Extension News from the West

Wanted: Volunteer wine tasters

Washington State University Extension News - Tue, 05/16/2017 - 3:01pm

Researchers with the WSU Viticulture and Enology Program seek volunteer panelists in the Tri-Cities, Wash. area to assist with wine sensory evaluation.  Three sensory panels will be held summer 2017:

A sensory panelist evaluates research wines at the Ste. Michelle Wine Estates WSU Wine Science Center in Richland, Wash.
  • Panel 1-Red Wine Color and Astringency/Mouthfeel (June)
  • Panel 2-Red Wine Aroma and Mouthfeel (July)
  • Panel 3-White Wine Aroma and Mouthfeel (August)

Ideal candidates are wine-consuming adults 21 and older with basic wine knowledge.  Volunteers will be asked to attend a series of hour-long group training sessions where they will learn about wine characteristics and be taught how to evaluate wines.

Once the training is complete, panelists will schedule a time to conduct independent sensory evaluations.

Training and evaluations will be held at the Ste. Michelle Wine Estates WSU Wine Science Center at 359 University Drive in Richland, Wash.

Results from the sensory panels will support ongoing WSU viticulture and enology research that helps the Northwest region stay competitive in the national and global wine market, while providing sustainable growth in the industry.

Space on each panel is limited.  To participate, email caroline.merrell@wsu.edu and indicate which panel(s) you would like to join.

Into the Alaskan wilderness to help coastal bears

Washington State University Extension News - Mon, 05/15/2017 - 9:07am
By Joy Erlenbach

Coastal areas within Katmai National Park in Alaska are home to dense populations of iconic brown bears, which are an important part of the ecosystem, the viewing experience of park visitors, and the economy of the region. Yet habitats used by bears within the park are faced with impacts from tourism, the potential for oil spills, increasing ocean acidification, and other threats, which all have the capacity to severely alter the habitat and food resources available to coastal bears.

Joy Erlenbach and a colleague scan the Alaskan horizon for bears. Photo courtesy Joy Erlenbach

This summer is the third and final field season for my collaborative project with the National Park Service and US Geological Survey studying the potential effects of oil spills, increases in visitation, and ocean acidification on Katmai’s bears.

The project involves using Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) collars to track bear movements, determine which habitats they prefer, and understand how their habitat-use affects body composition (mass and fat gains). We are also characterizing diets of coastal bears using stable isotope analysis to understand the magnitude and breadth of marine-derived foods in bear diets (clams, mussels, otters, seals, salmon), as well as their effects on the body composition of bears.

Other areas of our study include using video collars to further understand bear diet and habitat selection, conducting behavioral observations to document foraging rates on different food resources, and using activity sensors to elucidate what bears are doing in different habitats. All of this work will aid in the management of park resources for bears, visitors, and other wildlife.

This summer, as in previous summers, my time will be spent finding bears using a helicopter, collecting measurements from the bears, and fitting them with a GPS collar. The remainder of my time will be spent camping in remote areas of Katmai collecting observations of non-collared bears and their foraging preferences.

The Changing Tides team puts a GPS collar and gets info on a bear in the Katmai National Park in Alaska. Photo courtesy Joy Erlenbach

The project is challenging: living in a tent for 60 days each summer, being so remote your only rescue is by plane, not showering for weeks at a time, getting eaten alive by mosquitoes, having to put on the same damp socks and pants you’ve worn for the last week, among other things… But it has also been rewarding. The chance to get to live with and learn to understand bears at such a deep level is something that has not only been a dream of mine but also important for helping people understand the true nature of bears as well as some of the ways bears have been misrepresented in popular media.

You can learn more about the Changing Tides project here:

https://www.nps.gov/katm/learn/changing-tides.htm

https://www.nps.gov/gis/storymaps/mapjournal/v1/?appid=e0b1c5fe2f64476b8ad278e61e16a598

https://www.nps.gov/katm/blogs/katmai-terrane-blog.htm?tagID=2CE7E35C-1DD8-B71C-0769D935D58C42D3

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3KGJcBfZzc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSvS2eHG4XU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G4tT4fZutDk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9sZCsDSgEMQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHmabBzzZDY

Registration dates set for fall 2017 Master Gardener training

Become a University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Master Gardener

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension will hold two registration sessions for fall 2017 Master Gardener Training. Registration sessions will be held on Monday, June 5 and Wednesday, June 14 at 9 a.m. at Cooperative Extension’s Lifelong Learning Center, 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev. Pre-registration is required.

No gardening background is necessary to become a Master Gardener! The most important qualifications are your commitment to complete the training and to share your knowledge through volunteer service. The Master Gardener program is open to adults who accept the stringent training and volunteer commitments.

The Master Gardener mission is to train community volunteers in appropriate desert gardening practices. Eighty hours of class training and 50 hours of volunteer work on approved projects are required in order to become a Master Gardener. Classes are scheduled on most Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from 8:30 — 12:30 beginning Sept. 9 through Oct. 30 (based on instructor availability). You must attend all 20 classes. Find information on our volunteer program on our website.

