Extension News from the West

WSU/USDA Plant Metabolomics Celebration Agenda

Washington State University Extension News - Mon, 02/20/2017 - 1:01pm

Agenda for WSU/USDA Plant Metabolomics Celebration 
Pullman, Washington
March 21, 2017

• 9 a.m., Welcome and Introductions at 402 Biotechnology Life Sciences Building by David Weller, Research Leader, Wheat Health, Genetics and Quality Research Unit, ARS-USDA.

• 9:15 a.m., Corporate Strategy and Collaboration Philosophy, Mike Harrington, Senior Vice President for Global Markets, Waters Corporation.

• 9:30 a.m., General Overview of Metabolomics System Workflow, Ken Rosnack, Principal Business Development Manager, Food & Environmental Markets at Waters Corporation.

• 9:50 a.m., Wheat Rhizosphere Metabolomics at Washington State University, with Bob Bonsall, Biochemistry Research Scientist, Senior Scientist, WSU, and David Weller, Research Leader, Wheat Health, Genetics and Quality Research Unit, ARS-USDA.

• 10:15-10:45 a.m., Break

• 10:45 a.m., Metabolomics and Genomics – How they work together, Jose Castro Perez, Director of Health Sciences Marketing, Waters Corporation.

• 11:05 a.m., Plant Tissue Imaging at Washington State University, Norman Lewis, Professor, Institute of Biological Chemistry, WSU.

• 11:25 a.m., Closing Talk

• 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m., Lunch & Discussions, First Floor Atrium, Vogel Plant Biosciences Building.

• 1:30-2:30 p.m., Ribbon Cutting for New Mass Spectrometer and Lab Tour, 330 Vogel Plant Biosciences Building.

Staff Biographies: Wheat Health, Genetics and Quality Research

Washington State University Extension News - Mon, 02/20/2017 - 12:31pm

David Weller

David Weller, Research Leader, Wheat Health, Genetics and Quality Research Unit

Dr. David Weller is Research Leader of the USDA-ARS Wheat Health, Genetics and Quality Research Unit at Pullman, and adjunct professor of plant pathology at Washington State University.

Weller received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in plant pathology from Michigan State University. His research focuses on the control of soilborne pathogens, the rhizosphere microbiome and metabolome, and disease-suppressive soils. In 2003-05 and 2013, he was the Willie Commelin Scholten (WCS) Endowed Professor of Phytopathology and OECD Fellow at Utrecht University, The Netherlands.

Dr. Weller is a Fellow of the American Phytopathological Society (APS) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a recipient of the APS Ruth Allen Award for outstanding research. He has published over 170 journal articles and reviews and regularly lectures at universities worldwide.

Weller founded and directs the nationally-recognized Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) outreach program “Pumping-Up the Math and Science Pipeline,” which provides novel educational opportunities in science and mathematics to underserved students in rural and Native American communities in the Pacific Northwest. For these activities, Dr. Weller received the Washington State University 2010 Martin Luther King Jr. Distinguished Service Award and the USDA Secretary’s Honor Award in 2011.

Robert Bonsall, Biochemist, Research Administrator and Senior Scientist, WSU Department of Plant Pathology/USDA-ARS
As a biochemist, senior research scientist and director of the USDA Agricultural Research Service’s Bio-Analytical Laboratory, Research and Developmental Chemistries at Washington State University, Bonsall was responsible for the initial design of the laboratory and instrumentation.

Robert Bonsall examines spectra of metabolites that help protect wheat.

His biochemistry expertise emphasizes small molecule metabolomics and instrumentation. Bonsall conducts hands-on research to develop chemical isolation protocols and instrumental analysis used by researchers worldwide, including:

• Photodiode array (PDA) High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) & PDA Ultra Pressure Liquid Chromatography (UPLC) for isolation, identification, chemical modification and spectral characterization of plant signal molecules and bacterial antibiotics, and;

• HPLC & UPLC mass spectral analysis (Thermabeam electron impact, Quadrupole/Orthoganol Time of Flight and Synapt Tri-Wave MS) to elucidate the structure of antibiotics and small molecule intermediates involved in biocontrol and bio-markers of wheat and barley health.

These antibiotics are produced in field soils and are responsible for the biocontrol of root diseases of wheat, barley and biofuel crops. The rhizosphere metabolome can be defined and further understood by identifying these biomarkers. They are also used for the biocontrol of root diseases of agricultural crops.

Based on his research achievements at WSU, Bonsall was honored with the President’s Employee Excellence Award in 1999.

