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Customized Growing Degree Day Calculations and Forecasting

This document provides step by step instructions for calculating growing degree day status and viewing growing degree day forecasts available from the uspest.org website. The uspest.org website allows users to select a weather station near them and then set their own degree units, lower and upper thresholds for growing degree calculations. Most pre-calculated growing degree reports use a default of 50F as their lower threshold. Unfortunately, this is not accurate for many of the crops we grow in Oregon. Thus, the ability to custom calculate and generate forecasts for growing degree days is ideal. Check out uspest.org, follow these instructions and get ahead on your planning!

Betsy Verhoeven | Dec 2019 | Fact Sheet

Dry Farming Oregon

Oregon State University is known for its College of Agricultural Sciences. The school offers 25 Major and Minor options that include but are not limited to Botany, Animal Sciences, and even Fermentation Sciences for you beer ...

Jan 2017 | Article

Orchid Cactus - Epiphyllums

Learn about plant cuttings, water and light requirements, temperature, fertilizer, pests, and repotting.

Cal Peterson | Jan 2011 | Article

Sustainable food-buying options expand

Northwest growers adopt sustainable agriculture practices and certification.

Mar 27, 2008 | News Story

Blueberry bacterial and fungal diseases

Pacific Northwest blueberry growers must identify and control a number of bacterial and fungal diseases in order to ensure the highest yields. Fortunately, only a few of the diseases that occur on highbush blueberry in this region cause significant losses when left unchecked.

Jay Pscheidt, Jerry Weiland | Mar 2015 | Article

Reflections of a SARE Fellow

The 2014-2016 cadre of SARE Fellows visited numerous farms in Arkansas, Nebraska, Idaho, and West Virginia to study sustainable agricultural practices. The Fellows themselves were from Florida, Maine, Missouri, and Washington; they ...

Susan Kerr | Oct 2017 | Article