During the registration, an overview of the training and program requirements will be offered and the opportunity to fill out an application and have an interview with a current Master Gardener. Pre-registration is required. Email or call Lori Leas at 702-257-5501 to reserve a space; please indicate the Registration date of your choice. Full details will be emailed to pre-registrants.

For questions about registration, training or volunteer requirements email or call Ann Edmunds, Program Coordinator, at 702-257-5587.

The Clark County Cooperative Extension Botanical Gardens (including the Master Gardener Herb and Rose Gardens) are open to the public Monday - Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Research Center and Demonstration Orchard located at 4600 Horse Road, North Las Vegas, Nev. is open Tues., Thurs. and Sat. mornings from 8 a.m. to noon. Email or call the Master Gardener Help Line at 702-257-5555 for directions or to chat with a Master Gardener about your gardening questions.

In 2016, Master Gardeners answered questions from 1,648 individuals from 91 out of 114 zip codes, 246 emails and assisted 268 walk-in people at the Help Desk. Master Gardeners taught 1,709 classes or spoke to over 31,097 people at community events. Two-hundred, twenty-nine active Master Gardeners working on 35 community projects logged over 35,268 hours. Based on the $23.56 national average, the value of Master Gardener volunteer service to Clark County was $830,916.90.

Life in the fat lane

Washington State University Extension News - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 2:34pm

Hibernating bears have evolved to add as much fat as possible each fall so they can survive several months without eating. But just how do they do that without any health repercussions? This mystery is one researchers at Washington State University are trying to unravel.

A view from above showing just how a bear’s body changes from spring to fall, preparing for hibernation.

“When people gain weight, or add a lot of fat, they can become diabetic or suffer other health consequences,” said Heiko Jansen, associate professor of integrative physiology and neuroscience at WSU. “But bears don’t, they’re perfectly adapted to the hibernation/activity cycle.”

For the first time, WSU scientists were able to confirm that bears are completely resistant to insulin during hibernation, meaning any sugar in their bloodstream just stays there and doesn’t break down. But that insulin-resistant status is reversible as the bears’ metabolism restarts when they come out of hibernation.

“Scientists have guessed this is the case for years, but this is the first time anybody has been able to prove it,” Jansen said.

In addition to the insulin finding, the research team wanted to learn how bears’ appetites change so tremendously throughout the year. They don’t eat at all through the winter without feeling hungry. And when they wake up, they don’t act desperately hungry.

But, in late summer, they become ravenous as they begin to build up their fat stores for the coming winter. By October, they slow their intake down again before going back into hibernation, Jansen said.

Hunger is suppressed in bears, as in humans, with the hormone leptin, he said.

“We found that in August we could give bears leptin and it had no impact,” Jansen said. “They still ate all the time. So, we figured out that it’s because their brains change over time. By late fall, they’re sensitive to leptin again and it works to suppress their appetites for the winter. They have developed a very complex system for adapting to their environment.”

A grizzly bear with her cubs at the WSU bear center.

The findings were published in the article “Life in the fat lane: seasonal regulation of insulin sensitivity, food intake, and adipose biology in brown bears” in the Journal of Comparative Physiology: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00360-016-1050-9.

Jansen and his colleagues hope to continue their study to see exactly how bears resist insulin during hibernation on the molecular level. If they can figure that out, it could lead to breakthroughs in fighting diabetes in humans.

“We’re still a way off from that, but this study shows there’s hope,” Jansen said.

WSU bears off to a walking start

Washington State University Extension News - Wed, 05/10/2017 - 2:25pm

The WSU Bear Center has some new equipment, which you may have noticed during your volunteer shifts. It’s a treadmill that will be used to measure the energy cost for various activities, including lying, sitting, standing and walking.

The treadmill at the WSU Bear Center

The treadmill is actually returning home, after spending the winter at the San Diego Zoo. It is part of a research study that involves figuring out how efficient grizzlies are compared to polar bears as the two species increasingly become competitors in the warming Arctic. This winter, a polar bear at the San Diego Zoo spent time lying and walking on it while researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz measured the costs.

Currently, our bears are being trained, through judicious use of hot dogs, dog biscuits, apples and cookies, to use the treadmill so they feel safe and comfortable during the research. Once they’re used to the equipment, WSU scientists will start measuring them for their part of an ongoing research study that includes multiple federal agencies.

It will be a few weeks before our bears are ready for full usage of the machine, but it didn’t take them long to re-familiarize themselves to it. We hope to take a full range of measurements in mid-June.

Installing the treadmill back into its place took about a dozen people almost two hours and involved a moving truck, two forklifts, and several crowbars and high-strength dollies.

The treadmill will be at the Bear Center through the summer and into the fall. It may leave again for more work with polar bears, but no plans have been finalized yet.

