Extension ConnEXTion

February 2011 (print-friendly version)

"What the American People Want"

My colleague Chuck Gay, Associate Vice President for Utah State University Cooperative Extension, recently attended the Western Governors’ Association winter meeting.  One of the invited speakers had a compelling message that Chuck thought inspiring and he shared the following with Utah Extension employees.  I found food for thought in Chuck’s message that perhaps might benefit OSU Extension as well and asked if I could forward his message to you.  I hope you, too, find value in this message. 

Best regards for a healthy and happy new year to you all, Debbie

“Last week I was privileged to attend the winter meeting of the Western Governors’ Association representing USU Extension and the Western Extension Directors Association.  One of the invited speakers was Frank Luntz, who is an American political consultant and pollster. His most recent work has been with the Fox News Channel as a frequent commentator and analyst, as well as running focus groups after presidential debates.  Luntz's specialty is “testing language and finding words that will help his clients sell their product or turn public opinion on an issue or a candidate.” He is also an author of business books dealing with communication strategies and public opinion.  Luntz's current company, The Word Doctors, specializes in message creation and image management for commercial and political clients.

He spoke to the governors and us in the audience about the latest polls that his company had conducted concerning “what the American people want.”  As I sat listening and taking notes, I could not help but relate his message to our efforts to bring the best, research based information to the public.  Since returning, I have read and re-read my notes many times, asking myself how well I do.  Below, I am providing you with his take home message, and ask each of you to ask yourself the same question.  It matters not what our job title is, we all work with and deal with the public, i.e., the people of the state. 

In light of the five items below that Mr. Luntz says the American people want.  Do we ensure that the people with and for whom we work:
·    Have fewer hassles in their lives,
·    Have fewer worries (knowledge helps remove worries),
·    More choices (opportunities),
·    Make more money (or manage their resources well),
·    Have more time (or understand how to take full advantage of what they have).

The top four items among the American people for which they are willing to work hard are:
·    Achieving financial success (33% rank this as number one)
·    Owning their home - 22%
·    Having a close, loving family – 21%
·    Working for oneself – 18%

Listed below are the values that the American people want to see in government and business and all things associated:
·    Stability in life is the number one goal and value
·    Ethics in government and business
·    Accountability
·    A fierce integrity in all that we do
·    Respect
·    A commitment to do the right thing
·    Measureable results

I suppose that these and other desires and values are among the reasons why the word “Service” is in our official name.  One last thought from Frank Luntz.  He says that the word “imagine” is currently the most powerful word in the English language.”

Charles W. Gay, Associate Vice President for Utah State University Cooperative Extension

Carnegie Foundation Names OSU a "Community Engagement" University

Colleagues:

Colleagues:
It is with great pleasure that we begin a new year and a new term with wonderful news from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: Today, the Foundation has announced that OSU is one of 115 universities nationwide to receive its "Community Engagement" designation for campuses with exceptional, mutually beneficial relationships with the external communities they serve.
OSU has been focused on building reciprocal relationships with communities around Oregon since the university's founding as one of the nation's original land grant institutions in 1868. That work has expanded over the years, and is manifest today in OSU presences in every one of Oregon's 36 counties. The richly diverse activities that take place in those many disparate locations has woven our university deeply into the fabric of Oregon and will only grow as OSU continues its progress toward becoming one of America's premier land grant institutions.
Please join me in congratulating the team, led by 4H Program Leader Roger Rennekamp, that undertook the extensive preparation leading to our successful application for this new designation. And to those of you whose work helps to connect OSU every day to the communities we endeavor to serve, I offer a heartfelt thanks. There are many attributes that we hope Oregonians associate with our university, but our outreach to and engagement with the people of this state is certainly at the top of that list.
 
Sincerely,
Edward J. Ray
PresideColleagues:

It is with great pleasure that we begin a new year and a new term with wonderful news from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching: Today, the Foundation has announced that OSU is one of 115 universities nationwide to receive its "Community Engagement" designation for campuses with exceptional, mutually beneficial relationships with the external communities they serve.

OSU has been focused on building reciprocal relationships with communities around Oregon since the university's founding as one of the nation's original land grant institutions in 1868. That work has expanded over the years, and is manifest today in OSU presences in every one of Oregon's 36 counties. The richly diverse activities that take place in those many disparate locations has woven our university deeply into the fabric of Oregon and will only grow as OSU continues its progress toward becoming one of America's premier land grant institutions.

Please join me in congratulating the team, led by 4H Program Leader Roger Rennekamp, that undertook the extensive preparation leading to our successful application for this new designation. And to those of you whose work helps to connect OSU every day to the communities we endeavor to serve, I offer a heartfelt thanks. There are many attributes that we hope Oregonians associate with our university, but our outreach to and engagement with the people of this state is certainly at the top of that list. 

Sincerely,

Edward J. Ray
President

News from OSU Libraries and the Oregon Explorer

News from OSU Libraries and the Oregon ExplorerTM 

Bonnie Avery, Natural Resources Librarian

The Oregon Explorer (http://oregonexplorer.info) architecture is now updated and enhanced.  Its many web portals can be accessed by anyone, anywhere, anytime but we hope this new version provides improved usability.  If you are familiar with a given portal, you can just add the portal keyword to the URL (e.g. http://oregonexplorer.info/deschutes”) and locate it. The Oregon Explorer portals are organized according to three schemes and are linked in the lower half of the website.

  • Place-based/Location portals provide natural resources data specific to certain geographic areas in Oregon (North Coast, Umpqua, Deschutes, Willamette, and Lakes “Basin” Explorers).  
  • Topic-based portals provide information about issues and ecological features that cover the entire state (Wildfire Risk, Hazards, Imagery, Wildlife, Land Use, Wetlands and Rural communities).  
  • Data Portals are currently a somewhat special subset and provide access to Imagery and the Oregon Spatial Data Library. 

