoes, squash, melons, peppers and eggplant.
  • Place pheromone traps in apple trees to detect presence of codling moth. Plan a control program of sprays, baits, or predators when moths are found. 

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • If needed, fertilize rhododendrons and azaleas with acid-type fertilizer. If established and healthy, their nutrient needs should be minimal. Remove spent blossoms.
  • When selecting new roses, choose plants labeled for resistance to diseases. Fertilize roses and control rose diseases such as mildew with a registered fungicide. 

Planting/Propagation

  • Plant dahlias, gladioli, and tuberous begonias in mid-May.
  • Plant chrysanthemums for fall color.

Plant these vegetables (dates vary locally; check with local gardeners):

  • Oregon coast: snap beans, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cantaloupes, pickling cucumbers, dill, kale, parsnips, peppers, pumpkins, summer and winter squash, sweet corn, and tomatoes.
  • Western Oregon: mid-May, transplant tomato and pepper seedlings.
  • Western valleys, Portland, Roseburg, Medford: snap and lima beans, Brussels sprouts, cantaloupes, slicing and pickling cucumbers, dill, eggplant, kale, peppers, pumpkins, summer and winter squash, onions, potatoes, tomatoes, and watermelon.
  • Lower elevations, eastern Oregon (dates vary widely): snap and lima beans, beets, celery, sweet corn, slicing and pickling cucumbers, dill, kale, kohlrabi, onions, parsley, parsnips, peppers, white potatoes, pumpkins, summer and winter squash, and tomatoes.
  • Central Oregon and higher elevations of Eastern Oregon: Direct seed carrots, corn (late May), chard, kohlrabi, and potatoes. Transplant Brussel sprouts, cauliflower, cucumbers (late May), leeks, or peppers.
  • Columbia and Snake River valleys, Ontario: cantaloupes, dill, eggplant, kale, okra, peppers, sweet potatoes, tomatoes, and watermelon.

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • If an unknown plant problem occurs, contact your local Master Gardener hotline or plant clinic, for identification and future management options.
  • Manage weeds while they are small and actively growing with light cultivation or herbicides. Once the weed has gone to bud, herbicides are less effective.
  • Trap moles and gophers as new mounds appear.
  • Leafrolling worms may affect apples and blueberries. Prune off and destroy affected leaves.
  • Monitor aphids on strawberries and ornamentals. If present, control options include washing off with water, hand removal, or using registered insecticides labeled for the problem plant. Read and follow all label directions prior to using insecticides. Promoting natural enemies (predators and parasitoids that eat or kill insects) is a longer-term solution for insect control in gardens.
  • Spittle bugs may appear on ornamental plants as foam on stems. In most cases, they don't require management. If desired, wash off with water or use insecticidal soap as a contact spray. Read and follow label directions when using insecticides, including insecticidal soap.
  • Control cabbage worms in cabbage and cauliflower, 12-spotted cucumber beetle in beans and lettuce, maggot in radishes. Control can involve hand removal, placing barrier screen over newly planted rows, or spraying or dusting with registered pesticides, labeled for use on the problem plant. Read and follow label directions when using insecticides.
  • Tiny holes in foliage and shiny, black beetles on tomato, beets, radishes, and potato indicate flea beetle attack. Treat with Neem, Bt-s, or use nematodes for larvae. Read and follow label directions when using insecticides.
  • Prevent root maggots when planting cole crops (cabbage, broccoli, collards and kale), by covering with row covers or screens, or by applying appropriate insecticides.
  • Monitor rhododendrons, azaleas, primroses and other broadleaf ornamentals for adult root weevils. Look for fresh evidence of feeding (notching at leaf edges). Try sticky trap products on plant trunks to trap adult weevils. Protect against damaging the bark by applying the sticky material on a 4-inch wide band of poly sheeting or burlap wrapped around the trunk. Mark plants now and manage with beneficial nematodes when soil temperatures are above 55°F. If root weevils are a consistent problem, consider removing plants and choosing resistant varieties (See http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/eb0970e/eb0970e.pdf for list of rhododendrons exhibiting resistance to adult root weevil feeding)
  • Control slugs with bait or traps and by removing or mowing vegetation near garden plots.
  • Monitor blueberry, raspberry, strawberry and other plants that produce soft fruits and berries for Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD).  To learn how to monitor for SWD flies and larval infestations in fruit, visit http://swd.hort.oregonstate.edu/gardeners.
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Download: the May Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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June

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Planning

  • Construct trellises for tomatoes, cucumbers, pole beans, and vining ornamentals. 