April enrichment photos and video

Washington State University Extension News - Tue, 05/09/2017 - 3:15pm

At the WSU Bear Research, Education, and Conservation Center, we have an enrichment program aimed at keeping our bears physically healthy and mentally stimulated. Every month, we’ll show the new or different activities and physical challenges our bears can tackle.

Here, center manager Brandon Evans Hutzenbiler prepares the play structure in the exercise yard with hidden treats for the bears to find.

Among the treats are apples, breakfast cereal, and occasionally a cream cheese cover to provide a little extra treat and challenge.

And here are two videos of the two-year-old bears as they’re released into the exercise yard to find their hidden goodies, and then digging them out.

 

Butterfly Garden tour scheduled

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners offer tour and information

Monarch Butterfly on Tuberosa.

Join University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners on Wed., May 31 at 9 a.m. for a tour of the new Butterfly Gardens. The butterfly habitats feature 26 different species of milkweeds planted for monarch caterpillars, and nectar and forage plants for other butterflies. Visitors will learn which plants attract the adults, and which plants feed the caterpillars during this free tour.

The gardens are part of the Cooperative Extension Botanical Gardens located at 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev. The tour will begin in the Courtyard. Enter either through the front Reception area or the West side gate. The tour is free and open to the public. Come dressed for an outdoor walking tour.

For more information email or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 702-257-5555. Volunteers are available to answer questions Mon. — Fri. from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

WSU’s COSMIC CRISP in the National Spotlight

Washington State University Extension News - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 3:47pm
On NPR

National Public Radio’s the salt explores the release of WSU’s much anticipated COSMIC CRISPTM apple. Listen to perspectives from the Washington Tree Fruit Commission, regional growers, and the inventor himself – WSU Emeritus Professor of Horticulture Dr. Bruce Barritt.

Read / Listen Now

 

On PBS

Also, watch PBS Market to Market’s inside look to the characteristics that make COSMIC CRISPTM the most rapidly adopted apple the industry has ever seen.

 

Learn More

COSMIC CRISPTM  WSU Tree Fruit breeding

CAHNRS Aggie of the Year seeks to make an impact in the world of agriculture

Washington State University Extension News - Fri, 05/05/2017 - 9:47am
By Maya Wahl, CAHNRS Academic Programs

Our 2017 Aggie of the Year, Kyle Strachila, is one of CAHNRS best and brightest. A member of the Honors College, Kyle will graduate with two degrees: a bachelor of science in Economic Sciences with an option in Agricultural Economics, and a bachelor of science in Agriculture Food Systems with a major in Agricultural and Food Business Economics. It doesn’t stop there—he will also receive two minors, one in business and one in Spanish. He recently defended his honors thesis and passed with excellence. His research investigated how econometrics of the United States and Mexico explain immigration from Mexico to the U.S. There is no question that Kyle is an exemplary student and leader on and off campus. He has proven his excitement for agriculture is genuine and looks forward to serving the agriculture industry throughout his career.

Kyle was raised on his family’s dairy farm in Deming, Wash., and attended Mount Baker High School, where he was heavily involved in FFA. After graduation, he served as the 2011-2012 Washington State FFA Vice President. He says his experiences on the farm and with FFA developed his passion for agriculture. He came to WSU in the fall of 2012, ready to pursue a degree in agricultural economics and wanted to get involved with the student body. He joined Sigma Phi Epsilon his freshman year and immediately dove into leadership opportunities.

2017 Aggie of the Year Kyle Strachila and dean of CAHNRS Ron Mittelhammer at the CAHNRS Honors 2017 awards ceremony.

It doesn’t take long to realize that Kyle is a driven, intelligent young man who has demonstrated his natural leadership throughout his time at WSU. Not only did he work to make Sigma Phi Epsilon better by serving as the senior marshall on the Standards Board, he also worked his way up through ASWSU (Associated Students of Washington State University). He recently chaired his last meeting as the vice president of ASWSU and passed the baton to the newly elected officers.

“By taking on direct projects to better the community, providing unique experiences for students, and developing leadership skills in younger peers, I truly believe I’ve become a leader with a goal to make a difference wherever I go,” he said.

Beyond his experiences on campus, Kyle worked on his family’s dairy farm. His contributions to the family operation gave him an appreciation for agriculture. “I loved working on our farm, but I realized that I could have more of an impact on the industry off of it.”

This realization freed Kyle to pursue opportunities away from home. During the summer of 2015 he interned for Fisher Investments in Portland, where he stepped out of his comfort zone and “explored data analytics at a very successful investment firm.” Kyle has experienced the trials and tribulations of agricultural life as well as what it takes to be successful in the professional world.

Kyle’s academic advisor, Carla Makus, encouraged Kyle to challenge himself by joining the WSU Honors College and finding internships outside of agriculture. She made an impact on his decisions and he couldn’t be more grateful. His family also served as a support system while Kyle pursued his degrees. His older brother, Dan, continues to encourage him to make an impact elsewhere in the industry. While Kyle enjoys his time on the dairy, he aims to use his experiences to make the agricultural industry better.

