Pastures and Forages

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Article

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on several factors that make it virtually impossible to predict how dangerous the plant is at any given time.

By Cassie Bouska

Measuring Moisture in Hay

Online Resource

There are several subjective, physical, chemical, and instrumental methods for determining forage moisture. All methods depend on proper forage sampling. Because only a small quantity is sampled, it is important that the sample be representative of the entire lot of forage. This paper describes forage moisture, how it is determined, and how to sample for estimating forage moisture in the windrow, bale, and stack.

Measuring Moisture in Hay

Online Resource

There are several subjective, physical, chemical, and instrumental methods for determining forage moisture. All methods depend on proper forage sampling. Because only a small quantity is sampled, it is important that the sample be representative of the entire lot of forage. This paper describes forage moisture, how it is determined, and how to sample for estimating forage moisture in the windrow, bale, and stack.

Poison Hemlock and Western Water Hemlock – Deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Article

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. This article will focus on two common plants in Oregon: poison hemlock and western water hemlock. Ingestion of either of these plants by humans or livestock typically results in death.

By Scott Duggan

The Western Oregon and Washington Pasture Calendar

OSU Extension Catalog

This publication describes—by climatic zone—perennial pasture plant growth and how management actions can affect growth, both positively and negatively. Optimal management of forages by season is the basis for the Pasture Calendar.

By Gene Pirelli

Endophyte Toxins in Grass and Other Feed Sources: Risks to Livestock

OSU Extension Catalog

Many varieties of tall fescue and perennial ryegrass are infected with a fungal endophyte. Endophytes produce bioactive compounds that, while beneficial to the host plants, can be toxic to livestock that consume them. This publication explains what an endophyte is, describes livestock health...

By Nicole Anderson, Gene Pirelli

Clover Root Curculio in Alfalfa: Identification, Biology, and Management

OSU Extension Catalog

This publication helps growers in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington to identify clover root curculio infestations and to design an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program for managing clover root curculio in alfalfa.

Nutrient Management Guide for Dryland and Irrigated Alfalfa in the Inland Northwest

OSU Extension Catalog

This full-color illustrated guide for optimizing alfalfa production according to the growing conditions common throughout Idaho and east of the Cascades in Oregon and Washington provides specific recommendations for all critical nutrients.

Selenium Supplementation Strategies for Livestock in Oregon

OSU Extension Catalog

Provides an overview of the role of selenium in the diet of livestock, and discusses selenium supplementation rates and supplementation methods. Lists guidelines for assessing livestock's selenium status and summarizes research useful to Oregon livestock producers.

By Fara Brummer, Gene Pirelli

Who's Coming to Dinner?

OSU Extension Catalog

This video examines the eating habits of cows, sheep, horses, and goats, and explores how forage selection, pugging, trampling, and fencing contribute to a pasture's health and sustainability.

By David Hannaway