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Prune lilacs, forsythia, rhododendrons, and azaleas after blooming.
  • Fertilize vegetable garden 1 month after plants emerge by side dressing alongside rows.
  • Harvest thinnings from new plantings of lettuce, onion, and chard.
  • Pick ripe strawberries regularly to avoid fruit-rotting diseases.
  • Use organic mulches to conserve soil moisture in ornamental beds. An inch or two of sawdust, barkdust, or composted leaves will minimize loss of water through evaporation.
  • After normal fruit drop of apples, pears and peaches in June, consider thinning the remainder to produce a larger crop of fruit.
  • Make sure raised beds receive enough water for plants to avoid drought stress. If a green lawn is desired, make sure lawn areas are receiving adequate water (approximately 0.5 to 1.5 inches per week from June through August). Deep watering less often is more effective than frequent shallow watering. Measure your water use by placing an empty tuna can where your irrigation water lands.
  • (Mid-June): If green lawns are being maintained through the summer, apply 1 lb. nitrogen per 1,000 sq.ft. to lawns.
  • Central Oregon and higher elevations of eastern Oregon: Manage weeds while they are small and actively growing with light cultivation or herbicides. Once the weed has gone to bud, herbicides are less effective.
  • Central Oregon and higher elevations of Eastern Oregon: Frost can still be a concern during cold nights. Protect young vegetables from frost by having row cover (frost cloth) on hand. Place over crops when needed. Use season extenders, such as walls of water, around tomatoes and other tender plants. 

Planting/Propagation

  • Plant dahlias and gladioli. 

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • First week: spray cherry trees for cherry fruit fly, as necessary, if fruit is ripening.
  • First week: spray for codling moth in apple and pear trees, as necessary. Continue use of pheromone traps for insect pest detection.
  • Learn to identify beneficial insects and plant some insectary plants (e.g. Alyssum, Phacelia, coriander, candytuft, sunflower, yarrow, dill) to attract them to your garden. Check with local nurseries for best selections. See PNW550 (Encouraging Beneficial Insects in Your Garden) for more information.
  • Blossoms on squash and cucumbers begin to drop: this is nothing to worry about. Cherries may also drop fruit: this is not a major concern.
  • Monitor azaleas, primroses and other broadleaf ornamentals for adult root weevils. Look for fresh evidence of feeding (notching at leaf edges). Try sticky trap products on plant trunks to trap adult weevils. Protect against damaging the bark by applying the sticky material on a 4-inch wide band of poly sheeting or burlap wrapped around the trunk. Mark plants now and manage root weevils with beneficial nematodes when soil temperatures are above 55°F. If root weevils are a consistent problem, consider removing plants and choosing resistant varieties. (See http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/eb0970e/eb0970e.pdf for list of rhododendrons exhibiting resistance to adult root weevil feeding)
  • Control garden weeds by pulling, hoeing, or mulching.
  • Control aphids on vegetables as needed by hosing off with water or by using insecticidal soap or a registered insecticide.
  • Watch for 12-spotted beetles on beans and lettuce and cabbage worms or flea beetles in cole crops (cabbage, broccoli, Brussel sprouts). Remove the pests by hand or treat with registered pesticides.
  • Spray peas as first pods form, if necessary, to control weevils.
  • Birch trees dripping a sticky fluid from their leaves means that aphids are present. Control as needed.
  • Use yellow sticky traps to monitor for cherry fruit fly. About 1 week after the first fly is caught, spray cherries at appropriate intervals.
  • Last week: second spray for codling moth in apple and pear trees, as necessary.
  • Central Oregon and higher elevations of eastern Oregon: Manage weeds while they are small and actively growing with light cultivation or herbicides. Once the weed has gone to bud, herbicides are less effective. 
  • Continue monitoring blueberry, strawberry, cherry and other plants that produce soft fruits and berries for Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD).  If SWD are present, use an integrated and least toxic approach to manage the pests.  To learn how to monitor and manage SWD, visithttp://swd.hort.oregonstate.edu/gardeners.  
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Houseplants and Indoor Gardening

  • Move houseplants outdoors for cleaning, grooming, repotting and summer growth.