Cheers!

Washington State University Extension News - Mon, 02/13/2017 - 6:55pm

WSU had many students and faculty participate in the Washington Association of Wine Grape Growers Meeting, Convention and Trade Show, held Feb. 7-9. Here are some of the contributions made by WSU students and scientists:

2017 Speakers

Dr. James Moyer Ph.D., Associate Dean of Research, College of Agricultural, Human and Natural Resource Sciences
Do Agriculture, Grapes and Wine Fit into a World Class Education Institution?

Michelle Moyer Ph.D., Statewide V&E Extension Specialist
How Ignoring Basic Viticulture Tactics Can Mess up a Grower’s Bottom Line: Pests, Clean Plants, AgWeatherNet and More!
Disease by Phenology

Danielle Kleist,  Director of Students Life, WSU Tri-Cities

Dr. James Moyer adresses the crowd during the State of the Industry Session

Cover Letters-What it Says Before You Open Your Mouth

Charles Edwards Ph.D., Professor & Food Scientist
How Do You Know You Have a Microbial Problem? What Detection Method to Choose?

Thomas Henick-Kling Ph.D., Director, WSU Vicitulture & Enology
Microbial Spoilage of Wine and Its Prevention

Markus Keller Ph.D., Professor
Phenology and Growing Degree Days
The Perfect Climate for Wine – How Perfect is Washington?

Johnathan O’Hearn, WSU Entomology
Pest by Phenology

Jim Harbertson Ph.D., Associate Professor of Enology
Phenolics of Washington State Wines

Poster Winners WSU graduate student Ben-Min Chang gives his oral presentation during the 2017 WAWGG Poster Session.

Professional Category

First place: Lynn Mills
Second place: Sridhar Jarugula
Third Place: Prashant Swamy

Graduate Category

First place: Margaret McCoy
Second place: Ben-Min Chang
Third place: Caroline Merrell

Undergraduate Category

First place: Ashley Boren
Second place: Corydon Funk

Best Oral Presentation

Graduate: Zachary Cartwright

Graduate students Caroline Merrell and Garret Stahl pose next to their posters at the WAWAGG Conference.

Undergraduate: Ashley Boren

Outreach and Technology Transfer Committee

Tom Collins
Gwen Hoheisel
Catherine Ann Jones
Markus Keller
Mysti Meiers
Michelle Moyer

Farming by Phenology Program Advisors

Michelle Moyer
Gwen Hoheisel

Last chance for free radon kits to test homes for deadly gas

Cooperative Extension’s Radon Education Program is offering free radon test kits and educational presentations through Feb. 28.

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension offers free test kits statewide through February

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Radon Education Program is offering free radon test kits at several locations statewide through Feb. 28. In addition, there will be educational presentations on the dangers of radon Feb. 16 in Sparks, Feb. 28 in Yerington and March 2 in Stateline.

Radon is a naturally occurring, radioactive gas that is colorless, odorless and tasteless. It comes from the ground and can accumulate in homes, increasing the risk of lung cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates 21,000 Americans die each year from radon-caused lung cancer, killing more people than secondhand smoke, drunk driving, falls in the home, drowning or house fires.

In Nevada, one in four homes tested show radon concentrations at or above the EPA action level. According to experts, living in a home with radon concentrations at the action level poses as much risk of developing lung cancer as smoking about half a pack of cigarettes a day.

The risk of radon-caused lung cancer can be reduced. The first step is a simple three-day test to determine if a house has a radon problem, and winter is an ideal time to test a home for radon. If radon problems are found, they can be fixed.

A list of where free kits can be obtained throughout the state can be found at http://bit.ly/FreeKitLocations. Scheduled presentations on radon are:

  • Feb. 16 at the Sparks Library, 1125 12th St., Sparks, at 6 p.m.
  • Feb. 28 at the Yerington Intermediate School library, 215 Pearl St., Yerington, at 6 p.m.
  • March 2 at the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency, 128 Market St., Stateline, at 6 p.m.

For more information, call the Radon Hotline at 888-RADON10 (888-723-6610) or visit the Nevada Radon Education Program website. Cooperative Extension, the EPA and the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health urge all Nevadans to test their homes for radon.

The Nevada Radon Education Program is a program of University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and is funded by the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health. Since the program began in 2007, more than 23,000 homes have been tested in Nevada.