He says that his favorite part about being a CAHNRS Coug is the wide array of majors with connections to multiple industries and groups of people—everyone can find a home in CAHNRS. Kyle appreciates the college-wide events that CAHNRS holds, which have made him feel welcomed and connected to the college.

After commencement, Kyle is moving to Raleigh, North Carolina, to work as a Sales Excellence Associate for Bayer Crop Science, starting in the sales management training program.

“I would love to have my career’s work focus on answering three questions: Will we have enough food? Will it be safe? And will it be sustainable? That is what I intend to pursue.”

Congratulations, Kyle, and best wishes for your continued success!

Nevada Indian Summit held May 9-11

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension presents the Nevada Indian Summit to help tribal communities adapt to climate change, plan for economic development and make a profit.

Summit to help Nevada tribes adapt to climate change, plan for economic development

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension presents the Nevada Indian Summit May 9-11. The purpose of the summit, offered in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is to help tribal communities in Nevada adapt to climate change, plan for economic development and marketing, and learn how to make a profit.

Summit speakers will be experts from many Western entities, including University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, University of Nevada Center for Economic Development, Nevada Department of Corrections, Utah State University, the U.S. Geologic Survey, Desert Research Institute and University of Arizona Native Programs. Breakfast and lunch will be provided May 10 and 11.

Many topics will be explored, including economic development planning for Nevada tribes; how to make a profit in agriculture; and adapting agriculture to increasing variability of water supplies and temperatures. Workshops will also discuss establishing a marketing entity that would increase reservation profits through combined marketing efforts and possibly creating an Indian Branding of cattle and hay grown on the various reservations.

The First Climate Resilience Workshop, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., May 9, will address making climate data accessible and useable to Nevada tribal ranchers, farmers and resource managers for water management, and for traditional and production agricultural development and sustainability. The workshop is part of the Native Waters on Arid Lands Project, a five-year, $4.5 million grant from the United States Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture — Agriculture Food Research Initiative. The Native Waters on Arid Lands Project was one of five integrated research and Extension projects nationwide selected for U.S. Department of Agriculture funding.

Bill Payne, dean of University of Nevada College of Agriculture, Biotechnology and Natural Resources, will welcome guests the morning of the May 10 sessions, and May 11 will include an afternoon tour of the Pyramid Lake fisheries and museum. Read the complete list of session topics over the three days, find out pricing information and register today.

Partners in the Native Waters on Arid Lands Project include University of Nevada, Reno; The University of Arizona; First Americans Land-Grant Consortium; Utah State University; Desert Research Institute; Ohio University; United States Geological Survey; and the Federally Recognized Tribal Extension Program in Nevada and Arizona. Co-project directors include Loretta Singletary, along with Staci Emm of University of Nevada Cooperative Extension; Maureen McCarthy of University of Nevada, Reno; John Phillips of First Americans Land-Grant Consortium; Bonnie Colby, Karletta Chief and Trent Teegerstrom of The University of Arizona; Kynda Curtis and Eric Edwards of Utah State University; Mike Dettinger of U.S. Geological Survey; Derek Kauneckis of Ohio University; and Beverly Ramsey of Desert Research Institute.

WHO: University of Nevada Cooperative Extension.

WHAT: Nevada Indian Summit.

WHEN: Tuesday through Thursday, May 9-11.

WHERE: Nugget Casino Resort, 1100 Nugget Ave., Sparks.

Get the dirt on soil

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension offers workshop June 17

Soil workshop-June 17

Join University of Nevada Cooperative Extension on Saturday, June 17 for a workshop on Gardening in Small Places: the dirt on soil from 8 a.m. to noon.

If you’ve gardened in other parts of the country and then tried to garden here, you’ve noticed that the soil is different. Our Mojave soils are infertile, salty and alkaline — fine for desert natives — but not good for much else. If you’re curious about the soil in your yard, Angela O’Callaghan, social horticulturist, will help you analyze your soil. For this hands-on class all participants are asked to bring a bag of soil from their yard to test. Due to the hands-on nature of this class, class size is limited. Homeowners and other interested parties are welcome to attend.

Class space is limited to 15 and pre-registration is required. There is a $10 fee which includes class materials.

To register for the workshop held at the Lifelong Learning Center (8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev., I-215 and Windmill Lane), email Elaine Fagin or call 702-257-5573. Register online at Eventbrite.com.

The next Gardening in Small Places workshop dates are July 15, organic gardening; Aug. 26, landscape design; Sept. 9, native plants; Oct. 21, roses; and Nov. 18, growing fruit at home.

May garden tours of Botanical Gardens

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension Master Gardeners conduct tours

Walking Stick Cacti found in the Botanical Gardens

Learn all about hot summer colors for your garden that last through the summer heat on a special themed garden tour on May 20 with the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Master Gardeners.

