THE COMMITTEE FOR FAMILY FORESTLANDS

Update from the Committee for Family Forestlands
By Brad Withrow-Robinson, OSU Forestry and Natural Resources Extension and Susan Watkins, Yamhill County Landowner, and Vice-Chair of the Committee for Family Forests

The Committee for Family Forestlands (CFF) provides a family landowner's perspective to the Oregon Board of Forestry and the State Forester.  The Committee’s work is guided by landowner inputs such as the 2005 Family Forest symposium and by emerging events. 

The CFF recently presented its Annual Report to the Board of Forestry summarizing its work in the past year and looking ahead to the 2012-2013 cycle.  Among the issues that could affect family forestlands which the CFF will be addressing are:

  • Water issues, including on-going ODF and DEQ efforts regarding the mid-coast TMDL and RipStream riparian protection standards processes.
  • Critical infrastructure issues, especially on the eastside, including capacity of contractors and mills whose presence facilitates management of forestlands
  • Family ownership of forestland
  • Communicating about East side issues from the perspective of family forestlands and their owners.
  • Fire Protection Funding

The full CFF report to the Board of Forestry is available on the Board of Forestry website http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/BOARD/CFF/cff.shtml , which also provides links to past Committee work and an opportunity to send comments to the Committee.  The Committee welcomes your thoughts.

About the Committee for Family Forestlands
Established in 2000 by the Oregon Legislature at the request of the Oregon Board of Forestry, the Committee for Family Forestlands’ overall priority is to keep family forestlands in forest, by helping address the challenges to maintaining the viability of family forestlands.  The Committee advises the Board and the State Forester on matters such as developing financial incentives, maintaining infrastructure, preventing forest fragmentation and conversion, and the potential effects that changes in forest policy may have on family forestland owners.  The Committee also gives guidance to the Department of Forestry on efforts to provide and improve services to family woodland owners and to raise public awareness of the role that family forestlands play in maintaining a healthy forest environment, economically, socially, and ecologically. 

The Committee meets on a regular basis.  Members include four family forestland owners (representing small to large acreage ownerships in various regions of the state), a citizen at large, representatives of the environmental community, and a forest industry representative.  Ex-officio members include representatives from Oregon State University, the Oregon Forest Resources Institute, Associated Oregon Loggers, and the Department of Forestry. 

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