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Instead of leaving soil naked, coat it with cover crops

Grow "green manure" to keep soil from eroding, weeds from exploding and to add nutrients.

Kym Pokorny | Jul 27, 2018 | News Story

Is there a "no mow" lawn in my future?

Q: My so-called lawn needs help -- it consists of clumps of grass with bare spots between, My small yard is completely fenced with a large apple tree shading much of it, so the grass gets at most 3 to 4 hours of sun ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

What kind of ground cover crop should I plant?

Q: I have a small garden plot that I have let go fallow over the summer, but would like to plant something to keep the weeds down until next year. Most of the cover crops I read about look a lot like the invasive ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Put rose pruning and planting on the calendar

Mid- to late February is the time to pay attention to one of our favorite flowers

Kym Pokorny | Feb 5, 2016 | News Story

Native groundcovers are great for home landscapes

Try native groundcovers for home landscapes.

Mar 25, 2011 | News Story

Planting Bare-Root Roses in March

If you have ever purchased a bare-root rose, your first question might have been, will this awkward plant really produce roses? Yes it will!

Barbara McMullen | May 2007 | Article

Landscaping with Roses

Selecting roses for landscape use may seem like an impossible task, but with a few key elements in mind, you can select a rose or a group of roses to complement your new or current landscape.

Barbara McMullen | May 2007 | Article

Estimated value of cranberries as a livestock feed

Value analysis of cranberries as a livestock feed in the U.S.

Amy Peters, Michael Gamroth, Art Poole | Aug 2001 | Article

Pruning Roses

Pruning is a must-do job for spring. Your plants will thank you with beautiful blooms and vigorous health which helps ward off disease.

Barbara McMullen | May 2007 | Article

Old Garden Roses

The category of Old Roses remains one of the most misunderstood and confusing. Nurseries may call a plant an "antique rose" or an "old garden rose," but the rose may not truly be an Old Garden Rose.

Barbara McMullen | May 2007 | Article