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Climate change, plant roots may accelerate carbon loss from soils, say OSU researchers

Roots emit chemicals that release carbon by breaking bonds with minerals

Gail Wells | Apr 3, 2015 | News Story

Selecting Native Plants for Home Landscapes in Central Oregon

If planted in a suitable habitat, native plants are well adapted to Central Oregon soils and climate. When grown in the right conditions, native plants experience less environmental, insect, and disease damage than nonnative plants.

Amy Jo Detweiler | May 2008 | OSU Extension Catalog

We want to go native, can you help with plant selection?

Q: We are building our home and have disturbed the natural area in order to do so. We want to landscape as natural as possible with native species and would like to know where to find assistance in plant selections and ...

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I want to go native. Can I get support for project Lawn-B-Gawn?

Q: We are considering removing our front lawn and putting in drought tolerant, native plants to reduce our water use and lower maintenance. where can we find support and advice to do this?

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Native groundcovers are great for home landscapes

Try native groundcovers for home landscapes.

Mar 25, 2011 | News Story

I need a native alternative to my lawn. Any ideas?

Q: I find what I enjoy to be contrary to what most people enjoy... a flat green grass lawn. However, I am uncertain what to do as a do-it-your-self, low-maintenance, native alternative. so I'm currently researching things like ...

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Woodland owners learn how to fight climate change with trees

Forest owners in Lane County can potentially use their properties to help mitigate the problems caused by an excess of carbon in the atmosphere.

Janet Donnelly | Jan 3, 2020 | News Story

Native plants for Yamhill County

Information about various plants native to Yamhill County.

Linda R. McMahan | Jan 2010 | Article

Blueberry bacterial and fungal diseases

Pacific Northwest blueberry growers must identify and control a number of bacterial and fungal diseases in order to ensure the highest yields. Fortunately, only a few of the diseases that occur on highbush blueberry in this region cause significant losses when left unchecked.

Jay Pscheidt, Jerry Weiland | Mar 2015 | Article