Navigation is consistent across these portals and within each you can:

  • Learn about research: Read about important scientific research and restoration projects around the state, read first-person reports and publications. Search for additional information in the ScholarsArchive@OSU.
  • Learn about important issues: Learn about natural resource issues around the state through topic-specific stories that include videos, photos, and interviews with experts, and up-to-date scientific information.
  • Find images and data: View/download historical photographs, high-resolution aerial images, or geospatial data.
  • Create maps: Make accurate and up-to-date multi-layer maps using our free GIS program. For example, you can:
    • Find out what wildlife or plant species live in your area
    • Determine hazards for your area such as fire or flooding
    • Map your local watershed
  • Create reports: Look up information about demographics, land use, and economics in your area, and create a report.
  • Help build our library: Submit your own content, such as reports, publications, images, or datasets.

The new Explorer serves as an example of how Oregon State is embracing the worldwide open-source initiative.  NACSE (Northwest Alliance for Computational Science and Engineering) partnered with OSU Libraries and the Institute for Natural Resources (INR) to incorporate the use of open-source software as the foundation for the updated Oregon Explorer.   The Oregon Explorer and its website series have been developed over the past 7 years by OSU Libraries and the INR with additional funding from the Oregon Geospatial Enterprise Office, Meyer Memorial Trust, the Oregon Watershed enhancement Board, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and many others including OSU Extension.

"Processing of Specialty Fruit & Vegetable Products" Short Course to be Offered

OSU Department of Food Science & Technology Extension Service proudly announces the following educational opportunity.

Title: PROCESSING OF SPECIALTY FRUIT AND VEGETABLE PRODUCTS SHORT COURSE
Date: MARCH 14-16, 2011
Time: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm March 14 & 15; 8:00 – 11:30 am March 16
Location: Wiegand Hall on the OSU Campus in Corvallis, Oregon

Registration Fees: Early - $495 if registered BY March 1, 2011; Late - $550 if registered AFTER March 1, 2011
(registration fee includes handouts, pilot plant project materials, and two lunches)

Course Description:
This two and a half day short course provides attendees with concepts of specialty food production, the basic fruit and vegetable processing technologies, quality analysis, and hands-on experience in making selected specialty fruit and vegetable products through pilot plant exercises.
Topics include...

• Understanding specialty food production
• Unit operation in freezing, canning, drying, pickling, and jam processes. Controls for ensuring quality and food safety of specialty fruit and vegetable products
• Functions of different ingredients and their resources
• Pilot plant exercises in making three specialty fruit and vegetable products
• Basic food quality analysis with hands-on lab practices to measure Brix, pH, TA, water activity, color, texture, etc.
Short Course Instructors

The instructors have years of experience in fruit and vegetable processing and specialty foods production. The short course is designed to help attendees make the most of their expertise. There will be numerous opportunities throughout the short course to ask questions and receive input on attendees’ specific products and goals. Attendees are welcome to bring samples of the products for discussion and evaluation.
Who should attend?

This workshop is designed for anyone who is associated with or interested in getting into specialty food processing. Participants may be well-established food processors, small farmers interested in developing their own food products, or food inspectors responsible for the inspection of food processing plants and facilities. Attendees will obtain a comprehensive overview of the topics necessary to begin or work in a food processing business. This course is suitable for both entry level and more experienced individuals.

If you need more information please contact:
Debby Yacas, deborah.yacas@oregonstate.edu, or 800.823.2357

2011 Summer Agriculture Institute Offers Graduate Level Courses

Summer Agriculture Institute (SAI) is a 3-credit, week long, graduate level course for K12 educators with little or no agricultural background, offered through Oregon State University.

Session #1, Corvallis
June 19-24, 2011
Session #2,
Union/La Grande
July 17-22, 2011
The goal of SAI is to help educators use Agriculture as a context (or theme) for teaching the Academic Standards (science, math, social studies, English, etc.). Additionally, educators will receive hands on instruction and collateral materials to incorporate agriculture into their classroom curriculum. SAI provides a working environment for participants to experience current, factual, scientific information about agriculture.
Key Topics: 
Land and Water Usage 
Ag Marketing and Economics
Ag Education Applications 
Hydroponics Food Safety
Food Safety 
Commercial Farming
Benefits: Receive 3 graduate level credits from OSU for a fraction of the cost; high quality, accredited collateral materials provided; first-hand experience interacting with agriculture through tours of processing plants, farms, nurseries and agribusiness operations; opportunities to meet and work with agriculturists; hotel accommodations, meals and networking opportunities.
Requirements: Onsite participation (5 nights and 6 days) for all SAI candidates; an overnight stay with a host farm family (1 of the 5 nights); $500.00 registration fee payable to OAEF (Non-Refundable after April 1st); develop a comprehensive lesson plan utilizing knowledge gained as a SAI participant.
SAI History: Inception in 1989; the program was adopted by OAEF in 1991; funding provided by private, commodity, organizational and agri-businesses.
Contact Information: For SAI Applications and/or SAI Presentation Requests, please contact project coordinators directly.
PDF Applications are available online:
http://www.oregonfb.org/download/sai_app.pdf
Summer Ag Institute – SAI is a trademark of Oregon Agricultural Education Foundation (OAEF) and Oregon Farm Bureau Federation (OFBF). OAEF is a 501 (c) 3 corporation - Tax ID 94-31416114. Gifts and donations made to SAI are tax deductible to the extent allowable by law.
Debbie Crocker
SAI Project Coordinator
Session #1
dcrocker@99webstreet.com
Cell: 541-740-5073
Jana Lee Dick
Project Coordinator
Session #2
jana.dick@oregonstate.edu
Cell: 541-786-5129
PO Box E
Union, OR 97883
Ph: 541-562-5129 x22
Fax: 541-562-5348

Session #1, Corvallis: June 19-24, 2011
Session #2, Union/La Grande: July 17-22, 2011

The goal of SAI is to help educators use Agriculture as a context (or theme) for teaching the Academic Standards (science, math, social studies, English, etc.). Additionally, educators will receive hands on instruction and collateral materials to incorporate agriculture into their classroom curriculum. SAI provides a working environment for participants to experience current, factual, scientific information about agriculture.