Download: the June Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded  if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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July

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Mound soil up around base of potatoes. Gather and eat a few "new" potatoes from each hill, when plants begin to flower.
  • Early morning is the best time to water vegetable and flower gardens to reduce evaporation. Water the soil, rather than leaves to reduce disease. Water deeply and infrequently to encourage root growth.
  • Hanging baskets of flowers or vegetable plantings need careful attention to watering and feeding during extended periods of hot weather.
  • Weed and fertilize rhubarb and asparagus beds. A mulch of compost or rotted cow manure works well as fertilizer. Water deeply to develop crowns for next year.
  • Mulch to conserve soil moisture with paper, plastic, sawdust, etc.
  • Stake tall-growing flowering plants such as delphinium, hollyhocks, and lupine. Stake tomatoes, as necessary.
  • If a green lawn is desired, make sure lawn areas are receiving adequate water (approximately 0.5 to 1.5 inches per week from June through August). Deep watering less often is more effective than frequent shallow watering. Measure your water use by placing an empty tuna can where your irrigation water lands.
  • Make compost of lawn clippings and garden plants that are ready to be recycled. Do not use clippings if lawn has been treated with herbicide, including "weed-and-feed" products. Do not compost diseased plants unless you are using the "hot compost" method (120° to 150°F). 

Planting/Propagation

  • Midsummer plantings of beets, bush beans, carrots, cauliflower, broccoli, lettuce, kale, and peas will provide fall and winter crops.
  • Dig spring bulbs when tops have died down; divide and store or replant.
  • Oregon Coast: First planting of Chinese cabbage, kohlrabi, and rutabagas. 

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Control hollyhock rust by sanitation, picking affected leaves, or spraying with a registered fungicide. Read and follow label directions.
  • Watch for cutworm damage in garden. (In July, climbing cutworms become a problem and large portions of foliage will begin to disappear on established plants.) Use barriers, remove by hand, use beneficial nematodes when soil temperature is above 55°F, or spray with Bt-k according to label directions.
  • Late this month, begin to monitor for early and late blight on tomatoes.
  • Place traps to catch adult apple maggot flies. You can use pheromone traps to monitor presence of pests.
  • July 10: spray filbert trees for filbertworm, as necessary.
  • July 10-15: spray peach and prune trees for peach tree borer, and peach twig borer, as necessary.
  • July 17-23: third spray for codling moth in apple and pear trees, as necessary.
  • Cover blueberry bushes with netting to keep birds from eating all the crop.
  • Watch for early and late blight on tomatoes. Correct by pruning for air circulation, picking off affected leaves, and/or treat with approved fungicide.
  • Monitor camellias, holly, maple trees for scale insects. Treat if necessary.
  • Monitor rhododendrons for adult root weevils. Look for fresh evidence of feeding (notching). Try sticky trap products on plant trunks to trap adult weevils. Manage root weevils with beneficial nematodes (if soil temperature is above 55°F). If root weevils are a consistent problem, consider removing plants and choosing resistant varieties (See http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/eb0970e/eb0970e.pdf for list of rhododendrons exhibiting resistance to adult root weevil feeding.)
  • Check leafy vegetables for caterpillars. Pick off caterpillars as they appear. Use Bt-k, if necessary.
  • Spider mites can become a problem on ornamental plants, vegetables, and fruit plants during hot, dry weather. Watch for dusty-looking foliage, loss of color, presence of tiny mites. Wash infested areas with water or spray with appropriate pesticides.
  • Remove cankered limbs from fruit and nut trees for control of diseases such as apple anthracnose and bacterial canker of stone fruit. Sterilize tools before each new cut.
  • East of the Cascades: If necessary, spray for corn earworm as silking begins. Protect bees from spray.
  • Continue monitoring raspberry, blackberry, blueberry, cherry and other plants that produce soft fruits and berries for Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD).  If SWD are present, use an integrated and least toxic approach to manage the pests.  To learn how to monitor for SWD flies and larval infestations in fruit, visit http://swd.hort.oregonstate.edu/gardeners.
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Download: the July Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded  if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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August

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Planning

  • Dampwood termites begin flying late this month. Make sure your home is free of wet wood or places where wood and soil are in contact.
  • Optimal time for establishing a new lawn is August through Mid-September. 

