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Showing 1 - 9 of 9 results.

New ‘droughty’ soils model for Pacific Northwest could aid forest health in changing climate

Scientists have developed a new approach to modeling potentially drought-prone soils in Pacific Northwest forests, which could aid natural resource managers to prepare forested landscapes for a changing climate.

Chris Branam | Aug 16, 2018 | News Story

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

Sustainable food-buying options expand

Northwest growers adopt sustainable agriculture practices and certification.

Mar 27, 2008 | News Story

Growing vegetables in the Pacific Northwest coastal region

Asparagus, beets, carrots and summer squash are some of the vegetables you can grow along the coast. Learn what to watch out for in a region known for cooler temperatures.

Sally Reill | Jul 2017 | Article

What’s Wrong With My Madrone?

This article briefly discusses the most prevalent madrone disease problems, then offers a broader perspective on the health of this southern Oregon native.

Max Bennett, Dave Shaw | Nov 2006 | Article

Woodland owners learn how to fight climate change with trees

Forest owners in Lane County can potentially use their properties to help mitigate the problems caused by an excess of carbon in the atmosphere.

Janet Donnelly | Jan 3, 2020 | News Story

Greenhouse gas effect caused by mangrove forest conversion is quite significant

Shrimp ponds and cattle pastures account of much of the loss of the tropical forest

Chris Branam | Apr 10, 2017 | News Story

OSU researcher: Climate change may bring global food insecurity, impacts on U.S.

Climate warming threatens to destabilize agriculture systems, triggering food shortages and price hikes

Gail Wells | Dec 7, 2015 | News Story

OSU study questions cost-effectiveness of biofuels and their ability to cut fossil fuel use

A new study by economists at Oregon State University questions the cost-effectiveness of biofuels and says they would barely reduce fossil fuel use and would likely increase greenhouse gas emissions.

Tiffany Woods | Nov 29, 2011 | News Story