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Coastal Pastures in Oregon and Washington

The coastal regions of Oregon and Washington have different climate and soils than other parts of the states. Rainfall is high, ranging from 70 inches in southern Oregon to more than 100 inches in the coastal mountains. ...

Fred Lundin | Sep 1996 | Article

How to establish a wine grape vineyard

While the type of soil is important, location takes precedence when starting a vineyard for wine production.

Patricia Skinkis | Sep 2018 | Article

Checklist for putting your garden to bed for winter

The glistening cold of the Willamette Valley's first frost has ushered in the right time to clean up the garden.

Nov 8, 2013 | News Story

Irrigating pastures

Irrigating pastures can provide livestock with nutrition long into summer. Learn to monitor soil moisture to determine when to irrigate and how much water to apply.

Mylen Bohle | Jul 2007 | Article

I am furloughed, too early for gardening?

Q: I'm a furloughed federal employee and suddenly find myself with free time that could end tomorrow, next week, next month, who knows. On top of that, it's sunny! What are things I could do now that will be a good ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Pasture and Grazing Management

Improved pasture and grazing management offers a means of holding production costs to a minimum by efficient production of high quality forage. Pasture and grazing management often seems like an art but is really based on ...

Amy Peters, Lynn Cannon | Aug 1999 | Article

February Garden Calendar

Information about garden planning, maintenance and clean up, pest monitoring and management, houseplants, and indoor gardening for the month of February.

May 2018 | Article

Eat from the garden all year

Cloches allow you to eat fresh out of the garden all year.

Mar 31, 2011 | News Story

Take one more go at the garden before retiring for winter

There's plenty to do, including clean up and tool care

Kym Pokorny | Nov 22, 2017 | News Story

These cold-hardy vegetables may stick it out through winter

The fearless gardener still has a chance to plant some cold-hardy vegetables to harvest next spring, said Jim Myers, plant breeder and researcher at Oregon State University. But don't dawdle.

Sep 13, 2013 | News Story