Key Topics
Land and Water Usage 
Ag Marketing and Economics
Ag Education Applications 
Hydroponics Food Safety
Food Safety 
Commercial Farming

Benefits:
Receive 3 graduate level credits from OSU for a fraction of the cost; high quality, accredited collateral materials provided; first-hand experience interacting with agriculture through tours of processing plants, farms, nurseries and agribusiness operations; opportunities to meet and work with agriculturists; hotel accommodations, meals and networking opportunities.

Requirements:
Onsite participation (5 nights and 6 days) for all SAI candidates; an overnight stay with a host farm family (1 of the 5 nights); $500.00 registration fee payable to OAEF (Non-Refundable after April 1st); develop a comprehensive lesson plan utilizing knowledge gained as a SAI participant.

SAI History:
Inception in 1989; the program was adopted by OAEF in 1991; funding provided by private, commodity, organizational and agri-businesses.Contact Information: For SAI Applications and/or SAI Presentation Requests, please contact project coordinators directly.

PDF Applications are available online

Debbie Crocker
SAI Project Coordinator, Session #1
dcrocker@99webstreet.com

Jana Lee Dick
SAI Project Coordinator, Session #2
jana.dick@oregonstate.edu
PO Box E
Union, OR 97883
Ph: 541-562-5129 x22
Fax: 541-562-5348

From Security Manager to Master Gardener: Student Completes Ecampus Program While in Afghanistan
anaging security operations by day; studying the art and science of gardening by night: apparently it's just another day in the life of a Security Manager for Iraq and Afghanistan. 
Jay Addington has been working on and off as a private security contractor for CH2M Hill in the Middle East and Southwest Asia since 2004. When a co-worker informed him that he could pass time and gain knowledge by taking online classes through Oregon State Ecampus, he began exploring his options. 
"I've always been interested in plant nurseries and plan to buy and operate my own someday," says Addington. He built a greenhouse for his wife in the States, which made the dream even more alluring. In the process of stocking what's become "his greenhouse," Addington says it was hard to find vendors who were truly knowledgeable about the products they sold. Thus, he saw an opportunity in the market. He discovered Ecampus' Master Gardener™ online program and enrolled, hoping it would arm him with the knowledge he needed to be a well-informed nursery owner... 
Read the rest of Jay Addington's story here...

Managing security operations by day; studying the art and science of gardening by night: apparently it's just another day in the life of a Security Manager for Iraq and Afghanistan. 

Jay Addington has been working on and off as a private security contractor for CH2M Hill in the Middle East and Southwest Asia since 2004. When a co-worker informed him that he could pass time and gain knowledge by taking online classes through Oregon State Ecampus, he began exploring his options. 

"I've always been interested in plant nurseries and plan to buy and operate my own someday," says Addington. He built a greenhouse for his wife in the States, which made the dream even more alluring. In the process of stocking what's become "his greenhouse," Addington says it was hard to find vendors who were truly knowledgeable about the products they sold. Thus, he saw an opportunity in the market. He discovered Ecampus' Master Gardener™ online program and enrolled, hoping it would arm him with the knowledge he needed to be a well-informed nursery owner... 

Read the rest of Jay Addington's story here...

OSU Farm Conference Feb. 26

The Oregon State University Extension Service has opened registration for its 11th annual Oregon Small Farms Conference on Feb. 26 in Corvallis.

The daylong event is geared toward farmers, agriculture professionals, food policy advocates and managers of farmers markets. Chuck Hassebrook, the executive director of the Center for Rural Affairs, will open the event with a speech about how small farms are changing agriculture. Hassebrook specializes in commodity program reform, rural development policy, research and extension, rural revitalization and higher education.

Speakers will include farmers, OSU Extension Service faculty and U.S. Rep. KurtSchrader, a member of the House Committee on Agriculture.

Twenty-one sessions will be offered on topics that will include:
•       Marketing channels like multi-farm Community Supported Agriculture and FoodHub, an online marketplace that connects farmers with buyers;
•       Good agricultural practices for food safety and post-harvest handling;
•       State licensure requirements for growing or selling produce, livestock and value-added products;
•       Farm Direct checks and Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) fruit and vegetable voucher program;
•       Soil quality and cover cropping;
•       Oregon’s Farm Direct bill;
•       Impacts of local food;
•       Changes in Oregon’s food and agriculture systems;
•       Production, processing and marketing for niche meat producers.

As an aside to the conference, a demonstration on how to break down beef and pork carcasses will take place on Sunday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Clark Meat Center on campus. It requires an additional registration and is limited to 30 people. The cost is $75.

To register for the conference, go to http://smallfarms.oregonstate.edu/2011SFC.
To register for the carcass breakdown workshop, go to https://secure.oregonstate.edu/smallfarms-events/register/38.

The cost for the conference, which includes lunch, is $45 per person or $80 for two people from the same farm or organization through Feb. 16. After that, the fee rises to $50 per individual and will be $55 at the door. The conference will take place at the LaSells Stewart Center on campus.

2011 Pesticide Recertification Courses

The "Pesticide Recertification Courses 2011" brochure is available online at www.ipmnet.org/tim

Courses are targeted primarily at licensed commercial, public, and consultant applicators, though anyone can attend. Courses are:

Chemical Applicators Short Course, Jan 11-12, Wilsonville
OSU Extension Southern Oregon Recertification Workshop, Jan 24-25, Central Point
Non Crop Vegetation Management Course, Jan 25-26, Corvallis
PNW Pesticide Chemistry, Toxicology & Policy Short Course, Feb 1-2, Eugene
Central Oregon Pest Management Course, Feb 4, Redmond
Urban Pest Management Course, Feb 9, Oregon City
Weed Short Course, Feb 15-16, Ontario
Intermountain Pest Management Seminar, Feb 24, Klamath Fall

The "Pesticide Recertification Courses 2011" brochure is available online now at www.ipmnet.org/tim.

