Is Crossbow a good choice for killing wild blackberries?

A:

First, I should tell you that Crossbow is not labeled to be used in residential yards. You should pick another approach/product in this setting, but I want to go further to answer your question.

Crossbow has two active ingredients: 2,4-D butoxyethyl ester and triclopyr butoxyethyl ester. You can read about their "modes of action" in the NPIC collection of technical fact sheets.

I think you're asking, "Will the Crossbow hurt my neighbor's fruit trees?" The answer is likely yes. The label for Crossbow says, "Do not apply Crossbow directly to, or otherwise permit it to come into direct contact with ... fruit trees... and do not permit spray mists containing it to drift onto them." In another section, "Under conditions which are conducive to evaporation (high temperatures and low humidity), vapors from this product may injure susceptible crops growing nearby." Here is the label information for Crossbow.

I'm glad you reached out before making an application. There's a lot of great advice/information in this OSU publication by Max Bennett, Managing Himalayan Blackberry in western Oregon riparian areas.

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