The free, open to the public garden tour will begin at 10 a.m. on May 20 at Cooperative Extension’s Botanical Gardens located at 8050 Paradise Road, Las Vegas, Nev. Park in front and use west side gate to meet in the courtyard.

Through May, the Master Gardeners continue to offer weekly tours of the Botanical Gardens each Friday at 10 a.m. The gardens contain over 1300 species of desert appropriate landscape plants, including: trees, shrubs, perennials, palms, cacti and agaves. Plants are identified by botanical and common names. For the weekly tours, meet in the front Reception area near the Master Gardener Help Desk. The grounds are also open for self-guided walks weekdays from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

For more information email or call the Master Gardener Help Desk at 702-257-5555.

CAHNRS Coug Connections: Rylee Suhadolnik

Washington State University Extension News - Mon, 05/01/2017 - 1:52pm

Each week this year, we have showcased one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors. This is our last one for 2016-17! Ambassadors is a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Rylee Suhadolnik, a junior from Prosser, Wash.

Rylee Suhadolnik

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Agricultural Education.

What is a fun fact about you?

I showed market lambs for 10 years

Why WSU?

There is something unique about being immersed in a town consisting of more than 20,000 college students and still keeping a small town feel where you are being supported.

What is special about being a CAHNRS Coug?

CAHNRS consists of about 2,300 students with 24 majors, allowing homes for everyone.

Where do you want to be (professionally or personally) 10 years after you graduate?

I want to be an ag instructor and FFA advisor at a high school in Washington.

Favorite class you have taken within CAHNRS so far? Why?

AGTM 201; a metal fabrication class, it’s been the most hands-on and useful class I’ve taken.

What other extracurricular activities have you been involved in?

Agricultural Education Club, Collegiate FFA, and AgTM club,

Favorite Ferdinand’s flavor of ice cream?

Huckleberry

CAHNRS Coug Connections: Max Mielke

Washington State University Extension News - Mon, 05/01/2017 - 1:40pm

Each week, we will showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors. Ambassadors is a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Max Mielke, a junior from Davenport, Wash.

Max Mielke

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Agricultural Economics, with a minor in Business Administration.

What is a fun fact about you?

I am part of the fifth generation on our family wheat farm and beef cattle ranch. I enjoy jeeping, hiking, camping, hunting, sports, and being outdoors.

Why WSU?

I chose WSU because I knew that I would be able to grow as an individual and accomplish my goals, all while making lifelong friends.

What is special about being a CAHNRS Coug?

Being a CAHNRS Coug sets me apart from others and places me in a special CAHNRS family. Being a CAHNRS Coug is special because of the diversity along with the connection.

Where do you want to be (professionally or personally) 10 years after you graduate?

10 years after I graduate I want to be directly working in agriculture, helping others, and raising a God-fearing family.

Favorite class you have taken within CAHNRS so far? Why?

My favorite class so far is Animal Science 174, which is Cow-Calf Management. I really enjoyed this class because I was able to get outside and have hands-on experiences with ranching.

What other extracurricular activities have you been involved in?

I have been very involved with my fraternity, Sigma Chi, serving on exec. I am also involved with intramural sports, such as basketball, football, hockey, and soccer. I am involved in Economics Club as well, and I have a national role serving as a student advisor for Agriculture Future of America (AFA).

Favorite Ferdinand’s flavor of ice cream?

Apple Cup Crisp

Five Nevadans win National Wildfire Community Preparedness Day contest

Lakeview community residents disposed of hazardous wildfire fuels during their 2016 community cleanup day.

Winners receive $500 from State Farm to host wildfire preparation events in their communities

National Wildfire Community Preparedness Day is May 6, and five communities in northern Nevada have received project funding awards from State Farm to support activities aimed at reducing potential loss of life, property and natural resources to wildfire in their communities.

The five northern Nevada residents were among 150 winners chosen nationwide to receive funding from a pool of 420 applicants. Applicants provided a brief description of their proposed projects, and how the State Farm award will fund the projects. Descriptions included how groups or individuals will work toward reducing the risk of wildfire or impact of a recent fire, and/or advance preparedness for wildfire in the community. The Living With Fire Program, a collaborative effort of local, state and federal firefighting agencies led by University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, assisted the Nevada applicants, as part of Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month.

“Living With Fire was glad to assist some of the winners with their applications or events, and we’re excited to see these leaders taking steps to reduce the risk of wildfire in their communities,” said Nevada Cooperative Extension Living With Fire Co-Director Sonya Sistare. “Many of them are involved in our collaborative Nevada Network of Fire Adapted Communities effort that seeks to put Nevadans living in high fire-hazard communities in touch with the resources they need to work toward becoming fire adapted.”

The Nevada winners include Palomino Valley Auxiliary Fire Volunteer Cathy Glatthar, Lakeview Community resident D. Marie Bresch from Carson City, Rivermount Park Resident Sue Markert from Reno, Zephyr Cove Community Leader Ann Grant and Woodminster Community resident Patricia Owens from Incline Village.

