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Coastal Pastures in Oregon and Washington

The coastal regions of Oregon and Washington have different climate and soils than other parts of the states. Rainfall is high, ranging from 70 inches in southern Oregon to more than 100 inches in the coastal mountains. ...

Fred Lundin | Sep 1996 | Article

Infiltration Testing: Low-impact development fact sheet

One of the first steps in siting a low-impact development facility is infiltration testing. Infiltration tests estimate the rate at which runoff will infiltrate, or pass through, native soil. An infiltration test, in essence, ...

Derek Godwin | Aug 2018 | OSU Extension Catalog

Pasture and Grazing Management

Improved pasture and grazing management offers a means of holding production costs to a minimum by efficient production of high quality forage. Pasture and grazing management often seems like an art but is really based on ...

Amy Peters, Lynn Cannon | Aug 1999 | Article

Pacific NW Native Plants by Plant Community

Useful information about Western Hemlock-Douglas Fir Forest, Prairie, Scrub-Shrub Wetlands, and Mixed Deciduous Forest/Steep Dry Slope.

Lisa Albert | Jun 2014 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Poison Hemlock (Conium maculatum) – Silage Will Not Reduce the Toxin

Poison hemlock is one of the most poisonous of plants. Silage making has been used to reduce the concentrations of toxins in a variety of crops. Poison hemlock alkaloids are found in different concentrations depending on ...

Cassie Bouska, Amy Peters | Jan 2006 | Article