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Monitoring Vineyard Nutrition

This article describes how to determine vineyard nutrient needs through tissue and soil sampling.

Patricia Skinkis, Paul Schreiner | Dec 2018 | Article

How to establish a wine grape vineyard

While the type of soil is important, location takes precedence when starting a vineyard for wine production.

Patricia Skinkis | Sep 2018 | Article

Central Oregon Vegetable Gardening

A collection of articles for growing vegetables in Central Oregon. Include general information, recommendations, soil temperatures, rhubarb, potatoes, cucumbers, beets, carrots, radishes, onions, tomatoes and tomatillos.

Jul 2018 | Collection

Management of grapevine water status under irrigated and non-irrigated conditions

Information on vineyard water management, focusing on when to initiate irrigation.

Alexander Levin | Oct 2018 | Article

There's still time to plant more carrots

Carrots can still be planted into July for fall and winter harvest in most areas of the state.

Feb 19, 2003 | News Story

Growing vegetables in the Pacific Northwest coastal region

Asparagus, beets, carrots and summer squash are some of the vegetables you can grow along the coast. Learn what to watch out for in a region known for cooler temperatures.

Sally Reill | Jul 2017 | Article

Wine grape tissue nutrient analysis guidelines for Oregon

This is a guide that can be used by wine grape growers to interpret their vine tissue nutrient analysis results to determine nutrient sufficiency, deficiency or excess.

Paul Schreiner | May 2019 | Article

How blueberry plants develop and grow

Blueberries grow well in the Pacific Northwest. To get the most out of your bushes, it helps to understand the form and function of each part of the plant.

Bernadine Strik | Mar 2015 | Article

Grapevine Trunk Diseases in Oregon

A summary of the main trunk diseases causing issues in Oregon and management methods.

Melodie Putnam | Mar 2019 | Article

Range improvements: tools and methods to improve cattle distribution

Uneven grazing distribution patterns on rangeland can lead to overuse of forage in some areas and no use or waste of herbage in areas not visited by cattle. Range improvements affecting more even distribution of grazing ...

David Ganskopp | Jan 2019 | Article