Courses are targeted primarily at licensed commercial, public, and consultant applicators, though anyone can attend.

Courses are:

  • OSU Extension Southern Oregon Recertification Workshop, Jan 24-25, Central Point
  • Non Crop Vegetation Management Course, Jan 25-26, Corvallis
  • PNW Pesticide Chemistry, Toxicology & Policy Short Course, Feb 1-2, Eugene
  • Central Oregon Pest Management Course, Feb 4, Redmond
  • Urban Pest Management Course, Feb 9, Oregon City
  • Weed Short Course, Feb 15-16, Ontario
  • Intermountain Pest Management Seminar, Feb 24, Klamath Falls

 

Northwest AgrAbility Workshop

OSU Extension is partnering with the Department of Occupational Therapy at Pacific University and Goodwill Industries of Oregon to increase awareness of this program which supports disabled farmers, ranchers, and agricultural workers in remaining productive in their chosen vocation. Please distribute broadly to potentially interested parties.

Northwest AgrAbility Workshop
February 24-25, 2011
LaSells Stewart Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon

AgrAbility supports a high quality lifestyle for farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural workers with disabilities. Through education and assistance, AgrAbility helps to minimize or eliminate obstacles that inhibit success in production agriculture or agriculture-related vocations.  AgrAbility addresses concerns such as arthritis, back pain, and behavioral health issues as well as traumatic injuries, such as amputations and spinal cord injuries.  http://www.agrability.org/

Learn to:

  • Conduct on-farm assessments
  • Determine the best assistive devices and equipment for clients
  • Work with AgrAbility resources
  • Present needs to vocational rehabilitation
  • Maximize benefits for farmers and ranchers with other community based organizations
  • Close cases

REGISTRATION and FMI:
http://hort.oregonstate.edu/AgrAbility_Oregon_Workshop

Preregistration $130/person, $135 after Feb 15th, $140 at the door

Fee includes lunch Thursday & Friday, and dinner Thursday at Gathering Together Farm, Philomath Oregon.

Director of Oregon Wood Innovation Center Receives Ph.D. from PSU

Scott Leavengood, Director of the Oregon Wood Innovation Center, successfully defended his dissertation at PSU on November 29th, 2010.

With submission of his paper in November, he will be the newest Ph.D. graduate from the engineering and technology management program at Portland State University, studying best practices in quality management for achieving quality and innovation performance.

This has been a long nine year journey for Scott and his family.  Please join Extension in congratulating him on this singular achievement!

USDA Childhood Obesity Grant Awarded

Dr. Roger Beachy, director of the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, visiting OSU last month from Washington, gave a press conference to announce the new grant for $4.8 million awarded to the FCH program by USDA to address childhood obesity in rural Oregon.

Project directors Deborah John and Kathy Gunter from OSU Extension were awarded $4,878,865 to start the program, called "Generating Rural Options for Weight-Healthy Kids and Communities" (GROW HKC). Cooperative Extension in Oregon and six other Western states will develop a plan to prevent obesity among rural children and field test it in rural communities within three Oregon counties: Clackamas, Columbia and Klamath.

The project’s Oregon State University advisory team members will include faculty from public health; nutrition and exercise sciences; human development and family sciences; education; and OSU Extension’s family and community health, Master Gardner, and 4-H programs.

Congratulations, Kathy and Deborah!

The news story posted on the OSU website:
http://oregonstate.edu/ua/ncs/archives/2011/jan/oregon-state-university-...

The ABC News affiliate in Eugene, along with a link to their TV spot:
http://kezi.com/news/local/201745

Extension Faculty Honored for Professional Work

The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) gave Mike Bondi its Western Region Award for Excellence in Extension. Bondi is the chairman of the OSU Extension Service in Clackamas County and is an Extension agent in forestry and Christmas trees. In his 32 years with OSU, Bondi has spearheaded several successful outreach efforts.

Bondi's projects include Tree School in Clackamas County, which brings together about 600 family forest owners and Christmas tree growers for one day of classes each year. The Tree School concept has been used as a model for similar programs around Oregon and the nation. Bondi also helped create Forests Forever Inc., a nonprofit that owns and manages the Hopkins demonstration Forest near Oregon City. The group, which serves several thousand visitors each year, also offers educational programs and volunteer opportunities in the forest.

In 2008, Bondi was instrumental in the passage of a ballot measure that created a property tax in Clackamas County to support Extension's work there.

Lyla Houglum was recognized for her role as co-chair of Managing in Tough Times, a national Extension initiative formed in response to the economic downturn. Houglum helped assemble and manage a team that created an online directory allowing Extension educators across the country to pool resources and share educational materials to assist people struggling with financial difficulties. Houglum is the director of special initiatives with OSU Extension and the executive director of the Western Extension Directors Association.

Cary J. Green, the assistant dean and head adviser in the College of Agricultural Sciences, was recognized for completing a selective two-year leadership development program offered by the Food Systems Leadership Institute.

The APLU handed out the awards at its annual meeting in Dallas, Texas, in November. The APLU is a nonprofit association of 218 public research universities, land-grant institutions and state university systems.

This release is also available at: http://bit.ly/gYSbS9

High Desert Green Industry Conference - Registration Ends 1/28

If you supply, design, maintain or manage landscapes in the Intermountain West, you will want to be in Redmond, OR on February 9 & 10, 2011 to attend the 19th Annual High Desert Green Industry Conference!

Consider these reasons why you don't want to miss this event:

Reward yourself for being frugal. Thanks to our generous sponsors, registration fees have been maintained at the same low rate for years!

Connect with green industry suppliers from throughout the Northwest during the one-day trade show.

Attend a comprehensive schedule of educational classes covering topics relevant to your career and your business.

Attend a Master Class or two for a deeper learning on a specific topic. Classes run from 2 - 4 hours.

