Extension News from the West

CAHNRS Honors showcases outstanding students, partners

Washington State University Extension News - Tue, 04/04/2017 - 9:31am
Bunny Quirk, center, shares a testimonial with her scholarship recipient, Rylee Suhadolnik, joined by Dean Ron Mittelhammer, left, at CAHNRS Honors.

Outstanding students, volunteers and industry partners gained recognition at the annual CAHNRS Honors gala celebration held March 23 at SEL Events Center in Pullman.

Philanthropy awards
Winners of CAHNRS Alumni and Development Philanthropic Awards included:
• Philanthropic Family Award: Gaylon and Judith Campbell ’68 and ’64.
• Philanthropic Recent Graduate: Landon Macy ’15.
• Philanthropist of the Year: Mel Hamre ’54.
• Philanthropic Corporation: G.S. Long.
• Philanthropic Faculty Award: Professors Joye and Don Dillman.

Philanthropist of the Year Mel Hamre talks chickpeas with scholarship recipients Andrew Eberle, Cristen Frieszell and Holly Lane.

Student awards
• Emerging Undergraduate Leader in Agricultural or Natural Resource Sciences: Macy Hagler, Agricultural and Food Systems, Agriculture and Food Security. Nominees: Chia Wei Chang, Food Science; Hannah Fleming, Integrated Plant Sciences, Agricultural Biotechnology; David Gunkel, Integrated Plant Sciences, Fruit and Vegetable Management; Nathaniel Herrera, Animal Science, Pre-Vet; Lindsay Schilperoort, Agricultural and Food Systems, Agricultural and Food Business Economics.

Heather Rogers shows off her Outstanding Junior in Agriculture Award at CAHNRS Honors.

• Emerging Undergraduate Leader in Human Sciences: Paige Campbell, Economic Sciences, Economics, Policy and Law. Nominees: Hannah Heizer, Human Development; Ashley Wright, Apparel, Merchandising, Design and Textiles.
• Outstanding Junior in Human Sciences: Chet Broberg, Economic Sciences, Economics, Policy and Law; Nominees: Sydney Link, Apparel, Merchandising, Design and Textiles; Anna Watson, Human Development.
• Outstanding Junior in Ag or Natural Resource Sciences: Heather Rogers, Animal Sciences, PreVet. Nominees: Cristen Frieszell, Food Science; Max Mielke, Economic Sciences, Agricultural Economics; Kaitlin Miller, Integrated Plant Sciences, Agricultural Biotechnology.
• Family and Consumer Scientist of the Year: Mackenzie Selleg, Human Development. Nominees: Abigail Dovre, Economic Sciences, Business Economics; Ariana Paynter, Apparel, Merchandising, Design and Textiles, Merchandising Option.

Kyle Strachila receives his 2017 Aggie of the Year award from Dean Ron Mittelhammer.

• Aggie of the Year: Kyle Strachila, Agricultural and Food Systems, Agricultural and Food Business Economics. Nominees: Tyler Baker, Integrated Plant Sciences, Fruit and Vegetable Management; Sam Beck, Integrated Plant Sciences, Agricultural Biotechnology; McKenzie Corpron, Animal Sciences, Pre-Vet; Melanie Ford, Integrated Plant Sciences, Viticulture and Enology; Brandon Knodel, Agricultural and Food Systems, Agricultural Technology and Production Management; Deah McGaughey, Integrated Plant Sciences, Landscape, Nursery, and Greenhouse Management; Randee Zerger, Agricultural and Food Systems, Agriculture and Food Security.
• Superior Club Award: Forestry Club. Nominees: Dairy Club, Food Engineering Club, Food Science Club/Food Science Product Development Team, Horticulture Club, Human Development Club.

Forestry Club members accept their Superior Club award.

• Outstanding Seniors: Josh Adams, Economic Sciences, Agricultural Economics; Christina Andresen, Interior Design; Aaron Appleby, Agricultural and Food Systems, Organic Agriculture Systems; Matthew Buening, Economic Sciences, International Economics and Development; McKenzie Corpron, Animal Sciences, Pre-Vet; Abigail Dovre, Economic Sciences, Business Economics; Kristen Droogh, Agricultural Economics; Devon Griffith, Integrated Plant Sciences, Fruit and Vegetable Management; Austin Harding, Economic Sciences, Financial Markets; Zed Higgs, Economic Sciences, Quantitative Economics; Stephanie Hust, Human Development; Brennan Hyden, Integrated Plant Sciences, Agricultural Biotechnology; Mariah Julson, Agricultural and Food Systems, Agircultural Education; Hannah Karvonen, Integrated Plant Sciences, Landscape, Nursery and Greenhouse Management; Arianne Kreger, Food Science; Daniel Molina, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Sciences; Kristen Ozaki, Apparel, Merchandising, Design and Textiles, Merchandising Option; Callan Paisley, Integrated Plant Sciences, Viticulture and Enology; Anna Pettyjohn, Integrated Plant Sciences, Field Crop Management; Kyle Strachila, Agricultural and Food Systems, Agricultural and Food Business Economics; Jacob Tanke, Agricultural and Food Systems, Agricultural Technology and Production Management; Preston VanWinkle, Economic Sciences, Economics, Policy and Law; Nhi Vu, Agricultural and Food Systems, Agriculture and Food Security; Jennifer Weir, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Sciences.

