Search OSU Extension

Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results.

Red worms eat their way through kitchen waste to produce rich soil amendment

Keeping a worm farm is an easy project

Kym Pokorny | Aug 12, 2016 | News Story

Wiggle your way into worm composting

Worm castings -- AKA poop -- add valuable nutrients to the soil and is easy to make. The hardest part is making the bin and that's not difficult.

Kym Pokorny | Jul 23, 2018 | News Story

Turfgrasses and Lawn Care in Eastern Oregon

Today, turfgrass is the single largest irrigated crop in the United States and covers three times the land area of any other cultivated crop. An estimated 40.5 million acres of grasses are planted in residential, commercial and...

Richard Smiley | Jan 2018 | Article

I gotta have more worms!

Q: Where can I find information on adding worms to soil that has none? Thanks.

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Will glyphosate poison us or our pets?

Q: We live in a large condominium between NW Naito Parkway and the Willamette River. Our property extends to the banks of the river. Our landscaper has been using a diluted version of glyphosate to control weeds on the ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Composting with worms

Information about how to use worms to compost.

Dec 2017 | Article

Why are my trees dying?

Trees all over Oregon are displaying signs of poor health. People are quick to blame insects, but insects are rarely the underlying cause of the problem. Drought and other stressors can make trees vulnerable to pests and disease.

John Punches | Sep 2019 | Article

Weed management for blueberry fields in the Pacific Northwest

Weeds are always a difficult problem in blueberry production! They start to show up shortly after transplanting, and tend to become more problematic as time goes on. There are, however, strategies that help to control weeds in...

Tim Miller | Mar 2015 | Article

Wireworm

Information about the wireworm, or click beetle larva.

Jul 2018 | Article

What are those 'worms' in my firewood?

You may have encountered white, segmented “worms” or grubs when chopping firewood and wondered what they were. Common questions include, did they kill my tree? And are they a danger to other trees? The quick answers are no, and no.

Jun 2018 | Article