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Poor soil? Build up with raised beds

Framed or mounded, raised beds give plant roots the space they need

Kym Pokorny | Nov 8, 2016 | News Story

Raised Bed Gardening

Gardening in raised beds has been a common practice for centuries. "Raised" means the soil level in the bed is higher than its surrounding, and "bed" implies it is small enough to work from the walkways.

May 2018 | Fact Sheet

The ABCs of NPK: A fertilizer guide

Nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium aren't just an alphabet soup of chemicals. They are essential plant nutrients that, when used correctly, help to grow a healthy garden. Learn what fertilizers to apply when in this handy guide.

Lisa Ehle | Jun 2018 | Article

Phosphorus on the farm from feed grains and by-products

Phosphorus is an important plant nutrient for growing dairy forages. Unfortunately, many dairies have more phosphorus excreted and stored in manure than they can use during a crop year. Soils have the ability to store moderate ...

Troy Downing, Michael Gamroth | Mar 2004 | Article

Raised bed lumber, pressure treated safe?

Q: I am considering using some 2x6 inch material for a small raised bed for strawberries. My first thought was to consider pressure treated lumber, but I have read conflicting articles on the the safety of this product, with ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Why are my trees dying?

Trees all over Oregon are displaying signs of poor health. People are quick to blame insects, but insects are rarely the underlying cause of the problem. Drought and other stressors can make trees vulnerable to pests and disease.

John Punches | Sep 2019 | Article

Pacific NW Native Plants by Plant Community

Useful information about Western Hemlock-Douglas Fir Forest, Prairie, Scrub-Shrub Wetlands, and Mixed Deciduous Forest/Steep Dry Slope.

Lisa Albert | Jun 2014 | Article

Wireworm

Information about the wireworm, or click beetle larva.

Jul 2018 | Article

What are those 'worms' in my firewood?

You may have encountered white, segmented “worms” or grubs when chopping firewood and wondered what they were. Common questions include, did they kill my tree? And are they a danger to other trees? The quick answers are no, and no.

Jun 2018 | Article