People at the center

Washington State University Extension News - Thu, 03/30/2017 - 1:23pm

Volunteers at the WSU Bear Research, Education, and Conservation Center will interact regularly with center manager Brandon Evans Hutzenbiler and professor Charlie Robbins. Here’s a little background info about each one.

Brandon Evans Hutzenbiler, WSU Bear Center Manager Brandon Evans Hutzenbiler, with bear cubs.

Where are you from?
I’m from Ellensburg, Wash.

What is your background?
I earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Zoology in 2014 from WSU.

How did you get involved with the Bear Center?
I began volunteering at the center as an undergraduate, just like these volunteers. After graduation I continued to work part time at a USDA/ARS green house on campus and part time as a research assistant in Dr. Heiko Jansen’s laboratory. Since his research involves the bears, I continued to learn about and work with the bears. I continued to work at the bear center providing bear care and for Dr. Jansen assisting in graduate student projects (such as those involving in vitro culture of bear adipocytes).

What are your goals at the Center?
I just became facility manager in August 2016. One of my big focuses is on improving the enrichment program for the bears. It’s fun designing and building new things that will stimulate and challenge the bears, mentally and physically- or just providing them a new thing to interact with and adapt to. It’s been a great challenge for me.

Charlie Robbins, professor of Wildlife Biology in the School of the Environment

Where are you from?
I grew up in Texas, and came to WSU from Cornell University.

Why did you start the Bear Center?
There was a great need for biological and ecological information on grizzly bears.

What research are you currently working on?  I’ve got several projects going on. We have two ongoing field projects in Katmai National Park, several lab-based projects on the genetics of hibernation, and I’m starting a project on the energetics of grizzly bears with Yellowstone and Canadian field biologists. The latter will use the new treadmill at the center.

What do you consider your major accomplishments at the Center?
Just keeping it going for 31 years, generating an enormous amount of knowledge about bears, giving several hundred undergraduates the opportunity to work with such a unique species, and training more than a dozen graduate students who are now professional biologists with various universities and federal and state agencies. 

CAHNRS Coug Connections: Macy Hagler

Washington State University Extension News - Thu, 03/30/2017 - 11:26am

Each week, we will showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors. Ambassadors is a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Macy Hagler, a sophomore from Kuna, Idaho.

Macy Hagler

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Agriculture and Food Security, with minors in Business and Spanish.

What is a fun fact about you? 

Anyone who knows me will tell you that my favorite things are Dutch Bros, Buffalo Wild Wings, and skiing! I love a good excuse to go on a road trip, whether it’s the 8 miles to Moscow or a few hours to the ski hill.

Why WSU?

I found my home at WSU when I visited and got to explore the opportunities, meet the incredible people, and have some Ferdinand’s ice cream! I didn’t know very many people when I came here, but thanks to CAHNRS I found a college family in no time. I can’t stress enough how important the experiences I’ve had at this university and in this college were. I couldn’t have found them anywhere else. In the words of Mike Leach: “Why Washington State? Well that’s a stupid question.”

What is special about being a CAHNRS Coug?

You have a passionate, dedicated family of Cougs around you to help you reach your goals. I have met people from 24 different majors that I know I can rely on and learn so much from. I can’t imagine a better place to grow and develop!

Where do you want to be (professionally or personally) 10 years after you graduate?

In a place where my morning drive to work is my favorite part of my day. I can’t wait to use my education to help farmers with their everyday challenges and bring innovation to the most important industry in the world.

Favorite class you have taken within CAHNRS so far? Why?

The agroecology class I took with Dr. Kevin Murphy in Ecuador was the most impactful class I’ve taken so far. In this class, my mind was opened and my perspective was expanded. This course helped me realize how many ways there are to manage a farming system. I learned that sustainability can be incorporated in any operation, which led me to change my major to Ag and Food Security so that I could one day be a consultant to farmers and help refine their operations to maximize efficiency and longevity.

What other extracurricular activities have you been involved in?

CAHNRS Student Senate, Ag Ed Club, Horticulture Club, Agriculture Future of America, International Development Club

Favorite Ferdinand’s flavor of ice cream? 

Chocolate chip cookie dough

Meet the bears

Washington State University Extension News - Thu, 03/30/2017 - 9:57am

The WSU Bear Research, Education, and Conservation Center has 11 grizzlies in six pens. Here’s a little info about each one of them.