CAHNRS Coug Connections: Krissy Ozaki

Washington State University Extension News - Fri, 02/10/2017 - 4:17pm

Each week, we will showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors. Ambassadors is a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Krissy Ozaki, a senior from Idaho Falls, Id.

Krissy Ozaki

What are you studying?

I’m double majoring in Apparel Merchandising and Management and Operations.

What is a fun fact about you?

I have ridden a camel.

Why WSU?

WSU has it all: a variety of excellent academic programs, a multitude of clubs and organizations, and the most spirited, energetic, caring community!

What is special about being a CAHNRS Coug?

Being a Coug is a lifetime of pride and being a CAHNRS Coug means having a close-knit family within the greater WSU community.

Where do you want to be (professionally or personally) 10 years after you graduate?

I’d like to be alive, healthy, and happy working in a job I love and having adventures around the world.

Favorite class you have taken within CAHNRS so far? Why?

AMDT 317 because a variety of majors take the course, so there are diverse perspectives. I love learning about cultures and dress. It is fascinating.

What other extracurricular activities have you been involved in?

Undergraduate research about the life cycle of cotton.

Favorite Ferdinand’s flavor of ice cream?

Tin Lizzy

Nevada Youth Range Camp accepting applications

Students attending the 2016 Nevada Youth Range Camp present their rangeland management plan to fellow campers. This year’s camp is June 18-24, with applications due April 28.

Youth offered opportunity for hands-on learning about desert and mountain rangelands

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the Nevada Section of the Society for Range Management are now accepting applications for the Nevada Youth Range Camp to be held June-18-24 in central Nevada’s Desatoya Mountains. Applications must be submitted by April 28.

Now in its 57th year, the Nevada Youth Range Camp provides an opportunity for youth ages 14-18 in Nevada and eastern California to learn about Nevada’s desert and mountain rangelands and diverse ecosystems. Campers will stay at the Smith Creek Ranch, which has been recognized for its ecologically responsible approach to livestock management on public lands. While there, campers will learn from range management professionals who are knowledgeable in the ecology and management of the Great Basin’s desert and mountain rangelands.

Campers will learn basic surveying and map reading, identification and the importance of rangeland plants, evaluation of sagebrush and woodland ecosystems, wildlife surveying techniques, evaluation of stream health, and many other topics related to rangelands. Students can also enjoy the wildflowers and green vegetation produced by the Desatoya Mountain Range’s recent snowmelt through outdoor activities, including swimming, fishing, hiking, volleyball, horseshoes, campfires and photography.

Interested students must submit an application and a letter of recommendation from an adult other than a parent, relative or sibling. The cost to attend the camp is $200 and includes meals and camp activities. Applicants may be sponsored to attend the camp by contacting their local conservation district or other organizations.

For more information and to apply, go to the Nevada Youth Range Camp registration page or contact Kathryn Dyer at 775-861-6647 or kdyer@blm.gov. Completed applications with enclosures can be emailed to kdyer@blm.gov, or sent to NV Youth Range Camp, c/o Bureau of Land Management, ATTN: Kathryn Dyer, 1340 Financial Blvd., Reno, NV 89502. Approved applicants will be notified within two weeks of receipt of the application.

Cooperative Extension’s Nevada Youth Range Camp is conducted in partnership with state and federal agencies, including the Natural Resources Conservation Service, Nevada Division of Forestry, Nevada Division of Conservation Districts, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and Nevada Department of Wildlife. Financial sponsors include the Nevada Wildlife Federation, Nevada Conservation Districts, Nevada Bighorns Unlimited and Nevada Society for Range Management.

CAHNRS Coug Connections: Taylor Neal

Washington State University Extension News - Thu, 02/02/2017 - 11:49am

Each week, we will showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors, a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Taylor Neal, junior from Mercer Island, Wash.

Taylor Neal

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Economics, with a minor in Business.

What is a fun fact about you?

I got to ride on the trolley with Mickey Mouse when I was a kid.

Why WSU?

Both of my parents came to WSU, and it was a perfect choice to help gain independence and move far from home.

What is special about being a CAHNRS Coug?

Being a CAHNRS Coug provides an abundance of support and is truly a home away from home.

Where do you want to be (professionally or personally) 10 years after you graduate?

No idea! I think I would like to be working for a business and hopefully be back on the west side.

Favorite class you have taken within CAHNRS so far? Why?

My favorite class I have taken so far is my Economic Sciences 101 class. This is the course that caused me to fall in love with Economics and switch to a CAHNRS major.

What other extracurricular activities have you been involved in?

