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Showing 1 - 10 of 14 results.

Fruit tree site considerations

Climate, soil, water and chilling all effect which fruit trees will do best on your property. Here's what to consider.

Steve Renquist | May 2015 | Article

Management Strategies for Dealing with Select Poisonous Plants in Oregon

Rangeland, pastures and hay fields throughout Oregon often contain poisonous plants that are potentially dangerous to cattle and other livestock.

Andy Hulting, Karin Neff | Sep 2019 | Publication

Fairy Rings - Blessing or Curse?

Q: I just moved into a house on a golf course with giant fir trees. In our yard in the grass is a fairy ring. Is this good or bad?

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Take All

This root rot look-alike is endangering wheat, grass, and barley. Learn the signs, symptoms, and controls of this disease.

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Use Caution When Irrigating Oaks and Madrones

Excessive summer irrigation of oak and madrone trees may promote fungal diseases such as the oak root fungus (aka armillaria root disease) and crown rot.

Jun 2018 | Article

Growing vegetables in the Pacific Northwest coastal region

Asparagus, beets, carrots and summer squash are some of the vegetables you can grow along the coast. Learn what to watch out for in a region known for cooler temperatures.

Sally Reill | Jul 2017 | Article

Pump up your pumpkins to giant size

Record-winning pumpkin weighs in at more than 2,500 pounds

Kym Pokorny | May 26, 2017 | News Story

Blueberry bacterial and fungal diseases

Pacific Northwest blueberry growers must identify and control a number of bacterial and fungal diseases in order to ensure the highest yields. Fortunately, only a few of the diseases that occur on highbush blueberry in this region cause significant losses when left unchecked.

Jay Pscheidt, Jerry Weiland | Mar 2015 | Article

Avoiding poisonous plants in pasture and hay

How to identify, manage, and avoid poisonous plants in your pasture.

Shelby Filley | Apr 2012 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article