Kio and Peeka, are roommates and sisters. They’re both 12 years old and were born at the Center.

Luna, a 14-year-old female, was born at the Center as well. She doesn’t have a roommate.

Cooke and Oakley are wild bears from Yellowstone National Park that came to the Center as adults, when they were about 7 years old. They’re roommates and are now 14 years old.

Frank and John are brothers who were brought to the Center from Yellowstone as two-year-olds. They’re now 15 years old.

Dodge, Adak, Willow, and Zuri are the youngest bears at the Center at just over two years old. All were born at the Center, and Frank, John, Cooke, and Oakley are their parents. The four share space, currently.

In The Garden series continues

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners answer questions

Rain or shine, Master Gardener Richard Cutbirth conducts a Friday tour in the rain.

During their monthly garden work days, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners invite the community to visit the Demonstration and Test Gardens. As part of the In The Garden series, residents may bring their gardening questions on the following days during April:

ROSE GARDEN ~ Mondays, April 10 and 24, 9 a.m.

VEGETABLE GARDEN ~ Wednesday, April 12, 8:30 a.m.

HERB GARDEN ~ Wednesday, April 26, 9 a.m.

GUIDED TOURS ~ Fridays, April 7, 14, 21, 28 and Saturday, April 8 at 10 a.m.

Master Gardeners will answer questions and demonstrate proper seasonal plant care techniques. Visitors should be prepared to be outdoors (sun protection, closed toe shoes, drinking water). The gardens are part of the campus surrounding Cooperative Extension at 8050 Paradise Rd., Las Vegas, Nev. and feature 1300 species of desert-adapted plants that are identified by botanical and common names.

Visit the Master Gardener booths at these community events for answers to your gardening questions and free info sheets.

  • April 1, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. - Fresh 52 Farmers Market Spring Festival. (Tivoli Village, 440 S. Rampart, Las Vegas, Nev.)
  • April 8 and 9, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. - Cactus Show and Art Festival. (Moon Cactus and Koi, 6430 McGill Ave, Las Vegas, Nev.)
  • April 12 - 16, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. - Horticulture Bldg., Clark County Fair. (Fairgrounds, 1301 Whipple Ave, Logandale, Nev.) Admission fee charged.
  • April 15, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. - Wildflower Day. (Red Rock Canyon, 1000 Scenic Loop Dr. Las Vegas, Nev.)

For meeting locations or other questions call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 702-257-5555. Master Gardener volunteers staff the desk Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. — 3 p.m.

Community workshops and chef demonstrations scheduled

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension offers their expertise

Zion Garden Park raised beds.

The Zion Garden Park, an agricultural assistance program, along with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, is offering free community workshops with chef demonstrations during the spring/summer.

Each workshop, held on Saturday’s through July, will begin at 9 a.m. followed by a cooking demonstration at 10 a.m. The workshops are being presented by Cooperative Extension’s Social Horticulturist, Angela O’Callaghan, and Faculty Instructor, Aurora Buffington. The first six chef demonstrations are being coordinated by Create a Change Now and the last four cooking demonstrations are being coordinated by Cooperative Extension.

Topics include planning healthy meals in minutes; growing fruit at home; meal planning for diabetes; organic gardening; and more.

Along with Cooperative Extension and Create a Change Now, program partners include the Conservation District of Southern Nevada.

The free workshops are held at Zion United Methodist Church, 2108 Revere St., North Las Vegas, Nev.

For more information on exact dates and topics, email or call Barbara Wardlaw at Register online Conservation District of Southern Nevada. Walk-ins are welcome.

Network of Fire Adapted Communities Conference this month

A family reviews an evacuation plan in case of a wildfire emergency. The focus of this year’s Nevada Network of Fire Adapted Communities Conference is evacuation preparation.

Registration for the Nevada Network of Fire Adapted Communities Third Annual Conference is almost full, but a few spots are still available. University of Nevada Cooperative Extension will hold the conference 8 a.m. — 4:45 p.m., March 27, at the Atlantis Casino Resort Spa, 3800 S. Virginia St. in Reno. Participants represent the many stakeholders in Nevada’s wildland-urban interface fire issue, including members of wildfire-prone communities; local fire service representatives; local, state and federal agencies; and Community Emergency Response Team volunteers from Carson City, Douglas and Washoe Counties. The conference is free to the public, but attendees must register by March 23.

“Member communities of the Network have taken specific steps to prepare their homes for wildfire and to work toward becoming fire adapted,” said Nevada Network of Fire Adapted Communities Coordinator Elwood Miller, who served as executive director of the Nevada Fire Safe Council from 2002 to 2006 and is a University of Nevada, Reno professor emeritus of forestry. “At this year’s conference, we are focusing on how to prepare and practice both at home and on a communitywide basis, for a wildfire evacuation. Being prepared for evacuation is an important element of a fire adapted community.”