I have been an Economics 101/102 tutor!

Favorite Ferdinand’s flavor of ice cream?

Apple Cup Crisp or Chocolate Peanut Butter

Students share Tilth discoveries in blog series

Washington State University Extension News - Tue, 01/31/2017 - 12:53pm

In 2016, 28 CAHNRS undergraduate and graduate students in Crop and Soil Sciences, Horticulture, Agricultural and Food Systems, and Biological Systems Engineering attended the annual Tilth Conference in Wenatchee, Wash. There, they met hundreds of Northwest farmers and producers and learned about sustainable farms and food.

Since then, students have written about their Tilth discoveries and topics of interest in a series of blog posts on the Center for Sustainability and Natural ResourcesPerspectives on Sustainability blog.

Recent articles by Crystal Allen, Corina Serban, Janel Davisson, Brendon Anthony and Tariq Khalil explored animal power as an alternative to machines; manure use on small farms; building intergenerational connections; farm incubator programs; and other topics.

For Zachary Frederick, doctoral student in Plant Pathology, writing the blog post helped him learn new ways to share information with different audiences.

In his soon-to-be-published blog post, Frederick is writing about the agro-ecology of hedgerows. He explores this ancient form of farming, “using the hedge as a living, tangled barrier against other people, animals, and encroachment from the woods.”

The combination of history and agriculture has always been a side interest, says Frederick.

“In places like Normandy in northern France, hedgerows got so tall and thick a tank needed special modifications on the front to be able to shear through them,” he writes. “The modern practice creates less fortress-like hedges, but they still flower to attract pollinators, serve as a barrier against blowing dust, and house beneficial insects.”

Read their articles here: http://csanr.wsu.edu/category/blog/.

Youth get hands-on lessons in biofuels, food engineering, robotics

Washington State University Extension News - Tue, 01/31/2017 - 12:44pm
Carlos Zuniga, doctoral student in Biological Systems Engineering, introduces LMS students to a thermal camera.

Graduate students from CAHNRS’ Department of Biological Systems Engineering brought their research to life for students at Lincoln Middle School in Pullman.

In three 2016 visits, student researchers shared concepts in areas like food engineering, bioenergy and agricultural automation with middle school students in science teacher Marla Haugen’s class.

Be like a termite

“We wanted to help the younger generation know what’s happening in biofuels,” said doctoral scholar Innu Chaudhary, who led five students from Dr. Shulin Chen’s laboratory in sharing their National Science Foundation-funded research on fuel made from sustainable crops. 

To capture students’ interests, the WSU teams put science in their hands. In Chaudhary’s visit, students passed around a riddled block of termite-nibbled wood, illustrating WSU efforts to replicate the tiny insects’ mastery of lignin—tough structural molecules that slow down the process that turns plant matter into sugars and ultimately, fuel.

“Termites eat wood—a lot of it,” said Chaudhary. “We’ve found that termites can remove almost all lignin and have 98 percent sugar conversion in their gut. Our goal is to create a biomimic—a catalyst that mimics what happens inside a termite.”

The WSU students also made hands-on, wood and wire models of plant cells. Youths had to tug and pull to free wooden “carbohydrate” cores from a cage of “lignin.”

“We wanted them to feel how energy-intensive it is to remove lignin,” said Chaudhary.

Lincoln Middle School students learn about biofuels research during a WSU visit.

In the grand finale, two teams of middle school students competed in knowledge challenge that helped them prepare for their own science bowl. Chaudhary was impressed by how much they learned, and how much they already knew.

“This was the first time I visited a middle school in the United States, and I loved the experience,” she said. “I would love to do it again.”

A taste of science

“Everyone eats, and kids love food,” said graduate student Atisheel Kak, who gave lessons in food packaging and processing with fellow Food Engineering Club members. “We focused on the basics and fun.”

Club members asked questions like “Why do you need to process our food?” (The answer: potentially harmful bacteria), then gave students a sensory taste-test of milk products, such as condensed and powdered milk. The lesson helped drive home the importance of food packaging in preserving food quality.

“Students could see and taste the difference,” Kak said. “They told us they didn’t realize how much goes into food packaging.”

Water-saving robots

In a third visit, students peered through a thermal camera brought by doctoral student Carlos Zuniga, president of the Agricultural Automation and Engineering Club.

Talking with students about the importance of automation to our food supply, Zuniga and masters student Chongyuan Zhang shared research and videos on flying drones and apple-picking robots.

