Post-Harvest

PNW Dark Sweet Cherry Development Index Chart

pnw dark sweet cherry color development video

Video:
How to Postharvest: PNW Dark Sweet Cherry Development Index Chart

Tutorial video on how to use the new Pacific Northwest Dark Sweet Cherry Development Index Chart developed by Oregon State University.

pnw dark sweet cherry color development excel chart

PNW Dark Sweet Cherry Color Development Chart

Excel spreadsheet available for download.


Featured Publications

The effect of postharvest calcium applicationin hydro-cooling water on tissue calcium content, biochemical changes, and quality attributes of sweet cherry fruit

Yan Wang, Xingbin Xie, and Lynn E. Long; Food Chemistry 160 (2014) 22-30 
Quality and physiological responses of two late-season sweet cherry cultivars 'Lapins' and 'Skeena' to modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) during simulated long distance ocean shipping

Yan Wang, Jinhe Bai, Lynn E. Long; Postharvest Biology and Technology 110 (2015) 1-8

Physiological and biochemical changes relating to postharvest splitting of sweet cherries affected by calcium in hydrocooling water

Yan Wang, Lynn E. Long; Food Chemistry 181 (2015) 241-247

Respiration and quality responses of sweet cherry to different atmospheres during cold storage and shipping

Yan Wang, Lynn E. Long; Postharvest Biology and Technology 92 (2014) 62-69

Improving Shipping Quality of Sweet Cherry by Ca treatments

Yan Wang, Xinbin Xie, Todd Einhorn, Lynn E. Long

To improve storage/shipping quality of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.), the effect of calcium chloride
(CaCl2) added to hydro-cooling water on physiological and biochemical processes related to fruit and
pedicel quality was investigated on two major cultivars. The fruit tissue Ca content increased up to
29–85% logarithmically for ‘Sweetheart’ and 39–188% linearly for ‘Lapins’ as CaCl2 rate increased from
0.2% to 2.0% at 0 C for 5 min. The increase of fruit tissue Ca content was accompanied by reductions
in respiration rate, ascorbic acid degradation, and membrane lipid peroxidation, which enhanced total
phenolics content and total antioxidant capacity, and resulted in increases in fruit firmness and pitting
resistance and decreases in titratable acidity loss and decay of both cultivars. Pedicel browning was
inhibited by CaCl2 at 0.2% and 0.5%, but increased by higher rates at 1.0% and 2.0%, possibly via modifying
membrane lipid peroxidatio

 

 

 



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