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Some Garden Myths and What Research Has to Say

From the myth of collapsing root balls to myth of compost tea - learn the facts about a range of tips you may have heard through the years about healthy soil, pretty mulch, and more.

Richard Little | Feb 2014 | Article

Apple Resources for Umatilla County

Umatilla County is the apple capital of Oregon and produces ~2200 acres of apples.

Jul 2018 | Collection

My Apple Trees need Help!

Q: I have 5 apple trees and last year the growth was stunted with only 3-4 inches/year and also infested with apple maggots. I don't like the fly traps as one time a small bird was caught, probably following the moth. Is ...

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Is anaerobic compost tea useful, any tips?

Q: I would like to use compost tea on my garden. I don't have the means to make aerobic compost tea. If I use anaerobic compost tea as a soil drench only, will I still provide my soil a flush of beneficial microbes? Also, do you have any suggestions for making anaerobic compost tea?

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How the Rogue Valley became famous for pears

The Rogue Valley growers were pioneers in pear production, growing over 24 varieties and setting quality standards in packing pears. The Rogue Valley was the first and largest red pear growing region in the Pacific Northwest in...

Jul 2007 | Article

How blueberry plants develop and grow

Blueberries grow well in the Pacific Northwest. To get the most out of your bushes, it helps to understand the form and function of each part of the plant.

Bernadine Strik | Mar 2015 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article