“We want to know how plants are ‘feeling,’” Zuniga said. “To do that, we use sensors.”

His special cameras gauge plant health by temperature. Mounted on a drone, the camera could help farmers give their crops just the right amount of water and nutrients at the right time, saving resources.

“The students were very excited about the thermal camera,” said Zuniga. “When you have an interested audience, you’re motivated to work harder and do better. If just one student stays interested in studying automation, my effort has paid off.”

Las Vegas student places second in National Radon Poster Contest

Canarelli Middle School’s Joshua Fuji Fama from Las Vegas placed second in the 2017 National Radon Poster Contest with his poster, “That Monster Radon.”

Joshua Fuji Fama awarded for poster urging communities to test for radon

Canarelli Middle School student Joshua Fuji Fama, a sixth-grader from Las Vegas, placed second in the National Radon Poster Contest. He competed against students from nine other states and will receive $300 for his poster, “That Monster Radon.”

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Radon Education Program conducts the Nevada Radon Poster Contest each year to educate students and their families on the dangers of radon in the home, and to encourage Nevadans to test their homes for radon, a radioactive, colorless, odorless and tasteless gas that comes from the ground. Radon can accumulate in homes and can cause lung cancer.

The National Radon Poster Contest is co-sponsored by the American Lung Association and the Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, with support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The American Lung Association provides $1,500 in prize money for the three winning posters.

In addition to $300, Fama will receive $60 for placing second in the statewide contest. His teacher, Samantha Barry, will receive $35 for classroom supplies. They will receive their awards following an educational presentation on the dangers of radon at 1 p.m., Feb. 4 at Enterprise Library, 25 E. Shelbourne Ave. in Las Vegas.

Taylor Brown, an eighth-grader from Silverland Middle School in Fernley, placed first in the Nevada contest with her poster, “Corrupting Radon.” She will receive $75, and her teacher, Meghan Holmes, will receive $50 to use for classroom supplies.

Valeria Ramirez, an eighth-grade student from Yerington Intermediate School in Yerington, placed third in the statewide contest with her poster, “Check!Check!Check! For Radon.” She will receive $45, and her teacher, Debbie Pellegrini, will receive $20 for classroom supplies during a radon presentation program at 6 p.m., Feb. 28, at the Yerington Intermediate School Library, 215 Pearl St. in Yerington.

This is the eighth year that the Nevada Radon Education Program has participated in the Radon Poster Contest that is open to children, ages 9 to 14. The contest is sponsored by the Nevada Radon Education Program, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

This year’s Nevada Radon Poster Contest had 80 entries. Posters were judged on accuracy of information, visual communication of the topic, reproducibility and originality. Voting for the contest took place on the Nevada Radon Education’s Facebook page; and by polling of Cooperative Extension faculty and staff, representatives from the Radiation Control Program of the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health, Nevada radon industry professionals, representatives from the Nevada Radon Education Program, and other stakeholders.

The Nevada Radon Education Program is a program of University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and is funded by the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health. Since the program began in 2007, nearly 24,000 homes have been tested in Nevada. Free test kits are available at Cooperative Extension offices and partner locations throughout the state until the end of February.

For more information, visit the Nevada Radon Education Program website, or call the Radon Hotline at 888-RADON10 (888-723-6610).

First of three WSU oilseed workshops a success

Washington State University Extension News - Mon, 01/30/2017 - 10:21am

Nearly 100 producers, industry, agency, and university representatives gathered at the historic Hartline School January 26 for the year’s first WSU oilseed workshop.

The one-day event featured a wide range of sessions that encompassed beginning and more advanced information about canola and other oilseed production and marketing.

“I thought the workshop was highly informative and very well done,” commented Andy Juris. Andy and his father Ron farm near Bickleton, Wash., and have grown canola and flax to try to diversify their wheat rotation.

Jeff Schibel grows irrigated winter canola near Odessa in a rotation with wheat and potatoes and remarked the Hartline workshop was very comprehensive.

“The live plants and new format of being able to attend all the sessions were a great addition this year,” he said.

More than half the attendees were producers, including some who have never grown canola but are interested in it, and others who have grown it for more than ten years.

“I came away from the workshop with an optimistic feeling after seeing the number of people coming together to build a canola community in Washington state and the Pacific Northwest,” said Jesse Brunner, an experienced canola grower from Almira.

Scot Hulbert, chair of the Department of Plant Pathology at WSU, added he was “pleased to see how interactive growers and ag industry were, sharing their experiences with each other,” in the session he taught and throughout the day.