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Make compost of lawn clippings and garden plants that are ready to be recycled. Don't use clippings if lawn has been treated with herbicide, including "weed-and-feed" products. Don't compost diseased plants unless you are using the "hot compost" method (120° to 150°F).
  • Fertilize cucumbers, summer squash, and broccoli to maintain production while you continue harvesting.
  • Clean and fertilize strawberry beds.
  • Use mulch to protect ornamentals and garden plants from hot weather damage If needed, provide temporary shade, especially for recent plantings.
  • Camellias need deep watering to develop flower buds for next spring.
  • Prune raspberries, boysenberries, and other caneberries after harvest. Check raspberries for holes made by crown borers, near the soil line, at base of plant. Remove infested wood before adults emerge (approximately mid-August).
  • Monitor garden irrigation closely so crops and ornamentals don't dry out.
  • If a green lawn is desired, make sure lawn areas are receiving adequate water (approximately 0.5 to 1.5 inches per week from June through August). Deep watering less often is more effective than frequent shallow watering. Measure your water use by placing an empty tuna can where your irrigation water lands.
  • Prune cherry trees before fall rains begin to allow callusing in dry weather. This will minimize the spread of bacterial canker.
  • Western Oregon: Prune out dead fruiting canes in trailing blackberry and train new primocanes prior to end of month
  • High elevations, central and eastern Oregon: Prune away excess vegetation and new blossoms on tomatoes after mid-August. Concentrate on ripening set fruit.

Planting/Propagation

  • Plant winter cover crops in vacant space in the vegetable garden
  • Plant winter kale, Brussels sprouts, turnips, parsnips, parsley, and Chinese cabbage.
  • Western Oregon: Mid-summer planting of peas; use enation-virus-resistant varieties, plant fall crops of cabbage, cauliflower, and broccoli.
  • Oregon coast: Plant spinach.
  • Western valleys, Portland, Roseburg, Medford: Plant cauliflower, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, spinach, turnips, and parsnips.
  • Columbia and Snake River valleys, Ontario: Plant Chinese cabbage, and endive. 

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Check apple maggot traps; spray tree if needed.
  • Control yellowjackets and wasps with traps and lures as necessary. Keep in mind they are beneficial insects and help control pest insects in the home garden.
  • First week: If necessary, spray for walnut husk fly.
  • First week: If necessary second spray for peach tree borer and/or peach twig borer.
  • First week: If necessary, second spray of filbert trees for filbertworm.
  • Check for root weevils in ornamental shrubs and flowers; codling moth and spider mite in apple trees; scale insects in camellias, holly and maples. Treat as necessary.
  • Watch for corn earworm on early corn. Treat as needed.
  • Control caterpillars on leafy vegetables, as needed, with Bt-k, or by hand picking and removal.
  • For mite control on ornamentals and most vegetables, hose off foliage, spray with approved miticide if necessary.
  • Remove cankered limbs from fruit and nut trees for control of diseases such as apple anthracnose and bacterial canker of stone fruit. Sterilize tools before each new cut.
  • Continue monitoring peaches, plums, prunes, figs, fall-bearing raspberries and strawberries, and other plants that produce soft fruits and berries for Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD).  If SWD are present, use an integrated and least toxic approach to manage the pests.  To learn how to monitor for SWD flies and larval infestations in fruit, visit http://swd.hort.oregonstate.edu/gardeners.
  • Willamette Valley: Corn may need protection from earworm. Spray new silks with appropriate pesticides if necessary.
  • East of Cascades: Check for tomato hornworm. Remove them if found.
  • Coastal and western valleys: Spray potatoes and tomatoes for early and late blight.
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Download: the August Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded  if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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September

