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Will banana slugs munch my plants?

Q: Are banana slugs harmful to my flower or vegetable garden? I remember learning that they are beneficial but I would like to clarify. The internet is giving me very mixed answers.

A: View answer | View all featured questions

When should we stop grazing our pasture?

Q: We have had a horse grazing on our approx. 6 acre field which is normally cut for mixed grass hay. The horse has been on the field since we had it cut and baled into hay this past summer. In general, when is the ...

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Spikeweed

Can spraying this weed at the right time keep it out of our fields?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Fewer weeds equals more quality forage

Weeds can lower the quality and quantity of forage in a pasture or hayfield. In general, weeds have lower protein and energy than improved, cool season perennial and annual forages under good grazing management. The palatability...

Shelby Filley | Sep 2012 | Article

Less toxic iron phosphate slug bait proves effective

OSU research indicates that the less toxic iron phosphate containing slug baits are as effective as those with metaldehyde.

Feb 25, 2008 | News Story

Homemade Remedies for Pests and Diseases

Home remedies have shown some effectiveness against many garden pests and diseases.

Jul 2017 | Article

Velvetleaf-Have You Seen This Weed?

This small plant causes extensive crop loss. Is it still missing?

Mary Corp | Oct 2018 | Article

Blueberry bacterial and fungal diseases

Pacific Northwest blueberry growers must identify and control a number of bacterial and fungal diseases in order to ensure the highest yields. Fortunately, only a few of the diseases that occur on highbush blueberry in this region cause significant losses when left unchecked.

Jay Pscheidt, Jerry Weiland | Mar 2015 | Article

Slinky, slimy slugs on the loose and chomping through gardens

Control plant-eating mollusks early and often

Kym Pokorny | May 5, 2017 | News Story

Poison hemlock and Western waterhemlock: deadly plants that may be growing in your pasture

Poisonous plants are a major cause of economic loss to the livestock industry. Two poisonous plants common to Oregon are poison hemlock and Western water hemlock. Ingestion of either by humans or livestock typically results in death.

Scott Duggan | Jun 2018 | Article