Glatthar’s team will host a presentation about Survivable Space Assessments and what homeowners can do to prepare their homes and property for wildfire. The event takes place from 10 a.m. to noon at the Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District’s station at 6015 Ironwood Road in Palomino Valley.

The Lakeview community is partnering with the Carson City Fire Department to host a community clean-up day 7 a.m. to 2 pm. Residents in the community who schedule in advance will be provided free curbside pickup of their pine needles, cones, branches and other vegetation. A community appreciation picnic will follow.

Residents of Rivermount Park are planning a community clean-up of Heatheridge Hill. Residents are partnering with the Nevada Division of Forestry and Rubbish Runners, to remove vegetation identified as hazardous wildfire fuels and dispose of them in dumpsters donated by Rubbish Runners. A potluck meal will follow.

Community Leader Ann Grant is partnering with the Tahoe Network of Fire Adapted Communities, Tahoe Douglas Fire Protection District and volunteers from Douglas County Community Emergency Response Team and Whittell High School to distribute educational information and answer questions about defensible space and other wildfire preparedness concerns. Participants can also sign up for free defensible space evaluations and chipping services. Representatives will be on hand outside of the Zephyr Cove Post Office from 12:30 to 3 p.m.

Woodminster community members will assess the damage and downed trees in their community resulting from the long, rough winter. Grant funding will be used to assist residents with the removal of vegetation that is deemed a wildfire hazard.

National Wildfire Community Preparedness Day is part of activities for Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month, a collaborative effort of local, state and federal firefighting agencies; University of Nevada Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire program; and many others. This year’s message is “Wildfire! Prepare. Anticipate. Evacuate.” to encourage residents of Nevada’s wildfire-prone communities to prepare their homes and families for wildfire, anticipate environmental conditions and take precautions on Red Flag Warning days, and evacuate quickly when asked by emergency responders. For more information on Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month events and for information on how to reduce the wildfire threat, visit www.LivingWithFire.info or contact Sonya Sistare at University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, sistares@unce.unr.edu or 775-336-0271.

Family and Consumer Scientist is Making a Difference, One Step at a Time

Washington State University Extension News - Fri, 04/28/2017 - 11:05am
By Maya Wahl, CAHNRS Academic Programs

Hailing from the small town of Shelton, Wash., Mackenzie Selleg is a shining star within WSU’s College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences. A senior studying human development and criminal justice with a minor in political science and earning a certification in adolescence, Mackenzie has proven her leadership skills while serving her fellow students. She is the 2017 CAHNRS Family and Consumer Scientist.

Mackenzie Selleg and dean of CAHNRS Ron Mittelhammer at CAHNRS Honors 2017.

Four years ago when Mackenzie came to WSU, she was undecided on a major or direction. Her freshman year she took Human Development and Criminal Justice classes, and realized this was her passion.

Growing up with a police officer for a father gave Mackenzie a deep appreciation for law enforcement and criminal justice, but she knew that she wanted to do something different. Human Development and Criminal Justice have created a way for Mackenzie to practice law while understanding the “why” behind people’s actions.

In addition to working hard to maintain outstanding grades, she works as the ASWSU Director of Internal Affairs, serves as a WSU Campus Ambassador, serves on the executive board of her sorority, Pi Beta Phi, and works as an undergraduate research assistant for the Department of Human Development.

During the 2015-2016 school year, she worked on the Rural Food Insecurity project under Dr. Rayna Sage. She created a database of resources for the Partners of Rural Washington that includes all of the national, regional, and state resources and grants for which rural families and communities in Washington state are eligible.

“My time spent working as a research assistant in the human development department taught me about empathy and having a passion for what I am doing, and how these things can lead to making a difference in the lives of others,” she said.

Mackenzie also participated in the WSU Prison Debate Project during the spring of 2016. This experience is especially impactful for her criminal justice pursuits. She traveled to Coyote Ridge Correctional Facility and interacted directly with inmates.

That experience helped her understand controversial topics within the criminal justice system and taught her “how to empathize with individuals who have made poor decisions in the past but are working hard to create a better future,” she said

Growing up in a small town, Mackenzie didn’t expect to find a community like that here at WSU. But as a CAHNRS Coug, she walks to class and always seems to know someone. This has been an integral part of her finding a home within the college as well as at WSU as a whole.

“The opportunities are unlike other colleges,” she says.

Sage, Mackenzie’s research advisor, jumpstarted Mackenzie’s involvement in CAHNRS within Human Development. Since then, Mackenzie hasn’t slowed down.

Mackenzie’s parents push her to do something she loves and to be the best she can be. Her support system doesn’t end with her family. Her best friend, Devin Trubey, has always been supportive of her too. They served as RA’s together and joined the same sorority freshman year. In the four years at WSU, Devin has been a great friend and a source of encouragement. Mackenzie’s ability to shine in a sea of crimson and gray is due to her hard work and dedication, but she acknowledges that it would not be possible without the incredible people that she has behind her every step of the way.