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Dampwood termites begin flying late this month. Make sure your home is free of wet wood or places where wood and soil are in contact.
  • Recycle disease-free plant material and kitchen vegetable and fruit scraps into compost. Don't compost diseased plants unless you are using the "hot compost" method (120° to 150°F).
  • Harvest winter squash when the "ground spot" changes from white to a cream or gold color.
  • Pick and store winter squash; mulch carrot, parsnip, and beets for winter harvesting.
  • Protect tomatoes and/or pick green tomatoes and ripen indoors if frost threatens.
  • Reduce water on trees, shrubs, and vines east of Cascades to harden them off for winter.
  • Stake tall flowers to keep them from blowing over in fall winds.
  • Dig, clean, and store tuberous begonias if frost threatens.
  • Harvest potatoes when the tops die down. Store them in a dark location.
  • Optimal time for establishing a new lawn is August through Mid-September.
  • Aerate lawns.
  • (Early-September): Apply 1 lb. nitrogen per 1,000 sq.ft. to lawns. Reduce risks of run-off into local waterways by not fertilizing just prior to rain, and not over-irrigating so that water runs off of lawn and onto sidewalk or street.
  • Willamette Valley: Stop irrigating your lawn after Labor Day to suppress European crane fly populations. 

Planting/Propagation

  • Divide peonies and iris.
  • Plant or transplant woody ornamentals and mature herbaceous perennials. Fall planting of trees, shrubs and perennials can encourage healthy root growth over the winter.
  • Plant daffodils, tulips, and crocus for spring bloom. Work calcium and phosphorus into the soil below the bulbs at planting time. Remember when purchasing bulbs, the size of the bulb is directly correlated to the size of the flower yet to come in spring.
  • Western Oregon: plant winter cover of annual rye or winter peas in vegetable garden. 

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Apply parasitic nematodes to moist soil beneath rhododendrons and azaleas that show root weevil damage (notched leaves).
  • Control slugs as necessary. Least toxic management options for slugs include barriers and traps. Baits are also available for slug control; iron phosphate baits are safe to use around pets. Read and follow all label directions prior to using baits, or any other chemical control.
  • Monitor trailing berries for leaf and cane spot. Treat if necessary.
  • As necessary, apply copper spray for peach and cherry trees.
  • Spray for juniper twig blight, as necessary, after pruning away dead and infected twigs.
  • Continue monitoring late-season soft fruits and berries for Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD).  If SWD are present, use an integrated and least toxic approach to manage the pests.  To learn how to monitor for SWD flies and larval infestations in fruit, visit http://swd.hort.oregonstate.edu/gardeners.
  • Coastal and western valleys: spray susceptible varieties of potatoes and tomatoes for early and late blight. 
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Houseplants and Indoor Gardening

  • Clean houseplants, check for insects, and repot and fertilize if necessary; then bring them indoors.

Download: the September Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded  if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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October

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Planning

  • If needed, improve soil drainage needs of lawns before rain begins.
  • Register to become an OSU Master Gardener volunteer with your local Extension office. For more information, check online

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Drain or blow out your irrigation system, insulate valve mechanisms, in preparation of winter.
  • Recycle disease-free plant material and kitchen vegetable and fruit scraps into compost. Don't compost diseased plants unless you are using the "hot compost" method (120° to 150°F).
  • Use newspaper or cardboard covered by mulch to discourage winter and spring annual weeds or remove a lawn area for conversion to garden beds. For conversion, work in the paper and mulch as organic matter once the lawn grass has died.
  • Clean and paint greenhouses and cold frames for plant storage and winter growth.
  • Harvest sunflower heads; use seed for birdseed or roast for personal use.
  • Dig and store potatoes; keep in darkness, moderate humidity, temperature about 40°F. Discard unused potatoes if they sprout. Don't use as seed potatoes for next year.
  • Harvest and immediately dry filberts and walnuts; dry at 95° to 100°F.
  • Ripen green tomatoes indoors. Check often and discard rotting fruit.
  • Harvest and store apples; keep at about 40°F, moderate humidity.
  • Place mulch over roots of roses, azaleas, rhododendrons and berries for winter protection.
  • Trim or stake bushy herbaceous perennials to prevent wind damage.
  • To suppress future pest problems, clean up annual flower beds by removing diseased plant materials, overwintering areas for insect pests; mulch with manure or garden compost to feed the soil and suppress weeds.
  • Cover asparagus and rhubarb beds with a mulch of manure or compost.
  • Clean, sharpen and oil tools and equipment before storing for winter.
  • Store garden supplies and fertilizers in a safe, dry place out of reach of children.
  • Prune out dead fruiting canes in raspberries.
  • Western Oregon: Train and prune primocanes of raspberry
  • Western Oregon: Harvest squash and pumpkins; keep in dry area at 55° to 60°F.
  • Western Oregon: If necessary (as indicated by soil test results) and if weather permits, spade organic material and lime into garden soil.
  • Central/eastern Oregon: Prune evergreens. 

