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Guide to Oregon County Soil Survey Reports

An inventory of all the different kinds of soils in many Oregon counties is available. These inventories were made starting in the 1970’s by soil scientists of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service in ...

Brad Withrow-Robinson, Debra Zaveson | Dec 2007 | Article

OSU scientists report from Cyprus conflict

While Greek and Turkish Cypriots seek to resolve one of Europe's longest disputes, two scientists from Oregon State University are working to unite a divided country at ground level – through soil.

Peg Herring | Apr 27, 2004 | News Story

Turfgrasses and Lawn Care in Eastern Oregon

Today, turfgrass is the single largest irrigated crop in the United States and covers three times the land area of any other cultivated crop. An estimated 40.5 million acres of grasses are planted in residential, commercial and...

Richard Smiley | Jan 2018 | Article

Why Does Your Tree Look Sick?

Most “sick tree” problems can be traced back to underlying stresses that have reduced the tree's vigor, making it more vulnerable to diseases or insect pests.

Jun 2018 | Article

Spikeweed

Can spraying this weed at the right time keep it out of our fields?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Fewer weeds equals more quality forage

Weeds can lower the quality and quantity of forage in a pasture or hayfield. In general, weeds have lower protein and energy than improved, cool season perennial and annual forages under good grazing management. The palatability...

Shelby Filley | Sep 2012 | Article

Velvetleaf-Have You Seen This Weed?

This small plant causes extensive crop loss. Is it still missing?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

How to collect a plant specimen for disease diagnosis

A guide for how to collect and where to get a sample analyzed for plant diseases.

Melodie Putnam, Carol Savonen | Jul 2014 | Article

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article

Field Bindweed Control in Wheat: Fallow Rotations

Weed scientist, Daniel A. Ball of OSU, talks about the best way to rid fields of this noxious weed.

Daniel Ball | Oct 2001 | Article