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Alfalfa soil fertility and fertilization requirements

A productive alfalfa crop removes significant quantities of macronutrients and small amounts of micronutrients from the soil (Table 1). A complete fertilizer program is essential to ensure a highly productive, long-lived stand.

David Hannaway, Mylen Bohle, Daniel Miles, Yitian Lin, Brianna Randow | Sep 2019 | Publication

IPM Soilborne Diseases

Presentation by Kurtis L. Schroeder, Cropping Systems Agronomist & Plant Pathologist, on Soilborne Diseases of Cereals: Identification and Management

Kurtis L. Schroeder | Apr 2010 | Video

Spikeweed

Can spraying this weed at the right time keep it out of our fields?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Fewer weeds equals more quality forage

Weeds can lower the quality and quantity of forage in a pasture or hayfield. In general, weeds have lower protein and energy than improved, cool season perennial and annual forages under good grazing management. The palatability...

Shelby Filley | Sep 2012 | Article

Velvetleaf-Have You Seen This Weed?

This small plant causes extensive crop loss. Is it still missing?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Grazing Management Options for Riparian Areas

Our hope is to make you better acquainted with the important functions of riparian areas on your ranch, give you some ideas on how to manage them effectively, and provide a framework for developing grazing management that incorporates these areas into your overall cattle operation.

Dustin Johnson | Dec 2019 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Field Bindweed Control in Wheat: Fallow Rotations

Weed scientist, Daniel A. Ball of OSU, talks about the best way to rid fields of this noxious weed.

Daniel Ball | Oct 2001 | Article