There are two more oilseed workshops; one in Ritzville January 31, and another in Clarkston February 2. More information is available at www.css.wsu.edu/biofuels.

In conjunction with the workshops, there are two meetings February 1 to discuss the formation of a Pacific Northwest Canola Grower Association. Those are in Ritzville at 9 a.m., and Clarkston at 3 p.m. There is no charge to attend either of the February 1 meetings. Contact Karen Sowers, ksowers@wsu.edu, 808-283-7013 for more information.

CAHNRS Coug Connections: Tyler Baker

Washington State University Extension News - Fri, 01/27/2017 - 10:17am

Each week, we will showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors, a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Tyler Baker, a senior from Geneseo, NY.

Tyler Baker

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Fruit & Vegetable Management and Landscape, Nursery, Greenhouse Management. I’m also minoring in Horticulture.

What is a fun fact about you?

I attended three different high schools (two in Washington and one in New York), and I did running start at Skagit Valley College.

Why WSU?

Honestly, WSU was not my first choice but after learning about what CAHNRS had to offer and their extensive apple programs, I knew I would call WSU home.

What is special about being a CAHNRS Coug?

CAHNRS is a family and everyone is invested.

Where do you want to be (professionally or personally) 10 years after you graduate?

Professionally, I would like to own my own apple orchard and run an apple cider mill.

Favorite class you have taken within CAHNRS so far? Why?

Horticulture 416 with Amit Dhingra – I really enjoyed his method of teaching, engaging the students by using a discussion-based learning (Socratic Method) environment, which allows students to explore ideas and learn concepts in an open setting. I also enjoyed how the topics were focused on the practical application of plant physiology and how we worked on every scale – from the chloroplast to the whole system.

What other extracurricular activities have you been involved in?

I have participated in Horticulture Club, Organic Agriculture Club, Viticulture & Enology Club, and Gun Club, and I have also worked at the Tukey Orchard and the Horticulture Display Garden. I am currently planning on starting an Apple Cider Club.

Favorite Ferdinand’s flavor of ice cream?

Apple Cup Crisp

Garden Tours show homeowners how to add color to landscapes

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners conduct tours

Raised beds located at the Demonstration and Test Gardens starting to sprout.

Learn how to add color to your garden on a special themed garden tour this spring with the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Master Gardeners.

The garden tours, to be held at the Cooperative Extension’s Demonstration and Test Gardens, are offered on three Saturdays this spring. The tours will kick off on March 11 with “Spring has Sprung” featuring early blooming plants.

On April 8, Master Gardeners will discuss “April Flowers” and on May 20, the garden tours wrap up with “Hot Summer Colors.”

All tours start at 10 a.m. and are free to the public. Use the west side gate to meet in the courtyard of the Cooperative Extension’s Lifelong Learning Center located at 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev. Participants should come dressed and prepared for being outdoors. Plant lists will be provided.

The Master Gardeners continue to offer weekly tours of the entire Demonstration and Test Gardens each Friday at 10 a.m. The gardens contain over 1300 species of desert appropriate landscape plants, including: trees, shrubs, perennials, palms, cacti and agaves. Plants are identified by botanical and common names. For the weekly tours, meet in the front Reception area near the Master Gardener Help Desk. The grounds are also open for self-guided walks weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For more information email or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 702-257-5555 or visit the Master Gardener Facebook page.

Become a Nevada Naturalist

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension encourages outdoor lovers to participate

Nevada Naturalist Program Logo

Nevada Naturalist, a University of Nevada Cooperative Extension program, is looking for interested adults to participate. The Nevada Naturalist program educates and trains adults interested in learning about the natural resources in southern Nevada. Participants study natural resources, environmental education and interpretation, laws and regulations, and environmental issues.

The focus of the program is to give a broad understanding of nature to participants interested in learning, volunteering, teaching, and participating in conservation projects and issues. The program will also give participants the skills and confidence necessary to make a difference for environmental stewardship and conservation in Southern Nevada.

The program is open to individuals of all backgrounds. The spring semester begins April 3 and runs through May 27 on Monday’s and Wednesday’s from 6-9 p.m. at the Lifelong Learning Center (8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev.). Field trips are scheduled on Saturday’s at various times and locations. The cost is $195 per semester which includes all program materials, some refreshments and field trips. For more information on this program, or to register, please email or call Denise Parsons at 702-948-5906. Semester two will be offered in the fall of 2017.

