Search OSU Extension

Showing 1 - 4 of 4 results.

Is a dog latrine a bad place to grow vegetables?

Q: I'm very concerned about the health hazards of eating food grown in the beds where a dog has pooped. At this point, I could build a fence around the whole garden to stop any further damage, but I'm wondering about the existing and persistent harm of bacteria or worms that may now be in the soil. My house mate's dog did her duty in multiple beds throughout the ...

A: View answer | View all featured questions

Forages - hay and pasture collection

This collection has information on soil testing and ferilizing, renovation. forage management , hay, irrigation, feeding values, forage types, forage anti-quality factors, leasing pastures and more.

Shelby Filley | Aug 2019 | Collection

Fertilizing For Hay Production

Forages and all green plants require moisture, nutrients, heat, and light for growth. To make hay, you need good nutrition to maximize on productivity and quality of the final product. You might want to treat hay fields and pasture fields differently in terms of when you apply fertilizers especially nitrogen even when soil test results are the same. To see how this works ...

Sam Angima | Mar 2007 | Article

Western Oregon Hay

Because of our typically wet springs in western Oregon, the average hay crop usually ends up being of low quality. However, when forage in the field is young and tender it is of high quality. As the forage matures, it becomes higher in quantity, but lower in nutritive value (low protein and energy, low digestibility, high fiber). But, when we should cut the hay for ...

Shelby Filley | May 2013 | Article