You won’t want to miss our keynote speaker Ed Beaulieu, chief sustainability officer at Aquascapes, Inc. His work has been featured in Better Homes and Garden, Architectural Digest, and he has made several appearances on HGTV and DIY channel shows. He will discuss sustainability of water resources, rainwater harvesting and stormwater management.

Earn professional recertification and continuing education credits, if you are an Oregon-licensed pesticide applicator, landscape professional, or a certified arborist.

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN!

Go to our website to register on-line:
http://extension.oregonstate.edu/deschutes/hdgi/home
or by phone at 541-548-6088

Crook County/ COCC Computer & Education Center Groundbreaking

OSU/Crook County Agriculture Extension Office, along with Crook County and Central Oregon Community College (COCC), hosted the groundbreaking ceremony for the Crook County/COCC Computer and Education Center. The center will be the new home for the Crook County Open Campus. The building was made possible by a $3.9 million grant through the United States Department of Commerce from the Broadband Technology Opportunity Program and a $1 million contribution from COCC. When open in Aug 2011, the building will house college classes from OSU, COCC, and other colleges along with providing space for trainings and community events.

The ceremony was held Jan 24th. Representatives from OSU, COCC, State of Oregon, and local business gathered to celebrate all the hard work and collaboration needed to make this project a reality.

For more information on Crook County Open Campus and our new computer and education center, please visit http://oregonopencampus.org/crook.

Benton County 4-H Member Selected to Join National 4-H Congress Design Team

Elli Vanderzanden from Benton County was selected as one of eight youth to participate on the 2011 National 4-H Congress Design Team. Only 40 4-H youth from across the country made the team. Oregon 4-H selected and sent 15 youth to the event in November 2010 (Elli was one of the delegates who attended). 

The team is made up of the nation’s most outstanding 4-H members, 4-H volunteers, and Extension Staff. Team members will have the opportunity to help shape this ever-evolving opportunity for 4-H members from across the nation.

For more information, please visit the National 4-H Congress website, http://www.national4-hcongress.com/.

 

Washington County 4-Her meets Michelle Obama

4-H member and senior at Forest Grove High School will met First Lady Michelle Obama at a mentoring summit in Washington, D.C., recently.

Joel Cazares was invited by the National 4-H Council to attend the invitation-only National Mentoring Summit on Jan. 25 at the Library of Congress where he will also meet Attorney General Eric Holder.

Cazares was invited because he is a participant in Tech Wizards, a 4-H program run by the Oregon State University Extension Service in Washington County.

Launched in 1998, the bilingual after-school program teaches hands-on technological skills to low-income, marginalized youth ages 8 through 18 who are at risk of dropping out of school. About 1,000 students have participated in the program, and most go on to college, according to the program's director, Octaviano Merecias-Cuevas. Although Latinos are the targeted audience, any student can participate.

The students learn how to create websites, produce videos and podcasts, make computerized maps and build robots out of Legos. They gather confidence and learn to make decisions, set goals, think critically, work with a team, be accountable and communicate effectively, educators say. The overarching goal is to inspire them to go to college, get involved in their communities and choose careers in fields like science and engineering.

The program is one of three 4-H programs in the country that has been chosen to be replicated nationwide by the Department of Justice's Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. Merecias-Cuevas and several colleagues recently returned from Washington, D.C., where they trained staff and faculty of 23 universities to implement the program. Merecias-Cuevas, who is Cazares' mentor, will also attend the summit.

Cazares, 18, got involved with Tech Wizards during his sophomore year after friends encouraged him to join. Through the program, he has restored creeks, taught high school students how to teach basic computer skills, and mentored
elementary students in Lego robotics.

Mentoring – both of and by the students – is a key part of the program.

"From being mentored, I learned that there's actually help from people,” Cazares said. “All the help is there, but we are the ones who have to take the responsibility to actually ask for it."

Cazares, who was born in California but spent 13 years of his childhood in Mexico, plans to attend law school. He's currently recruiting new members for Tech Wizards, and intends to stay connected with the club after graduation.

"It's a moral requirement for me," he said. "If what I do in any sense helps my high school or any other high school, I will be more than glad to be there for them."

The summit was hosted by MENTOR, the Corporation for National and Community Service, the Harvard School of Public Health and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. In December, President Barack Obama issued a proclamation designating January as National Mentoring Month.

This story is available online: http://bit.ly/glDkrD

Renew Your ESP Gamma Chapter Membership for 2011

On behalf of the ESP Gamma Chapter Leadership Team I am inviting you to renew your Epsilon Sigma Phi membership for 2011.  As you know, ESP is the National Association of Extension Professionals, and administrators who work closely with and support their work, who exhibit excellence in Extension programming and/or administration.  

ESP is the only professional Extension organization (7000 members) that brings together all program areas, is national in scope, and has both retirees and current faculty and staff as members. Besides the networking opportunities with other professionals, benefits of ESP membership include: 

• Professional development conferences and distance learning opportunities.
• Connecting current employees and retirees to build networks, continuity, and support for the Extension system and related issues. 
• Unite Extension personnel and retirees across disciplines, units and programs in Oregon and the United States. 
• Access to scholarships for professional development, including national conferences, advanced degrees and to attend trainings & mini-grants.• Learn about international opportunities from members who have done work all over the world. 
• Opportunity to have your work recognized at state and national levels.  
• Opportunity to serve on state and national committees.
• Stipends to present workshops, poster presentations and serve on National Committees at national ESP Conferences.
• Opportunity to develop leadership skills

Annual membership dues for Gamma Chapter and National ESP are $55 and are due by January 15, 2011.  Please make your check payable to ESP and send to Treasurer Holly Berry, Marion County Extension, 3180 Center St. NE Room 1361, Salem, OR  97301.

I hope you will consider continuing your membership in Epsilon Sigma Phi. Your knowledge and experience are valuable to ESP and Extension, especially in these challenging times!  If you need more information please contact me.  

