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Management Strategies for Dealing with Select Poisonous Plants in Oregon

Rangeland, pastures and hay fields throughout Oregon often contain poisonous plants that are potentially dangerous to cattle and other livestock.

Andy Hulting, Karin Neff | Sep 2019 | Publication

Japanese Beetle: A Pest to Watch for in Oregon

Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica) is an insect exotic to the US, which has previously established throughout parts of the East Coast, Midwest and South. Although small numbers of beetles have been trapped at the Portland ...

Heather Stoven, Rachel Suits | Oct 2017 | Article

Avoiding poisonous plants in pasture and hay

How to identify, manage, and avoid poisonous plants in your pasture.

Shelby Filley | Apr 2012 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

Protect Oregon’s Brassica Crops: ODA’s black leg rules aim to control a disease outbreak

Black leg is a serious disease of Brassica crops that has recently appeared in outbreaks in western Oregon. It threatens Brassica production in the Pacific Northwest. In an effort to manage the disease and get it back to ...

Nick Andrews | Oct 2017 | Article

How to Remove Poison Oak Plants and Treat a Rash

Poison oak plants contain a chemical that causes a severe rash. Learn how to spot a plant, safely remove, and clean your clothes, gear and skin afterward to prevent a rash.

Jun 2010 | Article

Thinning: an important forest management tool

Thinning is the term foresters apply to removal of some trees from a stand to give others more room (and resources) to grow. It is a tool for improving timber value, making sites more productive, and — perhaps most ...

John Punches | Sep 2004 | Article

Management strategies for dealing with select poisonous plants in Oregon.

Rangeland, pastures and hay fields throughout Oregon often contain poisonous plants that are potentially dangerous to cattle and other livestock.

Andy Hulting, Karin Neff | Sep 2019 | Article