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Showing 1 - 10 of 11 results.

Rhubarb

Fertilizers, Hothouse Forcing, Harvesting, Handling, Storage, Pest Control

Aug 2004 | Article

Management Strategies for Dealing with Select Poisonous Plants in Oregon

Rangeland, pastures and hay fields throughout Oregon often contain poisonous plants that are potentially dangerous to cattle and other livestock.

Andy Hulting, Karin Neff | Sep 2019 | Publication

Incorporating Grains into a Whole Farm

How to properly incorporate grains into an entire farm. Includes suggestions for rotations on various types of farms.

Sep 2018 | Article

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article

Greenhouse Tomato Production in Oregon

Tomatoes are the most commonly produced greenhouse vegetable crop. Although greenhouse promoters claim each plant can produce 30 or more pounds of marketable fruit per year, that level of production is only possible with very ...

Apr 2002 | Article

How hormones and growth regulators affect your plants

Plant hormones and growth regulators are chemicals that affect flowering, aging, root growth, distortion and killing of organs, prevention or promotion of stem elongation, color enhancement of fruit, prevention of leafing and/or leaf fall, and many other conditions.

Ann Marie VanDerZanden | Jul 2012 | Article

Avoiding poisonous plants in pasture and hay

How to identify, manage, and avoid poisonous plants in your pasture.

Shelby Filley | Apr 2012 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

How to Remove Poison Oak Plants and Treat a Rash

Poison oak plants contain a chemical that causes a severe rash. Learn how to spot a plant, safely remove, and clean your clothes, gear and skin afterward to prevent a rash.

Jun 2010 | Article