She even has advice for current and future Cougars:

“You don’t have to wait to make a difference. You can start now, here at WSU.”

Upon graduation in May, Mackenzie will go to work as an intern in the Thurston County Prosecutor’s Officer as a member of the Juvenile Trial Team. Next fall she will study family law at the University of Oregon School of Law. She says her dream job would be to serve as a family court judge. She hopes to focus on family relationships, particularly adoption, divorce, custody, and abuse.

CAHNRS is honored to send such an accomplished young woman on, and there is no question that she will flourish in the next chapter of her life.

Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month kicks off May 1

Participants in last year’s Nevada Wildfire Awareness races enjoyed the beauty of Rancho San Rafael Regional Park. This year’s race takes place May 13 at Bartley Ranch Regional Park.

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension urges Nevadans to prepare their homes for wildfire

University of Nevada Cooperative Extension is once again coordinating the collaborative efforts of federal, state and local fire services, public safety agencies, community organizations and others to participate in Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month throughout May. This year’s message is “Wildfire! Prepare. Anticipate. Evacuate.” to encourage residents of Nevada’s wildfire-prone communities to prepare their homes and families for wildfire, anticipate environmental conditions and take precautions on Red Flag Warning days, and evacuate quickly when asked by emergency responders.

“We want residents to think about the broader picture in preparing for wildfire,” said Ed Smith, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension natural resource specialist and co-manager of the Living With Fire educational program. “Besides creating defensible space, they also need to consider a family emergency evacuation plan and what they would take with them for all family members and pets. Waiting until a wildfire is nearby to start planning is a bad idea.”

Events are scheduled across the state to encourage residents to take action. Cooperative Extension’s Living With Fire Program representatives will be participating in many of this year’s events, including:

  • May 6: Ember House activity at the Eureka Department of Natural Resources’ Firewise event, 11 a.m. — 1 p.m., at the Eureka Fire House, 10306 Main St. in Eureka.
  • May 6: Junk The Junipers, 8 a.m. — 1 p.m., at the Nevada Division of Forestry, 885 Eastlake Blvd. in Washoe Valley.
  • May 8: Wildfire Awareness Day at the Nevada State Legislature, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., 401 S. Carson St. in Carson City.
  • May 13: Third Annual Wildland Fire Awareness Multi-Hour Run, race start times vary from 7 a.m. to 9 a.m., at Bartley Ranch Regional Park, 6000 Bartley Ranch Road in Reno. In addition, the event includes a free treasure hunt and other family-friendly non-race activities. To register for a race time or more information, visit the Wildland Fire Awareness Multi-Hour Run website.
  • May 18: Wildfire Awareness Presentation focusing on evacuation, post-fire rehabilitation and insurance concerns, 5:30 p.m. — 7:30 p.m., at the Toiyabe Golf Clubhouse, 19 Lightning W. Ranch Road in Washoe Valley. RSVP required by May 12. For more information or to register, contact Jamie Roice-Gomes at roicej@unce.unr.edu.
  • May 20: Junk The Junipers, 8 a.m. — 1 p.m., at the lot adjacent to the Truckee Meadows Fire Protection District’s Silver Lake Volunteer Fire Station, 11525 Red Rock Road in Silver Lake.
  • May 24: Wildfire Awareness Presentation focusing on evacuation and insurance concerns, 5:30 p.m. — 7:30 p.m., at the Washoe County Cooperative Extension Office, 4955 Energy Way in Reno. RSVP required by May 12. For more information or to register, contact Jamie Roice-Gomes at roicej@unce.unr.edu.

Nevadans are invited to find activities in their area at the Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month website and to learn about the steps they can take to prepare their homes for wildfire.

Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month is a collaborative effort by local, state and federal firefighting agencies, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and many others. Major funding partners include the Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Forest Service, and Nevada Division of Forestry.

For more information on Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month events and for information on how to reduce your wildfire threat, visit www.LivingWithFire.info or contact Sonya Sistare at University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, sistares@unce.unr.edu or 775-336-0271.

CAHNRS Coug Connections: Anna Watson

Washington State University Extension News - Tue, 04/25/2017 - 10:04am

Each week, we will showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors. Ambassadors is a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Anna Watson, a junior from Lakewood, Wash.

Anna Watson

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Human Development – Family & Consumer Science Education.

What is a fun fact about you?

In addition to being a teacher, I want to own a hound rescue.

Why WSU?

It’s such a welcoming place and nobody is out of place

What is special about being a CAHNRS Coug?

The family atmosphere

Where do you want to be (professionally or personally) 10 years after you graduate?

I hope to be a high school teacher teaching Family and Consumer Science, an owner of a hound rescue, and have a family.

Favorite class you have taken within CAHNRS so far? Why?

HD 201, learning about parental development.

Favorite Ferdinand’s flavor of ice cream?