The Nevada Network of Fire Adapted Communities is part of Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program, founded in 1997 to teach homeowners how to live more safely in Nevada’s high wildfire-hazard environments. The goal of The Network is to connect interested community members with the resources and partners they need so they can reduce their wildfire threat, be better prepared to evacuate when a wildfire occurs, and ultimately work toward becoming fire adapted.

The conference will include a presentation from homeowner Mel Holland and North Lake Tahoe Fire Protection District Assistant Fire Marshal Mark Regan about their wildfire evacuation experiences; a presentation by Washoe County Emergency Manager Aaron Kenneston about community-level evacuation planning; and a presentation by Network and Development Watershed Research and Training Center Program Director Michelle Medley-Daniel about the national Fire Adapted Communities Learning Network. A continental breakfast, buffet lunch, refreshments and conference materials will be provided. For more information or to register, visit www.LivingWithFire.info or call Miller at 775-336-0266.

The conference is made possible by funding from a Community Assistant Agreement with the Bureau of Land Management Nevada State Office, and through a State Fire Assistance Grant from the Nevada Division of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service. Additional support was provided by a Good Neighbor Citizenship Company Grant from State Farm Insurance, and the Nevada Land Trust through support provided by the U.S. Forest Service and The Nature Conservancy to Watershed Research and Training Center, under the terms of Cooperative Agreement #FIRE_WRTC_FAC_10012014. The content and opinions expressed herein are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the position or the policy of the USFS, DOI, The Nature Conservancy, or the WRTC and no official endorsement should be inferred.

Kids cook during spring break

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s nutrition staff offering classes

Ezra is learning kitchen basics in Cooperative Extension’s Nutrition Lab.

Is your child ready for educational fun in the kitchen? During the Clark County School District’s spring break, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s nutrition staff is offering free beginners’ cooking classes for kids ages 9-13. The short course is held from 9-11 a.m. from April 10 -12 in the Lifelong Learning Center’s Nutrition Lab.

Your child will learn cooking basics such as measuring, cutting, reading recipes, choosing foods, and general kitchen safety. Space is limited to 12 students for this free class. Register through Eventbrite.com, search kids-cook. Parent/guardian is required to sign an assumption of risk form upon arrival to first class.

Cooperative Extension’s Lifelong Learning Center is located at 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev. For more information, email or call Susan Lednicky at 702-257-5548.

Grow Your Own, Nevada classes return in April

Cooperative Extension will present a workshop on “Starting Plants From Seeds or Cuttings,” 6 to 8 p.m., April 4, as part of the “Grow Your Own, Nevada!” series. Photo courtesy of Wendy Hanson Mazet, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension.

Cooperative Extension offers eight back-to-basics courses to be offered statewide

Gardening for 45 minutes burns as many calories as 30 minutes of aerobic exercise. Preschool children served homegrown produce are more than twice as likely to eat five servings of fruits and vegetables a day as children who rarely eat homegrown produce.

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension is offering eight new “Grow Your Own, Nevada!” classes at seven locations statewide to help Nevadans who want to get on a path to more sustainable, local, healthy living by growing more of their own food.

“Gardening in Nevada is a challenge,” Cooperative Extension Horticulture Specialist Heidi Kratsch said. “But you can learn to deal with our harsh climate and poor soils by building on the success of others. Grow Your Own educators are experienced gardeners and growers and are excited to share what they know with the community.”

The series of workshops will run 6 to 8 p.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays, April 4 through April 27. The workshops will provide gardeners and those interested in growing healthy foods with a back-to-the-basics guide to producing bountiful harvests in Nevada. The topics will include:

  • April 4: Starting Plants From Seeds or Cuttings
  • April 6: Growing Tomatoes
  • April 11: The Challenge of Gardening in Nevada Soils
  • April 13: Attractive & Edible Landscapes
  • April 18: Vegetable Garden Pollinators & Other Beneficial Insects
  • April 20: Ins & Outs of Fruit Trees
  • April 25: Vegetable Garden Pest Control
  • April 27: Successful Berry Growing Basics

The workshops will be held at the Washoe County Cooperative Extension office, 4955 Energy Way in Reno, and will also be available via interactive video at Cooperative Extension offices in Elko, Hawthorne, Lovelock, Pahrump, Winnemucca and Yerington.

“Anyone can become a better gardener by attending these classes,” Kratsch said. “From the beginner to the advanced gardener, everyone can benefit from a Grow Your Own class.”

To register for any or all of the upcoming “Grow Your Own, Nevada!” classes, visit the Grow Your Own, Nevada! home page. The class fee for those attending at the Washoe County office is $15 per class or $60 for all eight classes. The cost covers class supplies, materials and refreshments. Reno participants attending all eight classes will also receive a USB flash drive containing gardening resources. K-12 teachers and Master Gardeners in Reno receive a discount on registration cost. Class fees in other locations vary. Residents should contact their local Cooperative Extension office for information on attending the workshops in those locations. Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance should contact Ashley Andrews, andrewsa@unce.unr.edu, at least three days prior to the first day of the course.

