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Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results.

Planting Bare-Root Roses in March

If you have ever purchased a bare-root rose, your first question might have been, will this awkward plant really produce roses? Yes it will!

Barbara McMullen | May 2007 | Article

Growing vegetables in the Pacific Northwest coastal region

Asparagus, beets, carrots and summer squash are some of the vegetables you can grow along the coast. Learn what to watch out for in a region known for cooler temperatures.

Sally Reill | Jul 2017 | Article

Put rose pruning and planting on the calendar

Mid- to late February is the time to pay attention to one of our favorite flowers

Kym Pokorny | Feb 5, 2016 | News Story

Landscaping with Roses

Selecting roses for landscape use may seem like an impossible task, but with a few key elements in mind, you can select a rose or a group of roses to complement your new or current landscape.

Barbara McMullen | May 2007 | Article

Grazing Management Options for Riparian Areas

Our hope is to make you better acquainted with the important functions of riparian areas on your ranch, give you some ideas on how to manage them effectively, and provide a framework for developing grazing management that incorporates these areas into your overall cattle operation.

Dustin Johnson | Dec 2019 | Article

How much time do cattle spend in rangeland streams? Not so much, says OSU study

Now we have detailed data on how cattle use rangeland streams, says Williams

Gail Wells | Dec 29, 2016 | News Story

How to Remove Poison Oak Plants and Treat a Rash

Poison oak plants contain a chemical that causes a severe rash. Learn how to spot a plant, safely remove, and clean your clothes, gear and skin afterward to prevent a rash.

Jun 2010 | Article

Pruning Roses

Pruning is a must-do job for spring. Your plants will thank you with beautiful blooms and vigorous health which helps ward off disease.

Barbara McMullen | May 2007 | Article

Old Garden Roses

The category of Old Roses remains one of the most misunderstood and confusing. Nurseries may call a plant an "antique rose" or an "old garden rose," but the rose may not truly be an Old Garden Rose.

Barbara McMullen | May 2007 | Article