Registration is available online at Eventbrite.com.

Topics include: site stewardship, regional plants and animals, invasive species, geology and soils, environmental laws, taxonomy, biological diversity, and more. Classes are held in the spring and fall in a variety of settings including classrooms, museums and in the field. Additionally, students complete a project intended to increase their capacity and knowledge about specific issues that interest them. Participants receive a certificate following the completion of the course and their projects.

The Nevada Naturalist Program is sponsored and coordinated by Cooperative Extension. The program capitalizes on the incredible expertise of individuals and organizations in southern Nevada who are partners and participating instructors.

Along with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, participating partners include: The Henderson Bird Preserve, Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, Nevada State Museum, Clark County Wetlands Park, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, and Nevada Department of Wildlife.

Registration now open for Wildfire Awareness Multi-hour Trail Event

Participants in the 2016 Nevada Wildfire Awareness races ran in both Washoe and Clark Counties to bring awareness of fire danger and to raise funds for the Wildland Firefighter Foundation. This year’s event is May 13 at Bartley Ranch Regional Park in Reno. Photo courtesy of University of Nevada Cooperative Extension.

Event to raise money to help injured firefighters and the families of fallen firefighters

Registration is open for the Northern Nevada Wildfire Awareness Multi-hour Trail Event in Reno, hosted by University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management and Desert Sky Adventures. All proceeds from the race will be donated to the Wildland Firefighter Foundation.

The event is Saturday, May 13, at Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road in Reno. Participants can choose how long they want to run, either one, three or six hours, and then they see how many laps around the one-mile flat, dirt trail loop that they can run in the chosen amount of time. Participants can register as solo runners or as teams. The six-hour race begins at 7 a.m., the three-hour race begins at 8 a.m., and the one-hour race begins at 9 a.m.

Cost is $25 per person by Jan. 31, $30 between Feb. 1 and April 1, $35 between April 2 and May 11, and $40 on May 12 and 13. Cost includes a tech t-shirt, goodie bag, finisher’s medal, snacks, a downloadable race photo and refreshments, including refreshments courtesy of the Brewer’s Cabinet. To register or for more information, visit the race webpage .

There will be a variety of fire engines and displays of educational information, along with a visit from Smokey Bear. The public is invited to come out and cheer on the runners, visit with firefighter representatives, and enjoy Nevada’s outdoor beauty.

The Wildland Firefighter Foundation is a nonprofit organization that provides assistance to fallen firefighters’ families and to firefighters injured in the line of duty. The proceeds of the race will help families travel to see firefighters who were injured while aiding another state; help the families of firefighters unable to work because they’re still healing; and help the families of firefighters killed while working.

The race is part of the activities for Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month in May, which is a collaborative effort by local, state and federal firefighting agencies; University of Nevada Cooperative Extension; and many others. This year’s focus is on the importance of preparing yourself, your family, and around your home and property, in advance of a wildfire. Having good defensible space and an evacuation plan can help ensure wildfire survival.

Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program, which began in 1997, teaches homeowners how to live more safely with the wildfire threat. The program has received numerous national awards, and been credited with spurring actions that have saved many homes. For more information about Living With Fire, visit the Living With Fire website or contact Sonya Sistare at University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, sistares@unce.unr.edu or 775-887-2252.

Gardening in Small Places: composting

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension gardening monthly workshops continue

Hands-on composting workshop.

Join University of Nevada Cooperative Extension on Saturday, March 11, for a one-day workshop on Gardening in Small Places: composting. The class runs from 8 a.m. to Noon and explains how to create a balanced compost even if you do not have a large garden spot.

If you think you can’t compost in the Mojave Desert or if you’ve tried to compost in the desert and haven’t been successful, please consider joining the compost class. When purchased in the stores, compost can be expensive. So why not make your own? If you eat fruits and vegetables and throw any parts of them away, you have the beginning makings of compost. Even if you live in an apartment, you can compost. You can make compost in the smallest of areas…just maybe not conventionally.

If you are interested in being greener, Angela O’Callaghan, social horticulturist, will show you how to make the perfectly balanced compost, and it’s easier than you think! In addition, you will see our compost demonstration area. If you are considering purchasing a composter, the compost demonstration area is for you.

Class space is limited to 25 and pre-registration is required. There is a $10 fee per class which covers class materials.

To register for this class, held at the Lifelong Learning Center (8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev.), email or call Elaine Fagin at 702-257-5573. Register online via Eventbrite.com.

