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Soil Acidity in Oregon: Understanding and Using Concepts for Crop Production

Soil acidity, expressed by low soil pH, causes reduced crop growth and significant economic loss. It is the most commonly overlooked and poorly understood yield-limiting factor in western Oregon and a developing concern in eastern...

Dan Sullivan, Andy Hulting, Nicole Anderson | Jul 2013 | OSU Extension Catalog

Acidifying Soil for Crop Production: Inland Pacific Northwest

Explains the relationship between high soil pH and nutrient deficiencies in crop plants. Color photos illustrate symptoms of pH-induced nutrient deficiency. Explains the causes of high soil pH and presents step-by-step instructions for lowering pH.

Don Wysocki | Sep 2007 | OSU Extension Catalog

Applying Lime to Raise Soil pH for Crop Production (Western Oregon)

This publication describes how to estimate lime application rate and lists criteria for choosing liming materials (source), lime application method (placement), and how often to apply lime (frequency).

Dan Sullivan, Gene Pirelli, Nicole Anderson | May 2013 | OSU Extension Catalog

Acidifying Soil for Crop Production West of the Cascade Mountains (Western Oregon and Washington)

Explains the relationship between high soil pH and nutrient deficiencies in blueberries, rhododendrons, azaleas, and other ornamental crops. Color photos illustrate symptoms of pH-induced nutrient deficiency. Presents step-by-step instructions...

Feb 2004 | OSU Extension Catalog

Conifers naturally shed needles in summer and fall

You're not looking at the same needles over time

Kym Pokorny | Oct 7, 2016 | News Story

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article

Range improvements: tools and methods to improve cattle distribution

Uneven grazing distribution patterns on rangeland can lead to overuse of forage in some areas and no use or waste of herbage in areas not visited by cattle. Range improvements affecting more even distribution of grazing ...

David Ganskopp | Jan 2019 | Article