A symphony of soil signals in wheat science

Washington State University Extension News - Tue, 03/14/2017 - 4:46pm
At the USDA Wheat Health, Genetics and Quality Research Unit at Washington State University, senior scientist Robert Bonsall and research leader David Weller use the new Synapt G2-Si HD mass spectrometer to understand the intricate web of chemical signals that drive the health and development of wheat (Seth Truscott/WSU Photos).

Scientists at Washington State University are unveiling a new high-tech tool that reveals secrets in the soil for healthier wheat.

On Tuesday, March 21, researchers in the Wheat Health Genetics and Quality Research Unit will cut the ribbon for a new, advanced mass spectrometry system. The instrument detects and identifies molecules based on their mass, allowing the team of university and USDA-Agricultural Research Service scientists, for the first time, to study the metabolome of wheat—millions of tiny compounds involved in the symbiosis of wheat, soil and microbes. Their discoveries could help farmers raise crops that are highly resistant to devastating root diseases and environmental stresses.

“In wheat, most of the action goes on below ground, out of sight,” said David Weller, plant pathologist and head of USDA’s Pullman wheat research team. He studies how thriving roots and healthy soils protect wheat from disease.

The new, $700,000 liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) system, built by the Waters Corporation of Milford, Mass., replaces the unit’s aging instrument, giving Weller’s team a powerful tool to see what happens at the root level.

“This new mass spectrometer helps us understand the chemical symphony going on in the roots,” he said. “It’s been a black box up until now.”

Senior scientist Robert Bonsall views a soil sample to be studied in the new mass spectrometer.

Signals in the soil

Weller’s team sees promise in the natural antibiotics found in the symbiotic zone of roots, soil and microbes, known as the rhizosphere.

“In the soil, organisms use chemical signals to communicate,” said Robert Bonsall, a senior scientist at WSU who has studied the rhizosphere for nearly 25 years. “When a plant is attacked by a disease, it sends out an SOS. Bacteria that produce antibiotics come to the plant’s rescue.”

To understand this exchange, Bonsall and Weller look for chemical clues called biomarkers.

“All of these compounds, some from the plant, some produced by micro-organisms, dramatically affect the health of the roots and the productivity of the plant,” said Weller. “It’s a beautifully coordinated symphony of chemical signals, protecting the plant and helping its growth. Hundreds of thousands of organisms contribute to it.”

Mass-spectrometry discoveries could lead to healthier, disease-resistant wheat.

Partnership with Waters

The new instrument, a Synapt G2-Si HD Mass Spectrometer combined with an ACQUITY Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography system, was purchased last fall, following a successful test by WSU and Waters Corporation experts that compared natural antibiotic levels in soils and on wheat roots from Lind, Wash

The Pullman wheat research unit’s work with Waters goes back decades. Bonsall and Weller say their partnership with the company’s engineers and experts has been critical to their studies.

“Our collaboration with Drs. Weller and Bonsall illustrates how the Synapt system’s enhanced capabilities will enable the laboratory to ‘decode’ more soil components than ever before in the rhizosphere,” said Ken Rosnack, principal business development manager at Waters Corporation.

“This is the first time that ion mobility—a feature of the Synapt system which distinguishes molecules based on their size, shape, and ionic charge—has been applied to this area of biomarker research,” Rosnack added. “We’re very excited that WSU will use this technology to probe the soil metabolome and advance our understanding of rhizosphere microbiology and plant pathology.”

  • The Plant Metabolomics Celebration begins at 9 a.m. Tuesday, March 21, at the Biotechnology-Life Sciences Building (BLS 402) on the WSU Pullman campus. Public and media are welcome. The celebration includes short talks by WSU and USDA scientists and representatives of Waters Corp, as well as lunchtime discussions and a lab tour.
  • To attend, RSVP to David Weller at wellerd@wsu.edu or by calling (509) 335-6210. View a celebration agenda here.

Award-winning apparel professor fosters sustainable industry

Washington State University Extension News - Tue, 03/14/2017 - 3:10pm
Ting Chi

Whether it’s exploring ways to “upcycle” cotton waste into valuable fibers or promoting adoption of biodegradable plastic mulch for farmers, Ting Chi is leading the way to a sustainable future for the textile and apparel industry.

Now, Chi, an associate professor in the Department of Apparel, Merchandising, Design and Textiles at Washington State University, is garnering national recognition for his industry-changing efforts.

Chi was selected in February to receive the Mid-Career Excellence Award from the International Textile and Apparel Association, the main academic organization for textile and apparel faculty in higher education.