Lemon

Outstanding juniors great examples for college

Washington State University Extension News - Fri, 04/21/2017 - 8:46am
By Maya Wahl, CAHNRS Academic Programs

Articulate, enthusiastic, and driven are just a few words that describe this year’s Outstanding Juniors in Agricultural and Human Sciences. The WSU College of Agricultural, Human, and Natural Resource Sciences is home for Chet Broberg of Bellingham, Wash. and Heather Rogers of Spokane, students who have put in the time and effort to earn two of the distinguished awards offered within the college.

Outstanding Junior in Human Sciences

Chet Broberg and Dean of CAHNRS Ron Mittelhammer

Chet Broberg, studying economic sciences with a focus in policy and law, discovered he was a natural at understanding economics in high school, which inspired him to pursue the field at WSU. He worked as an editor for The Daily Evergreen and currently serves as the vice president of scholarship for FarmHouse Fraternity. Both of these on-campus positions started as simple ways to stay involved and in his comfort zone, but grew into leadership opportunities driving him to pursue good jobs and even better grades.

“My favorite part about being a CAHNRS Coug is how supportive and friendly my professors are,” Brogerg said.

He also said he never had trouble diving into his classes because of the outstanding faculty. He received support from family and friends who believe he can achieve whatever he sets his mind to.

Chet worked hard to become a well-rounded leader, something that he takes great pride in. He has an undeniable passion for people and hopes to make a difference in people’s lives. Spending time at his local food bank is especially impactful, as are the writings of Ta-Nahesi Coates, an influential social and political journalist.

Chet is committed to social justice, so he plans to attend law school after receiving his bachelor’s next year. His end goal is to become a public defender and take on some of the most important issues in our society today. He wants to “serve an important role in the way our country works,” and “serve the people who need it most.”

Outstanding Junior in Agricultural Sciences

Heather Rogers and Dean of CAHNRS Ron Mittelhammer

Heather Rogers has dedicated herself to being an exceptional student and leader. An animal sciences/pre-vet major, CAHNRS Ambassador, and avid reader, Heather finds ways to satisfy her passion for science as well as writing. She works as an English 102 facilitator and volunteers at the WSU writing center, as well as working as an animal care technician in the exotics department at the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Heather has a variety of interests and hobbies—that’s what made her such an excellent candidate for Outstanding Junior in Agricultural Sciences.

She does not come from a traditional agricultural background and even admitted to having to search out what animal sciences was before coming to WSU. This never stopped her from excelling in her classes and finding a home in CAHNRS. Some of Heather’s favorite parts about being a CAHNRS Coug are the sense of community and hands-on learning. Her classes are challenging, but she receives an overwhelming amount of support from her peers, professors, and staff, including Val Fisher, animal sciences academic coordinator.

“I’ve always been a people person, and I enjoy problem-solving,” Rogers said.

She credits Fisher, the Ignite program, and diving into her animal sciences classes with helping her realize that she could use her problem-solving skills and passion for people to make animals—and their owners— feel better.

Heather plans to go to veterinary school to earn her D.V.M. and find her specialty. Currently, she is leaning towards a mixed practice, taking care of all sorts of animals. No matter what path Heather chooses, the veterinary and animal industries will be better for it.

Cheers!

Washington State University Extension News - Wed, 04/19/2017 - 11:53am
WSU researchers awarded 2017 best enology paper by ASEV WSU researchers Dr. James Harbertson, left, and Richard Larsen, right.

WSU researchers Dr. James F. Harbertson, Richard Larsen and former WSU graduate student L. Federico Casassa of California Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, were recently awarded “best enology paper” by the American Society for Enology and Viticulture for their paper “Effects of Vineyard and Winemaking Practices Impacting Berry Size on Evolution of Phenolics During Winemaking.

Each year the ASEV Best Paper Committee reviews all papers published in the journal over the past year and selects them most outstanding papers—one in viticulture and one in enology.  The winning papers are recognized for outstanding research and substantial contributions to the field.

The authors have been invited to present their papers at ASEV’s national conference in Bellevue, Wash., June 26-29, where they will also receive their award.

Viticulture, enology student wins national honor

Connor Eck, a senior at Washington State University Tri-Cities and originally from Del Mar, Calif., has been named a national Newman Civic Fellow by Campus Compact, a Boston-based nonprofit organization working to advance the public purposes of higher education.

The fellowship provides learning and networking opportunities to teach students leadership and how to bring communities

WSU V&E student Connor Eck

together for positive change. As a student winemaker in WSU’s Blended Learning program, Eck worked with local growers and winemakers to develop leadership skills, gain hands-on experience and exercise environmentally friendly winemaking practices.

“I aim to find a way to limit the amount of water used in the farming of grapes and during the winemaking process, while still producing a high-quality product,” he said.

“The cultivation of community-committed leaders has never been more crucial,” said Andrew Seligsohn, Campus Compact president. “Our country needs more people who know how to bring communities together.”

The fellowship, named for Campus Compact co-founder Frank Newman, chose 273 students for the 2017 cohort. It is supported by the KPMG Foundation and Newman’s Own Foundation.