Fire season requires residents to be at an increased awareness for the dangers of wildfire. Your local fire agency takes every precaution to help protect you and your property from fire. During a large wildfire, there may not be enough fire engines or firefighters to defend every home.

Your local law enforcement agency orders evacuations. If you feel threatened by a wildfire, do not wait for an official evacuation order.

There are three levels of evacuation.

  • Level 1 Evacuation means “BE READY” for potential evacuation. Residents should be aware of the danger that exists in their area, monitor emergency services websites and local media outlets for information. This is the time for preparation and precautionary movement of persons with special needs, mobile property and (under certain circumstances) pets and livestock. If conditions worsen, emergency services personnel may contact you via an emergency notification system.

  • Level 2 Evacuation means “BE SET” to evacuate. You should be ready to leave at a moment’s notice as this level indicates there is a significant danger to your area, and residents should either voluntarily relocate to a shelter or with family/friends outside of the affected area. Residents may have time to gather necessary items, but doing so is at their own risk.

  • Level 3 Evacuation means “GO” evacuate NOW – leave immediately! Danger to your area is current or imminent, and you should evacuate immediately. If you choose to ignore this advisement, you must understand that emergency services may not be available to assist you further. DO NOT delay leaving to gather any belongings or make efforts to protect your home.

If you are advised to evacuate, take your emergency supply kit, lock your home, and choose a route away from the fire hazard. Watch for changes in the speed and direction of the fire and smoke. Tell someone when you left and where you are going.

Remember the eight Ps​ in case an immediate evacuation is required: people, pets, personal computer, prescriptions, paperwork (important documents), pictures, phone (cell), and plastic (credit/bank cards).

Information was provided by the Office of the State Fire Marshal

Download the Oregon State Evacuation Levels Flyer in English and in Spanish

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