Thank you!

Jim Reeb, Chair
ESP, Gamma Chapter, Member Recruitment & Retention Committee

Call for Nominations Women of Achievement Awards 2011

WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT

The Women of Achievement awards honor the contributions and commitment of outstanding women on our campus and throughout Oregon whose work has benefited women. These awards are given to honor women who work to improve the quality of life for their sisters and to recognize their contributions to feminist empowerment.

Do you know someone in your life who should be recognized?  We rely on women like you to identify possible recipients of the Women of Achievement Awards.  You can submit nominations beginning now through March 4, 2011.  We hope at least one recipient of the award will be a student at Oregon State University.

The time and location of the awards ceremony will be announced in Spring quarter.  You can also receive up-to-date information by subscribing to the e-newsletter, just send an email to womenscenter@lists.oregonstate.edu.

2011 CALL FOR NOMINATIONS

Each year, in conjunction with National Women’s History Month, the Women’s Center at Oregon State University (OSU) presents the Women of Achievement Awards. These awards honor the contributions and commitment of outstanding women on our campus and throughout the state of Oregon whose work has benefited women. These awards are given to encourage women in their work and to let them know their contributions do not go unnoticed.

We need your help identifying possible recipients of the 2011 Women of Achievement Awards. Please use the nomination format that follows. We encourage you to distribute this form to anyone interested in making nominations. We hope that at least one recipient of the award will be a student at Oregon State University.

The deadline for submitting nominations is Friday, March 4, 2011. The committee will be making final decisions by March 11, and notifying successful nominees that week. The awards will be presented at the Memorial Union Lounge on Tuesday, April 26, 2011 from 3:30-5:00pm.

Please help us recognize some of the many talented and empowering women who have furthered the status of women. Below are the instructions for submitting a nomination. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Women of Achievement Committee:

Linda Anderson
Melissa Cheyney
Sharyn Clough
Sara Gwin
Sarah Hulse
Marty Roberts

WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS CRITERIA

The Women of Achievement Awards honor women whose actions and accomplishments meet the following criteria.

  1. Demonstrated a commitment to equality and dedication to furthering the status of women in Oregon
  2. Engaged in work that has positively affected the lives of women and has potential for creating real change
  3. Served as an important role model in the lives of girls or women
  4. Exhibited active involvement in feminist causes and/or organizations (e.g., pay equity, violence against women, women’s health, etc.)
  5. Participated in significant efforts to improve women’s well-being

PROCEDURE FOR SUBMITTING NOMINATIONS

Nominators must provide:

  • Name, address, phone and e-mail of nominator
  • Relationship to nominee
  • Name, address, and e-mail of the woman being nominated
  • A nomination letter with specific examples of the actions and accomplishments of the nominee that meet the criteria listed above

Nominators may also include:

  • No more than three (3) additional letters of recommendation from individuals other than the primary nominator. Each letter should clearly address, with specific examples, the criteria and qualifications about which the letter writer has direct knowledge. The primary nominator should forward a copy of the award criteria to letter writers. Please remind letter writers that strong nominations will exemplify the nominee’s accomplishments in accordance with the award criteria.
  • A curriculum vita or resume for nominee.

Women of Achievement Award nomination packets must be received by Friday, March 4, 2011. Questions can be addressed to Beth Rietveld at 541.737.1330 or by e-mail: beth.rietveld@oregonstate.edu. Please send them to the address below:

Beth Rietveld
OSU Women’s Center
Women’s Center/Benton Annex
Corvallis, OR 97331-2503

PAST WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT AWARD RECIPIENTS

1985: Jeanne Dost,  JoAnne Trow
1986: Margaret Hallock, Christy Joaccim, Hilda Thompson
1987: Margaret Carter, Margie Hendrickson, Patty Layman, Nancy Vanderpool
1988: Sally Hacker, Margaret Lumpkin
1989: Kay Bower, Ann Brodie, Judy Juntunen
1990: Carol Whipple, Gladys McCoy, Norma Paulus, Miriam W.Orzech
1991: Cynthia G. Lindner, Ilsa Kaattari, Margarita Donnelly, Kathleen G. Saadat
1992: Ataa A. Akyeampong, Helen Berg, Dawn Marges
1993: Janet Lee, Darryla Green-McGrath, Cheryl McLean
1994: Norma Neilson, Mary Demarest, Prudence Miles, Becky Warner
1995: Sherry Clark, Susan A. Goblirsh, Jo-Ann Leong, Sara Malueg, Marina Santos
1996: Stephanie Sanford, Lani Roberts, Jude Hanzo, Viette Helme
1997: Judy Fortmiller, GayLynn Pack, Susan Stafford, Marianne Vydra, Beth Rietveld
1998: Caroline Wilkins, Phyllis Lee, JoAnn Miller
1999: Alexis Walker, Karyle Butcher, Mina McDaniel, Elizabeth Newhall, Sylvia Moore
2000: Susan Shaw, Marlis Miller, Karen Higgins, Mary Anne Deagan
2001: Flaxen Conway, Erlinda Gonzales-Berry, Karel Murphy
2002: Leslie Burns, Betty Busch, Carole Anne Crateau, Rebecca Johnson
2003: Anne Gilles, Linda Klinge, Judith Li, Makiko Matsumoto, Annie Popkin
2004: Rebecca Concepcion, Moira Dempsey, Kathleen Heath, Mary Zelinka, Anisa Zvonkovic
2005: Michelle Bothwell, Joanne Apter, Nancy O’Mara, Marie Harvey, Mehra Shirazi
2006: Donna Champeau, Lisa Ede, Diane Crocker, Barb Gartner Lachenbruch, Paula Krane
2007: Linda Anderson, Zel Brook, Laura Rice
2008: Virginia Weis, Robin Ryan, Debbie Bird McCubbin, Cait O'Brien, Melissa Cheyney
2009: Joann Stutzman, Sue Merrill, Jenny Woodson, Lynn Steele, Patti Watkins, Carrie Giese, Jennifer Jabson
2010: Sandra Neubaum, Lorena Reynolds, Roni Sue, Karen Swanger

Videos of the O&E Conference 2010

Videos have been uploaded from the November's Outreach & Engagement Conference.

