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Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results.

New ‘droughty’ soils model for Pacific Northwest could aid forest health in changing climate

Scientists have developed a new approach to modeling potentially drought-prone soils in Pacific Northwest forests, which could aid natural resource managers to prepare forested landscapes for a changing climate.

Chris Branam | Aug 16, 2018 | News Story

Woodland owners learn how to fight climate change with trees

Forest owners in Lane County can potentially use their properties to help mitigate the problems caused by an excess of carbon in the atmosphere.

Janet Donnelly | Jan 3, 2020 | News Story

Greenhouse gas effect caused by mangrove forest conversion is quite significant

Shrimp ponds and cattle pastures account of much of the loss of the tropical forest

Chris Branam | Apr 10, 2017 | News Story

OSU researcher: Climate change may bring global food insecurity, impacts on U.S.

Climate warming threatens to destabilize agriculture systems, triggering food shortages and price hikes

Gail Wells | Dec 7, 2015 | News Story

Spikeweed

Can spraying this weed at the right time keep it out of our fields?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Fewer weeds equals more quality forage

Weeds can lower the quality and quantity of forage in a pasture or hayfield. In general, weeds have lower protein and energy than improved, cool season perennial and annual forages under good grazing management. The palatability...

Shelby Filley | Sep 2012 | Article

Velvetleaf-Have You Seen This Weed?

This small plant causes extensive crop loss. Is it still missing?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Weed management for blueberry fields in the Pacific Northwest

Weeds are always a difficult problem in blueberry production! They start to show up shortly after transplanting, and tend to become more problematic as time goes on. There are, however, strategies that help to control weeds in...

Tim Miller | Mar 2015 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Field Bindweed Control in Wheat: Fallow Rotations

Weed scientist, Daniel A. Ball of OSU, talks about the best way to rid fields of this noxious weed.

Daniel Ball | Oct 2001 | Article