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To graze or not to graze that is my question.

Q: I have a small dairy goat farm, and at the moment have 5 adult does plus 2 donkeys. In the winter they are confined to the paddock around the barn, but in spring I begin rotating them between 3 small pastures, one ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Spikeweed

Can spraying this weed at the right time keep it out of our fields?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Fewer weeds equals more quality forage

Weeds can lower the quality and quantity of forage in a pasture or hayfield. In general, weeds have lower protein and energy than improved, cool season perennial and annual forages under good grazing management. The palatability...

Shelby Filley | Sep 2012 | Article

A burrowing pest: controlling gophers on your property

Gophers can cause a lot of damage on a farm. Here's what to do when these small mammals invade your small acreage: Trap them, set out bait or maybe even enlist the help of barn owls. If you decide to try a trap, make sure to set it in the main tunnel.

Melissa Matthewson | Mar 2007 | Article

Velvetleaf-Have You Seen This Weed?

This small plant causes extensive crop loss. Is it still missing?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Blueberry bacterial and fungal diseases

Pacific Northwest blueberry growers must identify and control a number of bacterial and fungal diseases in order to ensure the highest yields. Fortunately, only a few of the diseases that occur on highbush blueberry in this region cause significant losses when left unchecked.

Jay Pscheidt, Jerry Weiland | Mar 2015 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Field Bindweed Control in Wheat: Fallow Rotations

Weed scientist, Daniel A. Ball of OSU, talks about the best way to rid fields of this noxious weed.

Daniel Ball | Oct 2001 | Article