Planting/Propagation

  • Dig and divide rhubarb. (Should be done about every 4 years.)
  • Plant garlic for harvesting next summer.
  • Propagate chrysanthemums, fuchsias, geraniums by stem cuttings.
  • Save seeds from the vegetable and flower garden. Dry, date, label, and store in a cool and dry location.
  • Plant ground covers and shrubs.
  • Dig and store geraniums, tuberous begonias, dahlias, gladiolas.
  • Pot and store tulips and daffodils to force into early bloom, indoors, in December and January. 

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Monitor landscape plants for problems. Don't treat unless a problem is identified.
  • Remove and dispose of windfall apples that might be harboring apple maggot or codling moth larvae.
  • Rake and destroy diseased leaves (apple, cherry, rose, etc.), or hot compost diseased leaves.
  • Spray apple and stone fruit trees at leaf fall to prevent various fungal and bacterial diseases. Obtain a copy of Managing Diseases and Insects in Home Orchards (EC 631) from your local Extension office.
  • If moles and gophers are a problem, consider traps.
  • Western Oregon: Control fall-germinating lawn weeds while they are small. Hand weeding and weeding tools are particularly effective at this stage. 
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Houseplants and Indoor Gardening

  • Early October: Reduce water, place in cool area (50-55°F) and increase time in shade or darkness (12-14 hours) to force Christmas cactus to bloom in late December.
  • Place hanging pots of fuchsias where they won't freeze. Don't cut back until spring.
  • Western Oregon: Check/treat houseplants for disease and insects before bringing indoors.

Download: the October Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded  if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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November

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Planning

  • Force spring bulbs for indoor blooms in December. 

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Service lawn mower prior to winter.
  • Check potatoes in storage and remove any going bad.
  • Place a portable cold frame over rows of winter vegetables.
  • Place mulch around berries for winter protection.
  • Cover rhubarb and asparagus beds with composted manure and straw.
  • Rake and compost leaves that are free of diseases and insects. Use mulches to prevent erosion and compaction from rain.
  • Protect built-in sprinkler systems: drain the system, insulate the valve mechanisms.
  • Clean and oil lawnmower, other garden equipment and tools before storing for winter. Drain and store hoses carefully to avoid damage from freezing. Renew mulch around perennial flower beds after removing weeds.
  • Protect tender evergreens from drying wind.
  • Tie limbs of upright evergreens to prevent breakage by snow or ice.
  • Trim chrysanthemums to 4 to 6 inches after they finish blooming.
  • Leave ornamental grasses up in winter to provide winter texture in the landscape. Cut them back a few inches above the ground in early spring.
  • Western Oregon: Last chance to plant cover crops for soil building. You can also use a 3- to 4-inch layer of leaves, spread over the garden plot, to eliminate winter weeds, suppress early spring weeds and prevent soil compaction by rain.
  • Western Oregon: Watch for wet soil and drainage problems in yard during heavy rains. Tiling, ditching, and French drains are possible solutions. Consider rain gardens and bioswales as a long-term solution.
  • Western Oregon: Take cuttings of rhododendrons and camellias for propagation; propagate begonias from leaf cuttings.
  • Western Oregon: Prune roses to "knee-high" to prevent winter wind damage.
  • Central/eastern Oregon: Water your newly planted perennials, trees and shrubs every 6 to 8 weeks with a deep soaking to prevent drying out, if there is no snow cover and the ground is warm enough to accept water.
  • Central/eastern Oregon: Wrap the trunks of young, thin-barked trees (maples, aspen, ash) with paper tree wrap late in the month to prevent sunscald. Remove in April. Wrap new trees 2-3 years in a row until the outer bark has thickened. 