Nominated by a peer, Huantian Cao of the University of Delaware, and supported by association faculty members at five other universities, including WSU AMDT Chair Joan Ellis, Chi was honored for excellence in research and teaching, success in obtaining grants, and productivity in publishing high quality peer-reviewed research papers and winning awards.

At WSU for the past nine years, he currently is part of more than $5 million in multiple research projects on sustainable production and management in the textile, apparel and agriculture industries. Chi leads a three-year USDA grant to build the textile and apparel industry’s future workforce.

Teaching classes including global sourcing, environmental and social issues, and apparel merchandising analysis, among others, Chi helps students master the sustainable practices that are changing the textile and apparel industries, from raw materials through production to the consumer.

“A good researcher can be a good teacher,” he said. “What you learn in research should go into your teaching, so students understand what’s happening at the forefront of your field.”

Chi was proud to be selected. The mid-career award, he says, puts him in a stronger position to collaborate with peers, gain grants and publish in high-quality journals.

“We’re very proud of Dr. Chi,” said Ellis. “This prestigious award shows the incredible work coming out of AMDT over the past few years. Dr. Chi is one of our top teachers in sustainability, global sourcing and the supply chain. His research has direct impacts on the sustainability efforts of the industry.”

Chi will be recognized at the at the ITAA Annual Meeting this November in St. Petersburg, Fla.

• Contact: Ting Chi, Associate Professor, Department of Apparel, Merchandising, Design and Textiles, (509) 335-8536, tchi@wsu.edu

Gardening in small places hands-on workshops

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension offers gardening workshops

Angela O’Callaghan, Ph.D., Social Horticulturist

Join University of Nevada Cooperative Extension on Wednesday, April 19 and Thursday, April 20 for Gardening in Small Places workshops. The classes, taught by Angela O’Callaghan, are designed to give you an overview of issues facing small-space gardeners.

The workshop will be held from 5-8 p.m. on Wednesday and repeated on Thursday at the same time. Topics include container gardening, selecting native plants, problem solving, irrigation and more. Homeowners and other interested parties are welcome to attend these workshops.

Class space is limited. There is a $10 fee for the workshops to cover materials. Pre-registration is required online at Eventbrite.com For more information about this workshop held at the White Pine County Library, email or call Juan Carlos Cervantes, Extension Educator, at 775-293-6599.

Starting a food business workshop offered by Cooperative Extension

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension offers “Starting a Food Business in Nevada” March 28-30. The class covers creating and selling food items, such as jellies, pickles, baked goods and frozen produce. Photo Courtesy of Melody Hefner, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension.

Class to help individuals seeking to sell food products including jams and packaged foods

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension is offering a workshop on “Starting a Food Business in Nevada” March 28-30. Attendees will learn key considerations to creating and selling food items, such as jellies, baked goods, pickles and frozen produce.

“Historically, growers needed alternate uses for produce not ‘beautiful’ enough for restaurants to purchase,” said Lincoln County Extension Educator Holly Gatzke. “Since then, growers and others have become interested in making and selling food products. And, with the recent passage of the Cottage Food and Craft Food laws, producing food products for sale is easier than ever. This class will help people understand these laws as well as provide an overall understanding of how to run a business and what to consider when making and packaging food for selling. It’s about everything from cottage foods to craft foods and beyond.”

Gatzke and Molly Roemer, who has a degree in nutrition, will present at the workshop. The workshop will be 12:30 — 4:30 p.m., each day live at the Lincoln County Cooperative Extension Office, 360 Lincoln St. in Caliente, and will be available via videoconference at Cooperative Extension offices in Carson City, Elko, Fallon, Gardnerville and Hawthorne. The workshop is free; however, lunch is not provided.

The class is funded by the Nevada Department of Agriculture’s Federal-State Marketing Improvement Program. For more information or to register, contact Gatzke at gatzkeh@unce.unr.edu or 775-962-1300. Persons in need of special accommodations or assistance should call at least three days prior to the class they intend to attend.

2017 4-H Resident Summer Camp at Lake Tahoe

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension hosts Southern Area camp

Counselor Clint Hatch instructing camper Anthony on the basics of Archery at last year’s camp.

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Southern Area’s 4-H resident camp is being held at the Nevada State 4-H Camp at beautiful Lake Tahoe from July 23 - 28. Registration is open to campers between the ages of 9-15 until the camp is full. 4-H Membership is required. (Membership is free, please request applications by placing Club: needed on the pre-enrollment form.)

This year’s camp utilizes the 4-H Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (S.T.E.M.) program. During the six days, campers will participate in activities centering on nature, healthy lifestyles, robotics, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), rocketry, history, dramatic arts, leadership, creative arts, and much more.

Cost of the camp is $430 and includes transportation, meals, T-shirt, and activities. If you would like your child to attend camp, please email or call Karen Best at 702-257-5538. Registration is available online via Eventbrite.com.