Upcoming Gardening in Small Places workshop dates are April 8, irrigation; May 20, solving garden problems; June 17, organic gardening; and July 15, soils.

Cooperative Extension and Rose Society March meeting

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension partners with Rose Society

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the South Valley Rose Society are collaborating and offering educational meetings throughout the spring. Free and open to the public, the March 23 topic is Preparing for the 2017 Rose Show and PSW District Convention by ARS Certified Judges.

It’s time to bring your favorite "pet" roses to hear what the ARS Apprentice and Horticultural Judges will be looking for at these events. Las Vegas Rose Show (April 15) and the Pacific Southwest District Convention (April 21-23). Learn essential preparation techniques in the selection, transporting and grooming of your rose submission.

All educational meetings are held at 7 p.m. at the Lifelong Learning Center located at 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev. (I-215 and Windmill Lane). For more information, please email or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 702-257-5555.

Archery, shotgun and rifle shooting sports schedule announced

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension picks new location

4-H Leader Shorty Tom assists Nicholas in applying a fletching to an arrow.

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension 4-H is looking for interested youth to join their shooting sports club. Archery, shotgun and rifle shooting sports will be offered. All equipment for shotgun, rifles and archery will be provided.

The 4-H Shooting Sports Club will meet on Feb. 25, March 11, March 25, April 22 and May 13. On each day, shotgun is at 9 a.m.; club meeting is at 9:50 a.m.; archery is at 10 a.m. and rifle is at 11 a.m. (Dates are subject to change.) The new location is the field located behind the AMPM located at 2300 Glendale Blvd., Moapa, Nev.

The small fee covers materials. Both shotgun and rifle are $75. There are only 10 spots available per discipline, so register early by emailing or calling Lacey Tom at 702-397-2604 x2.

February garden demonstrations and tours scheduled

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners conduct demos

One of the many pathways located in the Outdoor Education Center

During their monthly garden work days, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners invite the community to visit the Demonstration and Test Gardens. As part of the In the Garden series, residents may bring their gardening questions on the following days during Feb.:

The free demonstrations are open to the public.

Rose Garden — Mondays, Feb. 13 and 27 at 9 a.m.

Herb Garden — Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 9 a.m.

Master Gardeners will also offer garden tours on each Friday in Feb. (3, 10, 17and 24) at 10 a.m. The tours are based on participants’ interests. For groups of 10 or more, call Ann Edmunds at 702-257-5587 at least one week prior.

Visitors should be prepared to be outdoors (sun protection, closed toe shoes, drinking water). The gardens surround Cooperative Extension’s Lifelong Learning Center at 8050 Paradise Rd., Las Vegas, Nev. and features 1300 species of desert-adapted plants that are identified by botanical and common names.

For more information or other gardening questions, email or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 702-257-5555. Master Gardener volunteers staff the desk Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

CAHNRS Coug Connections: Maite Muse

Washington State University Extension News - Fri, 01/20/2017 - 12:02pm

Each week, we will showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors, a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Maite Muse, a senior from Moses Lake, Wash.

Maite Muse

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Animal Sciences.

What is a fun fact about you?

I was a fortunate enough to be able to bring my horse with me to college and continue riding.

Why WSU?

The first time I came to WSU I knew I wanted to attend this university. I was amazed with how many opportunities there were and could not wait to join the Cougar family. Also, who doesn’t love Ferdinand’s ice cream?

What is special about being a CAHNRS Coug?

The college encompasses a wide range of academic fields and helped me hone in on my passion for the dairy industry. CAHNRS helped me find a place where I really belong.

Where do you want to be (professionally or personally) 10 years after you graduate?

After I graduate, I will be working for Vantage Dairy Supplies in California, and in ten years I hope to have progressed in the company… and be soaking up the California sun!

Favorite class you have taken within CAHNRS so far? Why?

Animal Science 313 is focused on feeding, and feeding is rumored to be a difficult class, but in what other class can you spend time making your own silage and formulating rations? Dr. Nelson is such a great professor who takes the time to really help you learn.

What other extracurricular activities have you been involved in?

During my time here at WSU, I have had the chance to live at the Ensminger Beef Center and be a member of Cooperative University Dairy Students (CUDS) and participate in dairy challenges. These programs have provided me the hands-on, real world experience I needed.

Favorite Ferdinand’s flavor of ice cream?
It’s not technically an “ice cream flavor,” but the Oreo milkshake is my favorite thing on the menu.