View them here: http://oregonstate.edu/media/filter/rhnzl

100+ Ways to Celebrate

How is your county planning on celebrating Extension's Centennial? 

  1. Have a “Proclamation Signing” event at the Courthouse – serve Centennial cake and orange punch.
  2. Partner with local museums to create an Extension “Centennial”display.
  3. Have a tree planting ceremony at the Courthouse or Fair Groundsalong with marker to commemorate 100th year.
  4. Have an office Open House event with cake and ice cream.
  5. Create a special Centennial display booth at County Fair.

For more ideas, download 100+ Ways to Celebrate (PDF).

Also be sure to check out the online OSU Extension Centennial tool kit for additional resources.

Centennial Committee Members

Joys, Sorrows, and Well-Wishes

Our Condolences

Leeds Bailey, Malheur County Agent from 1941-1975, passed away in an Ontario care center Friday, October 29, at the age of 95.  

Gray Thompson, long time Extension Agent, and responsible for starting the OSU Master Gardener Program with then Agent, Duane Hatch of Lane County, passed away in Portland on Sunday, December 26. Service will be held at Moreland Presbyterian.

Sunny Hunt, Extension Clatsop County, died peacefully at home on Monday, January 10, 2011 following illness and cancer.  Sunny worked as an OSU Extension FCH Education Program Assistant in Clatsop County from 2004 to 2007. In 2007 she became an FCH instructor and resigned in 2009. Sunny worked in the Oregon Family Nutrition Program and on community projects, including the Community Garden Project. Sunny was a wonderful colleague.

Lynn Jensen, Malheur County Staff Chair and Crops faculty, passed away January 14, 2011 in Ontario. Lynn has been the Crops agent in Malheur County since 1983 – focusing on onions and potato production. He has also served as Staff Chair in Malheur County for many years. He loved his work and the people he worked with in Malheur County.

W. Wayne Roberts, retired horticulturral extension agent for Yamhill, Polk and Marion counties passed away peacefully November 13, 2010. He served as president of the National Association of County Agriculture Agents, and after retirement, secretary of the Oregon Horticulture Society.

Our sympathy to Jeff Papke, on the death of his "amazing dad," Donald E. Papke, on January 30, 2011.

Marketing Update

We just added photos of all merchandise! We will be asking for your input soon on a few NEW Centennial products, too!

PROMOTIONAL ITEMS - Tips

Due to budget constraints we will begin charging a minimal fee for some previously free items. Pocket folders are now $.25 each.
Check the online order form regularly for limited time special offers. 
To order accurately always use the order form from the website. We run out or add marketing items and adjust prices on a regular basis.
New ideas always welcomed!
CENTENNIAL ITEMS – Select items for possible statewide order. It saves $$$ and expands range of available items!
Look for upcoming short survey to Office Managers and Chairs/Superintendents on special order centennial items. If quantity and commitment is adequate for a group order of any item  Admin marketing coordinator, Vicki Campbell will place a bulk order to minimize cost. Ideas include: 
Candy 
“Thanks a Million” individually wrapped chocolate coins or larger bar, 
“Thanks for Volunteering” 2”x5” bar with custom wrapper,
“You Make the Difference” 2”x5” bar with custom wrapper, 
2” indiv wrapped “Your’e A Star” dark chocolates, 
Centennial logo custom 2”x3’ imprinted chocolate bar and wrapper, 
Extension or Centennial 1.5” – 2” indiv wrapped custom imprinted pieces 
M&M’s – orange and black with OSU and/or 100 years/Extension printed
Other
nice ballpoint pens with logo 
Centennial coffee mugs- taller latte mugs or basic
Extension or Centennial sandstone coasters (set of 4) 
embroidered fleece throw blanket
imprinted wine glassesPROMOTIONAL ITEM NEWS – Tips
  • We have merged the centennial items into the general marketing order form to simplify your ordering process.
  • Due to budget constraints we will begin charging a minimal fee for some previously free items.  Pocket folders are now $0.25 each.  
  • Check the online order form regularly for limited time special offers. 
  • To order accurately always use the order form from the website. We run out or add marketing items and adjust prices on a regular basis.
  • New ideas always welcomed!

CENTENNIAL ITEMS - Help us select items for a bulk statewide order. We can save $$$ and expand the range of available items!

Look for an upcoming short survey asking for your input on specially selected items.  If quantity and commitment are adequate Vicki Campbell will place a bulk order to minimize cost. Some ideas for this bulk order include:

Candy 

  • “Thanks a Million” individually wrapped chocolate coins or larger bar, 
  • “Thanks for Volunteering” 2”x5” bar with custom wrapper,
  • “You Make the Difference” 2”x5” bar with custom wrapper, 
  • 2” individually wrapped “You're A Star” dark chocolates, 
  • Centennial logo custom 2”x3’ imprinted chocolate bar and wrapper, 
  • Extension or Centennial 1.5” – 2” indiv wrapped custom imprinted pieces 
  • M&M’s – orange and black with OSU and/or 100 years/Extension printed

Other

  • Nice ballpoint pens with logo 
  • Centennial coffee mugs- taller latte mugs or basic
  • Extension or Centennial sandstone coasters (set of 4) 
  • Embroidered fleece throw blanket
  • Imprinted wine glasses
February/March Technology Training

The Winter schedule for the Online Technology Training series is offered by Extension training staff.  These short classes will be delivered via the Adobe Connect virtual classroom, so you can attend from the comfort of your own desk.

TECHNOLOGY TRAINING Winter ‘11

Format: Online technology training via Adobe Connect

Office 2010 – Overview

An introduction to the new features available in Office 2010. Includes an overview of Word, Outlook, and Excel.