Lake Tahoe is a unique and magnificent treasure. This historic 4-H Camp creates opportunities for inspiration, education and relaxation - right on the lakeshore. Owned and operated by the University of Nevada, the camp has a rich tradition as a setting for youth to live and learn at Lake Tahoe. The diverse forest, meadow and beach ecosystems provide an unparalleled opportunity for outdoor environmental education. This spectacular site on 32 acres at the south shore of Lake Tahoe is available to youth and adult groups for camps, conferences, educational events, retreats or other programs.

4-H is an organization that primarily focuses on positive youth development and is open to all youth ages 5 to 19. 4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship, life skills and technical skills through active participation in events, projects and community service. 4-H is the largest out-of-school youth organization in the United States with over 7 million members. There are over 49,000 young people engaged in 4-H programs across the state of Nevada. 4-H is delivered in many different settings including community and project clubs, military and 4-H afterschool programs; special interest groups; school enrichment; faith-based; camping and more.

Beef Feedlot School teaches nutrition, increasing profits and reducing feed cost

The Beef Feedlot School will focus on feedlot nutrition, increasing feed efficiency and reducing feed costs for livestock. Photo courtesy of Robert Moore, University of Nevada, Reno.

Cooperative Extension provides chance for livestock producers to use feed efficiently

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension will be hosting a “Beef Feedlot School,” 9 a.m. — 3 p.m., March 24 and 31 at Western Nevada Cattle Feeders, 2105 N. Meridian Road in Lovelock, Nev. The classes are geared toward cattle producers and will focus on beef feedlot nutrition, maximizing profits by increasing feed efficiency and using byproducts to reduce feed costs.

”This course will benefit local beef producers who have feedlots and/or who finish their cattle on their own ranches for local markets or their own consumption,” said Pershing County Extension Educator Steve Foster.

Attendees will hear presentations from Francis Fluharty, Ohio State University research professor in animal sciences; Melanie Hamilton, office manager for Western Nevada Cattle Feeders; and Foster. Hamilton and Foster will present live, while Fluharty will be featured in videos from the Ohio State University website.

Topics on March 24 include:

  • Industry Update, Ruminant Digestive Physiology and Rumen Function, presented by Fluharty.
  • Protein Digestion and Metabolism, Protein Sources, presented by Fluharty.
  • Overview of Western Nevada Cattle Feeders, presented by Hamilton.

Topics on March 31 include:

  • Receiving and Growing Strategies for Calves Versus Yearlings, and Holstein Growing and Finishing, presented by Fluharty.
  • Methodologies to Enhance Marbling and Feed Efficiency, presented by Fluharty.
  • Utilizing Ultrasound to Sort Cattle for Selling on the Grid, presented by Foster.

The school is sponsored by Westway Feed Products and Western Nevada Cattle Feeders. Register by March 22 by contacting Dixie McKay, mcayd@unce.unr.edu, or 775-273-2923.

Cooperative Extension and Rose Society April meeting

Pictorial highlights from the district convention

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the South Valley Rose Society are collaborating and offering educational meetings throughout the spring. Free and open to the public, the April 27 meeting will highlight the winners of the District Convention in Pasadena.

Just four days after returning from the District Convention in Pasadena, we’ll meet to highlight both events in a rose pictorial. Come and relive all the category winners, including Novice and especially Rose Photography. Learn new show tips and discuss how beneficial were last month’s preparation meetings.

All educational meetings are held at 7 p.m. at the Lifelong Learning Center located at 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev. (I-215 and Windmill Lane). For more information, email or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 702-257-5555.

Gardening in Small Places: understanding your irrigation

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension gardening monthly workshops continue

Professor Robinson instructs irrigation workshop participants

Join University of Nevada Cooperative Extension on Saturday, April 8, for a one-day workshop on Gardening in Small Places: understanding your irrigation. The class runs from 8 a.m. to noon.

With the spring season upon us, it’s time to start thinking of our landscapes again…including the often neglected irrigation. As your plants grow, and your landscape changes, your irrigation needs change, too. No one type of irrigation is good for all plants. When you have a variety of plants in your landscape, you need a varied irrigation to accommodate those plants. Hint… there is more than one type of drip irrigation.

If you’d like to have a better understanding of your irrigation system, or you want to make your system more efficient, then this class is for you. Proper irrigation can prevent water waste and help you save money.

Professor ML Robinson, environmental horticulturist, will help you discover the right type of irrigation for your landscape. The workshop, will cover different types of irrigation and how they are best used so you can figure out what would work best in your landscape. Homeowners and other interested parties are welcome to attend.

Class space is limited to 25 and pre-registration is required. There is a $10 fee per class which covers class materials.

To register for this class, held at the Lifelong Learning Center (8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev.), email or call Elaine Fagin at 702-257-5573. Register online at Eventbrite.com.