Planting/Propagation

  • Plant window garden of lettuce, chives, parsley.
  • Good time to plant trees and shrubs. Consider planting shrubs and trees that supply food and shelter to birds; e.g., sumac, elderberry, flowering currant, and mock orange.
  • Western Oregon: Still time to plant spring-flowering bulbs, such as tulips, daffodils, hyacinths, crocuses. Don't delay.
  • Western Oregon: Good time to plant garlic for harvest next summer, and to transplant landscape trees and shrubs. 

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Monitor landscape plants for problems. Don't treat unless a problem is identified.
  • Rake and destroy leaves from fruit trees that were diseased this year. Remove and discard mummified fruit.
  • Check firewood for insect infestations. Burn affected wood first and don't store inside.
  • Treat peaches 4 weeks after leaf fall spray for peach leaf curl and shothole diseases.
  • Western Oregon: Moss appearing in lawn may mean too much shade or poor drainage. Correct site conditions if moss is bothersome.
  • Western Oregon: Bait garden, flower beds for slugs during rainy periods. Use traps or new phosphate baits, which are pet-safe. 
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Houseplants and Indoor Gardening

  • Reduce fertilizer applications to houseplants.

Download: the November Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded  if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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December

Reminders of key garden chores, such as fertilizing, pest control, planting, and maintenance for this month. Recommendations are not necessarily applicable to all areas of Oregon. For more info, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Maintenance and Clean Up

  • Spread wood ashes evenly on vegetable garden. Use no more than 1.5 lb/100 sq ft/year. Don't use if the soil pH is greater than 7.0 or if potassium levels are excessive.
  • Protect new landscape plants from wind. Use stakes, guy wires and/or windbreaks as needed.
  • Yard sanitation: Rake leaves, cut and remove withered stalks of perennial flowers, mulch flowerbeds, hoe or pull winter weeds.
  • Turn the compost pile and protect from heavy rains, if necessary.
  • During heavy rains, watch for drainage problems in the yard. Tilling, ditching, and French drains are possible short-term solutions. Consider rain gardens and bioswales as a longer-term solution.
  • Check stored flower bulbs, fresh vegetables, fruits for rot and fungus problems. Discard any showing signs of rot.
  • Tie limbs of columnar evergreens to prevent snow or ice breakage.
  • Central/eastern Oregon: Water your plants every 6 to 8 weeks with a deep soaking to prevent drying out.
  • Western Oregon: Do not walk on lawns until frost has melted.
  • Western Oregon: Make sure that landscape plants in protected sites receive water regularly during the winter. 

Planting/Propagation

  • Western Oregon: Good time of year to plant trees, and landscape shrubs. 

Pest Monitoring and Management

  • Monitor landscape plants for problems. Don't treat unless a problem is identified.
  • Check for rodent damage around bases of trees and large shrubs. Remove weeds to prevent rodents from using them as hiding places. Use traps and approved baits as necessary.
  • Avoid mounding mulching materials around the bases of trees and shrubs. The mulch might provide cover for rodents.
  • Monitor spruce trees for spruce aphids. Treat if present in large numbers. Read and follow pesticide label directions. 
  • Identify problems before acting, and opt for the least toxic approach. Cultural, physical and biological controls are the cornerstones of a sustainable pest management program. Use chemical controls only after you identify a pest problem and carefully read the pesticide label. Least-toxic choices are insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides and organic and synthetic pesticides. These recommendations might not apply to all areas of Oregon. For more information, contact your local OSU Extension Service office.

Houseplants and Indoor Gardening

  • Protect poinsettias from cold, place in sunlight, don't let leaves touch cold windows; fertilize with houseplant fertilizer to maintain leaf color.
  • Monitor houseplants for adequate water and fertilizer. Water and fertilizer requirements generally are less in winter.

Download: the December Calendar (PDF - 32 K) 
These files use Adobe Reader, which can be downloaded  if needed.
Updated 9/14/11.

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