Wed., 2/16, 9-10 a.m.

Register at:
http://oregonstate.edu/training/course_view.php?crse_id=257&showHidden=true

Outlook 2010

An in-depth look at new features in Outlook 2010, including Conversation View, Quick Steps, Mail Tips, and a number of other new elements. We’ll also explore new scheduling views in the calendar. 

Tues., 2/22, 9-10 a.m.
Wed., 3/16, 9-10 a.m.

Register at:
http://oregonstate.edu/training/course_view.php?crse_id=258&showHidden=true

Using Multimedia in Office 2010 

Explore new tools available for photo-editing in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint and video-editing and audio-editing in PowerPoint. The screenshot tool will also be reviewed. 

Wed., 3/9, 9-9:45 a.m.

Register at:
http://oregonstate.edu/training/session_view.php?sess_id=1468

Welcome to Windows 7

Preview the operating system that will replace Windows XP on your computer soon.  This will be a brief review of the new environment, working with files and folders, and searching for content on a Windows 7 PC. 

Thurs., 2/3, 10-10:30 a.m.

Register at:
http://oregonstate.edu/training/course_view.php?crse_id=261&showHidden=true

Questions about your VPN?

Learn about VPN (Virtual Private Networking), how it works, and how to keep making it work for you!  (VPN is required to connect remotely to the OSU network.)

Wed., 3/2, 9-9:30 a.m.

Register at:
http://oregonstate.edu/training/session_view.php?sess_id=1472

Pre-register for these classes by contacting Karen Watte (karen.watte@oregonstate.edu) or Isaac Magana (isaac.magana@oregonstate.edu) or by registering directly at the website noted under each session description.   If your office would like to schedule group training on one of these topics on a different date, please contact us.

You will receive log-in information at least 2 days prior to the session.  All classes are held via Adobe Connect.  You will need a computer that has Flash Player (loaded on all OSU computers) and an Internet connection. 

Recordings of previous trainings can be found at: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/internal/computing/recorded-training-sessions

Looking for more intensive short courses on specific computer applications or advanced techniques? Check out the online Ed2Go classes through OSU E-Campus.  http://www.ed2go.com/oregonstate/

Why publish with EESC?

Why publish with EESC?

By Mark Anderson-Wilk, Publishing Leader, Extension and Experiment Station Communications (EESC)

Extension faculty deliver educational materials in a variety of venues and have multiple opportunities to engage with audiences online independent of the involvement of a formal publisher.

For many publishing projects, however, the role of the publisher remains as important as ever. Partnering with EESC, OSU Extension Service’s designated publisher, offers numerous advantageous for Extension faculty:

Quality control. All products published in the OSU Extension Catalog are edited and designed by communication professionals. Our publishing team has decades of professional publishing experience and has received
numerous national awards for our work.

Recognized scholarship. All materials published in the Extension Catalog go through peer review and are recognized as a form of scholarship.

Series numbers. When products are published in the Extension Catalog, they are assigned series numbers (for example, EC, EM, 4-H, PNW, and SR numbers) that provide a convenient way to refer to the products.

Digital preservation. EESC archives all materials published in the Extension Catalog so that they will be available for future reference and reuse as appropriate.

Copyright management. EESC serves as OSU’s copyright steward for materials published in the Extension Catalog. We ensure that all necessary copyright permissions have been documented for the materials we publish, and we respond to outside requests for reproducing items we have published.

To learn more or to get started on a publishing project, please visit us on the web: http://extension.oregonstate.edu/eesc/educational-publishing

Upcoming Events

2015
Feb 11 - Feb 12 The Tropicana, Las Vegas, NV
Mar 2 - Mar 5 Washington, DC
Mar 9 - Mar 13 Red Lion Jantzen Beach, Portland, OR
Mar 10 - Mar 12 Radisson Suites, Tucson, AZ
Mar 10 Capitol Building, Salem, OR
Apr 2 - Apr 3 CH2M Hill Alumni Center, Corvallis
Apr 7 - Apr 10 Seattle, WA
Apr 12 - Apr 15 The Hyatt Regency, Crystal City, VA
Apr 13 OSU Alumni Center, Corvallis OR
Apr 13 OSU Alumni Center, Corvallis, OR
Apr 14 Capitol Building, Salem, OR
Apr 15 OSU Alumni Center, Corvallis, OR
Apr 28 - May 1 Portland, OR
May 4 - May 7 Atlanta, GA
May 4 - May 7 Portland, Maine
May 6 - May 8 Atlanta, Georgia
May 12 - May 15 Orlando, FL
Jun 8 - Jun 11 Charleston, SC
Jun 26 - Jun 27 Bend, OR
Jul 6 - Jul 9 Breckenridge, CO
Jul 12 - Jul 16 Sioux Falls, SD
Aug 6 - Aug 8 Linfield College, McMinnville, OR
Sep 22 - Sep 25 Councile Bluffs, IA, USA
Sep 27 - Sep 30 Penn State, State College, PA
Oct 4 - Oct 7 Coeur d' Alene Resort, Coeur d' Alene, ID
Oct 6 - Oct 9 Las Cruces, NM
Oct 12 - Oct 14 St. Louis, MO
Oct 25 - Oct 29 Portland, OR
Nov 2 - Nov 5 Greenbrier Resort, White Sulphur Springs, WV
Nov 3 - Nov 7 Baton Rouge, LA
Nov 15 - Nov 17 Indianapolis, IN
Dec 7 - Dec 11 CH2M Hill Alumni Center, Corvallis
2016
Jun 26 - Jun 29 Burlington, VT
Jul 24 - Jul 28 Little Rock, AR
Sep 11 - Sep 16 Big Sky, Montana
Sep 19 - Sep 22 Jackson Lake Lodge, Jackson Hole, WY
Nov 13 - Nov 15 Austin, TX
2017
Jul 9 - Jul 13 Salt Lake City, UT
Nov 12 - Nov 14 Washington, DC