Upcoming Gardening in Small Places workshop dates are May 20, solving garden problems; June 17, organic gardening; and July 15, soils.

Grape-growing and wine-making class offered

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources will host “Growing Grapes and Making Wine in Nevada,” March 18 and April 14.

University experts discuss how to grow grapes in Nevada’s diverse and stressful climate

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Herds and Harvest Program is offering “Growing Grapes and Making Wine in Nevada,” March 18 in Reno and April 14 in Las Vegas. Taught in partnership with the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources, the workshop is meant to help beginning farmers and ranchers, and anyone interested in grape growing and wine making, to develop agricultural entrepreneurship, implement sustainable agricultural marketing strategies and improve profitability.

“Grapes use one-tenth of the water that alfalfa and other grain crops need to grow,” faculty member Jordan Chaffin, who is teaching during the workshop, said. “In addition, wine growing has been booming across the country, especially in Washington State, which has a similar climate to northern Nevada. It’s a $4 billion industry in Washington, and Nevada could be next.”

Professor Grant Cramer will join Chaffin in teaching the workshops. Quality winemaking will be discussed at both workshops. The workshop in Reno will focus on growing grapes in northern Nevada, while the workshop in Las Vegas will focus on growing grapes in southern Nevada. The Reno class will conclude with a wine tasting of local varieties.

The University has been doing research on growing grapes in Nevada since establishing its own vineyard in 1995. Cramer has been doing research for more than 30 years on helping plants grow in adverse conditions. His research focuses on growing plants that tolerate salt-water irrigation, drought and cold. He was named the College’s Researcher of the Year in 2006 and 2010.

Chaffin graduated from University of California, Davis, with a degree in viticulture and enology, or wine making, in 2015. During the past seven years, he has been making wine and planning and planting vineyards. He has worked for companies in Napa and Sonoma in California, and for companies in New Zealand.

The Reno workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and the Las Vegas workshop will be from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The cost is $20 and covers lunch. The Reno class and wine tasting will be at the University of Nevada, Reno Innevation Center, 450 Sinclair St. Register online at the northern Nevada workshop’s registration page. The Las Vegas class will be at the Clark County Cooperative Extension Office, 8050 Paradise Road, Suite 105. Register online at the southern Nevada workshop’s registration page.

Read, plant, eat — special sunflower activity in children’s garden

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension offering a one-day special event for families

Sunflower grown in Children’s Demonstration Garden

It’s time to learn about sunflowers and what better way then by joining the Little Books and Little Cooks and Junior Master Gardner programs in the children’s garden! The two University of Nevada Cooperative Extension programs are collaborating to bring sunflower related activities for families with children ages 3-5 (and siblings) on Saturday, April 8 from 9:30 — 11:30 a.m.

The Read, Plant, Eat! scheduled activities include stories, crafts, yoga and a food recipe and seed planting. This free event is being held at Children’s Demonstration Garden located at Cooperative Extension’s Lifelong Learning Center at 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev. Parents and children are encouraged to wear closed-toed shoes and dress for outdoor activities. A hat and water are also recommended.

Little Books and Little Cooks (LBLC) was developed based on the premise that cooking offers children a way to learn pre-kindergarten skills and good nutrition and try nutritious foods. Parents can also learn about good nutrition, positive feeding practices and positive parent-child interaction skills by reading, cooking and eating together, as a way to help parents to be children’s first teacher.

Junior Master Gardener (JMG) is an international youth gardening program. Locally, JMG engages children in novel, hands-on group and individual learning experiences that provide a love of gardening, develop an appreciation for the environment and cultivate the mind.

For more information about the event, email or call Joann Trujillo at 702-257-5531. For more information about the programs, email or call YaeBin Kim (LBLC) at 702-257-5521 or Karyn Johnson (JMG) at 702-257-5523.

CAHNRS Coug Connections: Alfredo Rosas

Washington State University Extension News - Thu, 03/02/2017 - 4:29pm

Each week, we will showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors. Ambassadors is a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Alfredo Rosas, a senior from Vantage, Wash.

Alfredo Rosas

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Landscape Architecture.

What is a fun fact about you?

I love dancing to Mexican/Latino music.

Why WSU?

I chose WSU because of my major, scholarship help, and the people I was able to meet.

What is special about being a CAHNRS Coug?

The diversity found within the college, where help and opportunities are everywhere no matter your background.

Where do you want to be (professionally or personally) 10 years after you graduate?

I want to be in a good, stable job supporting my family.

Favorite class you have taken within CAHNRS so far? Why?

My Junior Fall Studio (SDC course), where we proposed design projects for the canal running through Walla Walla.

What other extracurricular activities have you been involved in?

I have been involved in the American Society of Landscape Architecture, among many other groups.

Favorite Ferdinand’s flavor of ice cream?

Mint Chocolate Chip or the coconut milkshake.